Lesser known Russian/Soviet composers

Started by vandermolen, July 13, 2008, 02:43:48 PM

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relm1

#620
Quote from: relm1 on July 24, 2023, 05:29:36 AMThis evening, I'll give this a listen.  While definitely not a lesser known composer, his Symphony No. 3 is very hit or miss.  I am not familiar with the piano concerto.



The Symphony No. 3 is a weak work.  I've just heard the Kondrashin which is probably the best but also the Stowkowski (the worst), the Glushchenko is a good middle road version.  The problem is the material is paper thin.  It is the worst part of Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture made five times longer and getting rid of anything good in that work.  This would make very bad film music.  The Kondrashin was very earnest but that doesn't overcome the mediocrity of the piece but what is most perplexing is the composer is much better than this.  There are bad performances of good works but with Kondrashin, I hear an excellent performance of a bad work.  The piano concerto was much more enjoyable.  I don't think I've ever heard a composer phone it in more than Khachaturian in this work...and I have a very high tolerance for pain. 

Symphonic Addict

I haven't heard the Kondrashin performance of that work yet. Glushchenko is my go-to, but yes, this is not a work I'm crazy about either. The first two symphonies do interest me a lot, so do the concertos and the rhapsodies-concertos to some extent.
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Cato

Concerning Khachaturian:

Quote from: relm1 on July 24, 2023, 04:17:01 PMThe Symphony No. 3 is a weak work.  I've just heard the Kondrashin which is probably the best but also the Stokowski (the worst)....  This would make very bad film music. 


I heard Stokowski's performance (I believe it was the world-premiere) when it appeared c. 50 years ago: bombastic and hilarious!

Yes, the exotic, syrupy, Central Asian main theme is straight from a cheap Arabian Nights movie from Monogram Studios. ;D
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relm1

Quote from: Cato on July 24, 2023, 06:28:46 PMConcerning Khachaturian:

I heard Stokowski's performance (I believe it was the world-premiere) when it appeared c. 50 years ago: bombastic and hilarious!

Yes, the exotic, syrupy, Central Asian main theme is straight from a cheap Arabian Nights movie from Monogram Studios. ;D

I probably went too far by saying this is bad film music but listening yesterday left me with a splitting headache that is 100% because of this music.  I love bombast when done right.  Example: Scriabin Poem of Ecstasy is a real joy ride and takes the listener on a magical and mystical journey.  That is not the case with Khachaturian's Symphony No. 3.  It's a lot of B and C material repeated very loudly forever.

Roy Bland


T. D.

#625
Quote from: Roy Bland on October 08, 2023, 06:04:22 PMPremiere of complete version "Master and Margarite" by Slonimsky
https://muzobozrenie.ru/master-i-margarita-sergeya-slonimskogo-premera-v-samare-6-8-oktyabrya-2023/

Thanks for posting this. I have the Bortko film on DVD(s).

vandermolen

I rather like Khachaturian's 3rd Symphony. I remember the writer David Fanning saying that it had a 'ghastly appeal' like those Red Square gymnastic displays of the Soviet era. The organ goes very 'Dr Phibes' but I rather like that. I like the recordings by Stokowski and Glushchenko.
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relm1


Roy Bland

#628
Soviet war movies soundtrack concerto

Roy Bland


lordlance

Revisiting this thread and I would like to add more Soviet-era symphonists than those found here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6zutgHUwTqJgnAxmiRlgH7?si=4ce8152ee09945e5

As always: Generally swifter, harsh/abrasive can be fine, don't really reciprocate to lyrical/slow music (only gets a shrug from me). Shostakovich's martial music could be an example. Propulsive music.
If you are interested in listening to orchestrations of solo/chamber music, you might be interested in this thread.
Also looking for recommendations on neglected conductors thread.

Roy Bland


Maestro267

Quote from: lordlance on November 14, 2023, 09:01:08 AMRevisiting this thread and I would like to add more Soviet-era symphonists than those found here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6zutgHUwTqJgnAxmiRlgH7?si=4ce8152ee09945e5

As always: Generally swifter, harsh/abrasive can be fine, don't really reciprocate to lyrical/slow music (only gets a shrug from me). Shostakovich's martial music could be an example. Propulsive music.


Hardly anything on here at all so I'm just going to recommend Aram Khachaturian's three symphonies (especially No. 3 (with organ and *fifteen extra trumpets*) if you want utter bombastic music that's peak Soviet). Also Boris Tishchenko's symphonies if you want something a little more lesser-known.

lordlance

#633
Quote from: Maestro267 on November 15, 2023, 01:57:49 AMHardly anything on here at all so I'm just going to recommend Aram Khachaturian's three symphonies (especially No. 3 (with organ and *fifteen extra trumpets*) if you want utter bombastic music that's peak Soviet). Also Boris Tishchenko's symphonies if you want something a little more lesser-known.

I was actually referring to replies to an earlier post of mine where I asked for specific recs. Those were all added to the playlist. I think it's better to get curated picks as opposed to just going through all recommendations which might be stylistically very different than what I enjoy. Do you have a specific Tischenko symphony you recommend?

(I am aware of Khatachaturian. I think it was the 2nd or 3rd I really liked.)
If you are interested in listening to orchestrations of solo/chamber music, you might be interested in this thread.
Also looking for recommendations on neglected conductors thread.

Roy Bland



Piano Music for Children by S. Prokofiev, G. Sviridov and S. FEINBERG" performed by SAORI TESHIMA, talented Japanese pianist

Roy Bland


Roy Bland

#636
Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on July 17, 2023, 11:51:23 PM@Roy Bland

Hi Roy,

We're curious as to how you heard about this recording and what you can tell us about it.  As in, what label it's on.  Who are the musicians involved?  Have you heard it and if so what can you tell us about it--like the text, etc.  AnotherSpin thinks that it's by Yuri Falik and it's listed in Wiki that he wrote a work with this title and the date also seems to fit.

Best,

PD
This is all i know about it
https://kansalliskirjasto.finna.fi/kansalliskirjastofikka/Record/fikka.5360779

Roy Bland


dhibbard

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10_8ozpBA0Y&t=6s

Lydia Auster Piano Concerto.

LYDIA AUSTER
May 30, 1912 Petropavlovsk, Kazakhstan – April 3,1993 Tallinn

Lydia Auster studied piano in Omsk Music School in 1927–1931 with L. Shcherbakova and composition with M. Nevitov. In 1931–1934, she studied composition in Leningrad Conservatoire with Mikhail Judin. In 1938, she graduated from the Moscow Conservatoire with a degree in composition with Vissarion Shebalin, and continued postgraduate studies in 1938–1941 and 1944–1945.

Lydia Auster has worked as a pianist with Omsk Radio Sinfonietta and as a cinema pianist. In 1941–1943, she was working as a composer with Ashgabat Philharmonic Orchestra. From 1943 to 1944, Auster was the chief editor of music broadcasts in Turkmenistan Radio, in 1948–1984, she was the music director of Estonian SSR Television and Radio Committee. Between 1950 and 1989, Auster was the chairman of USSR Music Foundation's Estonian Republic Department. Lydia Auster has been a board member of Estonian Composers' Union as well as Estonian Department of USSR – Czechoslovakia Friendship Society. In 1957, Auster received the honorary title of Estonian SSR Merited Art Worker and in 1984, the title of People's Artist of the Estonian SSR.

Lydia Auster's oeuvre is versatile in genre, she has written orchestral and stage works, including 4 ballets and a short opera, as well as solo songs and instrumental chamber music. Her music has poetic expression and a strong connection with folk music.
Her ballet Tiina (1955) has been staged in theatre Estonia in Tallinn and theatre Vanemuine in Tartu, also in Vilnius and Olomouc, Czech Republic. Her ballet Northen Dream (1960) has been staged in theatre Estonia and in Vilnius, Lithuania. Her orchestral works have been conducted by such conductors as Rostislav Merkulov, Kirill Raudsepp, Roman Matsov, Vallo Järvi, Erich Järvi, Aleksander Rjabov, Neeme Järvi and Eri Klas. Her music for winds has been often played by Jaan Tamm Wind Quintet.

dhibbard

Quote from: dhibbard on November 24, 2023, 12:36:31 PMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10_8ozpBA0Y&t=6s

Lydia Auster Piano Concerto.

LYDIA AUSTER
May 30, 1912 Petropavlovsk, Kazakhstan – April 3,1993 Tallinn

Lydia Auster studied piano in Omsk Music School in 1927–1931 with L. Shcherbakova and composition with M. Nevitov. In 1931–1934, she studied composition in Leningrad Conservatoire with Mikhail Judin. In 1938, she graduated from the Moscow Conservatoire with a degree in composition with Vissarion Shebalin, and continued postgraduate studies in 1938–1941 and 1944–1945.

Lydia Auster has worked as a pianist with Omsk Radio Sinfonietta and as a cinema pianist. In 1941–1943, she was working as a composer with Ashgabat Philharmonic Orchestra. From 1943 to 1944, Auster was the chief editor of music broadcasts in Turkmenistan Radio, in 1948–1984, she was the music director of Estonian SSR Television and Radio Committee. Between 1950 and 1989, Auster was the chairman of USSR Music Foundation's Estonian Republic Department. Lydia Auster has been a board member of Estonian Composers' Union as well as Estonian Department of USSR – Czechoslovakia Friendship Society. In 1957, Auster received the honorary title of Estonian SSR Merited Art Worker and in 1984, the title of People's Artist of the Estonian SSR.

Lydia Auster's oeuvre is versatile in genre, she has written orchestral and stage works, including 4 ballets and a short opera, as well as solo songs and instrumental chamber music. Her music has poetic expression and a strong connection with folk music.
Her ballet Tiina (1955) has been staged in theatre Estonia in Tallinn and theatre Vanemuine in Tartu, also in Vilnius and Olomouc, Czech Republic. Her ballet Northen Dream (1960) has been staged in theatre Estonia and in Vilnius, Lithuania. Her orchestral works have been conducted by such conductors as Rostislav Merkulov, Kirill Raudsepp, Roman Matsov, Vallo Järvi, Erich Järvi, Aleksander Rjabov, Neeme Järvi and Eri Klas. Her music for winds has been often played by Jaan Tamm Wind Quintet.

https://www.google.com/search?sca_esv=585133162&rlz=1C1VDKB_enUS992US992&tbm=vid&sxsrf=AM9HkKk58lKT73nwzTKLg-NDddcdEkS1iQ:1700861851576&q=Tiina+lydia+auster&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjrh-aTzN2CAxUzkGoFHeKOA78Q8ccDegQIERAJ&biw=1536&bih=707&dpr=1.25#fpstate=ive&vld=cid:d2cf1093,vid:uZo6OFO4ezw,st:0