Poll

Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?

YES
3 (14.3%)
NO
17 (81%)
NO OPINION
1 (4.8%)

Total Members Voted: 16

Voting closed: January 20, 2018, 07:32:58 PM

Author Topic: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?  (Read 11969 times)

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Offline amw

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #80 on: March 31, 2019, 06:29:56 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.
Brahms has the lullaby from op.49 which is definitely a hit. I think Bach also has a second hit in the form of the Minuet in G (which unlike BWV 565 is probably by him).

Offline JBS

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #81 on: March 31, 2019, 06:52:41 PM »
I seem to gave missed the Lullaby completely. I may have never even heard it before now!

I think the Hungarian Dances would be a better claimant. 
Speaking of which, in connection with the "hits not actually written by the composer who is famous for it" subthread

Quote
Only numbers 11, 14 and 16 are entirely original compositions. The better-known Hungarian Dances include Nos. 1 and 5, the latter which was based on the csárdás "Bártfai emlék" (Memories of Bártfa) by Hungarian composer Béla Kéler, which Brahms mistakenly thought was a traditional folksong.[3] A footnote on the Ludwig-Masters edition of a modern orchestration of Hungarian Dance No.1 states: "The material for this dance is believed to have come from the Divine Csárdás (ca. 1850) of Hungarian composer and conductor Miska Borzó."

(From https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Dances_(Brahms) )

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline Daverz

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #82 on: March 31, 2019, 07:08:19 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.

Schubert: Ave Maria

Offline Irons

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #83 on: March 31, 2019, 11:42:47 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.

Being pedantic, how can you be a one hit wonder with four? The Jupiter symphony must be up there with Eine Kleine. Schubert has the "Trout" and I wish I had a £1 for every playing of the Adagio of his String Quintet on "Desert Island Discs".
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #84 on: March 31, 2019, 11:51:19 PM »
The Planets is not close to being a "ringtone hit" or "classics of the movies", so the comparisons are lopsided.

There are at least two or three dozens of "ringtone hits" far better known than the Planets (I myself would probably not recognize some of the "Planets" besides Mars and Jupiter). E.g. by Bach at least the "Air", the badinerie from the flute suite, probably also Jesus, Joy, Sleepers awake, the beginning of the 3rd Brandenburg and probably a few more.

More apt comparisons for the Planets would be one hit wonders that are major works but not quite ringtone hits like the already mentioned Pictures of an Exhibition or Weber's Freischütz. I think Holst is in pretty good company there.
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I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #85 on: April 01, 2019, 12:47:52 AM »
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.

Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 5.
Schubert: Ave Maria.
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Offline Biffo

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #86 on: April 01, 2019, 12:52:27 AM »
Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 5.
Schubert: Ave Maria.

Brahms - No - I would probably recognise it as one of the Hungarian Dances but not know the number
Schubert - Yes but there would be lingering uncertainty as to whether it wasn't that other syrupy confection already mentioned.

Offline Florestan

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #87 on: April 01, 2019, 01:17:48 AM »
Brahms - No - I would probably recognise it as one of the Hungarian Dances but not know the number

It doesn't matter whether one would know the number --- or even the composer; what matters is that this particular Hungarian Dance is known worldwide, probably much more known than The Planets.

Quote
Schubert - Yes but there would be lingering uncertainty as to whether it wasn't that other syrupy confection already mentioned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ave_Maria_(Schubert)



"Melody is the essence of music." - Mozart

"Believe nothing you hear, and only one-half that you see." - Edgar Allan Poe

Offline ChopinBroccoli

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #88 on: July 20, 2019, 09:24:18 AM »
Even within The Planets, there are just sections that I find overwhelmingly excellent ... the work on the whole I'm not yet convinced is genuinely great ... I think it's good and I think Holst was talented

I don't think of him as a great composer by any stretch and I find much of his music derivative and pointlessly austere and stiff ... so, narrowly speaking I'd have to say he's a bit of a one-hit wonder if we're comparing him to really major composers

In general, I think his music is solid and generally quite good but I think it's impossible to objectively deem him "great" or even "near great"
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 09:26:12 AM by ChopinBroccoli »
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SymphonicAddict

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #89 on: July 20, 2019, 10:35:41 AM »
Even within The Planets, there are just sections that I find overwhelmingly excellent ... the work on the whole I'm not yet convinced is genuinely great ... I think it's good and I think Holst was talented

I don't think of him as a great composer by any stretch and I find much of his music derivative and pointlessly austere and stiff ... so, narrowly speaking I'd have to say he's a bit of a one-hit wonder if we're comparing him to really major composers

In general, I think his music is solid and generally quite good but I think it's impossible to objectively deem him "great" or even "near great"

The Planets is one of the real orchestral masterpieces of the early 20th century, so I differ with you on that regard. However, your other comments fit what I think of this composer, although I do consider other works like Beni Mora, Japanese Suite, First Choral Symphony, Indra, The Hymn of Jesus, Ode to Death, A Choral Fantasia, Suite de ballet, Egdon Heath, St Paul Suite, etc being greatly impressive, moving or fun.

Offline ChopinBroccoli

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #90 on: July 20, 2019, 10:43:40 AM »
The Planets is one of the real orchestral masterpieces of the early 20th century, so I differ with you on that regard. However, your other comments fit what I think of this composer, although I do consider other works like Beni Mora, Japanese Suite, First Choral Symphony, Indra, The Hymn of Jesus, Ode to Death, A Choral Fantasia, Suite de ballet, Egdon Heath, St Paul Suite, etc being greatly impressive, moving or fun.

Totally fair take
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #91 on: July 20, 2019, 11:39:24 AM »
The Planets is one of the real orchestral masterpieces of the early 20th century, so I differ with you on that regard. However, your other comments fit what I think of this composer, although I do consider other works like Beni Mora, Japanese Suite, First Choral Symphony, Indra, The Hymn of Jesus, Ode to Death, A Choral Fantasia, Suite de ballet, Egdon Heath, St Paul Suite, etc being greatly impressive, moving or fun.
I largely agree with you Cesar. In particulatr I rate the First Choral Symphony and Egdon Heath very highly. To your list I'd add The Perfect Fool Ballet Music, Hammersmith and the Cloud Messenger which has some wonderful moments. The band suites are good too.
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Offline Irons

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #92 on: July 21, 2019, 10:28:28 PM »
The Planets is one of the real orchestral masterpieces of the early 20th century, so I differ with you on that regard. However, your other comments fit what I think of this composer, although I do consider other works like Beni Mora, Japanese Suite, First Choral Symphony, Indra, The Hymn of Jesus, Ode to Death, A Choral Fantasia, Suite de ballet, Egdon Heath, St Paul Suite, etc being greatly impressive, moving or fun.

It is. To evaluate Holst I think the way to go is look at him as two composers. One who wrote The Planets and another who composed the rest. A work as great, popular and untypical (of Holst) as The Planets casts a long shadow. I am pleased Suite de Ballet is on your list as it is a work I love.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.