Author Topic: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)  (Read 34556 times)

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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #140 on: November 02, 2021, 06:17:32 PM »
Another example of me eating my own words. I've come to enjoy more of this composer's music lately. Namely, the 2nd symphony, which is an absolute treasure chest of beautiful ideas. The opening motif alone sends me to quite a tranquil and sunlit place. It also reminds me of spring for some odd reason. Almost like a reawakening of the spirit in a way. Looking forward to digging into the 1st and 3rd symphonies, which I don't know well at all.

The 2nd is a terrific score. Its style reminds me of Bruckner and Strauss in how imposing, challenging, devotional and chromatic sounds like. The 2nd movement is my favorite, with a splendidly lyrical section around 6:30 that just melts my heart. That is a tune with technique!!

The No. 3 in A major could be the more challenging or chromatic of the bunch. The style is rather "autumnal", sober, very introspective in my view. That work has grown on me over the years. And the 1st is so lovely. Schmidt pays homage to Bruckner with a motif or an idea in the endearing 2nd movement which seems belonging to Bruckner's 7th Symphony. He's an interesting composer for sure. His chamber music has some gems too: the Piano Quintet in G major and the Clarinet and Piano (left hand) Quintet in A major.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2021, 06:24:03 PM by Symphonic Addict »
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #141 on: November 02, 2021, 06:55:45 PM »
Well, at least you’re making amends by adopting him as your avatar - for now  :D.

Indeed! 8)
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #142 on: November 02, 2021, 07:44:59 PM »
The 2nd is a terrific score. Its style reminds me of Bruckner and Strauss in how imposing, challenging, devotional and chromatic sounds like. The 2nd movement is my favorite, with a splendidly lyrical section around 6:30 that just melts my heart. That is a tune with technique!!

The No. 3 in A major could be the more challenging or chromatic of the bunch. The style is rather "autumnal", sober, very introspective in my view. That work has grown on me over the years. And the 1st is so lovely. Schmidt pays homage to Bruckner with a motif or an idea in the endearing 2nd movement which seems belonging to Bruckner's 7th Symphony. He's an interesting composer for sure. His chamber music has some gems too: the Piano Quintet in G major and the Clarinet and Piano (left hand) Quintet in A major.

Excellent to read, Cesar. Glad you enjoy this composer's music as well. I'm just starting to really get reacquainted with it after a long hiatus. The chamber works are definitely on my must-hear list along with Notre Dame.
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #143 on: November 02, 2021, 07:55:20 PM »
Excellent to read, Cesar. Glad you enjoy this composer's music as well. I'm just starting to really get reacquainted with it after a long hiatus. The chamber works are definitely on my must-hear list along with Notre Dame.

Good stuff, John. The Husar Variations also contain some remarkable music and ideas. His organ works are virtually unknown to me, and that's a significant deal of his output.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #144 on: November 02, 2021, 07:57:03 PM »
Good stuff, John. The Husar Variations also contain some remarkable music and ideas. His organ works are virtually unknown to me, and that's a significant deal of his output.

I'll gladly skip over the organ works, but yes, Variations on a Hussar's Song is a great piece.
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline André

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Re: Franz Schmidt(1874-1939)
« Reply #145 on: December 01, 2021, 05:05:32 PM »


Listening to the 4th as I write, after Welser-Möst, Moralt, Rajter (last week) and before Mehta (tomorrow).

It is indeed a very, very fine performance, definitely digging deeper into the score than WM and Rajter, but less than Moralt, whose searing conception is carried out by the Wiener Symphoniker as if it was their last concert on this earth.

I noticed a couple of thematic connections with other composers’ works. The opening trumpet solo (reprised at the beginning of III) is varied into a motto that is used by Strauss in Elektra (Elektra’s opening scene, when she calls out the ghost of her slain father: ‘Agamemnon!’) - and then in II, Delius’ shadow hovers, especially in the ascending scales of the long opening theme, first heard on the cello (hardly noticeable), then on the strings (more so) and then the clarinet and oboe (unmistakeable). I’m sure these are not quotes, not even influences other than a common Austro-German post-romantic heritage. Still, for some strange reason these perceived links to Strauss and Delius make me appreciate Schmidt even more.