Streaming Movie Suggestions

Started by ando, October 02, 2023, 02:17:04 PM

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ando

Binged watched this 4 part series several days ago -


Disraeli: Portrait of a Romantic (1978, Claude Whatham)
It dramatizes the rise and triumph of the ambitious, conservative Victorian prime minister. It's a well written series highlighted by a fine portrayal by Ian McShane. Mary Peach as his equally "dizzy" paramour and eventual longtime counterpart is equally as good. Free on the Tube. Recommended.

drogulus

Quote from: ando on January 01, 2024, 09:20:15 AMBinged watched this 4 part series several days ago -


Disraeli: Portrait of a Romantic (1978, Claude Whatham)
It dramatizes the rise and triumph of the ambitious, conservative Victorian prime minister. It's a well written series highlighted by a fine portrayal by Ian McShane. Mary Peach as his equally "dizzy" paramour and eventual longtime counterpart is equally as good. Free on the Tube. Recommended.

     YT widescreens it, which for 1978 British TV is very ungood as it cuts the bottom and top off. Prime shows it in 4:3. Either way it actually looks pretty decent given its age.
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ando

Quote from: drogulus on January 01, 2024, 01:56:29 PMYT widescreens it, which for 1978 British TV is very ungood as it cuts the bottom and top off. Prime shows it in 4:3. Either way it actually looks pretty decent given its age.
Thanks for the Prime tip. These tv/movie classics seem to get distributed across several platforms at once now. And the once top tier platforms (in terms of content) like The Criterion Channel are joining in on the monthly feature of dreck. The same dreck. Looks like I'll be cancelling most of my subs very soon.   

drogulus

Quote from: ando on January 02, 2024, 04:58:44 AMThanks for the Prime tip. These tv/movie classics seem to get distributed across several platforms at once now. And the once top tier platforms (in terms of content) like The Criterion Channel are joining in on the monthly feature of dreck. The same dreck. Looks like I'll be cancelling most of my subs very soon.   

    I cancelled Britbox. I have Apple, Prime, Criterion and Netflix. Part of Prime is MHZ, which gets more views than all the others combined.
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ando

Quote from: drogulus on January 02, 2024, 06:57:23 AMI cancelled Britbox. I have Apple, Prime, Criterion and Netflix. Part of Prime is MHZ, which gets more views than all the others combined.
Funny; Britbox is the one I'll keep just for the ability to stream all the Shakespeare plays (w/faithful adaptations, however varied the production quality) and several other classic Brit tv series.

The Ken Russell films almost made me change my mind about The Criterion Channel, especially this one -



But then I found it on YouTube (and in fairly great shape).

But I haven't watched many of the Tavernier, Berlanga, and Fassbinder films that I've been meaning to view that you won't find anywhere else (except, perhaps YouTube). And yeah, Prime's a keeper for me, too.


ando


Mutiny on the Bounty (1962, Lewis Milestone, Carol Reed, George Seaton)
This one is still my favorite of the three big Hollywood Bounty flicks. Here's a bit of background on the production. It's streaming free on The Tube.



ando


Vladimir Horowitz: The Last Romantic (1985, Albert Maysles, David Maysles)
It's one of the Maysles Brothers' collaborations that I haven't seen until today. And Horowitz' I've put off listening to like you'd put off opening a bottle of wine from a great vintage, thinking how much better it will be when you finally have a sip. No excuses tonight.  :D

ando


Karl Böhm In Rehearsal and Performance: Richard Srauss' Don Juan (1970/2008, EuroArts)
"Recorded on 17 September (rehearsal) and 18 September 1970 (performance), this recording offers a welcome focus on the final preparations of a single piece from start to finish. While some recordings offer selections of rehearsal footage as a bonus or among the "extras" included with a video, the premise behind this release is the rehearsal. In doing so, it affords a glimpse at Böhm in rehearsal, where the formal face known from stills and several recordings gives way to the conductor's involvement with the details of the score." - James Zychowicz

ando


Glad to see it on YouTube but I do hope they left it alone!

ando


The Genius of Mozart (2004, James Kent, Andy King- Dabbs, Ursula Macfarlane)
I've waited years before watching this look at Wolfgang's life. Created as a three part series it's rarely been available in high definition online. The above copy (Part 1) is serviceable, but another channel has far better versions of the succeeding 2 parts. Narrated by British composer, Charles Hazelwood. Happy Birthday, Wolfie!

ando


Yesterday was Franz Schubert's birthday and I went searching for some kind of representation on the Criterion Channel in honor of the composer. Didn't expect a horror film but that's what I got in Marie-Louise Iribe's silent film, The Erl King, a cinematic take on the Goethe ballad set to music by Schubert. The set up to the story was so chilling that I waited until tonight to finish it. Haven't done that in about 30 years.  :) Recommended.

ando

Black History Month fun pick -


Stormy Weather (1943, Andrew L. Stone)
The history lies in the array of top flight African American talent featured in a single mainstream Hollywood film; a rare occurrence before WWII. The plot, what there is of it, is simply an excuse to string together dance and music acts. Glad we have a record of it. Classic. Free on the Tube (for the moment).

ando


A video record of Solti's recording of Wagner's Ring Cycle.

Interesting.  8)

ando


https://vimeo.com/408613317
Ulysees (1967, Joseph Strick)
My way of honoring St. Patrick's Day (Parade's too far away) with a film rendition of the two famous Joycean Dubliners. Great novels are probably best left alone but this might be interesting. IMDB page. Best free streaming version is on Vimeo (above).

Jo498

There is in fact a "Bloomsday" celebrated on June, 16th.
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

ando


If you've got the latest chip tech on your android or iOS phone the free film streaming platform, Tubi, gives you the option of a movie roulette pick. I've only ever seen the 8 Ball feature once but the "spin" button is in the upper right of the screen. Go to a favorite film category, tap the spin button and the algorithm magic gives you the perfect selection. I've used it to pick films then watch them on my larger home screens.

My first go yielded a terrible film from the list of "Leaving Soon" titles. Evidently, streaming services are picking up on The Criterion Channel's 24/7 pot-luck movie feature where seemingly random titles play round the clock. With a library full of exceptional work like Criterion you're bound to discover something intriguing. With a less discerning but far more varied service like Tubi the random pick seems more eerily serendipitous. It's childish fun for grown up cinema heads, in any case.  8)

DavidW

Tubi brings back memories of wandering Blockbuster or Hollywood and seeing all the cheap straight to video junk on the walls with great gems hidden in the middle.

I've noticed some services like Britbox having a live tv feature so you can just tune in.  I think people are getting exhausted or paralyzed by the sheer amount of choice.

ando

Quote from: DavidW on June 25, 2024, 09:20:28 AMTubi brings back memories of wandering Blockbuster or Hollywood and seeing all the cheap straight to video junk on the walls with great gems hidden in the middle.

I've noticed some services like Britbox having a live tv feature so you can just tune in.  I think people are getting exhausted or paralyzed by the sheer amount of choice.
Quite. 🙂

NumberSix

Quote from: DavidW on June 25, 2024, 09:20:28 AMTubi brings back memories of wandering Blockbuster or Hollywood and seeing all the cheap straight to video junk on the walls with great gems hidden in the middle.

I've noticed some services like Britbox having a live tv feature so you can just tune in.  I think people are getting exhausted or paralyzed by the sheer amount of choice.

Indeed. One evening, not long ago, I spent what turned out to be something like 90 minutes or more browsing through available options on Amazon prime trying to decide what to watch. Mind you, I have hundreds and hundreds of movies — because at some point, my brother and I merged our accounts using moviesanywhere. And I didn't want to watch any of them, even though probably a good third of them I've never seen before.

That night I gave up and just started watching YouTube again.