Author Topic: Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon  (Read 224371 times)

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Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon
« Reply #1680 on: June 06, 2021, 06:49:22 AM »
I've been deeply impressed by returning to hearing Prokofiev's symphonies this last week after quite an absence. I picked up the Schipperges biography for £1 at a second hand book store along with Simpson's two paperbacks on The Symphony, Tawaststjerna's second volume of Sibelius translated by Layton, and Alma Mahler on the man himself, all for 50p each. I also had Mahler Rembered by Lebrecht for £1, but I hear he isn't so popular round here.

The Prokofiev is a great read for a novice. The draw of 'home' described there is quite a thing, despite the imperfections that home brings. Anyway, despite not always being so able to discern all of the differences between symphony cycles that many here can describe at length, I've found a real immediacy in the Dmitrij Kitajenko renderings that is less noticeable in the Gergiev and Jarvi that I began with. I've been able to thoroughly enjoy 6, 3, and 7 more than ever with this set of performances. 2 is an 'edge of the seat' experience.

Apologies for rambling, but it's been immensely positive.

My fav cycle. The Litton recordings are good too.

Online k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon
« Reply #1681 on: June 06, 2021, 08:37:53 AM »
I've been deeply impressed by returning to hearing Prokofiev's symphonies this last week after quite an absence. I picked up the Schipperges biography for £1 at a second hand book store along with Simpson's two paperbacks on The Symphony, Tawaststjerna's second volume of Sibelius translated by Layton, and Alma Mahler on the man himself, all for 50p each. I also had Mahler Rembered by Lebrecht for £1, but I hear he isn't so popular round here.

The Prokofiev is a great read for a novice. The draw of 'home' described there is quite a thing, despite the imperfections that home brings. Anyway, despite not always being so able to discern all of the differences between symphony cycles that many here can describe at length, I've found a real immediacy in the Dmitrij Kitajenko renderings that is less noticeable in the Gergiev and Jarvi that I began with. I've been able to thoroughly enjoy 6, 3, and 7 more than ever with this set of performances. 2 is an 'edge of the seat' experience.

Apologies for rambling, but it's been immensely positive.

Excellent, and I do like the Kitajenko set.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon
« Reply #1682 on: June 08, 2021, 07:01:07 AM »
I've been deeply impressed by returning to hearing Prokofiev's symphonies this last week after quite an absence. I picked up the Schipperges biography for £1 at a second hand book store along with Simpson's two paperbacks on The Symphony, Tawaststjerna's second volume of Sibelius translated by Layton, and Alma Mahler on the man himself, all for 50p each. I also had Mahler Rembered by Lebrecht for £1, but I hear he isn't so popular round here.

The Prokofiev is a great read for a novice. The draw of 'home' described there is quite a thing, despite the imperfections that home brings. Anyway, despite not always being so able to discern all of the differences between symphony cycles that many here can describe at length, I've found a real immediacy in the Dmitrij Kitajenko renderings that is less noticeable in the Gergiev and Jarvi that I began with. I've been able to thoroughly enjoy 6, 3, and 7 more than ever with this set of performances. 2 is an 'edge of the seat' experience.

Apologies for rambling, but it's been immensely positive.

One thing that’s so fascinating about Prokofiev’s symphonic cycle is how completely different each symphony is from one another. I mean, just look at the difference in style between the first two symphonies!  :D
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon
« Reply #1683 on: June 08, 2021, 08:54:33 AM »
One thing that’s so fascinating about Prokofiev’s symphonic cycle is how completely different each symphony is from one another. I mean, just look at the difference in style between the first two symphonies!  :D

It really is quite a thing. The biography I've been reading speaks of #1 being Haydnesque, with a work in which Haydn 'would retain his own mode of writing, but also assimilate a few new things', and by the time he gets to France and starts #2 in 1924  he's writing 'a Symphony of Iron and Steel, stark and shocking and, above all, modern'.

Fascinating stuff! Am enjoying reading the context of his life and composing. Aside from his own growth and personal influences, what a world in transition.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2021, 08:57:18 AM by foxandpeng »
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