Author Topic: Dvorak's Den  (Read 123280 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #660 on: June 18, 2021, 06:31:43 PM »
Yes, that's a very nice one too.  You might check to see whether or not someone has already posted a link in the Sibelius thread and if not post it there?  :)

PD

Good idea. I believe I’ve already posted a link to this site on the Sibelius thread several years ago. 8)
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Offline Madiel

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #661 on: June 18, 2021, 07:33:04 PM »
Just a follow-up, I also like the Sibelius website:

http://www.sibelius.fi/english/index.htm

Yes, it's also a very good one.

Another excellent one, especially for knowing about recordings, is for Medtner: https://www.medtner.org.uk/
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #662 on: June 18, 2021, 07:36:59 PM »
Yes, it's also a very good one.

Another excellent one, especially for knowing about recordings, is for Medtner: https://www.medtner.org.uk/

If only I were a fan of Medtner. :-\ But yes, that does look like a nice site.
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Offline Madiel

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #663 on: June 18, 2021, 07:42:16 PM »
If only I were a fan of Medtner. :-\

With the right resources you could become one!  :laugh:
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #664 on: June 19, 2021, 06:16:26 PM »
With the right resources you could become one!  :laugh:

 :P
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Offline aligreto

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #665 on: June 20, 2021, 03:39:49 AM »
Dvorak: Slavonic Dances Op. 72 [Szell]





Both the music and the presentation of it are always strong, assertive and terrifically energetic and exciting in the two works on this CD.
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Offline Madiel

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #666 on: September 02, 2021, 04:04:54 AM »
As mentioned in the WAYLT thread, I'm trying the early quartets again for the first time in several years. I own the Prague Qt box (Deutsche Grammophon), but these days with access to streaming I thought I'd try elsewhere.

And goodness, maybe I thought that early Dvorak was interminable because the Prague Quartet play the whole shebang, without any edits. I've not listened to their performance of quartet no.1 again yet, but the difference in timing between the recordings of no.1 I'm aware of is pretty stark:

Panocha Quartet 33:31
Zemlinsky Quartet 34:03
Vlach Quartet 36:49
Stamitz Quartet 40:13
Prague Quartet 48:28

The Zemlinsky Qt are explicit in saying they're using a critical edition that makes cuts. Presumably at least some of the others are as well, and I've actually come across a review of the Vlach complaining at how they'd cut music in the introduction that the Prague include.

I'm quite enjoying the Panocha version. So next I'll have to go back to the Prague and see how I react to it. If I get no joy out of it then... well, maybe I need an alternate set to redeem the earlier quartets (because normally I only listen from no.7 onwards).
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #667 on: September 02, 2021, 06:31:21 PM »
Dvorak's early quartets contains much fine - and characteristic - music in them. The Panocha recordings are superb.

I was listening to his Symphony no. 2 recently (a work which I hadn't paid much attention to before) - sure, the first two movements may be a bit structurally incoherent, but the scherzo and finale are in a whole different league! They're quite remarkable for their freshness of invention, life-affirming energy, and symphonic sweep. As I've said before, in these two movements one can really hear Dvorak "coming into his own". I listened to Otmar Suitner's recording with the Staatskapelle Berlin - a fine performance. 
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Online OrchestralNut

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #668 on: September 03, 2021, 02:32:53 AM »
Dvorak's early quartets contains much fine - and characteristic - music in them. The Panocha recordings are superb.

I was listening to his Symphony no. 2 recently (a work which I hadn't paid much attention to before) - sure, the first two movements may be a bit structurally incoherent, but the scherzo and finale are in a whole different league! They're quite remarkable for their freshness of invention, life-affirming energy, and symphonic sweep. As I've said before, in these two movements one can really hear Dvorak "coming into his own". I listened to Otmar Suitner's recording with the Staatskapelle Berlin - a fine performance.

Over time, it seems the schrezo to Symphony No. 2 has become my favourite schrezo of Dvorak's symphonies. Lately, the 2nd symphony has been the one I listen to most frequently.

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #669 on: September 03, 2021, 02:52:09 AM »
As mentioned in the WAYLT thread, I'm trying the early quartets again for the first time in several years. I own the Prague Qt box (Deutsche Grammophon), but these days with access to streaming I thought I'd try elsewhere.

And goodness, maybe I thought that early Dvorak was interminable because the Prague Quartet play the whole shebang, without any edits. I've not listened to their performance of quartet no.1 again yet, but the difference in timing between the recordings of no.1 I'm aware of is pretty stark:

Panocha Quartet 33:31
Zemlinsky Quartet 34:03
Vlach Quartet 36:49
Stamitz Quartet 40:13
Prague Quartet 48:28

The Zemlinsky Qt are explicit in saying they're using a critical edition that makes cuts. Presumably at least some of the others are as well, and I've actually come across a review of the Vlach complaining at how they'd cut music in the introduction that the Prague include.

I'm quite enjoying the Panocha version. So next I'll have to go back to the Prague and see how I react to it. If I get no joy out of it then... well, maybe I need an alternate set to redeem the earlier quartets (because normally I only listen from no.7 onwards).

And here I thought the Stamitz Quartet was overly long and tedious in this work!  I stand corrected!  I also prefer the Panocha Quartet.

Offline kyjo

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #670 on: September 03, 2021, 09:01:36 AM »
Over time, it seems the schrezo to Symphony No. 2 has become my favourite schrezo of Dvorak's symphonies. Lately, the 2nd symphony has been the one I listen to most frequently.

Indeed, it’s a remarkable movement that, rather unusually for a scherzo, has a long-breathed melodic sweep and keen sense of pacing that’s so engaging to the listener.
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Offline Madiel

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Re: Dvorak's Den
« Reply #671 on: September 03, 2021, 08:38:29 PM »
I've confirmed for quartet no.1 that the Prague Qt are using a different edition to everyone else. The introduction to the 1st movement has a whole pile of extra music. Similarly in the finale it doesn't take long to find the Prague are playing extra bars.

As far as I can gather from comments elsewhere, this means that most quartets are following Dvorak's later revision, where he heavily cut 3 of the movements, but the Prague must be playing the original version.

I don't yet know what's going on in quartets 2 and 3 because as far as I know Dvorak didn't revise those. If anything he didn't want them around...
« Last Edit: September 03, 2021, 08:41:01 PM by Madiel »
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