Author Topic: What are you currently reading?  (Read 932510 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JBS

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3881
  • If music be the food of love, play on!
  • Location: USA

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline vers la flamme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1723
  • Location: Atlanta
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9961 on: June 24, 2020, 01:16:34 PM »
Started Mann's Buddenbrooks a few days ago. Really loving it so far. I find it an easy read coming off of Wuthering Heights, which I really enjoyed, but found dense at times. I'm a big fan of these kinds of multigenerational books...

Really 2020 is the year of me getting back into fiction, after years of not reading much at all, and what I did read was exclusively nonfiction. I feel like a little kid again, getting immersed in the worlds of these stories. Quite exciting. If this is anything like how I was getting into classical music a couple of years ago, I suspect this will be a longstanding obsession.

Offline deprofundis

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 650
  • Location: montreal canada
  • Currently Listening to:
    classical, skronk-jazz, blues, experimental etc
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9962 on: June 28, 2020, 12:03:46 PM »
I was reading l'aventure polyphonique de Nicolas Gombert by Paul van Nevel quite interesting but stop because , my eyes are tired, don't have a good eye sight like before, I'm not blind but my vision suffered to a point were it's pain streaking hard to reads whiteout intense light and having m nose pop in the book, I' 43 years old life  unfair, but  I also have to purchase  new glasses need them at all sake, once It were SO HUMILIATING, I though m father was talking to my sister I come outside and say animal my sister, I call her friendly animal because she lack in manners not because she a woman(i'm no sexist) but this time  I did not realize I mistaken an elderly woman for my sister on my street , my father was so laughing at me, and I did  hide inside and said oh no oh no excuse me lady I mistaken you for my sister I felt real bad...

Now when I see this lady I coward inside, that not so funny and stop calling my sister animal :(



Online AlberichUndHagen

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 90
  • Location: Helsinki
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9963 on: June 29, 2020, 08:57:28 AM »
Started Mann's Buddenbrooks a few days ago. Really loving it so far. I find it an easy read coming off of Wuthering Heights, which I really enjoyed, but found dense at times. I'm a big fan of these kinds of multigenerational books...

Really 2020 is the year of me getting back into fiction, after years of not reading much at all, and what I did read was exclusively nonfiction. I feel like a little kid again, getting immersed in the worlds of these stories. Quite exciting. If this is anything like how I was getting into classical music a couple of years ago, I suspect this will be a longstanding obsession.

Buddenbrooks is definitely a gem. My only complaints really are the first 20-30 pages or so. I seem to run to this often in Mann's work (the beginning being the weakest part) such as in Buddenbrooks and Magic Mountain. Joseph is an interesting case in that the beginning section was more interesting than the real beginning of the story itself so it kind of applies here too but once again, for ex. this second part of Joseph and his brothers has been very, very interesting and enjoyable. Although since I've only read about 1/3 of the entire tetralogy I can't tell if things continue to be as good.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2020, 09:00:34 AM by AlberichUndHagen »

Online André

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8792
  • Location: Laval, QC
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9964 on: June 29, 2020, 09:33:29 AM »
Buddenbrooks is definitely a gem. My only complaints really are the first 20-30 pages or so. I seem to run to this often in Mann's work (the beginning being the weakest part) such as in Buddenbrooks and Magic Mountain. Joseph is an interesting case in that the beginning section was more interesting than the real beginning of the story itself so it kind of applies here too but once again, for ex. this second part of Joseph and his brothers has been very, very interesting and enjoyable. Although since I've only read about 1/3 of the entire tetralogy I can't tell if things continue to be as good.

Things get better and better. The ‘recognition scene’ is thrilling. The short epilogue is the only weak part IMO.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 22095
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9965 on: July 01, 2020, 01:13:31 AM »
Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray





This, Wilde’s only novel, is always worth another read. One always has to take it slowly so that one does not miss any of the myriad witticisms and aphorisms contained within the text. Still, it is essentially a very dark tale of depravity.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline vers la flamme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1723
  • Location: Atlanta
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9966 on: July 01, 2020, 01:32:26 AM »
Buddenbrooks is definitely a gem. My only complaints really are the first 20-30 pages or so. I seem to run to this often in Mann's work (the beginning being the weakest part) such as in Buddenbrooks and Magic Mountain. Joseph is an interesting case in that the beginning section was more interesting than the real beginning of the story itself so it kind of applies here too but once again, for ex. this second part of Joseph and his brothers has been very, very interesting and enjoyable. Although since I've only read about 1/3 of the entire tetralogy I can't tell if things continue to be as good.

I loved the beginning of Buddenbrooks! I really felt like I was "there" at the big house on Meng Strasse, and I couldn't escape the feeling, "nowhere to go from here but down".

I'm on the last 50 pages or so now. I really burned through it. But it's been one of the most rewarding reading experiences of my life, surely.

Offline Dowder

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 702
  • Location: America's Country
  • Currently Listening to:
    All the good stuff
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9967 on: July 01, 2020, 01:18:45 PM »


Primarily about the French Philosophes and their influence and thought that shaped the Radical Enlightenment but also a compare/contrast to the Moderate Enlightenment thinkers. The author feels the latter were mostly inconsequential and not much of a lasting force for change.
”But what is government but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”~~James Madison, Federalist 51

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5043
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9968 on: July 02, 2020, 01:23:46 AM »


The author feels the latter were mostly inconsequential and not much of a lasting force for change.
It simply means he dismisses all of the Enlightenment thinkers accept for the happy few he can mould into his own scheme. The most un-historical history books in years.  :)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline SimonNZ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8150
  • Location: Christchurch, NZ
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9969 on: July 02, 2020, 10:34:12 AM »
Finished:



Started:


Online Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 21383
    • Brian's blog
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9970 on: July 02, 2020, 10:40:26 AM »
Yesterday I started the project that will take up my July: War and Peace!!!

Offline SimonNZ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8150
  • Location: Christchurch, NZ
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9971 on: July 02, 2020, 11:45:00 AM »
Yesterday I started the project that will take up my July: War and Peace!!!

Recently I finally got around to Isaiah Berlin's 90-page essay "The Hedgehog And The Fox" which is a study of the philosophy of history sections of War And Peace. It's been so long since I read WP that I can no longer remember the epilogue he refers to often.



read the copy on the lest but gave it away because I discovered it's also in the "Russian Thinkers" collection of Berlin I've got on the right
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 11:47:23 AM by SimonNZ »

Offline Dowder

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 702
  • Location: America's Country
  • Currently Listening to:
    All the good stuff
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9972 on: July 02, 2020, 03:05:57 PM »
It simply means he dismisses all of the Enlightenment thinkers accept for the happy few he can mould into his own scheme. The most un-historical history books in years.  :)
I don’t think he dismisses them completely or denies they have had their admirers or adherents but he just doesn’t find their ideas or thought to have been radical or daring enough for the kind of change that has occurred in the last several hundred years, principally starting with the French Revolution. 

If you have another book on the subject worth recommending then by all means share it.
”But what is government but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”~~James Madison, Federalist 51

Online Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4884
  • Location: Germany
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9973 on: July 02, 2020, 10:13:09 PM »
I think I read a bunch of articles or interviews around Israel's book a few years ago and as I recall I thought that his distinction between "radical" and "moderate" enligthenment thinkers was interesting and a fair point. He seems to exaggerate or be simply wrong about the influence. Surely, a moderate like Kant was very influential. Or Locke before that. I'd also say that Voltaire and Diderot were more moderate than Rousseau, D'Holbach or LaMettrie and comparably important to Rousseau und more so than the last two. (Just random examples, I am not trying to state a thesis).
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Florestan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 19741
  • Location: Bucharest, Romania
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9974 on: July 02, 2020, 11:26:04 PM »
I think I read a bunch of articles or interviews around Israel's book a few years ago and as I recall I thought that his distinction between "radical" and "moderate" enligthenment thinkers was interesting and a fair point. He seems to exaggerate or be simply wrong about the influence. Surely, a moderate like Kant was very influential. Or Locke before that.


Good point.

Quote
I'd also say that Voltaire and Diderot were more moderate than Rousseau, D'Holbach or LaMettrie

Rousseau was no moderate, not by any stretch of imagination. How can one be a moderate who prescribes death for atheists*?

(*all right, by atheism he meant disbelief in the civil religion of the state, but still.Anyone who wishes death upon those who disagree with them is no moderate. It's not even a radical. It's a fanatic.)

Beside, we're talking about the man who abandoned his own children to an orphanage and then went on to write extensively about how children should be educated. Disgusting. Nietzsche was right in calling Rousseau "a moral tarantula".
"Melody is the essence of music." --- Mozart

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5043
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9975 on: July 03, 2020, 12:04:49 AM »
I don’t think he dismisses them completely or denies they have had their admirers or adherents but he just doesn’t find their ideas or thought to have been radical or daring enough for the kind of change that has occurred in the last several hundred years, principally starting with the French Revolution. 

That's a teleological and, if you wish, also finalist scheme, both deadly sins for historians. Almost any overview of what the Enlightenment was - there are dozens of them around - will be more reliable.

I think I read a bunch of articles or interviews around Israel's book a few years ago and as I recall I thought that his distinction between "radical" and "moderate" enligthenment thinkers was interesting and a fair point. He seems to exaggerate or be simply wrong about the influence. Surely, a moderate like Kant was very influential. Or Locke before that. I'd also say that Voltaire and Diderot were more moderate than Rousseau, D'Holbach or LaMettrie and comparably important to Rousseau und more so than the last two. (Just random examples, I am not trying to state a thesis).

Exactly.
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 22095
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9976 on: July 03, 2020, 12:07:52 AM »
Wells: Love and Mr. Lewisham





This story traces the path of a young idealistic man over a few short years where, through circumstances, he is gradually worn down and transformed into a realist who must surrender his ideals. The tale is made more interesting, nay determined, by the two very different women who enter his life and the effect that they have or could have had on him. It is a good read.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Dowder

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 702
  • Location: America's Country
  • Currently Listening to:
    All the good stuff
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9977 on: July 03, 2020, 03:34:58 AM »
I think I read a bunch of articles or interviews around Israel's book a few years ago and as I recall I thought that his distinction between "radical" and "moderate" enligthenment thinkers was interesting and a fair point. He seems to exaggerate or be simply wrong about the influence. Surely, a moderate like Kant was very influential. Or Locke before that. I'd also say that Voltaire and Diderot were more moderate than Rousseau, D'Holbach or LaMettrie and comparably important to Rousseau und more so than the last two. (Just random examples, I am not trying to state a thesis).
He seems to think that Locke’s and the “moderate enlightenment” influence peaked by the 1760’s-70’s and then waned gradually. Interesting how much he is mentioned regarding the American revolution but I read that among philosophers quoted by the founders, Locke was fourth behind Montesquieu, Harrington and Blackstone.

Beside, we're talking about the man who abandoned his own children to an orphanage and then went on to write extensively about how children should be educated. Disgusting. Nietzsche was right in calling Rousseau "a moral tarantula".
He reminds me of Thomas Jefferson, private life rather sordid and contradictory but a fascinating thinker and person in general.
”But what is government but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”~~James Madison, Federalist 51

Online Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 21383
    • Brian's blog
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9978 on: July 03, 2020, 05:35:34 AM »
Beside, we're talking about the man who abandoned his own children to an orphanage and then went on to write extensively about how children should be educated. Disgusting. Nietzsche was right in calling Rousseau "a moral tarantula".
By coincidence, a few weeks ago I read Mary Wollstonecraft's "Vindication of the Rights of Women" and she sees Rousseau as her primary enemy on the subject of how to educate women, to the point of mocking much of the rest of his belief system too.

Offline Florestan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 19741
  • Location: Bucharest, Romania
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9979 on: July 03, 2020, 10:42:45 AM »
He reminds me of Thomas Jefferson, private life rather sordid and contradictory but a fascinating thinker and person in general.

Agreed about Jefferson, but I can't stand Rousseau, neither as a thinker (a proto-totalitarian) nor as a person in general (a "moral tarantula" in the apt words of Nietzsche).

Voltaire, on the other hand, despite his numerous flaws, was a great and noble soul, keenly aware of, and opposed to, injustice and fanaticism. A proto-liberal. It's no wonder he and Rousseau never got along well.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2020, 10:46:20 AM by Florestan »
"Melody is the essence of music." --- Mozart