Author Topic: Recordings for lute and related instruments  (Read 169090 times)

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Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #600 on: January 21, 2022, 01:06:23 PM »
I’ve just received a batch of five lute recordings from Japan, including this. No surprises: it is British music iki style, tons of space for the phrases to breathe, it must be very hard to do, to judge how long to hold a note, a rest. Masterful playing obvs. Without wishing to wax poetic, one feels one is in the presence of an angel.

HMV Japan are wonderful! Easy to deal with, all the customs stuff dealt with, a good system of discounts especially for multiple orders, reasonable delivery charges and the package got from Tokyo to London in about as much time as a package takes to get from Glasgow to London.

Glad to hear that everything went well, and the disc (and other recordings) was very good. Miles Davis once said that how you don’t play is more important than how you play (or something like that). It appears that the recording in question and his Weichenberger disc were well-received in Japan.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #601 on: January 22, 2022, 12:18:03 PM »
The Weichenberger is wonderful, it reveals a composer as poetic as Reusner. The only other Weichenberger I’d heard before was on a recording by Miguel Yisrael which I really didn’t enjoy one bit - go figure.

There’s a Weichenberger suite in Satoh’s Austrian music compilation CD.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #602 on: February 04, 2022, 01:54:56 AM »
Brilliant sounding instrument and I’m really enjoying Henning. dall’Aquila is so inventive and engaging.


Yes, each string with its own timbre, which makes the counterpoint come out. The music is very fine and indeed subtle and complex. Lukas Henning, who was a student of Hopkinson Smith, has some good friends - in the booklet he thanks Bjorn Schmelzer. Any friend of Bjorn’s is a friend of mine.

By the way, if you look carefully at the back cover you’ll see that some of the music is by Lukas Henning, I’m not sure what’s going on here, as far as I can see the booklet doesn’t explain.

The Stradivarius label is up to some good things - be sure to check the recording of music by Albert de Rippe that Gabriele Palomba made for them.




https://musicamemo.bandcamp.com/album/tarot-de-paris

Came out last year but I missed it, it’s very good!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #603 on: February 05, 2022, 08:07:26 PM »
I want to get back into French lute music. It’s interesting how The French style distinguishes itself. I think I’ve been listening to a lot of Italian and English lute music. Was there anything of the French in 2021? Any recordings?

Here’s a 2022 one, and I think it’s worth catching - eloquent playing and well recorded



https://outhere-music.com/en/albums/meditation-les-quatre-saisons-du-luth
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #604 on: February 20, 2022, 01:18:28 AM »


Tremendous thing this - a compilation of music from two important renaissance publishers operating out of Paris in the 16th century. We all know that Sakurada is an angel and so this music takes on a transcendent quality, especially the Le Roy pieces IMO. Those Le Roy songs may not be available elsewhere, music from Attaingnant’s publicatiion house has been frequently recorded, in my opinion most successfully by Hopkinson Smith, but Sakurada may well give Smith a run for his money.

Sakurada’s approach is noticeably different from his teacher Satoh’s - because in Sakurada there’s an absence of iki.

The style of the Le Roy makes me think of Howard Skempton. It’s amazing how I forget something: fine poetry need not be complex poetry.

This is unobtainable as far as I know from the west, but it’s easy to obtain from hmv.co.jp, who are excellent to deal with.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2022, 02:44:20 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #605 on: February 22, 2022, 12:12:29 AM »


This CD from Paul O’Dette of French renaissance  music has been rereleased. It contains amongst other things some pieces by a composer called Jean-Paul Paladin which O’Dette plays very well indeed. It’s one of those recordings which is well worth catching on a streaming service I think.

Revisiting this not totally satisfying - but still worth hearing once or twice - recording sent me in search of Jean Paul Paladin. Aka Giovanni Paolo Paladino, based in Lyon, worked for Francois 1. This is from the Michel Bernstein stable, lutenist Eugène Ferré, who I know from a recording dedicated to Nicolas Vallet.

The first thing to say is that a whole CD dedicated to Paladin is too much for me. 15 minutes max.

Poetically done on a very soft instrument, they were obviously so proud of it they gave it a star spot on the cover.  Lots of space to breath between the phrases. More contemplative than energetic, but none the worse for that.




« Last Edit: February 22, 2022, 12:20:23 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #606 on: February 22, 2022, 02:13:28 PM »


Tremendous thing this - a compilation of music from two important renaissance publishers operating out of Paris in the 16th century. We all know that Sakurada is an angel and so this music takes on a transcendent quality, especially the Le Roy pieces IMO. Those Le Roy songs may not be available elsewhere, music from Attaingnant’s publicatiion house has been frequently recorded, in my opinion most successfully by Hopkinson Smith, but Sakurada may well give Smith a run for his money.

Sakurada’s approach is noticeably different from his teacher Satoh’s - because in Sakurada there’s an absence of iki.

The style of the Le Roy makes me think of Howard Skempton. It’s amazing how I forget something: fine poetry need not be complex poetry.

This is unobtainable as far as I know from the west, but it’s easy to obtain from hmv.co.jp, who are excellent to deal with.

Hope I will find the disc and his theorbo disc in Japan this year. The title (Guitar and Lute of French Renaissance) indicates that some of the music were originally for guitar. I guess they were transcribed by Sakurada, Sato, or somebody else.
I enjoyed listening to the other albums by Sakurada on YT.

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kiIt78uDCmiQtT7CLDex7x6NHwMS0N_J0

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nimY_g64npam95HZDsvjcZcHBqHw9_6pc



« Last Edit: February 22, 2022, 02:15:09 PM by Dry Brett Kavanaugh »

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #607 on: February 22, 2022, 02:21:56 PM »
Jan van Bijlert, “Musical Company”. The girl is playing a theorbo. Looks like a lute to me.

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jan_van_Bijlert_-_Musical_Company_-_WGA02182.jpg#mw-jump-to-license

« Last Edit: February 22, 2022, 02:43:25 PM by Dry Brett Kavanaugh »

Offline Que

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #608 on: February 22, 2022, 02:54:04 PM »
Jan van Bijlert, “Musical Company”. The girl is playing a theorbo. Looks like a lute to me.

"A theorbo differs from a regular lute in that the theorbo has a much longer neck which extends beyond the regular fingerboard/neck and a second pegbox at the end of the extended neck. Low-register bass strings are added on the extended neck. This gives a theorbo a much wider range of pitches (notes) than a regular lute."

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #609 on: February 22, 2022, 06:49:49 PM »
"A theorbo differs from a regular lute in that the theorbo has a much longer neck which extends beyond the regular fingerboard/neck and a second pegbox at the end of the extended neck. Low-register bass strings are added on the extended neck. This gives a theorbo a much wider range of pitches (notes) than a regular lute."

Thank you, Que. The explanation of the painting on the Wikimedia maybe wrong. Anyway I like the painting.

Offline Que

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #610 on: February 23, 2022, 02:20:14 AM »
Thank you, Que. The explanation of the painting on the Wikimedia maybe wrong. Anyway I like the painting.

A Dutch painting, naturally!  :D

From what I understand from the description it is a theorbo with a double neck - like the one pictured below - the bended part is clearly visible to our right, but you can still see a bit of the long straight part next to her head.


Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #611 on: February 23, 2022, 11:34:13 PM »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #612 on: March 25, 2022, 10:16:50 AM »


An attractive new compilation CD. Valet, Bachelet, the inevitable Dowland and the even more inevitable Anon. Sort of Renaiso-baroquish if you know what I mean. Well recorded and eloquent playing, well worth a listen.

I can’t find much interesting about Mikko Ikäheimo on the web.  I don’t know what Ikkaheimo’s instrument is. But I do know who Per Brahe was

Quote
Count Per Brahe (February 18, 1602 - September 2, 1680) was a Swedish
soldier and statesman.
Brahe was born on the island of Rydboholm, near Stockholm. He was the
grandson of Per Brahe (1520-1590), one of Gustavus Vasa's Privy Councillors,
created count of Visingsborg by Eric XIV of Sweden, known also as the
continuator of Peder Svart's chronicle of Gustavus, and author of Oeconomia
in 1585, a manual for young noblemen. Per Brahe the younger, after
completing his education by several years travel abroad, became in 1626
chamberlain to Gustavus Adolphus, whose lasting friendship he gained.
He fought with distinction in Province of Prussia during the last three
years of the Polish War (1626-1629) and also, as colonel of a regiment of
horse, in 1630 in Germany. After the death of Gustavus Adolphus in 1632 his
military yielded to his political activity. He had been elected president or
Lantmarskalk ath the Riksdag of 1629, and in the following year was created
a Privy Councillor. In 1635 he conducted the negotiations for an armistice
with Poland. In 1637-1640 and again in 1648-1654 he was Governor General in
Finland, to which country he rendered inestimable services by his wise and
provident rule. He reformed the whole administration, introduced a postal
system, built ten new towns, improved and developed commerce and
agriculture, and very greatly promoted education. In 1640 he opened the
University of bo, of which he was the founder, and first chancellor. After
the death of Charles X of Sweden in 1660, Brahe, as Rikskansler or
Chancellor of the Realm, became one of the regents of Sweden for the second
time (he had held a similar office during the minority of Christina,
1632-1644), and during the difficult year 1660 he had entire control of both
foreign and domestic affairs. He died on September 2, 1680, at Brahehus, his
castle at Visingsborg, where during his lifetime he had held more than regal
pomp.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2022, 10:22:40 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline JBS

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #613 on: March 25, 2022, 11:17:10 AM »
Digging through Wikipedia, it seem the Swedish Brahe family were cousins of the "Danish" Brahe family, of whom Tycho Brahe is obviously the best-known.
The common ancestor was a late 14th century knight or nobleman with two sons: the "Danes" derive from the older son, the Swedes from the younger son's daughter (her son chose to use Brahe as his last name).

I put quotes around "Danish/Danes" because the family actually originated, and held lands, in Helland and Scania, at that point (and into the lifetime of Per the Younger) part of the Kingdom of Denmark, although geographically part of Sweden.

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #614 on: March 28, 2022, 12:35:29 AM »
I want to get back into French lute music. It’s interesting how The French style distinguishes itself. I think I’ve been listening to a lot of Italian and English lute music. Was there anything of the French in 2021? Any recordings?

Just found this

https://open.spotify.com/album/5iWdVj5N9WJuZh2xDOu0Dn
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Offline milk

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Offline Que

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #617 on: March 28, 2022, 07:16:54 AM »
Familiar artist!  :)

There are two BTW: http://www.claireantonini.com/?Discographie
I have the earlier one: both seem to be on spotify.

I'm trying to revisit French baroque lute music, with mixed feelings. The thing that's caught my attention most is Hopkinson Smith's Gallot -- maybe because he somehow makes it sound older than it is!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #618 on: March 29, 2022, 04:12:45 AM »


I just want to make a little post in praise of Mauricio Burraglia. This guy, IMO, has the magic touch. He plays with real colour, and he has the knack of finding a balance between lyricism and counterpoint in style brisé.

The reason I didn’t pay so much attention to him before is that his recordings often include some Weiss, and Weiss isn’t a composer whose music much interests me. But really, theres there’s Mouton and there’s Gallot and there’s de Visée, so it’s not all Weiss!

Well recorded too - which matters in this baroque music, where there’s a lot of notes.
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Offline milk

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #619 on: March 30, 2022, 04:37:35 AM »


I just want to make a little post in praise of Mauricio Burraglia. This guy, IMO, has the magic touch. He plays with real colour, and he has the knack of finding a balance between lyricism and counterpoint in style brisé.

The reason I didn’t pay so much attention to him before is that his recordings often include some Weiss, and Weiss isn’t a composer whose music much interests me. But really, theres there’s Mouton and there’s Gallot and there’s de Visée, so it’s not all Weiss!

Well recorded too - which matters in this baroque music, where there’s a lot of notes.

It does sound great!