The British Composers Thread

Started by Mark, October 25, 2007, 12:26:56 PM

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foxandpeng

Quote from: lordlance on Today at 08:23:53 AMThank you. Do you have specific pieces from these folks that you would recommend? No need for every single one maybe just top 5.

Maybe a couple of personal favourites to get you going?

Simpson 9
Matthews 5 or 9
Any Arnell symphonies
Rubbra 3
Maconchy SQs 1 - 4
Havergal Brian 8
George Lloyd 4 - 8
Hans Gal 2
Tippett Rose Lake
Any Gavin Bryars SQs

Lots of great stuff in there, but others are probably equally as good?
"A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

Tolstoy

lordlance

Ah thank you. I have the video of Rattle and LSO performing The Rose Lake.

Luke

Bryars is one of my very favourite composers, believe me - I have pretty much everything he's ever put out on CD and the stunning Electric Guitar/2 violas/cello quartet After the Requiem is one of my very favourite pieces of music - but virtually every bar he has written is slow and languid, so I'm not sure he'll be up lordlance's street. There is a chugging-along bit in one of the quartets that is virtually the only thing of its sort in his output, though. There's another in The Four Elements, which is also for a larger ensemble than he often writes for (there are a few concertos and other orchestral pieces, but not many).

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: lordlance on March 27, 2023, 06:58:09 PMMy experience with British composers so far:
1. Macmillan - Love The Confession of Isobel Gowdie
2. Parry - Symphony #5 seems worth a second listen
3. Maxwell Davies - a tough nut to crack and one I've not heard in a long time
4. Elgar - his symphonies are incredibly dull and academic; I do enjoy In The South and Cockaigne though
5. Vaughan Williams - Symphony #4 piqued my interest and #5 was boring
6. Stanford - not great based on Symphony #3.I - have to get around to finishing the piece - and first half of Concert Piece for Organ and Orchestra
7. Malcolm Arnold - love his music except notably Symphony No. 9)
8. Turnage - I used to like his music when I first started hearing contemporary music not so much anymore. Too dissonant. I might revisit the Rattle disc to see if I feel differently as that is what got me into the composer.
9. Bax - Heard a lot of his orchestral music and even though his style is unmistakable so much of it can just become a mush of excellent atmospheric background music rather than masterpieces that stick with you. I have to revisit Symphony #6 and Russian Suite. I remember enjoying Festival Overture.
10. Walton - I've not revisited his First Symphony but remember liking it.

I want to try more British composers. Looking for orchestral music that is generally more busy or vigorous and not calm/contemplative or sounds like like En Saga (I recently tried rehearing it.)
A couple of suggestions regarding Vaughan Williams:  You might enjoy his symphony No. 6 and also his Symphony No. 9 (particularly with the Boult recording of No. 9 on Everest) which was recorded very shortly after the composer's death...quite intense to say the least.

Happy exploring!

PD

foxandpeng

Quote from: Roasted Swan on Today at 08:18:25 AMGood list - but who's Easley Blackwood?!

You know. Easley Blackwood. That American composer who slips unnoticed into lists of British composers when they're listed off the top of a poster's head without checking. THAT Easley Blackwood.

*facepalms*

Responsible for these fine American symphonies.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Aug01/Blackwood.htm
"A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

Tolstoy