Carl Reinecke

Started by JoshLilly, May 18, 2007, 11:39:38 AM

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JoshLilly

I'm not the biggest Reinecke fan in the world, which is odd considering how much of his music I have. I guess I keep coming back because I mildly like a lot of it, and I kept hoping for something to really grab me. I started with the Undine Sonata (for flute and piano), which seems to be his most popular work... I just didn't really like it that much. I didn't dislike it either. That ended up being something I felt for other things of his, like the Flute Concerto, a serenade for strings, some chamber music.

I like all three of his symphonies. I like the harp concerto quite a bit. I really like the Piano Concerto #3. Up until a couple of weeks ago, it was far and away my favourite work of Reinecke's. But I'm making this thread since a new cpo CD came out recently with his Violin Concerto in G minor, Op.141. I think it's his second Violin Concerto, but not sure what happened to the first. As far as I know, this is the first CD to come out with either of them on it. Finally, Reinecke blew me away. I love this thing. Based on my Internet hunting, it looks like a lot of non-Reinecke fans are won over by this piece.

Anyway, maybe Reinecke deserves a fresh chance, and a fresh thread. Sorry if I'm not supposed to create such one, please delete it if this is inappropriate.

Brewski

Quote from: JoshLilly on May 18, 2007, 11:39:38 AM
Anyway, maybe Reinecke deserves a fresh chance, and a fresh thread. Sorry if I'm not supposed to create such one, please delete it if this is inappropriate.

You are encouraged to create threads on whatever topic(s) interest you, and this is certainly appropriate!  :D

--Bruce

"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

tjguitar

I'm not familiar with this composer but a 'harp concerto' certainly sounds interesting. Is there any 'definitive' recording(s)?

JoshLilly

Unfortunately, I only know of one. Luckily, it's on Naxos, so the price isn't a killer! You can check out some 1 minute sound samples: http://tinyurl.com/yrxqw6

SonicMan46

Quote from: JoshLilly on May 18, 2007, 11:39:38 AM
.....................
Anyway, maybe Reinecke deserves a fresh chance, and a fresh thread. Sorry if I'm not supposed to create such one, please delete it if this is inappropriate.

Josh - I'm not sure if you're trying to start a Reinecke thread or to discourage one?  ::)  But for those who may be interested in this composer, check out this SHORT THREAD in the old forum (actually started by me!  :o) - appears that Harry & I were the only contributors; but there are pics of a half dozen or so CDs of this composer's work; Harry did not seem to like the Naxos disc, but this might be worth further posting!

JoshLilly

There are a few works by Reinecke that a lot more people might enjoy, if they were familiar with them: Piano Concerto #3, Violin Concerto in G minor, Symphonies 2&3. The 2nd and 3rd symphonies are on a great disc from the Chandos label, with Howard Shelley conducting the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra. I'd never heard that orchestra before, but they do a great job here, and as always, Chandos has excellent sound quality. As for the symphonies themselves, I revisted them recently after my wonderful experience with the G minor Violin Concerto. I really like them both, more than I remembered. I used to hear the first movement of the 3rd symphony in my head, and couldn't remember what it was! It's always a relief when you finally hear that piece that you couldn't place. Both of them have very attractive themes and nice emotional impact.

On that Naxos CD, I was lured by price and that I wanted that Harp Concerto. I've found a couple of other recordings of it, but never heard them. I wasn't that disappointed with it, but then, I have nothing with which to compare it. Which of the others is best?

Hector

I know what you mean.

A sort of Mendelssohn composed by Brahms or is it Brahms composed by Mendelssohn.

His works wend there sweet way along to there  affable endings and always sounds like the composer looks.

I'm not knocking him, just a tad puzzled but I will persevere as better men than me, Gunga Din, seem to "rate" him.

JoshLilly

#7
A piano roll made by Reinecke of Beethoven's Ecossaise in E-Flat. It's interesting that Reinecke was already about 3 years old before Beethoven even died. I doubt there is any other recording of any sort of Beethoven music made by someone who was alive while Beethoven was. Also, keep in mind that Reinecke was past 80 when he made this!

http://www.reinfrank.plus.com/music/ecossaise.mp3

Over the past year, I've grown somewhat obsessed with Reinecke. I'd have to say he's among my favourite composers these days.

Harry

Reinecke is a very good composer, and the Chandos cd with the symphonies is on its way to me!
Thanks for reminding me.
I had it before but lost if during a internal re shifting of my boxes. ;D

MN Dave

Quote from: Harry on April 25, 2008, 12:27:35 PM
I had it before but lost if during a internal re shifting of my boxes. ;D

Did that hurt, Harry?

Sean

The Flute concerto didn't really grab me either, but he's certainly a figure to return to.

The new erato

Quote from: MN Brahms on April 25, 2008, 12:29:51 PM
Did that hurt, Harry?
The theme of disappearing CDs is interesting; I've had a few CDs probably misplaced in the wrong box, never to be seen again. I always hope for them to unexpectedly pop up when I open an album, but no....my collection is too large.

The one argument for ripping to hard disc I think.

Jo498

Of the handful of pieces by Reinecke I have heard, the most interesting for me are the trios with winds and piano: oboe, horn, piano and clarinet, horn, piano. There is another one for the "Kegelstatt" ensemble clarinet, viola, piano that is also good but a not quite as colorful and varied. I'll probably try the symphonies on Chandos at some stage.
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

SonicMan46

Reinecke TTT!  Thread started in 2007, last post in 2017, and only a page long - possible rejuvenation? 

Carl Reinecke was a long-lived German pianist, composer, conductor, and pedagogue - short bio below w/ some of his 'famous' students listed.  He composed in nearly all genres and was quite prolific w/ 288 Opus numbers (and well over a 100 works w/o an opus #) - see his German website for a complete listing (first page shown at bottom).  He is representative of 19th century romantic composing - if Schumann, Mendelssohn, and Brahms are some of your favorites from that era, then Reinecke should please, although many would of course put him as 'second tier' - he might have been more highly rated by some if he did not live as long and composed in the same manner as a half or so century earlier?

My collection of his works is small, just 8 discs w/ a mixture of orchestral and chamber works - the first three up for a listen this morning shown below - all quite nice w/ good reviews (attached).  So, hope that others 'chime in' with their thoughts, comments, and any recommendations.  Dave :)

QuoteCarl Reinecke (1824 - 1910), German pianist, composer, conductor, and teacher who sought, in his works and teaching, to preserve the Classical tradition in the late 19th century. After study with his father, Reinecke made several concert tours. He taught counterpoint and piano at the Cologne Conservatory (1851–54) and was music director first at Barmen (1854–59), then at Breslau University (1859–60). He held the important posts of conductor of Leipzig's Gewandhaus Orchestra (1860–95) and teacher of piano and composition at the Leipzig Conservatory from 1860, while he continued to make annual concert tours. He became the Conservatory's director in 1897. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, counting among his students Edvard Grieg, Hugo Riemann, Arthur Sullivan, and Felix Weingartner. He wrote works for orchestra (symphonies, overtures, concertos), piano, and voice, as well as chamber music and works for the stage. (Source)

     

 

SonicMan46

Well, let me continue - I've been listening to Reinecke most of the day - below on top are the CDs remaining in my collection, i.e. Piano Concertos on 2-discs, Symphonies 2/3, and two chamber work CDs - reviews of most of these recordings attached for those interested.  My 'listening' conclusion today is that I enjoy his chamber works more (but that's my usual preference); also decided to order two more discs (at the bottom) of Symphony No. 1/Violin Concerto and the String Quartets on 2-discs, both received excellent reviews (not attached - will if requested).  Dave :)


     

 

Symphonic Addict

That set of piano concerti from CPO is what is playing here now, specifically the PC. 3. Sheer invention and poetry I mean, if you love Mendelssohn, Schumann, Beethoven, Schubert, you'll enjoy this.

Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

Jo498

I think I have heard the first symphony and maybe a piano concerto but don't remember any of it.
I like the chamber music with woodwinds, though, my favorite by some margin being the trio for oboe, horn, piano in a minor op.188 that seems the most atmospheric (and although I usually prefer clarinet, the most interesting in the combination of instruments/sounds compared to his two trios with clarinet).
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

Symphonic Addict

He's not one of those indispensable composers IMO, but he did write many interesting pieces in a well-crafted and traditional idiom. The PCs 3 and 4, the Concertos for Violin, Cello, Harp and Flute respectively, and Symphonies 2 and 3 contain some of his best music too. This is a composer I like to revisit with certain frequency.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

kyjo

His Violin Concerto is an impressive, serious, and inspired work that doesn't rely on soloistic pyrotechnics like most other Romantic VCs do. Also well worth hearing is his gorgeous Harp Concerto. I have pretty good memories of the PC no. 3; don't know any of his symphonies or chamber music yet.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

SonicMan46

Well, seems to be some interest lately in this short thread - since posting last, my Reinecke collection has gone up to 14 discs w/ the 3 shown below of Clarinet Music & Piano Trios (2-CDs) (updated database @ bottom - click to enlarge) - some reviews and comments attached for the new additions, for those interested.

Today will peruse Amazon and my 'across the pond' sites to see if I want any more of Carl's music - he compose nearly 300 Opus numbered works so there must be some more of interest, e.g. solo piano - any comments, suggestions, and/or recommendations?  Dave :)