Author Topic: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers  (Read 96571 times)

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Offline pjme

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #360 on: April 19, 2020, 09:22:41 AM »


Without the glasses ....!

http://www.yuributsko.com/en/

Alas, this website seems to be "under construction" forever.



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/bIlGzwEyuK0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/bIlGzwEyuK0</a>
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 09:46:29 AM by pjme »

Offline relm1

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #361 on: April 19, 2020, 03:18:22 PM »


Without the glasses ....!

http://www.yuributsko.com/en/

Alas, this website seems to be "under construction" forever.



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/bIlGzwEyuK0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/bIlGzwEyuK0</a>

lol, what a non website.  Your post had more information about him than his website but I very much enjoyed the music sampler on the youtube clip.  I would like to hear/know more but sadly his website isn't the place to go.

EDIT: My bad, the Russian version of the site is far more complete, it was only the English version that was lacking.  I am intrigued and would love to hear more.  Here is his work list translated from his Russian site: 

Operas
“Notes of a Madman” (by N.V. Gogol, 1964)
“White Nights” (according to F. M. Dostoevsky, 1968)
“From the artist’s letters” (according to K. A. Korovin, 1974)
“Venediktov, or the Golden Triangle” (according to A. V. Chayanov, 1983)
Ballet
"Insight" (1974)
Cantatas and oratorios
Cantata No. 1 "Evening" (on folklore texts, 1961)
Cantata No. 3 “Wedding Songs” (to folklore texts, 1970)
Cantata No. 4 “Mayakovsky for Children” (1968)
Cantata No. 5 “Four Ancient Chants” (to the texts of Russian spiritual verses, 1969)
Cantata No. 6 “Liturgical hymn” (to liturgical Orthodox texts, 1982)
Cantata No. 7 “Metamorphoses” (to the French texts by B. de Dardel, 1986)
Canon to the Terrible (to the texts of the letters of Ivan the Terrible, 2009)
Oratorio No. 1 “The Legend of the Pugachevsky Revolt” (to folk texts and A. S. Pushkin, 1970)
Oratorio No. 2 “Pesnoslov” (to verses by N. A. Klyuyev, 2003)
For a large symphony orchestra
Symphonies
Symphony in 4 fragments (No. 2), 1972
Symphony-praises (No. 3, with solo piano), 1976
Recital Symphony (No. 4), 1986
Symphony-Intermezzo (No. 5), 1992
Symphony-Epilogue (No. 6), 1993
Symphony No. 7 (1996)
Symphonies suites
"Old Russian Painting" (1970)
“From Russian Antiquity” (1982)
"Mr. Veliky Novgorod" (1987)
“People’s Russia for the sake of Christ” (1992)
The Voice of the Far Outskirts (1993)
Musical scenes (based on “Lysistrata” by Aristophanes, 2009)
For chamber orchestra
Symphony for Strings (1965)
Chamber symphonies
Number 1 "Solemn Chant" (1973)
No. 2 "Ode to the memory of the victims of the Revolution" (1983)
No. 3 “Spiritual Verse” (1982)
Concert Symphony “Letters without an Address” (with solo violas and violin, 2000)
Transfiguration Concert Symphony (with solo violin and viola, 2001)
Concert Symphony “Spring Motives” (2005)
Liturgical Music (2007)
Concert Symphony “Silence of Autumn” (2008)
Concerts for solo instruments with orchestra
Concertino for Piano and Chamber Orchestra (1963)
“Epitaph” (Concerto No. 1 for violin and orchestra, 1975)
“Crying” (Concerto No. 2 for violin and orchestra, 1982)
Concerto No. 3 for violin and orchestra (1997)
Eclogue (Concerto No. 1 for viola and orchestra, 1989)
Concert No. 2 for viola and chamber orchestra (2001)
Concerto No. 1 for cello and orchestra (1968)
“Reacher” (Concerto No. 2 for cello and orchestra, 1979)
Invitation to the Waltz (Concert for String Orchestra, 1996)
Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra (2004)
Concerto No. 4 for violin and orchestra (2005)
Chamber Instrumental Works
Trio Quintet “Es muss sein” for strings and piano (1970)
Piano Trio No. 1 (1972)
Polyphonic concerto for 4 keyboard instruments (1972)
Sonata No. 1 for two pianos (1974)
Sonata No. 2 for two pianos (1974)
Sonata No. 1 for violin and piano (1975)
String Quartet No. 1 (1975)
Sonata for Viola and Piano (1976)
String Quartet No. 2 (1979)
String Quartet No. 3 (1982)
String Quartet No. 4 (1983)
Piano Trio No. 2 “The Path Towards” (1994)
Piano Trio No. 3 “From the Days of My Youth” (2002)
String Quartet No. 5
String Quartet No. 6
String Quartet No. 7
Piano Trio No. 4 “Desert Angel”
For piano
Partita (1965)
Pastorales, a series of plays (1966)
Sonata in 4 Fragments (1972)
“From the diary”, a series of plays (1990-2007)
For organ
Prelude, praises and postludes (1968)
Polyphonic variations on an old Russian theme (1974)
Large organ notebook (2003; dedicated to L. B. Shishkhanova)
Second Large Organ Notebook: Russian Images, Pictures, Tales, There were Nebylitsy (2010; dedicated to M.N. Cheburkina)
Vocal cycles
6 scenes to verses from the poem by A. A. Blok “The Twelve” for bass and piano (1957-1962)
“Loneliness” to verses by V. F. Khodasevich for baritone and piano (1966)
Compositions for a cappella choir
6 female choirs (for folk texts, 1968)
“Travel complaints” (to verses by A. S. Pushkin, 1990)
Music for the cinema
1968 - The Young Lady and the Hooligan
1968 - "First Love"
1970 - “Russia in its Icon” (documentary)
1971 - "Old Russian Painting" (documentary)
1971 - "These are different, different, different faces ..."
1975 - "Poshekhonskaya antiquity"
1977 - "Going through the agony" (TV series)
1977 - "Call me to the far light"
1982 - The Examiner (film production)
1984 - "Mr. Veliky Novgorod"
1985 - Shores in the Fog
1988 - Walking People
1991 - "The place of the killer is vacant ..."
1991 - "Mashenka"
1991 - "Ivan Fedorov"
1992 - The Breakthrough
1995 - “Under the Sign of Scorpio”
Other works
Theater music
Music for audio performances for children (10 phonograph records of the company “Melody”)
Instrumentation of works by Russian classics for large and chamber orchestras (Mussorgsky, Rachmaninov, Glazunov, Lyadov)
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 03:30:08 PM by relm1 »

Offline Cato

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #362 on: April 19, 2020, 03:44:00 PM »
YouTube offers the Butsko Symphony #4:


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/DM8Q33snlxE" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/DM8Q33snlxE</a>
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Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #363 on: April 19, 2020, 09:45:09 PM »
I've enjoyed hearing some Butsko and wish that some of his symphonies were on CD.

Another symphony I have enjoyed is the No.1 by Andria Balanchivadze (Georgian composer 1906-1992):

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2Hy_wQNjO7Q

At the beginning it sounds a bit 'Socialist-Realist Crash-Bang-Wallop' but I found myself more engrossed in it as it progressed and became, IMO, a rather deeper and more interesting work.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 09:48:07 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pjme

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #364 on: April 19, 2020, 10:07:19 PM »
From one of my earlier posts on Butsko:

There's more Butsko on YT - albeit often in older recordings.

Symphony nr.3 : https://youtu.be/E_l2kLmVJYo
Symphony nr 4 : https://youtu.be/DM8Q33snlxE
Symphony nr 5 : https://youtu.be/SfoCapHkf9w
Symphony -suite "Old Russian paintings" : https://youtu.be/5ccxYccZLw0
Symphony- suite nr . 2: https://youtu.be/wIqhrQHXAW8
Canon to the Guardian Angel : https://youtu.be/1444GDE8spo

The "Wedding songs" cantata, an early work, is very reminiscent of Stravinsky's Svadebka.
https://youtu.be/ozqRGtUZU24
YT has also some organ music :
https://youtu.be/9iLzCvgDJ3Y

Chamber music : pianotrio nr 4
https://youtu.be/B_U6Yc3T8QI
Remembrance concert in 2016 - a year after his death. 30 long minutes, but I'll blame it on the performance....

Apparently he has still his admirers in Russia - fortunately! A fascinating composer with a huge (thus uneven...) catalogue. I think he's in heaven,singing the Lord's praises  with Wojciech Kilar, Olivier Messiaen, Andrzej Panufnik, Penderecki and other mystics...
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 10:35:28 PM by pjme »

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #365 on: April 20, 2020, 12:40:13 AM »
From one of my earlier posts on Butsko:

There's more Butsko on YT - albeit often in older recordings.

Symphony nr.3 : https://youtu.be/E_l2kLmVJYo
Symphony nr 4 : https://youtu.be/DM8Q33snlxE
Symphony nr 5 : https://youtu.be/SfoCapHkf9w
Symphony -suite "Old Russian paintings" : https://youtu.be/5ccxYccZLw0
Symphony- suite nr . 2: https://youtu.be/wIqhrQHXAW8
Canon to the Guardian Angel : https://youtu.be/1444GDE8spo

The "Wedding songs" cantata, an early work, is very reminiscent of Stravinsky's Svadebka.
https://youtu.be/ozqRGtUZU24
YT has also some organ music :
https://youtu.be/9iLzCvgDJ3Y

Chamber music : pianotrio nr 4
https://youtu.be/B_U6Yc3T8QI
Remembrance concert in 2016 - a year after his death. 30 long minutes, but I'll blame it on the performance....

Apparently he has still his admirers in Russia - fortunately! A fascinating composer with a huge (thus uneven...) catalogue. I think he's in heaven,singing the Lord's praises  with Wojciech Kilar, Olivier Messiaen, Andrzej Panufnik, Penderecki and other mystics...
Which are your favourites of his works?
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pjme

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #366 on: April 20, 2020, 01:20:57 AM »
Definitely the third Symphony-suite "Lord Novgorod the Great", with chorus and alto solo.
Movements:
I. Вьюн над водой: (Плач) ....(shout or cry)
II. Ах вы, ветры: (Причитание) .....(lament or elegy)
III. Слава: (Величальная) ......(cheering or joy, glory)

I suppose it is some kind of ode to Novgorod. But as there is very little up to date info in English  on the works by Butsko , I can only guess.
I will listen again to the symphonies.
It is the unusual, strange, baffling mix of styles that intrigues me.

 

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #367 on: April 20, 2020, 08:44:03 PM »
Definitely the third Symphony-suite "Lord Novgorod the Great", with chorus and alto solo.
Movements:
I. Вьюн над водой: (Плач) ....(shout or cry)
II. Ах вы, ветры: (Причитание) .....(lament or elegy)
III. Слава: (Величальная) ......(cheering or joy, glory)

I suppose it is some kind of ode to Novgorod. But as there is very little up to date info in English  on the works by Butsko , I can only guess.
I will listen again to the symphonies.
It is the unusual, strange, baffling mix of styles that intrigues me.
Thanks for introducing us to his music. It is certainly worth exploring IMO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pjme

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #368 on: April 20, 2020, 10:45:09 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/T7WnpUWVMgQ" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/T7WnpUWVMgQ</a>

For those interested in contemporary Russian music do visit Composer /pianist/conductor Mikhail Kollontay's You Tube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/user/poi2uytr
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Kollontay

"I, undersigned Mikhail Kollontay declare
all my works of art to be in public domain
and free for any use as long
as they carry my name on it.
I shall not require any special permissions
nor royalties of any kind to me,
my family or my estate.
I shall however require my direct participation
in the rehearsal process of every composition
as long as I am alive. If this requirement
is not satisfied, then it will be left to God’s judgment.
M. Kollontay
February 6, 2017"


« Last Edit: April 20, 2020, 11:01:43 PM by pjme »

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #369 on: April 22, 2020, 01:06:02 AM »
Currently listening to the quite beautiful and consoling 'Songs of the Mountain and Meadow Mari':

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline The new erato

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #370 on: April 22, 2020, 02:30:22 AM »
Russian Composer Alexander Vustin is dead from Corona. He was Composer in Residence at last years Rosendal Chamber Music festival.

Offline pjme

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #371 on: April 22, 2020, 03:38:41 AM »
Currently listening to the quite beautiful and consoling 'Songs of the Mountain and Meadow Mari':


I have this disc and am listening.
"The songs of the mountain and the meadow Mari" is really lovely, at moments almost Vaughan Williams like in some sweet string writing, the last rythmical section is vaguely reminiscent of Honegger/Martinu.
Scored for strings, 4 horns, solo flute, harp, celesta and timpani. Schirmer gives the title as "The Songs of the People in Mountains and Mari Meadows, Symphonic Pictures" which is more accurate, I think, since Eshpai uses seven Mari folksongs.


Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #372 on: April 22, 2020, 04:05:40 AM »
I have this disc and am listening.
"The songs of the mountain and the meadow Mari" is really lovely, at moments almost Vaughan Williams like in some sweet string writing, the last rythmical section is vaguely reminiscent of Honegger/Martinu.
Scored for strings, 4 horns, solo flute, harp, celesta and timpani. Schirmer gives the title as "The Songs of the People in Mountains and Mari Meadows, Symphonic Pictures" which is more accurate, I think, since Eshpai uses seven Mari folksongs.

Am pleased that you like it too.
I think that you're right about the VW/Honegger/Martinu echoes - they are three of my favourite composers. Certainly the Tallis Fantasia came to mind at one point, although the emotion is more overt with Eshpai I think.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #373 on: April 22, 2020, 04:56:43 AM »
Russian Composer Alexander Vustin is dead from Corona. He was Composer in Residence at last years Rosendal Chamber Music festival.
Don't know his music but sorry to hear that.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #374 on: April 22, 2020, 08:39:13 PM »
A strong recommendation for this CD, my favourite of the Eshpai symphonies.
No.5 quotes German marching themes of WW2 in the manner of Shostakovich's 7th Symphony.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #375 on: April 23, 2020, 05:52:52 AM »
I have not heard Eshpai's 5th. The 3rd, I find a most moving symphony as the whole work is built around his father, Yakov Eshpai. A motif is borrowed from a work composed by his father and the symphony closes with a coda symbolising a minute of silence.
A Melodiya LP with Fuat Mansurov directing Orchestra of Moscow Radio. The R/S Ivanov conducting the 1st.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2020, 05:55:22 AM by Irons »
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #376 on: April 23, 2020, 08:07:47 AM »
I have not heard Eshpai's 5th. The 3rd, I find a most moving symphony as the whole work is built around his father, Yakov Eshpai. A motif is borrowed from a work composed by his father and the symphony closes with a coda symbolising a minute of silence.
A Melodiya LP with Fuat Mansurov directing Orchestra of Moscow Radio. The R/S Ivanov conducting the 1st.
Sounds very interesting Lol. Pity there is no CD. I think you'd like the Russian Disc CD featuring symphonies 4 and 5 as well as 'The Songs of the Mountain and Meadow Mari'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #377 on: April 23, 2020, 08:44:36 AM »
Concerning Alexander Vustin: this would seem appropriate.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/hJtiaU3lcTs" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/hJtiaU3lcTs</a>
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Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #378 on: April 23, 2020, 02:19:01 PM »
IMHO better Eshpai's symphonies are n°2 and 4 (far superior at ballet "Circle" that ispired it).A modern recording of "Angara" would be  highly appropriate.

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #379 on: April 23, 2020, 09:55:35 PM »
IMHO better Eshpai's symphonies are n°2 and 4 (far superior at ballet "Circle" that ispired it).A modern recording of "Angara" would be  highly appropriate.
Interesting to know. I haven't heard No.2 in ages so will lookout for my CD. 4 is very good but 5 is my favourite. I've actually enjoyed them all and the Flute and Violin Concerto.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).