Author Topic: Hilding Rosenberg  (Read 26483 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #120 on: September 11, 2018, 11:05:12 PM »
Count me as other fan of this awesome composer. I'm listening to the symphonies (something rare on me, isn't it?  ;) ) and I'm really impressed. I've played the first 3 of them (the 1st and 2nd on YouTube). This is absolutely wonderful stuff. As I'm not a musician, I can't speak about them on musical terms, just I can say they have great power, a sort of seriousness which I find engaging, and a strong sense of transcendence. His style is something like Nielsen meets Hindemith. I'm not meaning he's derivative, it's just how I perceive the music. Where has Rosenberg been all my life?

Now I intend to hear the 4th Symphony (The Revelation of St. John).
I agree with you Cesar (nothing unusual about that either  ;D) and think that Rosenberg is a very fine composer and underrated - why did not BIS record all the symphonies as they did, for example, with Vagn Holmboe and Tubin? I think that Rosenberg is just as deserving. I remember hearing Symphony 2 ('Grave') on the radio and rather enjoying it  and then it came to the incredibly moving, redemptive ending which I found and still do find overwhelming. No.3 is even better and also features a wonderfully inspiriting and moving conclusion. Symphony 4 has wonderful moments of great stillness and beauty. As someone here rightly said it's like looking at a stained-glass window. My other favourite is the sibelian Symphony 6, which I find gripping throughout (must play that one later today!) - also, if you don't already know it you must hear the beautiful Christmas cantata 'The Holy Night' which is magical. At least BIS recorded symphonies 3 and 6 together but it is a shame that they never pushed on with the project.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #121 on: September 12, 2018, 07:50:34 PM »
I agree with you Cesar (nothing unusual about that either  ;D) and think that Rosenberg is a very fine composer and underrated - why did not BIS record all the symphonies as they did, for example, with Vagn Holmboe and Tubin? I think that Rosenberg is just as deserving. I remember hearing Symphony 2 ('Grave') on the radio and rather enjoying it  and then it came to the incredibly moving, redemptive ending which I found and still do find overwhelming. No.3 is even better and also features a wonderfully inspiriting and moving conclusion. Symphony 4 has wonderful moments of great stillness and beauty. As someone here rightly said it's like looking at a stained-glass window. My other favourite is the sibelian Symphony 6, which I find gripping throughout (must play that one later today!) - also, if you don't already know it you must hear the beautiful Christmas cantata 'The Holy Night' which is magical. At least BIS recorded symphonies 3 and 6 together but it is a shame that they never pushed on with the project.

I agree with all you wrote, Jeffrey (it's definitely the rule most of the time  :D )

He's been one of the greatest revelations this year. I don't know why I waited so long to pay attention to this wondrous music. It's better late than never! It's the sort of music that appeals to me in a high degree. Also, it's truly a crime that we don't have a recorded complete cycle, as you pointed out, being a relatively major composer from Sweden. And yes, the endings from the 2nd and 3rd symphonies certainly lifted my spirit.

Today I listened to the symphonies 4 and 5 (the latter on YouTube). I confimed my admiration by hearing these two works. His choral writing is stupendous and quite effective, overtly dramatic (but not too much) in the 4th and more subdued and mystic in the 5th. Perhaps the 4th was a little overlong, but I did enjoy it very much and there weren't many dull moments. As for the 5th, I think this one I liked the most. Its beginning is quite magical and peaceful, reminding me of Sibelius a little bit. The bells add an interesting touch to the piece, and overall, I've always liked the use of bells in music.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 08:03:33 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #122 on: September 13, 2018, 09:08:15 AM »
I agree with all you wrote, Jeffrey (it's definitely the rule most of the time  :D )

He's been one of the greatest revelations this year. I don't know why I waited so long to pay attention to this wondrous music. It's better late than never! It's the sort of music that appeals to me in a high degree. Also, it's truly a crime that we don't have a recorded complete cycle, as you pointed out, being a relatively major composer from Sweden. And yes, the endings from the 2nd and 3rd symphonies certainly lifted my spirit.

Today I listened to the symphonies 4 and 5 (the latter on YouTube). I confimed my admiration by hearing these two works. His choral writing is stupendous and quite effective, overtly dramatic (but not too much) in the 4th and more subdued and mystic in the 5th. Perhaps the 4th was a little overlong, but I did enjoy it very much and there weren't many dull moments. As for the 5th, I think this one I liked the most. Its beginning is quite magical and peaceful, reminding me of Sibelius a little bit. The bells add an interesting touch to the piece, and overall, I've always liked the use of bells in music.
I hardly know the 5th at all. According to Robert Layton it is Rosenberg's masterpiece. I only have it in the boxed set 'Rosenberg conducts Rosenberg' in a rather old recording. I need to hear this work again as, initially, it made little impression on me compared to symphonies 3,2,6 and 4 (in that order of preference).
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #123 on: June 21, 2021, 02:48:26 AM »
From WAYLTN thread.
Rosenberg's birthday today (b.21/06/1892)
This CD would make a great introduction to Rosenberg's music, with the 'catchy', atmospheric and inspiriting 'Orpheus in Town' followed by arguably Rosenberg's greatest symphony in a good recording. I'm sorry that Finlandia didn't record more Rosenberg symphonies, some have never appeared on CD. Tubin and Vagn Holmboe have all their symphonies represented on CD but I consider Rosenberg to be no less deserving:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #124 on: June 21, 2021, 08:14:54 AM »
From WAYLTN thread.
Rosenberg's birthday today (b.21/06/1892)
This CD would make a great introduction to Rosenberg's music, with the 'catchy', atmospheric and inspiriting 'Orpheus in Town' followed by arguably Rosenberg's greatest symphony in a good recording. I'm sorry that Finlandia didn't record more Rosenberg symphonies, some have never appeared on CD. Tubin and Vagn Holmboe have all their symphonies represented on CD but I consider Rosenberg to be no less deserving:


Very much enjoy Rosenberg's music, and still primarily listen to his symphonies from YT rips saved to my phone. Time a complete cycle was available, as you say. I much prefer his SQs to those by Holmboe - bought both as digital downloads in the same swoop some years ago, but the Rosenberg have far more play by some distance.
“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

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Offline DaveF

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #125 on: June 21, 2021, 10:12:07 AM »
There is a (fairly) modern recording of no.5 from Sveriges Radio that seems to get broadcast at least once a year.  It can currently be heard here:

https://sverigesradio.se/avsnitt/1714723

starting about 27:30.  It is rather better than the composer's own recording on wax cylinders or whatever.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #126 on: June 21, 2021, 02:30:02 PM »
There is a (fairly) modern recording of no.5 from Sveriges Radio that seems to get broadcast at least once a year.  It can currently be heard here:

https://sverigesradio.se/avsnitt/1714723

starting about 27:30.  It is rather better than the composer's own recording on wax cylinders or whatever.
Oh, thank you Dave. I have the composers recording in a 'Rosenberg conducts Rosenberg' boxed set. It does indeed sound like it was recorded on the runway at Stockholm Airport!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).