What were you listening to? (CLOSED)

Started by Maciek, April 06, 2007, 02:22:49 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

PaulR

Beethoven:  Piano Sonata No. 14 in C# Minor Op. 27 no 2 "Moonlight" Pollini

Last movement.

dtwilbanks

LvB violin sonatas - Szeryng et al

bhodges

Bruckner: Symphony No. 8 (Celibidache/Munich, live recording) - Yes, more leisurely than most, but Celibidache makes it work with the help of the splendid Munich Philharmonic's playing and excellent sound.  Of the 10 or so recordings I have of this piece, this might be up there, but it's too soon to tell.



--Bruce

orbital

Quote from: George on September 19, 2007, 06:55:26 PM


This is great, I know. I have the Ampico recording, which is the same I think. Other preludes he plays are similarly excellent. 

George

#10464
Quote from: orbital on September 20, 2007, 06:39:50 AM
This is great, I know. I have the Ampico recording, which is the same I think. Other preludes he plays are similarly excellent. 

No, it's not the same I downloaded both yesterday and I swear the Teldec performance crushes the other like I grape. Please check it out. The timings are different too. The Decca is 4:03, the Teldec is 3:40.

Hector

Quote from: Jezetha on September 19, 2007, 07:57:25 AM
Mm, I think he was joking about Bruckner, Hector, not about Jochum's style of conducting... In this universe Bruckner has written the grandest of musical works, in a parallel one he writes nothing but burlesques - I had to smile at the idea.

Doh! No, he wasn't was he? Shilly me :-[

Smile? I nearly grinned!

Poulenc's 'Dialogues des Carmelites' with its deliciously gory ending. This is the nineties recording on Virgin that Kent Nagano conducted when he was still at the Opera de Lyon, with Catherine Dubosc, Van Dam and Rita Gorr as the old prioress.

Clearly one of the great post-War operas but it can be a bit of a slog at two and a half hours.

SonicMan46

Mozart Piano Sonatas w/ Ronald Brautigam on a fortepiano - first 2 of 6 discs in the CD player @ the moment; the fortepiano is a reproduction by Paul McNulty, and was built in Amsterdam in 1992, after on by Anton Gabriel Walter, ca. 1795 - in interested, check out McNulty's Website:D

 

Harry

Kaiser Ferdinand III. (1608-1657)

Hymnus de Navitate Jesu Redemptor Omnium.
Hymnus Deus Tuorum.
Hymnus Humanae Salutis.



Johann Heinrich Schmelzer. (1620/23-1679)

Lamento Sopra la Morte Ferdinand III.


Kaiser Josephus I. (1678-1711)

Cantate Regina Coeli.


Kaiser Leopold I. (1640-1705)


Sonata Piena.
Psalmus Laudate Pueri.


Linda Perillo, Jorg Waschinski, Sopranos.
David Cordier, Henning Voss, Altos.
Achim Kleinlein, Tenor.
Ulf Bastlein, Marcos Fink, Bass.
St. Florianer Sangerknaben.
Wiener Akademie, (Choir and Orchestra)/Martin Haselbock.

A nicely balanced recording from 1997, with plenty of air around the voices, and a Orchestra that is well placed onto the stage. Both Orchestra and Choir do well, very well indeed.
All Soloist are perfectly fitted for these non to difficult works. They are good compositions, not masterworks, but pleasant enough to hear. In fact I enjoyed it quite a bit. The instrumental parts are well written.

Lethevich

More Vänskä worship :P



Oceanides, various versions.
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

karlhenning

Sibelius
Symphony No. 4 in A Minor, Opus 63
SFSO / Blomstedt


Drains a flagon in Ben's honor  8)

dtwilbanks

Gieseking playing Debussy, as it should be played.  ;D

BachQ

Ives/Schuman Var on Am (Masur)
Brahms, Haydn Var (Masur)
Reger, Moz Var (Masur)

karlhenning


71 dB

Brahms - A German Requiem - Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra/Rundfunkchor Berlin/Rattle

I am surprised I really haven't heard this work until now, thanks to Mark.  :)

I am also surprised how boring I find it. I am listening to it the second time and I find the music surprisingly simple considering the scale of the work. My expectations were too high.

Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

BachQ

Quote from: karlhenning on September 20, 2007, 08:02:28 AM
These are just such ebullient fun!

I'm addicted to them, my dear Karl ........

Lethevich

Dvořák - String quartets nos.6 & 7 (Prager Quartet, DG).

Wow, no.6 has an engaging opening :D Dvořák is a master of this form.
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

karlhenning

Quote from: 71 dB on September 20, 2007, 08:27:18 AM
I am also surprised how boring I find it.

I'm not surprised.

It is a beautiful and wonderfully written work;  I don't find it boring in the least.  There must be a million choristers in the world who don't find it any more boring than I do.

I shouldn't say your expectations were "too high," no, not at all, Poju.

karlhenning

Sibelius
Symphony No. 5 in E-flat Major, Opus 82
SFSO / Blomstedt


Drains another virtual flagon  8)

Harry

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach.

Cassandra.
Dramatic Cantata for Alto, Strings and B.C.

Lena Susanne Norin, Alto.
Das Kleine Konzert/Hermann Max. (On period instruments)

A fine recording from 1995, with a good aural presence of Norin who carries the whole cd, surrounded by a ensemble that cuddles around her. In total a fine chamberlike recording with just the right amount of air around everyone.
Not often is this work performed, let alone recorded, and we have to thank CPO for doing it, for I find enough merit in it to warrant the investment. This Bach son shows clearly his talents for string writing and solo voice, and has this not from a stranger to this repertoire.
At times Norin is a tad to dramatic for her own good, and that results sometimes in a rather hardening of the voice, but that is a small minor point.
In all then a worthy addition.

Beautiful coverart made by Langlois

Lethevich

Quote from: Lethe on September 20, 2007, 08:50:38 AM
Dvořák - String quartets nos.6 & 7 (Prager Quartet, DG).

Wow, no.6 has an engaging opening :D Dvořák is a master of this form.

Now on no.7 - these works just pull you in from the start. Even if the last four had never been written, Dvořák's genius as a SQ writer would be undeniable. Each one I hear becomes my "new favourite", which is then promptly replaced by the next that I hear :D
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.