Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers

Started by vandermolen, July 13, 2008, 02:43:48 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Cato

#680
Quote from: Florestan on February 24, 2024, 04:18:31 AMExactly, but once again, if one can't read Russian one can't know that. I strongly suspect this is the case here.


Yes, and I do not believe "pretending" not to know Cyrillic script and Russian is necessarily involved.  The person is most probably much more concerned about the music s/he hears, and ignores everything else as irrelevant.

It might be time to revisit Cassandra by Vladimir Tarnopolski!


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Roy Bland


Roy Bland


T. D.

Quote from: Florestan on February 24, 2024, 04:18:31 AMExactly, but once again, if one can't read Russian one can't know that. I strongly suspect this is the case here.


It is clear from his many past posts, and the very nature of the links that he constantly provides, that he can read Russian to a significant degree. Definitely more than I can. I am merely familiar with Cyrillic alphabet but can easily make out the address / nature of the Sevastopol concert.

OTOH, the ignore list is always an option.

AnotherSpin


I think that the author of the latest posts not only understands the alphabet, but also the Russian language. I also think that many of the posts are inspired by Kremlin chauvinistic propaganda. For example, the recent mention of Kabardino-Balkaria. A small Islamic country in the Caucasus, whose population was deported almost entirely by Stalin and brought to the brink of extinction by Putin. Attributing Kabardino-Balkaria music to Russian/Soviet is insulting to say the least. The same with Tuva. Buddhist State of Turkich origin, annexed by USSR during WWII.

Roy Bland


Roy Bland


Roy Bland

#687

Roy Bland


 March 17, 2024, in the «Rachmaninov» Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, the Moscow solo ensemble «Studio of New music

Francesco B.Pratella: Sonata for viola and piano (1921)
•Antonio Russolo: «The bells of San Marco» for organ (1914)
•Arthur Lurie: «Sintesi» («Синтезы», 1914, arranged for ensemble by F.Karaev)
•Joseph Holbrook: 4 futuristic dances for piano (1914)
•Mikhail Matyushin: Composition in quarter tones for violin and piano (1923)
•Aleksandr Mossolov: «Factory. Music of the Machines» («Завод. Музыка машин», 1928, arranged for the ensemble by E. Denisov).
•Vladimir Deshevov: «Rails» («Рельсы», 1926, arranged for ensemble by V.Soifer)
•Aleksandr Khubejev: Intonarumori for ensemble (2011)

Roy Bland

Ippolitov Ivanov "Asia" opera  composed in 1900

Roy Bland


Florestan

Quote from: Roy Bland on April 26, 2024, 06:20:40 PMOn moldavian music

http://www.cnaa.md/files/theses/2016/23979/elena_mironenco_abstract.pdf

Wrong thread. Moldavians are not Russians but Romanians. The very text you linked to is written in Romanian.
When I'm creating at the piano, I tend to feel happy; but - the eternal dilemma - how can we be happy amid the unhappiness of others? I'd do everything I could to give everyone a moment of happiness. That's what's at the heart of my music. — Nino Rota

Roy Bland

#692
I submit to moderation and respectfully point out that most of the works regard the period before 1992 when Moldova was part of the USSR and had not still been annexed to Romania so much so that on the previous page we talk about eduard lazarev,Khachaturian,Lidiya Auster

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Roy Bland on April 27, 2024, 05:37:13 PMI submit to moderation and respectfully point out that most of the works regard the period before 1992 when Moldova was part of the USSR and had not still been annexed to Romania so much so that on the previous page we talk about eduard lazarev,Khachaturian,Lidiya Auster

Your argument may be correct. Until the end of 1991 Moldavia was part of USSR. Unlike some other republics of the former USSR, Moldavia never fought for its independence, only took advantage of the collapse of the USSR. It became independent Moldova Republic after 1991. It was never annexed by Romania. However, the pro-Moscow part of Moldavia along the Dniester River also declared its own independence after the short war with central Moldovan government in the early 1990s.

Roy Bland

Music Festival in Petersburg

The central concert – «Leningrad Ice Cream» («Ленинградский пломбир» «Leningrad Ice Cream») - will take place on May 15, 2024 in the Great Hall of the Philharmonic. Symphonic music will be performed there: Andrei Petrov's «Fanfare», Boris Tishchenko's Eighth Symphony (this is an anniversary offering: the composer's 85th birthday will be celebrated in 2024) and the concert « Spring" by Serghej Slonimskij for violin and orchestra. Works by Svetlana Lavrova and Anton Tanonov, artistic director of the show, will also be performed

Roy Bland

#695
Vladimir Petrenko (1927—2013)  Piano Concerto


and Tatar opera
https://uzgaresh.kazan-opera.ru/audio/