Author Topic: Luigi Dallapiccola  (Read 15791 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #60 on: June 28, 2013, 06:03:25 AM »
Two volumes, including the one with that very piece; I do remember thinking highly of it.

It's in my queue to-day!


I'll take the Apex with me... report on Chandos please!

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #61 on: June 28, 2013, 06:08:56 AM »
Really have enjoyed Noseda's orchestral recordings of Dallapiccola. Great stuff.
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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #62 on: June 28, 2013, 06:28:45 AM »
I'll take the Apex with me... report on Chandos please!

I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.
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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #63 on: June 28, 2013, 06:46:28 AM »
I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.

OK, I need to hear some Dallapiccola soon!
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snyprrr

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #64 on: June 29, 2013, 06:59:27 AM »
I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.


Go Dallapiccola!!! Maybe 12-tone needed the Italian touch, mm??? Like I said before, Leave Art to the Italians!!

Offline Octave

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #65 on: July 01, 2013, 01:29:45 AM »
Like I said before, Leave Art to the Italians!!

I owe you an apology for misunderstanding yr previous use of this expression.  I think it now comes into focus for me.
Looking ffwd very much to the Noseda/Chandos discs, and also to LD's writings on opera, on their way to me now.  I can only echo the praise for the Apex/Warner disc.  He was his own man, 12 tones and all! Exciting music with mystery to burn.
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Offline Rons_talking

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2016, 07:55:41 PM »
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).

snyprrr

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #67 on: May 25, 2016, 06:09:25 AM »
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).

I've always enjoyed Pesko's '...Questions/Answers...'

Does this Capriccio CD have (seems to) all his main Modernist works for orchestra? There's a companion disc for BAZ, too.

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #68 on: May 25, 2016, 06:20:10 AM »
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).
Great to read you're enjoying Dallapiccola, Rons! Wonderful composer indeed... I don't know that Steffens CD, but the prgramming is excellent, and the same forces' CD of Ginastera works is fantastic.

As for further works to explore, may I suggest the following:

Canti di prigionia and Due Cori di Michelangelo Buonarroti il giovane


Canti de liberazione (a personal favourite of mine)


And the quite wonderful opera Il Prigioniero



Unfortunatly, the frsrt two CDs I mention are long OOP  :(

Regards,

« Last Edit: May 25, 2016, 01:29:24 PM by ritter »
ritter
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Offline Klaze

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2016, 01:26:34 PM »
I have to explore this one further as well, so I'm taking notes from this thread.
For what it's worth I really enjoy the Liriche Greche (Greek Lyrics), which has been mentioned in the first few pages of this thread.
Can't personally recommend recordings for that, since I just have the one that's available on one of the Royal Concertgebouw Anthologies.

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Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
« Reply #70 on: September 05, 2016, 04:23:41 AM »
This rather interesting new release seems to have been oveRlooked:



An Mathilde (on a text by Heinrich Heine) is a major, 15 minute cantata for soprano and orchestra. AFAIK, it was only available previously on a (magnificent) set by DG (5 LPs plus a lavishly illustrated book) in honour of Heinrich Strobel (who led the music division of the Southwest German Radio, starting just after WW2, and was one of tyhe forces behind the revival of the Donaueschingen Festival). The soprano on that occasion was Magda László, under the baton of Hans Rosbaud.

One of the few remaining large pieces by Dallapiccola that was not available on CD, I recall it as being rather stark, but do look forward to reacquaint myself with it.

I am much less familiar with the work of Camillo Togni (except for some of the piano pieces).
ritter
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« Je me suis rarement perdu de vue ; je me suis détesté, je me suis adoré ; puis, nous avons vieilli ensemble. »