Author Topic: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)  (Read 219393 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2755
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1100 on: October 05, 2020, 12:46:39 AM »
The idea that your entire life should be wrapped up in your sexual partner is in fact a very modern one, built on notions of love being all-consuming.

The funny thing, to me, is that Schumann's music (and the story made of his life with Clara) is somehow one of the formative influences on this idea of romantic love.

There is no hard evidence for this. Just as there is no hard evidence that Provençal love poetry, Petrarch and Shakespeare had any influence on the way people thought about life and love.

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9904
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1101 on: October 05, 2020, 02:16:53 AM »
The funny thing, to me, is that Schumann's music (and the story made of his life with Clara) is somehow one of the formative influences on this idea of romantic love.

There is no hard evidence for this. Just as there is no hard evidence that Provençal love poetry, Petrarch and Shakespeare had any influence on the way people thought about life and love.

Yes, while there is no hard evidence, I can certainly see why you're saying that.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2755
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1102 on: October 05, 2020, 07:22:24 AM »
A lot of Schumann's piano music can be made to sound like a sound track to romantic love.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16142
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1103 on: October 05, 2020, 07:36:26 AM »
My view of romantic love was very much influenced by this Shakespeare sonnet

Quote
Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame
Is lust in action; and till action, lust
Is perjured, murd'rous, bloody, full of blame,
Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust,
Enjoyed no sooner but despisèd straight,
Past reason hunted; and, no sooner had
Past reason hated as a swallowed bait
On purpose laid to make the taker mad;
Mad in pursuit and in possession so,
Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme;
A bliss in proof and proved, a very woe;
Before, a joy proposed; behind, a dream.
    All this the world well knows; yet none knows well
    To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Scion7

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2377
  • A vajda az én dolgom, és az üzlet jó.
  • Location: Borgó Pass
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1104 on: October 26, 2020, 11:24:19 PM »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12690
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1105 on: December 18, 2020, 09:12:25 AM »
From last Monday, the Brentano Quartet in Brahms String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 51, No. 2 (following Schumann in the first half of the concert). Hadn't heard these musicians in quite awhile, and even considering the hundreds of string quartets working today, they are still on their game.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxcmU3ZhfnM

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Stürmisch Bewegt

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 188
  • Location: USA
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1106 on: April 07, 2021, 03:46:12 AM »
Gratifyingly warm and passionate endorsements of Brahms in today's New York Times Morning blog, inc. from the likes of Carlos Santana, Barbara Hendricks, Branford Marsalis, Anthony Tommasini, Hélène Grimaud, et al.  I like best of all what David Allen, Times writer, said of him :  "It took me a long time to love Brahms, whose music once struck me as all too sleepy — “autumnal,” we critics often call it. It wasn’t until time forced me to learn that to live is to lose, I think, that I came to obsess over the dark side of his scores: the grief and sorrow, the loneliness and guilt, the desperation, even the anger. Nowhere is that darkness more engulfing than in his fourth and final symphony, a work with rage at its heart, whatever face it might try to maintain. And no conductor has made its horrors more consuming than Wilhelm Furtwängler."

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/07/arts/music/five-minutes-classical-music-brahms.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_nn_20210407&instance_id=28950&nl=the-morning&regi_id=79376509&segment_id=55022&te=1&user_id=f68579435a3785b48905035b454f0c5c
Leben heißt nicht zu warten, bis der Sturm vorbeizieht, sondern lernen, im Regen zu tanzen.