Author Topic: Debussy's Preludes  (Read 54819 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Debussy's Preludes: Hakon Austbo, If You Haven't Tried...
« Reply #200 on: May 12, 2018, 05:03:49 PM »
I have just discovered Hakon Austbo's Simax Debussy. :-* :-* :-* Sound+Performance... as a Standard Issue, this works out-of-the-box for me...

Baron Scarpia

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #201 on: May 13, 2018, 04:18:37 PM »
I've come off my Debussy Preludes burn out and spot listened to a few pieces to reaffirm earlier impressions. Monique Haas on Erato, which I was trying to convince myself I likes, I admit I don't like, at least in the Preludes. But for a brisk, unsentimental version, Thibaudet is superb. For Poetic/spiritual, Arrau.  Must go back to Samson Francois. And must listen to Pollini.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #202 on: May 13, 2018, 11:36:01 PM »
I found an unusual and interesting one recently which people who like Michelangeli's accuracy, timbre and coolth may care to try, it's on spotify. Bruno Canino. It made me wonder whether there really is an Italian style in post war piano playing.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2018, 11:39:04 PM by Mandryka »
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snyprrr

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #203 on: May 14, 2018, 07:30:04 AM »
Martin Jones’ set isn’t even in the lower echelon of great Debussyians for me. He’s never been a pianist I’ve flocked to anyway. When you have pianists like Jacobs, Kocsis, Michelangeli, Bavouzet, Blechacz, Egorov, Cassard, among others, why in the world would I even want to hear any more of Jones’ traversal of Debussy? Then there’s the Nimbus sound --- oh vey.


No, of course I agree, it was an accident. However, he's pretty straightforward in his interpretations, so I could at least hear things somewhat MOR, and he's pretty good with rhythmic outburst/"puckish" bits,... but, yea, he's by no means Transcendental, as I said, it was an accident :-\

Stanislaw Bunin (DG)
Alexis Weissenberg (DG)

These two recitals represent what blows me away in Debussy Piano Playing. I know the latter is controversial, but I was blown away by 'The Snow Is Falling'.

Austbo Vols. 2-3 (Simax)
Kocsis 'Images' CD (Philips)
Beroff 3CD (EMI)
Crossley (SONY)... along with Roge/JYT, so-so,...

And these are the ones I'm coming back to most often for compares. Thankfully, most all Debussy PM recordings are on YT, to make any FinalPurchaseDecision a correct and lasting one!! Can't AFFORD to get into a Debussy War with my pocketbook, and don't want to, either.

I'm getting a little bit better handle on how to look at Debussy, the Piano Master. Who is his heir? Or, is his influence so absorbed by ALL, that finding it is ubiquitous?


Offline Draško

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #204 on: May 14, 2018, 02:36:28 PM »
I found an unusual and interesting one recently which people who like Michelangeli's accuracy, timbre and coolth may care to try, it's on spotify. Bruno Canino. It made me wonder whether there really is an Italian style in post war piano playing.

That is an interesting question. I certainly can hear some similarities in Italian pianists I'm familiar with, like  Michelangeli, Pollini or Piemontesi. They all have in common certain clarity, sharpness of attack, sparser using of pedal (but not dryness as with some older generation French players), but does that constitute a national style is difficult to tell. Perhaps there is some influence across the generations, but sample of pianists I know isn't broad enough to tell with any certainty. It does make me want to hear Zecchi, Ciani, Canino and maybe some more though.

Offline George

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #205 on: May 14, 2018, 05:00:19 PM »
That is an interesting question. I certainly can hear some similarities in Italian pianists I'm familiar with, like  Michelangeli, Pollini or Piemontesi. They all have in common certain clarity, sharpness of attack, sparser using of pedal (but not dryness as with some older generation French players), but does that constitute a national style is difficult to tell. Perhaps there is some influence across the generations, but sample of pianists I know isn't broad enough to tell with any certainty. It does make me want to hear Zecchi, Ciani, Canino and maybe some more though.

Of course, Michelangeli was Pollini's teacher, so that can explain some commonality in their style and approach.
"I can't live without music, because music is life." - Yvonne Lefébure

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #206 on: May 14, 2018, 10:15:41 PM »
That is an interesting question. I certainly can hear some similarities in Italian pianists I'm familiar with, like  Michelangeli, Pollini or Piemontesi. They all have in common certain clarity, sharpness of attack, sparser using of pedal (but not dryness as with some older generation French players), but does that constitute a national style is difficult to tell. Perhaps there is some influence across the generations, but sample of pianists I know isn't broad enough to tell with any certainty. It does make me want to hear Zecchi, Ciani, Canino and maybe some more though.

Who is Zecchi?
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Offline North Star

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #207 on: May 14, 2018, 10:20:39 PM »
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

My photographs on Flickr

Offline milk

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #208 on: July 18, 2018, 01:26:02 AM »

This has garnered raves...

Offline milk

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #209 on: October 14, 2020, 08:50:59 PM »

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #210 on: October 19, 2020, 11:04:06 AM »
Rave review at MusicWeb for an early '50s recording by a pianist I've never heard of before, Hans Henkemans:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2018/May/Debussy_Henkemans_4829490.htm

It's also on the streaming services.

My favorite recording!!  :) :) :)

Offline milk

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #211 on: October 19, 2020, 03:04:52 PM »
My favorite recording!!  :) :) :)
pretty good sound quality!

Offline hvbias

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #212 on: October 20, 2020, 11:45:39 AM »
milk you might like this one:


Offline milk

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #213 on: October 20, 2020, 02:32:23 PM »
milk you might like this one:


OH! On a period instrument! ETA: I had a chance to listen to half of this this morning and come away very impressed. I also had a chance to put on Lubimov for comparison and I find her instrument a bit clearer. Her playing is ravishing; VII, for example is full of misty drama, like a storm. She’s great. I have to research about her. I’m going to go back to Melnikov out of curiosity.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2020, 03:26:32 PM by milk »

Offline hvbias

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #214 on: October 20, 2020, 03:31:47 PM »
OH! On a period instrument! ETA: I had a chance to listen to half of this this morning and come away very impressed. I also had a chance to put on Lubimov for comparison and I find her instrument a bit clearer. Her playing is ravishing; VII, for example is full of misty drama, like a storm. She’s great. I have to research about her. I’m going to go back to Melnikov out of curiosity.

Yeah it's a wonderful sounding instrument and her playing is exceptional; she never hammers away at it trying to get more dynamic range or volume. It has some of Michelangeli's transcendental environnement.

Offline milk

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #215 on: October 21, 2020, 06:24:45 AM »
Yeah it's a wonderful sounding instrument and her playing is exceptional; she never hammers away at it trying to get more dynamic range or volume. It has some of Michelangeli's transcendental environnement.
I’m listening to some of her Bk 2 and it’s still entrancing. I was comparing it to Melnikov’s recording of Bk2 on an old Erard.  Melnikov is great too, but a little more subdued. The piano sound is less roomy, more intimate, and the effect of the playing is more relaxed and less dreamy.
Two great recordings but I’d choose Sasaki if I had to choose one (on period instruments).
Lubimov is another one on a period piano. There’s a little bit of drama missing from his. It doesn’t have the electric of Sasaki.

Offline hvbias

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Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #216 on: October 23, 2020, 06:24:30 AM »
I’m listening to some of her Bk 2 and it’s still entrancing. I was comparing it to Melnikov’s recording of Bk2 on an old Erard.  Melnikov is great too, but a little more subdued. The piano sound is less roomy, more intimate, and the effect of the playing is more relaxed and less dreamy.
Two great recordings but I’d choose Sasaki if I had to choose one (on period instruments).
Lubimov is another one on a period piano. There’s a little bit of drama missing from his. It doesn’t have the electric of Sasaki.

I heard Melnikov when they were rolling out that Debussy anniversary series. Lots of fine releases in that series but IMO Melnikov was one of the more underwhelming ones. He seems to hyper focus on the details when one aspect of the Preludes to achieve that dream like effect is looking at them as a whole.