Author Topic: James MacMillan  (Read 20856 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: James MacMillan
« Reply #100 on: December 06, 2021, 05:30:33 AM »
I can't help but note comparisons in the overall structure to Messiaen's La Transfiguration. Two parts of seven movements each, although the Messiaen runs gospel-2 meditations-gospel-2 meditations-chorale for each of its two Septenaries so it's not the symmetry of the MacMillan.
Interesting point. He has his own style, although at times I noted the possible influence of Britten, Ives and Janacek.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: James MacMillan
« Reply #101 on: December 06, 2021, 07:12:28 AM »
Interesting point. He has his own style, although at times I noted the possible influence of Britten, Ives and Janacek.

I also sense a little bit of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies in his music.  At least some of the earlier music like Confessions of Isobel Gowdie.  A very fine composer of consistency and depth. 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: James MacMillan
« Reply #102 on: December 06, 2021, 10:01:10 AM »
I also sense a little bit of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies in his music.  At least some of the earlier music like Confessions of Isobel Gowdie.  A very fine composer of consistency and depth.
I agree - although I don't know much Maxwell Davies. I think that MacMillan is a most interesting composer of 'musical modernism with a soul'!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: James MacMillan
« Reply #103 on: December 07, 2021, 08:24:58 AM »
I also sense a little bit of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies in his music.  At least some of the earlier music like Confessions of Isobel Gowdie.  A very fine composer of consistency and depth.

I can see that. I've spent a lot of time with PMD over the last few months, and what I've heard of MacMillan today has some resonance, to me at least. Less challenging than PMD, I think, though.
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Offline relm1

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Re: James MacMillan
« Reply #104 on: December 07, 2021, 05:13:59 PM »
I can see that. I've spent a lot of time with PMD over the last few months, and what I've heard of MacMillan today has some resonance, to me at least. Less challenging than PMD, I think, though.

Very much agree.  I recall PMD spoke highly of MacMillan to me in late 1990's.  I think at that time, JM was the next big thing, but I recall PMD saying he was impressed with his music and productivity in how he kept turning out major works.   Sadly, I didn't ask further or what works specifically he was referring to as I wasn't familiar enough with MacMillan at that time and Ades was the new "it" composer as Asyla had just premiered.  This was at the time that PMD was premiering "A Reel of Seven Fisherman" which was old fashioned by comparison.  I believe it even ended with a triad.  :laugh: