Author Topic: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers  (Read 96578 times)

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Offline Irons

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #380 on: April 23, 2020, 10:35:32 PM »
Interesting to know. I haven't heard No.2 in ages so will lookout for my CD. 4 is very good but 5 is my favourite. I've actually enjoyed them all and the Flute and Violin Concerto.

I have the violin concerto which is coupled with his sonata for the same instrument. A programming I like and wish occurred more often.

Inspired by thread I listened to Eshpai's 3rd last night. I found the work a mix of the traditional and modern, a foot in both camps.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline hvbias

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #381 on: April 25, 2020, 11:42:10 AM »
Any suggestions for really great CDs of Stanchinsky's piano music? Thank you.

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #382 on: July 28, 2020, 05:56:32 PM »
A major addiction : Ikarus IMHO is one finest work by Slonimsky

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #383 on: July 28, 2020, 06:00:53 PM »
A major addiction : Ikarus IMHO is one finest work by Slonimsky

Interesting. I think that 'Icarus' ('Icare') is the finest work I have heard composed by the conductor Igor Markevitch:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #384 on: July 28, 2020, 06:34:18 PM »
Interesting. I think that 'Icarus' ('Icare') is the finest work I have heard composed by the conductor Igor Markevitch:

I have to correct also Slonimsky composed a ballet on Ikarus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP9uCerxSrY

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #385 on: July 29, 2020, 02:01:37 AM »
I have to correct also Slonimsky composed a ballet on Ikarus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP9uCerxSrY
I think that there are probably different ways of spelling it. I was not intending to correct you at all.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #386 on: December 31, 2020, 04:30:53 PM »
The soviet Georgian composer Nektarios Chargeishvili (5 September 1937 – 14 November 1971), a 34-young Virgo wrote what, I consider, a ultra-stormy-cataclysmic wallow alla Russian Steppes! Now, THIS IS major stuff! How this composer has been passed unnoticed for so long is a crime. cilgwyn would explode by the wrath-mood-feeling of this epic and hair-rising symphony provokes!! Not only the orchestration is superbly done, but also the rhythmic vitality. I haven't hear anything as exciting as, say, Holmboe's Symphony No. 8 or Myaskovsky's Symphony No. 22. It, uncannily, finishes with an apparent calm mood, after so violent and insane music there is here.

Another composer it reminded of was the Bulgarian Emil Tabakov. Yet another creator of breathtakingly angry and hard-rhythmical symphonies and concertos, chiefly.

If you get enjoyment from Myaskovsky, Khachaturian, Shostakovich, don't miss this. No doubt here there are some of the most exciting climaxes in the Soviet symphonic literature. I mean, not apt for heart-suffering listeners!   :D :P

My last important discovery of this doom-laden-like year 2020 (?) (still to me).

BTW, this has been the year I've discovered and reassessed or reevaluated more stuff than ever. Rather fruitful in the end.

This performance had to be ultra exciting to attend. A real event for a music listener.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/O9i02ussewA" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/O9i02ussewA</a>

This info is taken from Wiki. Despite his age, a significantly prolific man he was.


Orchestral works

Scherzo for Orchestra (1957)
Suite for Orchestra (1957)
The Return of the Prodigal Son (1967)
Concerto No. 1 for chamber orchestra with cymbal (1959)
Concerto for orchestra (1960)
Concerto No. 2 for chamber orchestra (1962)
The absence of Dobrynya (1963)
Symphonic poem by Kirsch Danilov (1965)
Dobrynia subdued the Chubis (чудь покорил) (1965)
Concerto for violin and orchestra (1966)
Suite for string orchestra in memory of C. Monteverdi (1967)
Symphony (1971)


Film music

I bought a dad (1962)
The Secret to Success (1962)
Dimka (1963)
The Traveler with Luggage (1965)
I loved you (1968)
In the country of unlearned lessons (1969)
« Last Edit: January 01, 2021, 08:33:48 PM by Symphonic Addict »
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline André

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #387 on: December 31, 2020, 06:14:31 PM »
An incredible work indeed. Every once in a while it resurfaces at GMG. Too bad there’s never been a commercial release of his music  :-[.

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #388 on: December 31, 2020, 06:31:40 PM »
Another composer it reminded of was the Bulgarian Emil Tabakov. Yet another creator of breathtakingly angry and hard-rhythmical symphonies and concertos, chiefly.

Tabakov is also a strong conductor.IMHO this is the better version of this work:

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #389 on: January 02, 2021, 02:22:33 AM »
A new film about Alexander Mosolov ('Mosolov's Suitcase) is coming out (from an American director). You can see a trailer within this article:
https://www.palmspringslife.com/mosolovs-suitcase/
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #390 on: January 02, 2021, 07:33:02 AM »
A new film about Alexander Mosolov ('Mosolov's Suitcase) is coming out (from an American director). You can see a trailer within this article:
https://www.palmspringslife.com/mosolovs-suitcase/

The one work I want to hear from Mosolov is the complete ballet of Steel (from which the Iron Foundry movement originated), but alas, the the other movements have been lost. :(
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #391 on: January 02, 2021, 09:55:11 AM »
The one work I want to hear from Mosolov is the complete ballet of Steel (from which the Iron Foundry movement originated), but alas, the the other movements have been lost. :(
That's a pity. I really like the new Naxos CD featuring Symphony 5 and the Harp Concerto.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #392 on: January 02, 2021, 10:51:43 AM »
Enjoying Fantasia for Piano and Orchestra by Alexander Ma(t)chavariani, Georgian composer, in New Year's days.

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #393 on: January 02, 2021, 12:51:32 PM »
Tabakov is also a strong conductor.IMHO this is the better version of this work:


You often appear with some unusual and interesting repertoire from record labels I'm not familiar with. I remember that work from this CPO CD:

«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #394 on: January 02, 2021, 04:57:36 PM »
You often appear with some unusual and interesting repertoire from record labels I'm not familiar with. I remember that work from this CPO CD:


I have listened either these discs,Tabakov's is far superion both orchestra and conducting  there is a third cd version with entire ballet
https://www.metropolismusic.rs/ohridska-legenda-balet.6190149.html

Offline André

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #395 on: January 02, 2021, 05:45:40 PM »
Some years ago a friend made me a copy of the Legend of Ohrid disc by Tabakov. What I have is a four movement suite lasting some 40 minutes. Is it all there is on the disc you picture, Roy ?

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #396 on: January 02, 2021, 06:02:58 PM »
The Chargeishvili Symphony certainly is a powerful work.

This from Wikipedia about his life: “After being critical of the Soviet regime, he was dismissed from the Moscow Conservatory. After that, he struggled to find work (he was even denied a job as a bus driver), and his mental health deteriorated. In 1971, he committed suicide by hanging. He is buried in New Athos, Georgia.”

I was reflecting on the intolerance and stupidity of the Soviet regime and then it occurred to me that that in our neo-liberal world a young composer on a similar trajectory probably wouldn’t even have got the conservatory job, because of “higher education reforms”.

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #397 on: January 02, 2021, 08:25:06 PM »
Some years ago a friend made me a copy of the Legend of Ohrid disc by Tabakov. What I have is a four movement suite lasting some 40 minutes. Is it all there is on the disc you picture, Roy ?
Yes it is.Here complete version.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJ4sXX9yBTs
« Last Edit: January 02, 2021, 09:46:42 PM by Roy Bland »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #398 on: January 02, 2021, 09:55:57 PM »
That's a pity. I really like the new Naxos CD featuring Symphony 5 and the Harp Concerto.

Very nice, Jeffrey. Symphony No. 5? I wasn’t aware that Mosolov composed any symphonies aside from a symphony that appeared on the Northern Flowers label.
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers
« Reply #399 on: January 03, 2021, 01:05:32 AM »
The Chargeishvili Symphony certainly is a powerful work.

This from Wikipedia about his life: “After being critical of the Soviet regime, he was dismissed from the Moscow Conservatory. After that, he struggled to find work (he was even denied a job as a bus driver), and his mental health deteriorated. In 1971, he committed suicide by hanging. He is buried in New Athos, Georgia.”

I was reflecting on the intolerance and stupidity of the Soviet regime and then it occurred to me that that in our neo-liberal world a young composer on a similar trajectory probably wouldn’t even have got the conservatory job, because of “higher education reforms”.
How terribly sad.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).