Author Topic: Mendelssohn's Octet  (Read 4068 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Olias

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 89
    • Mekel Rogers - Composer
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Currently Listening to:
    Beethoven, Dvorak, Haydn, Mozart, and The Bangles
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #40 on: June 01, 2022, 02:56:30 PM »
I'm sorry, Olias, but as you can see from where I quoted your post, I don't know what picture has failed to appear. I would happily accept just a name...  :)

8)

Hausmusik London on Virgin label.
"It is the artists of the world, the feelers, and the thinkers who will ultimately save us." - Leonard Bernstein

Offline aukhawk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1515
  • Oh no! Someone catted my avatar!
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #41 on: June 02, 2022, 12:51:01 AM »
Hard to go wrong listening to this music.
I like the Eroica Quartet - PI, and rare 'original' uncut version - 3 of the 4 movements contain quite substantial chunks of extra material not usually heard, and for me it's basically a case of "more of the same, what's not to like".
For the more usual cut version I also like l'Archibudelli on Sony Vivarte for PI, and for MI
Eder Quartet & Kreuzberger Quartet on Apex - a very lively version, on a cheap reissue label
Australian CO (Tognetti) on BIS - HIP-ish

Offline Roasted Swan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2154
  • Location: UK
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #42 on: June 02, 2022, 01:20:35 AM »
Hard to go wrong listening to this music.
I like the Eroica Quartet - PI, and rare 'original' uncut version - 3 of the 4 movements contain quite substantial chunks of extra material not usually heard, and for me it's basically a case of "more of the same, what's not to like".
For the more usual cut version I also like l'Archibudelli on Sony Vivarte for PI, and for MI
Eder Quartet & Kreuzberger Quartet on Apex - a very lively version, on a cheap reissue label
Australian CO (Tognetti) on BIS - HIP-ish

I checked out the Eroica recording - it appears to have been released as a "download only" recording?  Is that correct? (very warmly reviewed in Gramophone I see....)

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5993
  • Location: Germany
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #43 on: June 02, 2022, 01:31:02 AM »
Is the Eroica quartet the only recording of the "original version"? (I had not even been aware that the usual version was a revised edition.)
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Roasted Swan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2154
  • Location: UK
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #44 on: June 02, 2022, 01:44:34 AM »
Is the Eroica quartet the only recording of the "original version"? (I had not even been aware that the usual version was a revised edition.)

Don't know if this is the only version - here's the positive Gramophone review;

https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/mendelssohn-octet-in-e-flat-major-op-20

I had a quick dip into this via my free Spotify account (so low streaming rates) and its very good and certainly interesting but the actual energy cannot top Ehnes & friends for me.  But that guy is one of the world's greatest living players so no shame in that!
« Last Edit: June 02, 2022, 04:04:14 AM by Roasted Swan »

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8199
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #45 on: June 02, 2022, 02:30:04 AM »
Is the Eroica quartet the only recording of the "original version"? (I had not even been aware that the usual version was a revised edition.)

I think so.  It is described as the "premier recording," but don't know if any later recordings used the unrevised work.

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5993
  • Location: Germany
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #46 on: June 02, 2022, 03:27:21 AM »
I think it would be sufficiently rare and usp and thus hardly go unmentioned on the cover/description of a recording. Unfortunately the Eroica is download only...
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline amw

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5107
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #47 on: June 05, 2022, 09:00:31 PM »


I remembered liking this one. Not sure anyone else will. For context, timings are 12:33 / 5:53 / 4:05 / 5:35, even faster than the Emerson selfcest recording. The acoustic is very dry and somewhat distant or boxy, compared to the more typical loud binaural 2020s chamber music recording.

I still like it. The overall effect is light and airy with plenty of energy, without being as overwhelmingly loud and dynamic as a lot of other modern recordings (e.g. the Ehnes et al. recording referenced above). Despite the lack of separation of voices it's possible to discern every contrapuntal line easily. Shaham also avoids turning the whole thing into a quasi-violin concerto, an occasional pitfall in celebrity-led recordings. I would call it "HIP-inspired" except the HIP players tend to play more slowly; these tempi nevertheless wind up feeling "right" despite initial misgivings that the music might fall apart. It isn't the last word in deeply moving, emotionally involving playing, for which one probably has to look towards the likes of Hausmusik (or maybe the Eroica Quartet), but it's a recommendable modern instruments version for people looking for that sort of thing. (If you didn't like the Heifetz recording, you're not the target audience.)

Offline Roasted Swan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2154
  • Location: UK
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #48 on: June 06, 2022, 12:17:36 AM »


I remembered liking this one. Not sure anyone else will. For context, timings are 12:33 / 5:53 / 4:05 / 5:35, even faster than the Emerson selfcest recording. The acoustic is very dry and somewhat distant or boxy, compared to the more typical loud binaural 2020s chamber music recording.

I still like it. The overall effect is light and airy with plenty of energy, without being as overwhelmingly loud and dynamic as a lot of other modern recordings (e.g. the Ehnes et al. recording referenced above). Despite the lack of separation of voices it's possible to discern every contrapuntal line easily. Shaham also avoids turning the whole thing into a quasi-violin concerto, an occasional pitfall in celebrity-led recordings. I would call it "HIP-inspired" except the HIP players tend to play more slowly; these tempi nevertheless wind up feeling "right" despite initial misgivings that the music might fall apart. It isn't the last word in deeply moving, emotionally involving playing, for which one probably has to look towards the likes of Hausmusik (or maybe the Eroica Quartet), but it's a recommendable modern instruments version for people looking for that sort of thing. (If you didn't like the Heifetz recording, you're not the target audience.)


Shaham is a genuinely GREAT player - one of my favourites amongst current players.  Don't know this version so cannot compare BUT this cover sleeve is up there for the "awful cover art" thread!  Mendelssohn Octet goes to the moon or post-apocalypse chamber music somesuch.  Also, given that I assume the players on the cover are those on the disc the violinist next to the bass (aah so not the octet proper but a string orchestra-ish version) has a dreadful playing position and general posture.  She'll have shoulder problems with her playing before long!

Offline Olias

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 89
    • Mekel Rogers - Composer
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Currently Listening to:
    Beethoven, Dvorak, Haydn, Mozart, and The Bangles
Re: Mendelssohn's Octet
« Reply #49 on: June 11, 2022, 05:53:36 AM »


I remembered liking this one. Not sure anyone else will. For context, timings are 12:33 / 5:53 / 4:05 / 5:35, even faster than the Emerson selfcest recording. The acoustic is very dry and somewhat distant or boxy, compared to the more typical loud binaural 2020s chamber music recording.

I still like it. The overall effect is light and airy with plenty of energy, without being as overwhelmingly loud and dynamic as a lot of other modern recordings (e.g. the Ehnes et al. recording referenced above). Despite the lack of separation of voices it's possible to discern every contrapuntal line easily. Shaham also avoids turning the whole thing into a quasi-violin concerto, an occasional pitfall in celebrity-led recordings. I would call it "HIP-inspired" except the HIP players tend to play more slowly; these tempi nevertheless wind up feeling "right" despite initial misgivings that the music might fall apart. It isn't the last word in deeply moving, emotionally involving playing, for which one probably has to look towards the likes of Hausmusik (or maybe the Eroica Quartet), but it's a recommendable modern instruments version for people looking for that sort of thing. (If you didn't like the Heifetz recording, you're not the target audience.)

Hmmmm, I do like most things that Shaham has recorded.  I'll check this one out.
"It is the artists of the world, the feelers, and the thinkers who will ultimately save us." - Leonard Bernstein