Author Topic: Franz Liszt (1811-86)  (Read 56979 times)

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abidoful

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #300 on: May 20, 2011, 11:53:29 AM »
Continuing my traversal of as much of Liszt's "out of the way" music as I can discover I am enjoying this 3-disc collection (complete, I think) of his lieder performed by Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and Daniel Barenboim.  Such beautiful nuanced performances!  Of course O lieb, so lang du lieben kannst is well know and often sung - but so much of the rest is entirely new to me and very good.
The lied "O lieb, so lang du lieben kannst" isn't permormed so often IMO-rather the contary- but the pianoversion of that song is a hit ("Liebesträume" its called). Most beloved Liszt songs are definatelu "O quand j'dor" and "Die Loreley".

DavidW

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #301 on: May 20, 2011, 11:53:38 AM »
Other forum?

You're like what?!  How could you!!? :'(

 ;D

Mn Dave

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #302 on: May 20, 2011, 12:51:53 PM »
You're like what?!  How could you!!? :'(

 ;D

Nah. I'm just curious which one.

Offline Brian

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #303 on: May 20, 2011, 12:55:19 PM »
You're like what?!  How could you!!? :'(

 ;D

There is no other forum.  0:)

Mn Dave

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #304 on: May 20, 2011, 12:56:21 PM »
There is no other forum.  0:)

You shall have no other forums before me!!  0:)

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #305 on: July 09, 2011, 03:22:19 AM »
 :o :o :o



34 discs for around $70, this sounds almost too good. I have a good amount of orchestral works by Liszt, but am very intrigued by this set.
Any Liszt fans have comments on this collection? Are these good performances?


Offline edward

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #306 on: July 09, 2011, 08:56:28 AM »
It's a mixed bag, really. Some of the recordings are bona-fide classics (Lazar Berman's Annees de pelerinage, the Zimerman/Ozawa concerto/Totentanz disc, Arrau in the Verdi transcriptions, much of the Bolet material), some are interesting if non-canonical (Sinopoli in the symphonies, Zimerman's B minor sonata and late pieces), and some are very odd choices given the performances DG/Universal had in the vault (Ott's Transcendentals, Solti in some of the symphonic poems).

Overall, I think the set really scores in having 5 or 6 absolutely outstanding discs of mainstream Liszt allied to 6 discs giving good coverage of his rarely-performed/recorded choral works (Legend of St. Elizabeth, Missa choralis, Hungarian Coronation Mass, Missa solemnis, Via crucis and  Cantico del sol di Francesco d'Assisi). So if that appearls, I'd go for it....I did when I saw it for sale for $60 CDN.
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #307 on: July 23, 2011, 09:20:30 AM »
Does Daniel have a mortgage that needs paying or something? So many recent discs pouring out.

Still, I'll be interested in the reviews on this one :)
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Offline smitty1931

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #308 on: July 24, 2011, 11:30:13 AM »
Any Liszt fan should see if their library system owns the Teaching Company's 2 DVDs of Liszt's life and works. Interesting and insightful. Recommended!

Offline haydnguy

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #309 on: August 17, 2011, 10:01:36 AM »
It's a mixed bag, really. Some of the recordings are bona-fide classics (Lazar Berman's Annees de pelerinage, the Zimerman/Ozawa concerto/Totentanz disc, Arrau in the Verdi transcriptions, much of the Bolet material), some are interesting if non-canonical (Sinopoli in the symphonies, Zimerman's B minor sonata and late pieces), and some are very odd choices given the performances DG/Universal had in the vault (Ott's Transcendentals, Solti in some of the symphonic poems).

Overall, I think the set really scores in having 5 or 6 absolutely outstanding discs of mainstream Liszt allied to 6 discs giving good coverage of his rarely-performed/recorded choral works (Legend of St. Elizabeth, Missa choralis, Hungarian Coronation Mass, Missa solemnis, Via crucis and  Cantico del sol di Francesco d'Assisi). So if that appearls, I'd go for it....I did when I saw it for sale for $60 CDN.

Edward, I'm in the middle of a marathon listen of my Lizt Collection box. (DG) I haven't seen anyone mention the lack of libretto for the lieder either on here or on the Amazon review. I'm just about finished with the solo piano and getting ready to listen to the organ music but the lack of libretto seems like a real bummer to ME. I don't mind downloading it, but the lack of libretto at all would mean that the listener has to search piece by piece on the web, which is unreasonable in my view.  ???

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #310 on: December 07, 2011, 12:57:31 PM »


A question - are the pieces contained on this disc the Douze grandes études, S.137 (1837) - perhaps they got the year wrong, - or a total revision in between these and the Études d'exécution transcendante, S.139 (1852)? S.138 is an intermediate version of Mazeppa, so I suppose it might be S.137 with that added, but some clarity would be welcome. If it is the latter, then surely the disc is mistitled? Fff confusion ;D
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Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #311 on: December 07, 2011, 01:04:26 PM »


A question - are the pieces contained on this disc the Douze grandes études, S.137 (1837) - perhaps they got the year wrong, - or a total revision in between these and the Études d'exécution transcendante, S.139 (1852)? S.138 is an intermediate version of Mazeppa, so I suppose it might be S.137 with that added, but some clarity would be welcome. If it is the latter, then surely the disc is mistitled? Fff confusion ;D
The only thing that I can think of is that while they were completed in 1837, I see they were only first published in 1838. Maybe that accounts for the date?
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #312 on: December 07, 2011, 02:19:07 PM »
Hmm danke - I suppose I will label them as Douze grandes études, as even if there is a difference, it could only be the Mazeppa movement?
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Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #313 on: December 12, 2011, 12:27:49 PM »
As I'm a massive piano lover and a self-taught pianist, along with Rachmaninov, Franz Liszt is certainly my favourite pianist (besides being one of my favourite composers in general) and one of my main source of inspiration :)
I absolutely love his music, which I've always found incredibly beautiful and powerfully evocative; it can be so thrilling, impressive and hauting, showing a wonderful virtuosic technique that makes the most of all the possibilities of the keyboard, but also extremely refined, melodious and passionate at the same time! Definitely, his compositions are full of brilliance and intensity, with an amazing orchestration and a deeply enchanting harmony.
I adore both his piano and the symphonic works, in particular the Piano Concertos, the Hungarian Rhapsodies, the Transcendental Etudes, the Annees de Pelerinage, the Faust-Symphony, Les Preludes, Mazeppa and Orpheus.
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #314 on: December 13, 2011, 06:15:14 PM »
It's super to have another Lisztian here! :)

I'm currently at a difficult spot in my exploration of the composer's music - I am really enjoying a lot of the solo piano works that the Hyperion edition has recorded, but it can be hard to make suggestions as the content is spread so far across small single pieces, tiny collections, etc. I simultaneously find these works highly enjoyable, but difficult to recommend without redundancy (as there are no alternate recordings of many of the works anyway). All I can say is "if you're interested in these recordings, don't hesitate".

The more I listen to Howard's playing, the more content I am with it - I don't hear the problems that some do and it feels note perfect, which is the ideal way to present unknown works. I'm sure that now the full box has been released, the single volumes must be going very cheaply.
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Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #315 on: December 14, 2011, 03:42:10 PM »
It's super to have another Lisztian here! :)

I'm currently at a difficult spot in my exploration of the composer's music - I am really enjoying a lot of the solo piano works that the Hyperion edition has recorded, but it can be hard to make suggestions as the content is spread so far across small single pieces, tiny collections, etc. I simultaneously find these works highly enjoyable, but difficult to recommend without redundancy (as there are no alternate recordings of many of the works anyway). All I can say is "if you're interested in these recordings, don't hesitate".

The more I listen to Howard's playing, the more content I am with it - I don't hear the problems that some do and it feels note perfect, which is the ideal way to present unknown works. I'm sure that now the full box has been released, the single volumes must be going very cheaply.

 :)

I agree Howard's volumes are very enjoyable and well-played, certainly stunning! But I have to admit that I prefer other pianists for the Hungarian Rhapsodies, the Transcendental Studies and the Années de pèlerinage (Richter, Arrau, Campanella, Ovchinnikov, Kempff, Barenboim, Ashkenazy).
Anyway it's wonderful he made a complete set of Liszt Piano Works, a set including even the less famous compositions! There's much more by Liszt than only Hungarian Rhapsody No.2, La campanella or Liebestraum No.3
"Music is the electrical soil in which the spirit lives, thinks and invents." - Ludwig van Beethoven

eyeresist

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #316 on: December 14, 2011, 10:04:21 PM »
I got into Liszt recently after picking up the Australian Eloquence 2-CD reissue of Solti in the tone poems and Fischer in the Hungarian Dances (which I eventually returned, as the final dance had an irreparable glitch). I can't seem to get anyone interested in talking about the orchestral music. They all want to talk about the piano music - or even the songs. BORING!

I'm trying at the moment to convince people of Liszt's importance to Mahler. Surely the Faust Symphony must have been a model for the Resurrection Symphony. See also the Heroide Funebre, a fractured funeral march worthy of Schnittke.

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #317 on: December 15, 2011, 12:43:09 AM »
I got into Liszt recently after picking up the Australian Eloquence 2-CD reissue of Solti in the tone poems and Fischer in the Hungarian Dances (which I eventually returned, as the final dance had an irreparable glitch). I can't seem to get anyone interested in talking about the orchestral music. They all want to talk about the piano music - or even the songs. BORING!

I'm trying at the moment to convince people of Liszt's importance to Mahler. Surely the Faust Symphony must have been a model for the Resurrection Symphony. See also the Heroide Funebre, a fractured funeral march worthy of Schnittke.
There may have been some discussion about this when Barenboim's Liszt set was released - I can't remember. I think Liszt is often the odd man out when it comes to linking early romanticsm with later romanticism. I don't think it's desrved.
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eyeresist

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #318 on: December 15, 2011, 04:29:21 PM »
There may have been some discussion about this when Barenboim's Liszt set was released - I can't remember. I think Liszt is often the odd man out when it comes to linking early romanticsm with later romanticism. I don't think it's desrved.
Yes, I think Liszt was a major factor in 19th century musical development. But now he is in historical terms a "missing link". He used to be HUGE, a landmark of the repertoire. The use of Les Preludes in the old Flash Gordon serials is proof enough of that (plus an orchestration of the piano sonata was used in the Karloff/Lugosi film The Black Cat). He's still popular with pianists, but even there we perceive the musicians feel special need to justify their playing him. For shame.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Franz Liszt (1811-86)
« Reply #319 on: December 15, 2011, 09:47:30 PM »
I got into Liszt recently after picking up the Australian Eloquence 2-CD reissue of Solti in the tone poems and Fischer in the Hungarian Dances (which I eventually returned, as the final dance had an irreparable glitch). I can't seem to get anyone interested in talking about the orchestral music. They all want to talk about the piano music - or even the songs. BORING!

I'm trying at the moment to convince people of Liszt's importance to Mahler. Surely the Faust Symphony must have been a model for the Resurrection Symphony. See also the Heroide Funebre, a fractured funeral march worthy of Schnittke.

I hear ya, eyeresist. I love Liszt's orchestral music in particular Prometheus, Orpheus, Faust Symphony, Mazeppa, Les Preludes to name a few. Yes, his solo piano music from what I've heard is good, but he's not given enough credit for his orchestral accomplishments. He's opened up many doors.
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