Author Topic: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)  (Read 13974 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #40 on: April 21, 2020, 10:51:08 PM »
Something unusual is how (apparently) Casella reused the slow movement from his 1st Symphony in his 2nd. Where is it supposed to belong?

Offline pjme

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2020, 10:52:51 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/KDslVGf7OTQ" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/KDslVGf7OTQ</a>

A great work, indeed. Dedicated to Enescu. The Frankfurt orchestra "au grand complet" are wonderfully committed .

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #42 on: April 22, 2020, 04:58:22 AM »
Yes, yes! Another firm favorite of mine. I like both Chandos and Naxos recording of it. And there is another recording which I haven't listened to it yet. This:



Oh dear! More temptation  ::)
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Offline pjme

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #43 on: April 22, 2020, 05:24:14 AM »
Something unusual is how (apparently) Casella reused the slow movement from his 1st Symphony in his 2nd. Where is it supposed to belong?

From Naxos:
The slow third movement of Casella’s Second Symphony—the first part he completed (early in 1908)—is simply the central movement of his First Symphony, with a single bar added at its midpoint, and reorchestrated in a far more Mahler-like manner; it even keeps the original key of F sharp minor, a tritone away from the Second Symphony’s C. Curiously, the musical material sometimes seems ill at ease in its new clothes, the first version feeling a better fit—with the exception of the theme that Casella adopts to germinate the Second Symphony’s ‘Epilogue’. Casella’s finale, albeit less monumental than the epic apotheosis of Mahler’s Second, traces a similar trajectory from darkness to triumphant C major light, marching through frequent reminiscences of Mahler’s later symphonies, the Third, Sixth and Seventh.
https://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.572414&catNum=572414&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English

It remains unclear why he reused that movement. The work was premiered in april 1910 - so he might have been in a hurry...?

Offline ritter

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #44 on: April 22, 2020, 05:57:20 AM »
From Naxos:
The slow third movement of Casella’s Second Symphony—the first part he completed (early in 1908)—is simply the central movement of his First Symphony, with a single bar added at its midpoint, and reorchestrated in a far more Mahler-like manner; it even keeps the original key of F sharp minor, a tritone away from the Second Symphony’s C. Curiously, the musical material sometimes seems ill at ease in its new clothes, the first version feeling a better fit—with the exception of the theme that Casella adopts to germinate the Second Symphony’s ‘Epilogue’. Casella’s finale, albeit less monumental than the epic apotheosis of Mahler’s Second, traces a similar trajectory from darkness to triumphant C major light, marching through frequent reminiscences of Mahler’s later symphonies, the Third, Sixth and Seventh.
https://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.572414&catNum=572414&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English
Very interesting, thanks!

Quote
It remains unclear why he reused that movement. The work was premiered in april 1910 - so he might have been in a hurry...?
Laziness? Perhaps he thought nobody would notice?   ;D
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #45 on: April 22, 2020, 03:47:35 PM »
The only recording I know of the complete La giara I know of is this, on the small La Bottega Discantica label from Italy:



To be honest, though, La giara is one of the rare instances  in which the concert suite includes everything that is really worthwhile in the score and feels “complete” and fully coherent; the complete ballet doesn’t really add that much more IMHO. For the suite, I’m very fond of the Christian Benda recording on Naxos (with tenor Marco Beasley really seductive in the vocal number, “La storia della fanciulla rapita dai pirati”). The vintage Decca recording conducted by Fernando Previtali (reissued in a great twofer by Australian Eloquence with other Italian music more or less from the same period) also made a very good impression on me when I first listened to it recently.

Excellent, ritter. Thanks for your illuminating response. I'll investigate then.
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #46 on: April 22, 2020, 03:50:22 PM »
From Naxos:
The slow third movement of Casella’s Second Symphony—the first part he completed (early in 1908)—is simply the central movement of his First Symphony, with a single bar added at its midpoint, and reorchestrated in a far more Mahler-like manner; it even keeps the original key of F sharp minor, a tritone away from the Second Symphony’s C. Curiously, the musical material sometimes seems ill at ease in its new clothes, the first version feeling a better fit—with the exception of the theme that Casella adopts to germinate the Second Symphony’s ‘Epilogue’. Casella’s finale, albeit less monumental than the epic apotheosis of Mahler’s Second, traces a similar trajectory from darkness to triumphant C major light, marching through frequent reminiscences of Mahler’s later symphonies, the Third, Sixth and Seventh.
https://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.572414&catNum=572414&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English

It remains unclear why he reused that movement. The work was premiered in april 1910 - so he might have been in a hurry...?

Interesting. I'll keep this in mind when I revisit the 2nd these days.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

Offline relm1

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #47 on: April 23, 2020, 05:30:54 AM »
It remains unclear why he reused that movement. The work was premiered in april 1910 - so he might have been in a hurry...?

Maybe he was copying his hero, Mahler, in how Mahler would also frequently recycle preexisting material like songs showing up in Symphony No. 1, 2, 3, at least thematically if not intact.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alfredo Casella(1883-1947)
« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2022, 06:58:03 AM »
Thought I would revive this thread...

From this "Listening" thread -

NP:

Casella
La Giara, Op. 41
Riccardo Caruso, tenor
Orchestra I.C.O. Lecce
Marco Balderi




The suite of La Giara is quite good, but it's so nice hearing the complete version of it as so much great music is always left out in these suites. Excellent performance and sound quality, too.

Although Rafael does bring up an interesting point:

The only recording I know of the complete La giara I know of is this, on the small La Bottega Discantica label from Italy:



To be honest, though, La giara is one of the rare instances  in which the concert suite includes everything that is really worthwhile in the score and feels “complete” and fully coherent; the complete ballet doesn’t really add that much more IMHO. For the suite, I’m very fond of the Christian Benda recording on Naxos (with tenor Marco Beasley really seductive in the vocal number, “La storia della fanciulla rapita dai pirati”). The vintage Decca recording conducted by Fernando Previtali (reissued in a great twofer by Australian Eloquence with other Italian music more or less from the same period) also made a very good impression on me when I first listened to it recently.
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