What were you listening to? (CLOSED)

Started by Maciek, April 06, 2007, 02:22:49 AM

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karlhenning

Dmitri Dmitriyevich
Satires (Pictures of the Past), Opus 109 (orch. Tishchenko)
Segrei Leiferkus
Russian Phil
Thos Sanderling

Novi

Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den der heimlich lauschet.

Solitary Wanderer



Haydn – Trumpet Concerto

H K Gruber – Three Mob Pieces



Symphony #2

Mozart Symphony #31
'I lingered round them, under that benign sky: watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells, listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass, and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.' ~ Emily Bronte

Solitary Wanderer

'I lingered round them, under that benign sky: watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells, listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass, and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.' ~ Emily Bronte

not edward

Berg: Quartet, Lyric Suite (ABQ).
Webern: Five Pieces, Six Bagatelles, Quartet (ABQ).
Prokofiev: Overture on Hebrew Themes, Quintet (Berlin Soloists).
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
-- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Que

Quote from: Ring_of_fire on September 19, 2007, 12:15:53 PM
That's a good one, isn't it?

I got it when they came to my school last year. :)

Very good - the best HIP Beethoven symphonies I've heard and the first that feels immediately totally "right". :)
Came to your school? Lucky you! :o

I'll post more comments on the HIP Beethoven thread after a few listenings.

Q

George


PaulR

Quote from: Que on September 19, 2007, 12:34:36 PM
Very good - the best HIP Beethoven symphonies I've heard and the first that feels immediately totally "right". :)
Came to your school? Lucky you! :o

I'll post more comments on the HIP Beethoven thread after a few listenings.

Q
They played Vivaldi Four Seasons and stuff that could be heard around the world at the time when the Four Seasons was written.  They also had a couple of masterclasses.  (Basses were with the Cellos).  After that Masterclass, the bassist actually showed me and the other bassists a baroque bass bow.  It's quite smaller than my usual bow.  it was a fun couple of days :)

George

Quote from: Harry on September 19, 2007, 03:22:57 AM
Yes you are right, and the percussion that underlines some of the melodies, make my stomach vibrate, and the rest of my household. ;D
;D

This made my stomach vibrate....with laughter.  ;D

Thanks for that, Harry.

pjme

#10429
Sergei Prokofiev : pianoconcerto nr 4 / left hand
Leon Fleisher / Boston SO: Seiji Ozawa.

What a lovely and strange work. Maybe not the most coherent of Prokofiev's concerti, but the fast movements are light and airy, elegantly mechanical. The slow movement - the longest of the 4 -is lyrical, sad.


Jehan Alain : Messe en septuor (for flute, organ ( or string quartet) and women's choir "à deux voix".) - 1938. Marie Claire Alain wrote the organ version. A most lovely work - serene and  refined .
beautiful CD : Naive/ Choir "Les éléments / Joël Suhubiette , Olivier Vernet ,organ - strangely the flutist(e)is not mentioned...
+ other works by poulenc, Fauré and Duruflé.

SonicMan46

Windy afternoon for me working in the office!  ;D

Rosetti, Antonio (c. 1750-1792) Wind Concertos to beat the band!  Clarinet, oboe, horns, & bassoon; 4-CD box set on the wonderful CPO label - he was actually born in Bohemia (so that great 'wind' writing tradition) as Franz Anton Rösler; musicians include Dieter Klöcker on clarinet, Lajos Lencsés on oboe, & Eckart Hübner on bassoon -  :)


Harry

Quote from: SonicMan on September 19, 2007, 01:19:27 PM
Windy afternoon for me working in the office!  ;D

Rosetti, Antonio (c. 1750-1792) Wind Concertos to beat the band!  Clarinet, oboe, horns, & bassoon; 4-CD box set on the wonderful CPO label - he was actually born in Bohemia (so that great 'wind' writing tradition) as Franz Anton Rösler; musicians include Dieter Klöcker on clarinet, Lajos Lencsés on oboe, & Eckart Hübner on bassoon -  :)



That is really a excellent recording Dave. :)

Drasko

Rachmaninov 2nd, Philadelphia/Ormandy, '79 I think

brpaulandrew

I was thinking about the Rostropovich recordings that I own after his death earlier this year. Not a single one with him conducting but I ran across this one with Serkin at the piano. It's early and late Brahms.

Brahms: The Cello Sonatas
Rostropovich, Rudolf Serkin
Deutsche Grammophon
B000001G4M

The liner notes say that Serkin relearned the Op. 99 at age 79 for the recording! A couple of masters at their best.

Br. Paul Andrew

Sorry, I can't copy and paste the cover art from Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Brahms-Cello-Sonatas-Johannes/dp/B000001G4M


BachQ

Mozart PC 24 in c minor (Alicia de Larrocha) (sp)

Lilas Pastia

Quote from: Harry on September 19, 2007, 08:17:23 AM
Midwolda Organ

Maastricht Organ

I was there last year. Isn't that the Notre-Dame church (Church of Our Lady) ?

PaulR

Beethoven:  Piano Sonata #14 in C# Minor "moonlight" op. 27 no 2/Pollini

I'm liking this :)

PaulR

Bach: Mass in B Minor Gardiner/Monteverdi Choir/English Baroque Soloists

First CD listening to, 2nd time hearing it

Lilas Pastia

#10438
Beethoven, symphony no. 9. This is a new DGG recording with the Cleveland orchestra under Franz Welser-Möst. Live from Severance Hall, Jan 2007. I'll go straight out and tout this as a major recording.

1) Presentation: although it's a live occasion, no coughs or instrumental flubs are heard. The recording is strange: although very transparent, it boasts low frequencies that give a solar plexus blow every time double basses have the upper hand (more often than you'd think). Anyhow, the large scale chorus (at least 125 if one is to believe the picture) is heard with clarity and fine focus.

2) Execution: just perfect IMO, but these are definitely not viennese winds or strings. Chorus sounds really great, one of the best I've heard. Due to the very fast pacing of IV, the soprano and mezzo don't amount for much (a pity - not many conductors achieve the balance between forward momentum and the women's voices' need for space to expand). Tenor Lopardo is more of a liability than an asset. I cringed when I saw his name on the cover, but I suppose his contract had to be honoured. He sounds like a throaty baritone crooning up on high :P. Bass René Pape does not disappoint - Au contraire! His is a startling, imposing contribution, achieving the balance WM probably strived for: curt and bangy, but still sounding like a human voice speaking.

3) Conception: Were it not for a full complement of repeats in the scherzo, this would be a 62 minutes reading, making it one of the faster paced versions on the market. Be that as it may, it never sounds quick. The first movement (under 15 minutes) is hectic-but-slow, measured-but-urgent, achieving a strange, almost uneasy balance between these two extremes. It does fit the movement's character. The scherzo is fleet, but still not very fast. Tiimpani strokes almost underplayed (the timpanist must have been raging >:D). The movement's position in the total framework s nicely judjed. The adagio clocks in at around 14 minutes, neither fast, nor slow. It is very lyrical and sweet. No excessive profuuundity here, just an elegiac, sweet interlude. The Finale would (as it should in any decent version) calls for a detailed analysis. Suffice to say that at under 22 minutes (don't believe the timings here, they include the end's applause)  it sounds youthful yet solid, exuberant and determined yet lyrical and joyful. I like the way urgency and ecstasy are brought together in the final Tochter aus Elysium choral ejaculation.

Altogether, I thought this is a recording that is intensely honest, in the sense of being more - much more - about the composer than the conductor. No mean feat...

Bogey

Quote from: Lilas Pastia on September 19, 2007, 06:23:22 PM
Beethoven, symphony no. 9.

Also....

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op.125 (Choral)
Colorado Symphony Orchestra & Chorus / Jeffrey Kahane
Donna Brown, soprano
Susan Platts, mezzo-soprano
Richard Clement, tenor
Nathan Berg, bass

There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz