Franz Schubert

Started by Paul-Michel, April 25, 2008, 05:54:19 AM

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San Antone

I prefer reading about and listening to the music and ignoring the personal/biographic aspects of a composer's life unless it figures directly in the creation of a work.

Karl Henning

Quote from: LKB on July 17, 2022, 02:54:01 PM
I'll take a drunken Schubert over any living composer, and most of the dead ones.  :D

I'm cryin' here, and not in my beer.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

LKB

Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 17, 2022, 03:13:05 PM
I'm cryin' here, and not in my beer.

Oops... apologies Karl, that was thoughtless of me.
Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen...

Karl Henning

Quote from: LKB on July 17, 2022, 05:19:52 PM
Oops... apologies Karl, that was thoughtless of me.

Spoken like a gentleman!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Iota

Quote from: VonStupp on July 15, 2022, 04:12:30 AM
A portly, five-foot tall man nicknamed 'Schwammerl', who died at age 31 of syphilitic-related maladies, contracted some 6 years earlier, and was keen to break crockery whilst imbibing, would not lay in the category of attractive for me.

But, there is someone for everyone, I suppose.  :-\

VS

Reading that I remembered a picture of the younger Schubert, when he did seem to sport kind of boy band-ish looks for a while. Clearly they didn't survive into his maturity.


Brahmsian

Can't wait for this to arrive, ordered a few days ago!


DavidW

Quote from: OrchestralNut on February 16, 2023, 12:59:36 PMCan't wait for this to arrive, ordered a few days ago!



I listened to it today.  It is as good as I remembered it being.

Brahmsian

Quote from: DavidW on February 16, 2023, 01:03:05 PMI listened to it today.  It is as good as I remembered it being.

Yeah, I was very impressed with the samples I listened to.

Brahmsian

I already know this is DavidW approved.   :) Just arrived and now *spinning.

*And thank goodness it is spinning.  I struggled mightily to get the disc from the grasps of its spine (practically needing the jaws of life to remove).  The plastic spine from the case cracked in doing so, as it had to be the sacrificial lamb, over the actual compact disc.

Worth it though, as it is magnificent.  Octet in F major, D803 - performed by Edding Quartet/Northernlight.  Also includes the Quartettsatz in C minor D703



 

DavidW

Oh one of those cases... arg

Karl Henning

As a newcomer to most of the piano sonatas, I have a q. for the Schubert mavens among us. I've been listening to (and thoroughly enjoying) Paul Badura-Skoda's recording of the sonatas. I found myself wanting to do some comparative listening, and have found myself immediately stymied. I realize that the beginning of an answer may perhaps be found in the excellent notes to the PBS set, but this week, I've been such a good lad and doing a lot of composing of my own, so pardon my laziness in seeking out the collective wisdom. The nature of the stymie is this: I was listening to what PBS lists as the sonata # 8 in f# minor, and I was curious to hear Ingrid Haebler's take on the same material. However, perusing the Haebler set, I find no  sonata in f# minor. There are early sonatas in B and A. Any enlightenment is appreciated.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

vers la flamme

My guess is simply that she hasn't recorded that particular sonata; I don't believe that box of Haebler's recordings makes any claims to completeness (few Schubert sonata boxes do, as a very limited number of pianists have actually made any attempt to record all of them).

Are you speaking of the D 571 Sonata (fragment)? If so I'm partial to András Schiff's recording of it.

Karl Henning

Quote from: vers la flamme on July 25, 2023, 10:51:22 AMAre you speaking of the D 571 Sonata (fragment)? If so I'm partial to András Schiff's recording of it.

Thanks.

The opening Allegro moderato is indeed the D 571. He then adds an Andante in A major, D 604, and concludes with the Scherzo in D major and Allegro in f♯ minor, D. 570.

I did find Schiff on YouTube:

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

vers la flamme

Quote from: Karl Henning on July 25, 2023, 01:00:49 PMThanks.

The opening Allegro moderato is indeed the D 571. He then adds an Andante in A major, D 604, and concludes with the Scherzo in D major and Allegro in f♯ minor, D. 570.

I did find Schiff on YouTube:



I see; would this happen to be PBS's original scholarship, the idea of piecing these fragments all together? Maybe you can answer that later when you're done with the pieces you're working on and can take a look at the booklet ;D

Spotted Horses

There are so many Schubert Piano Sonatas that were early works that were unpublished or abandoned and subsequently completed, that I don't think it is possible to define what constitutes a "complete" set of Sonatas. Heabler seems to skip the dubious ones, and to some extent picks and chooses among the early unpublished sonatas. But I was impressed enough with the Schubert recordings I listened to to purchase this thing.


There are simply two kinds of music, good music and the other kind. - Duke Ellington

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Karl Henning on July 25, 2023, 10:48:08 AMAs a newcomer to most of the piano sonatas, I have a q. for the Schubert mavens among us. I've been listening to (and thoroughly enjoying) Paul Badura-Skoda's recording of the sonatas. I found myself wanting to do some comparative listening, and have found myself immediately stymied. I realize that the beginning of an answer may perhaps be found in the excellent notes to the PBS set, but this week, I've been such a good lad and doing a lot of composing of my own, so pardon my laziness in seeking out the collective wisdom. The nature of the stymie is this: I was listening to what PBS lists as the sonata # 8 in f# minor, and I was curious to hear Ingrid Haebler's take on the same material. However, perusing the Haebler set, I find no  sonata in f# minor. There are early sonatas in B and A. Any enlightenment is appreciated.

Did you try Alfred Brendel's?

Spotted Horses

Quote from: AnotherSpin on July 25, 2023, 09:48:44 PMDid you try Alfred Brendel's?

I would also suggest Kempff, if you can tolerate less than ideal audio quality.
There are simply two kinds of music, good music and the other kind. - Duke Ellington

AnotherSpin

Speaking of sonatas. Volodos recorded a beautiful album a few years ago.

I remember I also really liked Annie Fischer's recordings of sonatas, but there too the sound quality of the old Hungaroton is an issue.

vers la flamme

Quote from: Spotted Horses on July 25, 2023, 10:09:22 PMI would also suggest Kempff, if you can tolerate less than ideal audio quality.

I never tried Kempff's Schubert (or Schumann) though I love his Beethoven and Brahms. Any particular recommendations?

Spotted Horses

Quote from: vers la flamme on July 26, 2023, 05:01:40 AMI never tried Kempff's Schubert (or Schumann) though I love his Beethoven and Brahms. Any particular recommendations?

Basically all of it! His Papillons stands out in my memory.
There are simply two kinds of music, good music and the other kind. - Duke Ellington