Author Topic: Dvorak's Den  (Read 125088 times)

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Offline Biffo

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #620 on: October 19, 2020, 02:28:21 AM »
My only meeting with Rusalka was on DVD, but it was with that "modern" staging which I didn't like at all, and it put me off. I need to listen to it again.

My first meeting was at English National Opera - it was a 'modern staging' but nothing too ridiculous. As soon as the performance was over I bought a ticket for another performance. Not long after I bought the Neumann recording on LP, later still on CD.

Offline kyjo

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #621 on: October 29, 2020, 03:15:57 PM »
I was fortunate enough to come across the OOP Supraphon recording (the only one, I believe - a travesty!) of his opera Dimitrij (1881-82) at a local shop:



...and WOW! It's very nearly as wonderful as Rusalka! Perhaps the reason it isn't performed more is for dramatic rather than musical reasons, because it's absolutely inspired over its entire 3+ hour duration. Dvořák's melodic fecundity here is really astonishing - just one marvelous idea after the other. Of particular note are some of the really rousing choruses, which have a rather Russian flavor to them, as befits the subject matter.

The whole recording can be found on YT. Please do make an effort to hear it - it's truly prime Dvořák!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mykFfZTioag-tPQaj-xKbwvjRgELcWU-c
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #622 on: November 02, 2020, 03:43:04 PM »
So much music to discover, but so little time available. Thank you, Kyle. Sounds like I have to listen to it as soon as possible.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Madiel

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #623 on: December 12, 2020, 04:15:35 AM »
Does anyone happen to have a physical copy of this album? If so I have a question.



Originally on the Unicorn label, later released by Treasure Island.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #624 on: March 08, 2021, 03:24:50 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto

I have always liked this work from the first time that I heard it. This is not an overtly virtuosic work and this aspect has apparently worked against it in the concert hall environment. This is unfortunate, if this is the case, as it is a really wonderfully strong, well constructed, lyrical work which is filled with flowing melodies, tension, excitement, drama and emotion.
This work boasts a wonderfully appealing opening movement. The exposition is wonderfully taut and tension filled. The piano enters somewhat hesitatingly but gradually builds in confidence and eventually holds its own with the orchestra ultimately establishing a voice of its own. The first movement is filled with very lyrical, melodic tunes. The drama and tension gradually builds up in the first movement to a wonderfully fulfilling and exciting crescendo that is well sustained.
The slow movement is wonderfully lyrical and atmospheric and it also has wonderful moments of great drama. I find that there is an element of pathos prevailing throughout this movement.
The wonderful Finale is a charming, exciting movement which dances along with great forward momentum. It is sometimes spirited and sometimes restrained but always lyrical and it ends with an intense and exciting conclusion. It contains the most recognisable music by Dvorak, stylistically, than the other two movements, I think.

I only have three versions of this work in my collection but I like them all:
« Last Edit: March 08, 2021, 04:06:39 AM by aligreto »
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Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #625 on: March 08, 2021, 03:26:10 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto [Firkusny/Susskind]




The opening movement is quite lyrical but it is big and bold. It is played very much in the grand Romantic style, to my ears. That is just a personal observation on interpretative style. It is well driven with good forward momentum. Both Firkusny and Susskind emphasise the drama in their presentations but it is still very eloquent.
This version presents a magical, lyrical Andante movement as befits this wonderful music. It is delicate, graceful, poignant and captivating. It is quite tender; wonderful!
The Finale is another robust presentation in a similar vein to that of the opening movement. It also has its contrasting delicate sections which are finely played. Both do not go for an overtly exuberant conclusion to the work; it is a more measured affair.
The requisite drama and intensity for this work is well portrayed here.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #626 on: March 08, 2021, 03:27:29 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto [Moravec/Belohlavek]





I find this to be a particularly fine performance. It is robust and somewhat assertive in the outer movements and it has quite a lyrical slow movement. The performance of the orchestra is taut and sensitively accompanies the soloist throughout. The recording is also very good and well balanced.
After the exposition in the first movement, Moravec enters with assertion and continues fluidly and with great confidence, but not over assertively, throughout. The drama and tension gradually builds up to a very fine, robust conclusion.
The performance of the slow movement displays wonderful grace, charm and poise from all of the forces. There is no sentimentality here, just fluid lyricism if slightly tempered with earnestness which is not necessarily a bad thing.
The presentation of the final movement is one of great assurity from all concerned. It is robust but not over assertive. The balance of the tone is well accomplished. Moravec has a wonderful lightness of touch.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #627 on: March 08, 2021, 03:28:32 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto [Ponti/Rohan]





The outer movements are performed here with intensity and passion, but in a somewhat understated way. That final flourish at the end of the first movement is wonderfully done. The performance is always lyrical.
This performance also has a magical, beguiling and lyrical Andante movement which sets a wonderfully atmospheric scene and tone which is thoroughly and delightfully captivating. Ponti gets the tone, and therefore the atmosphere, just right here with his wonderful touch.
This is an easy, free flowing Final movement from both Ponti and Rohan. The energy and excitement gradually builds up as the movement progresses. There is a strong conclusion to the movement.
This is a compelling performance from all concerned which has a great presence and an intensity to it. One feels that the orchestra has this music in its blood.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #628 on: March 08, 2021, 05:02:44 AM »
A shame that Ponti's recording has never made it to CD - one of the few of his Vox/Turnabout LP's not to as far as I know.  But as I recall he does use the 'revised' version of the score which has now been generally supplanted by pianists going back to Dvorak's original intentions I think.....

Online Daverz

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #629 on: March 08, 2021, 05:49:12 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto

Hurwitz did a video:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Ic0C7a7F_0E" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Ic0C7a7F_0E</a>

His top choice was Firkusny/Czech Phil/Neumann, and I concur:
 


According to Wikipedia: "Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career."

EDIT: this makes it seem like I was saying the recording with Susskind is the Kurz revision.  Pretty sure it's the original as well.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2021, 06:06:18 AM by Daverz »

Offline Brian

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #630 on: March 08, 2021, 10:02:39 AM »
I also agree on Firkusny, but the new one with Ivo Kahanek, paired to Martinu's Incantations, is also excellent.

Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #631 on: March 08, 2021, 11:52:07 AM »
A shame that Ponti's recording has never made it to CD - one of the few of his Vox/Turnabout LP's not to as far as I know.  But as I recall he does use the 'revised' version of the score which has now been generally supplanted by pianists going back to Dvorak's original intentions I think.....

I have checked that on the LP notes and you are correct.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #632 on: March 08, 2021, 02:06:51 PM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto [Firkusny/Susskind]




The opening movement is quite lyrical but it is big and bold. It is played very much in the grand Romantic style, to my ears. That is just a personal observation on interpretative style. It is well driven with good forward momentum. Both Firkusny and Susskind emphasise the drama in their presentations but it is still very eloquent.
This version presents a magical, lyrical Andante movement as befits this wonderful music. It is delicate, graceful, poignant and captivating. It is quite tender; wonderful!
The Finale is another robust presentation in a similar vein to that of the opening movement. It also has its contrasting delicate sections which are finely played. Both do not go for an overtly exuberant conclusion to the work; it is a more measured affair.
The requisite drama and intensity for this work is well portrayed here.

I don't know the recording with Susskind, but I do have a download of the one with George Szell which I enjoy (Naxos).  I noticed a comment on a youtube upload that apparently  "And a really rare one, one of the very few presenting Vilem Kurz' revision of the piano score, which actually was approved by Dvorak."  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9D4gCsrAGg

I'm not certain whether or not the one that I have is still available as a download.  I had purchased it years ago from prestoclassical.  All I have is a rather slightly fuzzy cover image--no notes.

PD

Online Daverz

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #633 on: March 08, 2021, 08:13:28 PM »
A shame that Ponti's recording has never made it to CD - one of the few of his Vox/Turnabout LP's not to as far as I know.  But as I recall he does use the 'revised' version of the score which has now been generally supplanted by pianists going back to Dvorak's original intentions I think.....

This recording did make it to CD on a Vox Box titled Music from Prague:

https://www.amazon.com/Music-Prague-1-Dvorak/dp/B000001K55




Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #634 on: March 09, 2021, 12:35:46 AM »
This recording did make it to CD on a Vox Box titled Music from Prague:

https://www.amazon.com/Music-Prague-1-Dvorak/dp/B000001K55



Excellent - thankyou for letting me know.  I have always enjoyed Ponti's bravura and back in the day of me collecting LP's I bought a lot of his "Unknown Romantic Piano Concertos" series.  But oddly this was not included in any of the big anthologies of Concerti either as VoxBox downloads or the Brilliant 40 disc "Romantic Piano Concertos" box.  The toruble is these Vox sets are quite often a bit pricey in the UK - but at least I now know to keep an eye out!

Offline MusicTurner

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #635 on: March 09, 2021, 02:30:07 AM »
Dvorak: Piano Concerto [Firkusny/Susskind]




The opening movement is quite lyrical but it is big and bold. It is played very much in the grand Romantic style, to my ears. That is just a personal observation on interpretative style. It is well driven with good forward momentum. Both Firkusny and Susskind emphasise the drama in their presentations but it is still very eloquent.
This version presents a magical, lyrical Andante movement as befits this wonderful music. It is delicate, graceful, poignant and captivating. It is quite tender; wonderful!
The Finale is another robust presentation in a similar vein to that of the opening movement. It also has its contrasting delicate sections which are finely played. Both do not go for an overtly exuberant conclusion to the work; it is a more measured affair.
The requisite drama and intensity for this work is well portrayed here.

Agree, it's a fine set; and I've always liked that piano concerto.

Offline Brewski

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #636 on: March 17, 2021, 06:22:05 AM »
Excellent piece by Douglas W. Shadle, associate professor of musicology at Vanderbilt University, on Dvořák's "New World" Symphony and its context and legacy.

Beloved and moving, the “New World” Symphony has a secure place on programs well into the future. But Dvorak, and the white composers who followed in his footsteps, should not be the loudest voices speaking on behalf of all Americans.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/17/arts/music/dvorak-new-world-symphony.html

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Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #637 on: April 26, 2021, 04:46:02 AM »
Maiden Monday Listen (to the work itself, and obviously thus, the recording)

I am floored at how great this is!

Dvořák

Requiem, Opus 89



Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #638 on: May 05, 2021, 09:48:50 AM »
Continuing my traversal through the Naxos complete published orchestral works box....

Listening to the Slavonic Rhapsodies, the Rhapsody Symphonic Poem and the Serenades.  All terrific stuff.

This box is proving to be a really great investment, and I still have another 5 discs to listen to before I complete my first run.  The only "duds" so far were on the same disc, those being the Gunzenhauser recordings of the 4th and 8th.  The rest of the Gunzenhauser recordings of the symphonies are very, very well done!  :)

« Last Edit: May 05, 2021, 09:53:50 AM by OrchestralNut »

Online k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #639 on: May 05, 2021, 09:51:05 AM »
Nice, Ray!
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