Author Topic: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)  (Read 17584 times)

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cilgwyn

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #80 on: June 11, 2017, 06:29:27 AM »
Yes,I've grown to really like that one. In fact I love that one! :) I think my next favourite has to be No 15. You can download a new recording of Botstein conducting No 11 from Amazon;but I think the old Louisville recording has a bit more of that elusive quality called atmosphere. Some of the symphonies do seem forgettable,but I rather like No's 4 & 5. His chamber music is very intriguing. The Mode cds are well worth acquiring. I also like Atlantis,his Variations for Orchestra and Ongaku. Sort the chaff from the wheat (and there is allot of chaff) and I think Cowell is actually quite an interesting,and at times,rewarding composer.

cilgwyn

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #81 on: June 11, 2017, 06:42:46 AM »
Incidentally, I only really started enjoying the music on this cd after making a cd-r of it without Hymn and Fuguing Tune No 3!




snyprrr

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #82 on: June 11, 2017, 07:27:31 AM »
(and there is allot of chaff)

wait... what? :laugh:

cilgwyn

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #83 on: June 11, 2017, 08:36:29 AM »
The wheat's good,though.....and very nourishing! :)



I see you're point,though! ::) ;D

cilgwyn

  • Guest
Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #84 on: June 11, 2017, 09:46:15 AM »
Ahem! Wheat from the chaff! :-[ ;D

These two cds are very good,imho. The music is well performed and recorded. Cowell's chamber music is intriguing and absorbing. I love the wacky Atlantis on Dancing with Henry,for small orchestra and voices. Lots of wordless grunting and moaning. Quite an extraordinary piece,and funny too! Must be fun to perform,too?! Mosaic is a 2 cd set.

 

NB: Actually,I like marmite on toast for breakfast. Can't stand cereal!! ??? :( ;D

snyprrr

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #85 on: June 12, 2017, 05:22:07 PM »
Ahem! Wheat from the chaff! :-[ ;D

I like marmite

mm mm mm...not for me thank you :P gag lol

'Mosaic' is the single best Cowell presentation there is. I passed on the other one... I can't remember what else is on it...but I thought it was "normal" stuff found elsewhere?...

Oh, and the few Koch CDs... the 'Concerto Grosso' sounds very pastoral, as does the Harp Quartet on the Mode disc...



I'd really like to hear more of the 'ultra dissonant' phase @1917-1919... the CPO disc has some of that... the 'Adagio';;;



uh...

cilgwyn

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #86 on: June 15, 2017, 12:49:01 PM »
I'm afraid I just have to disagree with you,snyprrr ...............................over Marmite!! :P ;D

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #87 on: June 16, 2017, 06:01:11 AM »
I'm afraid I just have to disagree with you,snyprrr ...............................over Marmite!! :P ;D

Well, you know what prince Charles used it for... ack!! :P

cilgwyn

  • Guest
Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #88 on: June 16, 2017, 08:27:19 AM »
"Prince Charles' favourite sandwich is a bap (organic, of course) filled with a fried egg, Gruyere cheese and the famously salty brown goo".
I'm not exactly a fan of Prince Charles;but to be fair this sounds delicious! The nearest I get to this is a poached egg,on marmite on toast,for breakfast!
I remember inadvertantly starting a 'Marmite' thread at the Art Music Forum,after inadvertantly letting slip that I preferred Vegemite. Well,I did for a while!! ::)
By the way,I didn't know Marmite had been used as a baldness cure?!! ??? ::)

In keeping with the topic;I suppose one could say that Henry Cowell is a 'Marmite' composer?!! ::) :D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
« Reply #89 on: November 30, 2021, 12:38:24 PM »
I thought that the rather unpopular (on this site anyway) HC deserved a bump-up (or to be awakened from hibernation). Today I have been greatly enjoying his 5th Symphony once again. Its opening rather reminded me of William Schuman's 'New England Triptych'. Douglas Moore's powerful and brooding 'In Memoriam' was a fine discovery and I have always enjoyed Dello Joio's 'Meditations on Ecclesiastes':
« Last Edit: November 30, 2021, 12:41:36 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).