Author Topic: Franz Liszt (1811-86)  (Read 77672 times)

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Offline schnittkease

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #440 on: March 06, 2019, 06:55:25 AM »
Unfortunately I don't have Madiel's astounding self-control.  :-[

Offline San Antone

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #441 on: March 06, 2019, 07:21:01 AM »
Unfortunately I don't have Madiel's astounding self-control.  :-[

I rely on streaming and only buy what is either 1) unavailable to stream (like Hyperion recordings) or 2) rarely, something I want even if it is available to stream.  Consequently, I am buying far fewer CDs than I used to, like, one-tenth as many if not fewer.

Offline springrite

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #442 on: March 07, 2019, 12:41:03 AM »
This is kind of why I don't even get beyond one recording if I'm happy with it. I don't go looking for others unless I feel unhappy in some way with what I have.


Well, this is exactly how I view marriage and the wife.
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline Madiel

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #443 on: March 07, 2019, 01:22:19 AM »
Well, this is exactly how I view marriage and the wife.

I wondered if someone would go there... I nearly did.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #444 on: March 07, 2019, 03:21:12 AM »
Where do streaming services fit in to this analogy??

Offline Madiel

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #445 on: March 07, 2019, 03:33:11 AM »
Where do streaming services fit in to this analogy??

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Offline Moonfish

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #446 on: October 16, 2019, 11:38:47 AM »
Liszt
Années de pèlerinage – Suisse
Jorge Bolet

My very first recording of the 'Années de pèlerinage – Suisse' that I bought as a poor graduate student (spending those last few dollars on an expensive cd rather than buying food - know what I mean?).  Even though I have heard many other performances I keep returning to this one over and over. I know we like to compare recordings and partake of new renditions etc. However, I wonder how much of our "ratings" are based on previous exposure, i.e. becoming attuned to a certain recording/rendition. How can a recording one learns to love and recognize not be the one that rises to the top in competition with "strangers', i.e. new recordings that one has had less exposure to? These newer recording may have been our primary recording if it was our very first encounter. Perhaps?   Regardless, ranking works of this kind is of course a subjective enterprise.  Bolet's recording will always be associated with the first journey into the complexity of Liszt's tonal world as my stomach rumbled as I clearly put my money into music rather than food.  0:)

"Every time you spend money you are casting a vote for the kind of world you want...."
Anna Lappé

Offline Brian

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #447 on: May 03, 2021, 10:43:00 AM »
One really glaring hole in the recording catalog is the complete set of Schubert transcriptions, "Soirées de Vienne." No. 6 is a popular encore which just about all the golden age pianists recorded and which some folks (like Joseph Moog and Dejan Lazić) still do. But there are 9 of these suckers. Any favored complete recordings? I think I asked this a year or two ago and the answer was that there are only 1-2 complete cycles out there. Leslie Howard's anti-virtuosic version comes in a three-CD box with a Celibidachean (Pogorelish?) rendition of Schubert's Hungarian divertissement (47 minutes!!).

We have a newcomer this month:



Unfortunately this one is a letdown too. Like Howard, Ferro takes his sweet time, but he's also rather square rhythmically, and undancey (check out No. 1 and see how long it goes before you recognize a dance happening). Worse, he's recorded so close up that the acoustic strips the piano of its color and makes Ferro sound like an insensitive banger of keys. Maybe he is one, or maybe he isn't, but it's just not flattering. Sigh.

Offline Brewski

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #448 on: June 19, 2022, 07:47:16 PM »
Here is Yunchan Lim in Liszt's Transcendental Etudes, a performance that apparently astounded the audience in the Cliburn Competition semi-final round on 10 June.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsGLmrR0BVs

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Offline Scion7

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #449 on: September 05, 2022, 06:41:20 PM »
There have been recordings of the Orpheus transcription for piano/harp and violin and cello,
but I have not encountered a recording of an organ-violin-cello transcription before (here, the arrangement is
by the organist) ... I find it very interesting and stirring.

How often we used to see him pounding away on his piano in a jerky and continually increasing fortissimo ... something by Bach, Beethoven, or Schumann! After a time, more or less prolonged, the deafening noise sank to a murmur, then silence—the master had found an idea. -d'Indy on Franck

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #450 on: September 06, 2022, 12:38:06 PM »
Here is Yunchan Lim in Liszt's Transcendental Etudes, a performance that apparently astounded the audience in the Cliburn Competition semi-final round on 10 June.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsGLmrR0BVs

--Bruce

HUGE talent - wow.......!! (thankyou for posting)

Online Spotted Horses

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #451 on: September 22, 2022, 06:22:44 AM »
I've made my way through Années de pèlerinage in the Ciccolini recording, then started going through it again with Cziffra. Both sets of recordings have their attractions and detractions. On a lark I decided to listen to several recordings of Sposalizio, the first piece in the second set (Deuxième année: Italie). I didn't want to go too far, and limited myself to three, Cziffra, Ciccolini and Leslie Howard.

The Cziffra recording has a very annoying feature. It is spliced together from two takes with very different recording sound. In the first part the sound is rather thin, with a slight domination of the right channel, then in mid phrase, we switch to recording with more presence and a slight left channel domination. Clearly the microphone position and/or recording set up is different. It is a seven minute piece of music and Cziffra is supposed to be one of the great virtuosos of the century. He can't just play this piece through?

Then Howard. The approach is slower, more deliberate, but he really luxuriates in the complex harmonization in the statements of the theme. The opening is magical The one thing that irked me a little at first is that in the climactic passage near the end he tends to insert little pauses at the harmonic transitions. When I listened again, prepared for them, I can see what Howard is doing, but it seems unnecessary.

Finally Ciccolini. Aside from the limitations of the 1961 recording technology, this recording is gorgeous. The richness of the harmony does not generally come across as well as in Howard's recording, but there are no little pauses.

I do not feel inclined to pronounce any recording "the best," although the technical problem in the Cziffra recording more-or-less spoiled it for me. (I reacted very positively to Cziffra's recording of the first part of Années de pèlerinage.

Oh, and the composition by Liszt itself, beautifully poetic.