Author Topic: Opera on DVD  (Read 287751 times)

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Offline Wendell_E

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    mostly opera and chamber music
Re: Opera on DVD
« Reply #780 on: January 14, 2021, 03:15:32 AM »
Did Wagner ever use castanets in the orchestra for any other work?  They're here at the beginning of the Overture. 

The only use that springs immediately to mind is in the ballet music in Tannhäuser, but only in the Paris/Vienna version.
“Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

Offline ritter

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Re: Opera on DVD
« Reply #781 on: January 14, 2021, 03:29:13 AM »
WAGNER (Richard!)  Das Liebesverbot    based on Shakespeare's Measure for Measure
Teatro Real, Madrid production
an early work (1835)  more like Gilbert & Sullivan than a Parsifal-like look at "forbidden love"
Did Wagner ever use castanets in the orchestra for any other work?  They're here at the beginning of the Overture.  And a surprise visit from "Angela Merkel" at the finale of this production.
I saw that production live here in Madrid. The opera isn’t anything memorable, but it was a rare and welcome chance to see early Wagner fully staged, a was ultimately a fun evening in the theatre.
ritter
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« Je me suis rarement perdu de vue ; je me suis détesté, je me suis adoré ; puis, nous avons vieilli ensemble. »

Offline listener

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Re: Opera on DVD
« Reply #782 on: January 14, 2021, 10:15:22 AM »
The only use that springs immediately to mind is in the ballet music in Tannhäuser, but only in the Paris/Vienna version.
Quite right, I see them in the Dover score

The staging is inventive, a single but complex set that slides back and forth with a few small sub-pieces and very well lit. 
With some advice about editing and plot clarification Wagner could have become the German Hérold.  It was interesting to discover this unexpected side of the composer.
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."