Author Topic: John Ireland (1879-1962)  (Read 21350 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #40 on: June 12, 2011, 11:44:05 AM »
I actually have the original release on Conifer. The new cover looks better though!

Me too. I WAs JUST listening to the Walton today and thinking to start a British Piano Concerto Thread. Great cd!!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #41 on: June 12, 2011, 01:31:03 PM »
'These Things Shall Be', 'Mai-Dun', 'The Forgotten Rite' and 'Legend' are my favourite works by Ireland - I also like the war-time 'Epic March'. He was a fine composer.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #42 on: June 12, 2011, 05:21:22 PM »
'These Things Shall Be', 'Mai-Dun', 'The Forgotten Rite' and 'Legend' are my favourite works by Ireland - I also like the war-time 'Epic March'. He was a fine composer.

Mai-Dun and Legend are, I agree, both fine works.
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Offline Luke

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #43 on: June 12, 2011, 11:42:14 PM »
No arguments from me, of course, but just the usual orchestral-music-is-only-a-part-of-the-picture plea - anyone who doesn't know Ireland's Piano Sonata or Sonatina, the London Pieces, Ballade, Greenways, the Decorations, the Preludes or above all Sarnia, to speak only of the piano music, is only getting a tiny bit of that picture. I've been playing them all so much this last couple of weeks (at the piano, I mean, not on CD, though that too).  Sarnia and the Sonatina, particularly, are very special works indeed, and the Ballade shows how extreme and even brutal Ireland can be

The idea strikes me that Sarnia or the Sonata, orchestrated, would make the most superlative works for those who only want orchestral...and then the idea recedes again when I think how perfectly conceived they are for the piano, Sarnia in particular! One to ponder, though...
« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 11:45:56 PM by Luke »

Offline Luke

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #44 on: June 12, 2011, 11:55:00 PM »
The Ballade too....just thinking about it again. It's almost never mentioned, but it's probably his most extreme piece, and such varied, huge sonorities. It would be marvellous, orchestrally. And the London Pieces...I'd better stop!

Scarpia

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #45 on: June 13, 2011, 04:55:56 AM »
I've been working my way through the Chandos chamber music collection again and now have the Parkin set of piano music on order.  Other than that, I have the pieces for piano and orchestra on Hyperion.  Looking forward to hearing the piano music.


karlhenning

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #46 on: June 13, 2011, 05:07:36 AM »
No arguments from me, of course, but just the usual orchestral-music-is-only-a-part-of-the-picture plea - anyone who doesn't know Ireland's Piano Sonata or Sonatina, the London Pieces, Ballade, Greenways, the Decorations, the Preludes or above all Sarnia, to speak only of the piano music, is only getting a tiny bit of that picture. I've been playing them all so much this last couple of weeks (at the piano, I mean, not on CD, though that too).  Sarnia and the Sonatina, particularly, are very special works indeed, and the Ballade shows how extreme and even brutal Ireland can be

The idea strikes me that Sarnia or the Sonata, orchestrated, would make the most superlative works for those who only want orchestral...and then the idea recedes again when I think how perfectly conceived they are for the piano, Sarnia in particular! One to ponder, though...

The Ballade too....just thinking about it again. It's almost never mentioned, but it's probably his most extreme piece, and such varied, huge sonorities. It would be marvellous, orchestrally. And the London Pieces...I'd better stop!

I liked the clips well, and you're making me yet more impatient of the arrival of the piano music set!

Offline Luke

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #47 on: June 13, 2011, 05:27:50 AM »
Was playing through the two Ballades this morning - the Ballade itself, and the Ballade of London Nights (have a look at the scores here - http://hemingways-studio-downloads.blogspot.com/2003_01_01_archive.html ). Really superb pieces, both, and as I say, the Ballade shows him working with real intensity and right at the extremes of his style. It's a superb piece, made even finer because the craftsmanship is, as always, so impeccable. The Ballade of London Nights is similar, though it's stylistic trajectory is larger, and there's something big going on under the surface which really affects me. 

karlhenning

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #48 on: June 13, 2011, 05:48:34 AM »
Thanks! And what a brilliant resource, thank you.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2011, 03:08:30 AM »
I think that this thread should be called 'Ireland's Windmill' as he lived in one! (I have seen it). I recommend a lovely new Naxos CD of Ireland's lyrical Piano Concerto played by John Leneman with the RLPO conducted by John Wilson. I already own many CDs of this work and thought that my purchase was more or less symptomatic of obsessive compulsive CD collecting disorder (known as OCCDCD to any properly trained psychotherapist  ;D). But, I am delighted as it is such a great version of the Piano Concerto - slower that usual and infused with a greater sense of poetry. I also like the lesser known 'Legend' which is a hauntingly atmospheric work - more dramatic than the concerto.  The performance is also the best I have heard. The earlier 'First Rhapsody' (1906) as the booklet note says is very much in the Lisztian tradition and the addition of some atmospheric solo piano works round of a lovely CD. Great cover photo of 'Chanctonbury Ring', a spot I know well on the South Downs in Sussex and where I sometimes go walking. Ireland was inspired by this countryside.

« Last Edit: December 17, 2011, 03:11:52 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline lescamil

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #50 on: December 17, 2011, 10:32:59 AM »
Have you heard the recording by Piers Lane on the Hyperion label of the Ireland works for piano and orchestra? I'd like to know how that one compares to this new one by John Lenehan.
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #51 on: December 17, 2011, 06:47:32 PM »
I haven't heard the new one, but can confirm the worthiness of the Hyperion disc - lovingly recorded. From the review I read of the Naxos disc, it's apparently an uncommonly broad take, but doesn't suffer for that.

In terms of programme, both discs seem to offer individual experiences too. The Delius concerto included on Hyperion is very fine, and while the Ireland works included on the Naxos disc can be termed filler - Ireland's short pieces are always of high quality.

Edit: Wait... I didn't read up from your post - and thought it was a general question, not to Vandermolen - who I seem to have cribbed my review from! ;D I can only revoice my enthusiasm for the Hyperion discc, though the new one does look excellent.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2011, 06:54:27 PM by Lethevich Dmitriyevna Pettersonova »
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Offline lescamil

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #52 on: December 17, 2011, 07:49:27 PM »
Yes, to this point, I thought the Piers Lane recording was the best that I had heard. Piers does a nice job on both of the Delius concerto versions also (he recorded the revised version of the Delius elsewhere). Lenehan is a pianist I have heard elsewhere playing other British works, so I can only hope for the best. I will check this out on Naxos Music Library soon.
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #53 on: December 17, 2011, 08:13:54 PM »
I think that the new disc will be a happy duplicate for me too, next round of purchases I make :)
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #54 on: December 19, 2011, 01:44:26 AM »
I don't think that it matters who replies  :D

Yes, I have the Hyperion CD which is excellent and the Delius Piano Concerto is perhaps my favourite work by that composer.  There is also a fine Somm CD with the Ireland PC and Legend (Mark Bebbington, David Curtis) which is worth having for the only recording of Bax's 'Concertino for Piano and Orch.) I hope that the same conductor and orchestra who recorded the new Naxos will go on to record Mai-Dun and The Forgotten Rite.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2011, 03:28:48 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Offline Luke

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #55 on: December 19, 2011, 01:57:07 AM »
Being imprinted on the Parkin disc (and Parkin had the composer's own advice on these works) I don't really like the Lane disc very much. But this new Naxos disc looks a winner - I'll be buying it soon. I should say, though I've said it already in this thread, that I rate both the Concerto and Legend extremely highly, and that in general Ireland is IMO one of the very finest of the British composers of his generation. But as I've said before, outside the Concerto and Legend, for the best of him you need to look to his piano and chamber music.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #56 on: December 19, 2011, 03:31:43 AM »
Being imprinted on the Parkin disc (and Parkin had the composer's own advice on these works) I don't really like the Lane disc very much. But this new Naxos disc looks a winner - I'll be buying it soon. I should say, though I've said it already in this thread, that I rate both the Concerto and Legend extremely highly, and that in general Ireland is IMO one of the very finest of the British composers of his generation. But as I've said before, outside the Concerto and Legend, for the best of him you need to look to his piano and chamber music.

I'm sure you're right and I need to explore these works myself.  I have a soft spot for 'These Things Shall Be', which is not generally highly regarded. The Epic March is good too. Yes, that Chandos CD is excellent in all respects.














"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

cilgwyn

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #57 on: January 22, 2017, 11:57:19 AM »
I have just finished playing Lyrita cd of the Piano concerto(etc). I like the Piano concerto. It really is a lovely work;but I also enjoyed  These Things shall Be. I do think the the Barbirolli recording is more stirring. It has more atmosphere,too;and not just because it's an old recording! At least,I don't think so?!! ;D  I'm now playing this Chandos collection. I bought this earlier incarnation of the cd,because I prefer the artwork.



The Chandos recording of These things shall be has Bryn Terfel as soloist. I'm not being very patriotic here,I know,but I must admit I can't stand his voice! ??? Ah well,each to his own!

cilgwyn

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #58 on: January 22, 2017, 12:39:43 PM »
I'm sure you're right and I need to explore these works myself.  I have a soft spot for 'These Things Shall Be', which is not generally highly regarded. The Epic March is good too. Yes, that Chandos CD is excellent in all respects.
I like These Things shall Be (see above).Unless it's got Bryn Terfel singing in it! (Also,see above) What not to like?!! ???

cilgwyn

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #59 on: January 22, 2017, 12:44:39 PM »
Someone will tell me now! ::) ;D