Author Topic: Recordings for lute and related instruments  (Read 161183 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14768
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #80 on: January 20, 2017, 02:56:31 PM »
 

I think this recording of a selection of music by Piccinini by Luciano Contini is a success in every way. The music is fabulous; the performances are full of tenderness and feeling; the instruments are characterful, rich and honey-toned; the sound quality is truthful.

For those interested in this music, I have the Brilliant 2-CD selection added above, licensed from Tactus - does not seem to be available at the moment from Amazon USA (and just checked BRO - not there, either).  Dave :)

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #81 on: January 20, 2017, 10:51:18 PM »
For those interested in this music, I have the Brilliant 2-CD selection added above, licensed from Tactus - does not seem to be available at the moment from Amazon USA (and just checked BRO - not there, either).  Dave :)


Yes and Francesca Torelli's contribution of Bk 2 to that Brilliant box is just fine, but I thought it was not as unbelievably excellent as Luciano Contini's in Bk 1.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #82 on: January 21, 2017, 11:02:18 PM »


This 1976 recording of music by Denis Gaultier by Hopkinson Smith is (according to Discogs) his first solo release.

The tempos are slow and the articulation is jolting and unfluid, at the emotional level everything is somber. The way Smith plays first two suites makes them sound like complex technical exercises to me. The last suite on the CD, which happens to be the last suite in the manuscript, is better.




This recording by Hopkinson Smith was made 12 years later in 1988 (Discogs again) and is dedicated to music by Ennemond Gaultier.

What a difference! There's a fluid lyricism, a sense of impredictable rhythm, a variety of timbre and attack, a wide range of complex bitter-sweet emotions.

« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 11:07:33 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8071
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #83 on: January 22, 2017, 03:05:29 AM »


This 1976 recording of music by Denis Gaultier by Hopkinson Smith is (according to Discogs) his first solo release.

The tempos are slow and the articulation is jolting and unfluid, at the emotional level everything is somber. The way Smith plays first two suites makes them sound like complex technical exercises to me. The last suite on the CD, which happens to be the last suite in the manuscript, is better.




This recording by Hopkinson Smith was made 12 years later in 1988 (Discogs again) and is dedicated to music by Ennemond Gaultier.

What a difference! There's a fluid lyricism, a sense of impredictable rhythm, a variety of timbre and attack, a wide range of complex bitter-sweet emotions.

Interesting.  I've not heard any music by either of these composers, who were cousins according to Grove:

Quote
Denis and Ennemond Gaultier are also confused in many French and foreign printed and manuscript collections of lute music; a number of pieces are signed simply with the surname. Moreover, it is sometimes impossible to be certain about the authorship of pieces attributed to ‘Vieux Gaultier’, ‘Denis Gaultier’, ‘Gaultier de Paris’ or ‘Gaultier le jeune’ since the same pieces are sometimes ascribed to both in different collections. La rhétorique des dieux and Pièces de luth sur trois différens modes nouveaux, which according to the title-pages consist only of works by Denis Gaultier, include pieces attributed elsewhere to Ennemond. The Livre de tablature, which Denis Gaultier began and which was completed after his death by his pupil Montarcis, does however contain an almost equal number of pieces clearly attributed either to Denis or to Ennemond.

Pièces de luth (c1669) and the Livre de tablature (c1672) both begin with brief instructions on how to play the lute. La rhétorique des dieux (c1652), a sumptuous manuscript compiled under the patronage of Anne de Chambré, is divided into 12 parts, each named after one of the Greek modes, and is illustrated with engravings after Le Sueur, Abraham Bosse and Robert de Nanteuil. His output (and that of Ennemond too), which was originally entirely for lute, comprises principally dances, some of which are indicated by subtitles selected from mythology. The two composers developed the tombeau, which in fact they pioneered in lute music. Their use of tonality is often more adventurous than that of their predecessors. Froberger was one of several composers of keyboard music who found inspiration in the style of their music, not least the textures; some compositions by the Gaultiers indeed were transcribed for harpsichord in the 17th century.

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8071
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #84 on: January 22, 2017, 03:10:36 AM »
Found this on Amazon Unlimited, called the Golden Age of the French Lute and which has a number of tracks of both Gaultier's:



Steven Stubbs is a new name to me (but I don't listen much to lute recordings).   I like the instrument he is using.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #85 on: January 22, 2017, 01:38:22 PM »


Presumably that's Apollo, God of the sun.

Anyway my reason for mentioning it is that there's nothing more sunny in music than this interpretation of Denis Gaultier by Louis Pernot, who I bet took his cue from the above picture which is in the incipit of the manuscript of La Rhétorique Des Dieux.



The most striking thing when you hear it is his lute, which has hardly any reverberation. Notes don't last long. He plays quickly and with dancing rhythms. The result is a extrovert, joyful and rather simple.

Is it any good? I mean, shouldn't style Brisé be deep and dark, complex and brooding, tragic and tortured.

I don't know. No one else plays like this. It's an important and imaginative contribution.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2017, 01:42:17 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline HIPster

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2771
  • HIPster
  • Location: Zimmermann's Cafe
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach and Beyond
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #86 on: January 22, 2017, 04:06:35 PM »
Nice, Mandryka

Thanks for posting.

Wise words from Que:

Never waste a good reason for a purchase....  ;)

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #87 on: January 25, 2017, 11:11:58 AM »
Actually Francesco da Milano (as he's better known) lived a century before Frescobaldi:






This is O'Dette's second recording. His first for Astree is really fresh sounding.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8071
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #88 on: January 25, 2017, 12:00:26 PM »
Some newer lute recordings recommended by the journal Early Music (Oxford University Press).



On Luys Milán: El Maestro Libro I (1536) (Naxos 8.573305, rec 2015, 66′) José Antonio Escobar simply plays through Book I of the work, which might seem unimaginative, but in fact Milán’s print is structured with didactic intent, and by key, and in any case the results are lovely. Escobar has a beautifully sure touch on what is evidently a very good instrument, whose tone is delicate yet clear, rounded and controlled, with good balance between treble and bass sides. Stylistically the music, somewhat episodic and rhetorical, stands between the noodlings of the earliest lute prints and the rigorous counterpoint of Francesco da Milano. The recording concludes with the six beautiful pavanas made famous by Segovia in the first wave of the plucked-string revival. Escobar’s taste and musicianship are faultless, as are the recorded sound, the choice of microphones and recording venue; an excellent recording all round.



Paris in the mid-16th century witnessed not exactly a golden age of lute playng such as the city was to host 100 years later, but evidently saw a good deal of charming and elegant lute music, as well as a brief craze for the little four-course guitar, lineal ancestor to the ukulele. The French court was also adoptive home to one of the great Italian players, Albert da Ripa (or de Rippe) until his death in 1551. On an online-only release, The Parisian delight (Magnatune [NO NUMBER], issued 2014, 66′) rising British lutenist Richard MacKenzie performs a selection of music from the prints of Guillaume de Morlaye and Adrian Le Roy, plus three pieces by Albert de Rippe. Some lively guitar strumming, a fair sprinkling of ground-based pieces, and a final amuse bouche of lightweight bransles (such dances do actually close the printed lute and guitar and collections of the time) mean that Gallic charm is not overwhelmed by learned fantasias and the like (though a few of these are here too); in fact perhaps one would have liked to hear more music by de Rippe, star turn of Francis I’s court. The recorded sound seems a tiny bit muffled, but MacKenzie can certainly play, and we hope for many more discs from him.



Meanwhile in Italy the lute culture was undergoing more radical development with Piccinini’s invention of extended-necked lutes, around 1594. One flamboyant modern performer, Rafael Bonavita, has compared this innovation to the invention of the electric guitar in our times, and his interpretations are accordingly rumbustuous. Mónica Pustilnik, by contrast, on her disc Alessandro Piccinini: Lute music (Accent ACC24193, rec 2013, 62′) brings a much gentler interpretation to this radically innovative music, that seems to connect it to the earlier traditions of lute playing. She plays 16 pieces from Piccinini’s two extant prints of 1623 and 1639 on a single-strung archlute (distinguished from the theorbo or chitarrone in that the top two strings are not in the re-entrant, octave-down tuning). The recorded sound and tone of the archlute are excellent, and her performances sensitive and introspective, with lovely rubato and dynamics, even in the well-known chiaconnas which other players have interpreted in a more bravura way.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #89 on: February 05, 2017, 09:27:51 AM »


A superb Kasberger CD here from Francesco Romano. Superb because of his wonderful sense of rubato, he makes the music come to life through gentle rhythms which sound so relaxed. And superb because of the beautiful tones he gets out of his instruments.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #90 on: February 05, 2017, 09:50:41 AM »
Some newer lute recordings recommended by the journal Early Music (Oxford University Press).



On Luys Milán: El Maestro Libro I (1536) (Naxos 8.573305, rec 2015, 66′) José Antonio Escobar simply plays through Book I of the work, which might seem unimaginative, but in fact Milán’s print is structured with didactic intent, and by key, and in any case the results are lovely. Escobar has a beautifully sure touch on what is evidently a very good instrument, whose tone is delicate yet clear, rounded and controlled, with good balance between treble and bass sides. Stylistically the music, somewhat episodic and rhetorical, stands between the noodlings of the earliest lute prints and the rigorous counterpoint of Francesco da Milano. The recording concludes with the six beautiful pavanas made famous by Segovia in the first wave of the plucked-string revival. Escobar’s taste and musicianship are faultless, as are the recorded sound, the choice of microphones and recording venue; an excellent recording all round.



Paris in the mid-16th century witnessed not exactly a golden age of lute playng such as the city was to host 100 years later, but evidently saw a good deal of charming and elegant lute music, as well as a brief craze for the little four-course guitar, lineal ancestor to the ukulele. The French court was also adoptive home to one of the great Italian players, Albert da Ripa (or de Rippe) until his death in 1551. On an online-only release, The Parisian delight (Magnatune [NO NUMBER], issued 2014, 66′) rising British lutenist Richard MacKenzie performs a selection of music from the prints of Guillaume de Morlaye and Adrian Le Roy, plus three pieces by Albert de Rippe. Some lively guitar strumming, a fair sprinkling of ground-based pieces, and a final amuse bouche of lightweight bransles (such dances do actually close the printed lute and guitar and collections of the time) mean that Gallic charm is not overwhelmed by learned fantasias and the like (though a few of these are here too); in fact perhaps one would have liked to hear more music by de Rippe, star turn of Francis I’s court. The recorded sound seems a tiny bit muffled, but MacKenzie can certainly play, and we hope for many more discs from him.



Meanwhile in Italy the lute culture was undergoing more radical development with Piccinini’s invention of extended-necked lutes, around 1594. One flamboyant modern performer, Rafael Bonavita, has compared this innovation to the invention of the electric guitar in our times, and his interpretations are accordingly rumbustuous. Mónica Pustilnik, by contrast, on her disc Alessandro Piccinini: Lute music (Accent ACC24193, rec 2013, 62′) brings a much gentler interpretation to this radically innovative music, that seems to connect it to the earlier traditions of lute playing. She plays 16 pieces from Piccinini’s two extant prints of 1623 and 1639 on a single-strung archlute (distinguished from the theorbo or chitarrone in that the top two strings are not in the re-entrant, octave-down tuning). The recorded sound and tone of the archlute are excellent, and her performances sensitive and introspective, with lovely rubato and dynamics, even in the well-known chiaconnas which other players have interpreted in a more bravura way.

It's great that you took the trouble to post this here.

I think that José Antonio's  Luys Milán recording is really interesting, because it reveals a music more contrapuntally interesting than I had expected from Hopkinson Smith's approach. This is a recording I shall be revisiting.

I was much less enamoured by Richard Mackenzie's CD: neither the music nor the performance made grabbed me. It's probably me and my mood now, and I'll revisit it in the near future.

I haven't had the chance to hear Mónica Pustilnik's Picninini yet.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2017, 10:01:54 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #91 on: May 29, 2017, 02:24:04 AM »


Francesco da Milano by Sandro Volta.

The recording opens with a sequence of 10 ricercari which I guess are early pieces because the fun begins after that, with an extended series of fantazias. Volta relishes the introspectiveness of the music, he reveals a music which is every bit as psychological as Chopin's nocturnes. He consistently articulates the pieces into small cells, deconstructing the music into its components rather than highlighting gorgeous melodies at the expense of polyphonic complexity. The instrument is muted and reminds me of the clavichord which Clemencic used for Cabezon. There's a similar tension as I hear in Cabezon, a tension between the extreme expressiveness and finesse of the musical gestures, and the unpolished sound of the instrument. Love that sort of thing!

The recording is too reverberant, he's  playing in his bathroom, but for me it's not a deal breaker, but it is a shame.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #92 on: November 02, 2017, 10:11:11 AM »


In Toyohiko Satoh's imaginative booklet essay, towards the end of his life, Robert de Visée reacted against the flamboyant, extrovert style which had come to dominate Versailles, and he fled to his native Portugal, to find a more reflective, slower, quieter, deeper way of life. And there, in his final years, he composed these  pieces  for lute, while listening to the birds singing and the river burbling. The way Satoh presents the music it sounds . . . reflective, slow, quiet, deep.

I have no idea if Satoh's postulates are true. I know that this music is rather good though - more contrapuntally interesting than I'd recalled from other performances of de Visée. And Satoh brings an attractive Zen feel - I mean reflective, slow, quiet, deep.


He's playing an authentic instrument (Laurentius Greiff in 1610) It would be seriously misleading  to say it sounds like a banjo, but it sounds a little bit more like a banjo than what people may expect to hear in French 17th century music. Love it.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 10:13:42 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Omicron9

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 356
  • Location: US
Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #93 on: November 03, 2017, 06:09:48 AM »
Hi Artem -

My favorite lutenist is Rolf Lislevand.  He has several recordings on his own, as well as with other groups, most notably under the leadership of Jordi Savall.

I am a huge fan of his two ensemble recordings on the ECM label.  Both are essential in my view:





Each emphasizes the use of improvisation in early music. 

Lislevand has a new, solo recording, coming out soon.  I have already pre-ordered it (something I very rarely do) and I eagerly await its arrival:



Rolf Lislevand - La Mascarade
Rolf Lislevand: Baroque guitar, theorbo

In this wonderful solo album, Norwegian early music performer Rolf Lislevand turns his attention to two composers from the court of Louis XIV: Robert de VisEe (c. 1655-1732) and the Italian-born Francesco Corbetta (c. 1615-1681), and plays their masterpieces with historical awareness and an inventiveness which belongs to the tradition.

De Visee wrote about playing what the instruments themselves called for, advice Lislevand takes to heart, adding improvised introductions to passacaglias from both composers. He uses two contrasting instruments here, the small Baroque guitar with its sparkling, crystal-clear sonorities and the theorbo, the dark-toned and earthy king of the lutes.

In his fascinating liner notes, Lislevand reminds us that 17th century instrumental performance was often an intimate affair, with lutenists frequently playing to a dozen privileged listeners.

The physical presence of the instruments and that sense of intimacy is recaptured by Manfred Eichers production of La Mascarade, made at Luganos Auditorio Stelio Molo.


...snip...

A big +1 on the Lislevand ECM releases; truly beautiful. 

As are the Naxos series of Silvius Leopold Weiss with Robert Barto.  His tone is beautiful, balanced; both powerful and delicate.  The albums are well-recorded, too.  The Weiss pieces are stunning to me; I never tire of this series.  The only drawback is that it is now up to 11 or 12 volumes which are only available as individual disks; no box set.  Yet.  If you love lute, I strongly recommend grabbing any volume in the Naxos Weiss/Barto series.  I'm sure it won't be your only purchase from this set.

Regards,
-09
"Signature-line free since 2017!"

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8071
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #94 on: November 03, 2017, 07:02:31 AM »
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017





This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.

Offline Omicron9

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 356
  • Location: US
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #95 on: November 03, 2017, 08:28:55 AM »
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017





This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.

Cool!  I look forward to getting a copy.  I have his Weiss (BIS) CD with the Rauwolf lute and truly like it.

-09
"Signature-line free since 2017!"

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #96 on: November 03, 2017, 10:09:01 AM »
Very good discussion of the Livre de Perrine here, by Louis Pernot. The whole website is an inspiration I think, he's a stimulating musician.

http://louispernot.com/Fr/Perrine.html

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #97 on: November 06, 2017, 11:24:23 PM »
   


Germain Pinel was old enough to be Robert Visée's grandad, he was Louis XIV's first guitar teacher, and his music has been very infrequently recorded. In fact, I think that apart from one suite by Anders Ericson, we only have his music on this Brilliant release by Miguel Yisrael.

Comparison between Ericson and Yisrael is really interesting because it reveals two completely different approaches to playing the style brisée. Yisrael is melodious, resonant, sweet and fluid, bold with rubato, introspective, more shade than light. Ericson cleaner and sharper with the articulation and the rhythms, more unpredictable, more awake, more light than shade, more tense. Their instruments suit their styles - Yisrael plays a very soft and resonant lute, and has been recorded in his bathroom;  Ericson's is muscular and solid and has an outstanding recorded sound. Yisrael will definitely appeal, I think, to people who appreciate Anthony Bailes.

« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 11:33:50 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17876
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #98 on: November 07, 2017, 06:13:07 AM »
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017






This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.

Strangely enough there was a release last year with similar material - Mouton and Weiss - by Mauricio Buraglia, who was lutenist on Charbonnier's Marais.  I prefer Buraglia in the Mouton I think, I haven't heard either play Weiss.



Mouton, by the way, seems the summit of baroque lute, the Bach of lute. Or maybe the Louis Couperin of the lute would be better to say. Along with Buraglia's recording, Anders Ericson's CD convinced me of this.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 06:37:36 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8071
Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #99 on: November 07, 2017, 06:48:24 AM »
Strangely enough there was a release last year with similar material - Mouton and Weiss - by Mauricio Buraglia, who was lutenist on Charbonnier's Marais.  I prefer Buraglia in the Mouton I think, I haven't heard either play Weiss.



Mouton, by the way, seems the summit of baroque lute, the Bach of lute. Or maybe the Louis Couperin of the lute would be better to say. Along with Buraglia's recording, Anders Ericson's CD convinced me of this.

I am not sure why you would prefer Buraglia's recording.  The primary attraction of the Lindberg disc is the sound of the lute, which is beautiful.