Bach Six Partitas

Started by mc ukrneal, January 25, 2010, 05:35:03 AM

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Mandryka

Quote from: milk on February 19, 2022, 06:14:04 AM
Does Rubsam give a sense of dance in, for example, his French Suites? I'm just listening to Tilney's 6th partita now. The courante is otherworldly; he plays it in a higher register than it's normally played. Yes, it's very slow, it's the opposite of dance; it's dark. He follow it up with an air that duels between the lute stop and non-lute stop. Again, he's not interested in the air as the dance its name suggests. The sarabande is even more of a crush; it's played almost like a fantasia or something. I respect what Tilney does and I think it's austere. I admit I probably won't return to it soon.

Weiss is reliably good.

No I don't think Rubsam does play up the dance, and I didn't mean what I said to be a dig against the later Tilney, I just want to get clear about what's actually happening. Rubsam plays up the counterpoint. I don't think I've heard Weiss.

With a performance like Tilney's partitas, you have to approach it with "soft ears" -- ears which aren't hardened by expectations.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

premont

Quote from: Mandryka on February 19, 2022, 06:23:47 AM
No I don't think Rubsam does play up the dance, and I didn't mean what I said to be a dig against the later Tilney, I just want to get clear about what's actually happening. Rubsam plays up the counterpoint. I don't think I've heard Weiss.

With a performance like Tilney's partitas, you have to approach it with "soft ears" -- ears which aren't hardened by expectations.

Both Rübsam and Tilney choose relatively slow tempi and neither of them stress the dance elements - to put it mildly, but I think Rübsam makes the music much more interesting and expressive than Tilney. Rübsam isn't "austere" and does care a lot more for the details (counterpoint and ornamentation eg.) than Tilney.
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Mandryka

#242
I just listened to Tilney and Rübsam play the toccata from the E minor. I thought both were pretty good actually because both suggest stumbling. Egarr - who, ironically, is the one who gave me the thought that the music suggests the stumbling Jesus on the way to Golgotha - doesn't come close!
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

milk

Quote from: Mandryka on February 19, 2022, 06:23:47 AM
No I don't think Rubsam does play up the dance, and I didn't mean what I said to be a dig against the later Tilney, I just want to get clear about what's actually happening. Rubsam plays up the counterpoint. I don't think I've heard Weiss.

With a performance like Tilney's partitas, you have to approach it with "soft ears" -- ears which aren't hardened by expectations.
Rubsam hasn't done the partitas on lautenwerk? It's the only one he's left to just the older piano recording? Have I got that right? I think I'll appreciate Rubsam more one day. I'm curious. Do you think the Goldberg recordings has markedly better sound quality?

Mandryka

#244
Quote from: milk on February 19, 2022, 10:37:10 PM
  Rubsam hasn't done the partitas on lautenwerk? It's the only one he's left to just the older piano recording? Have I got that right? I think I'll appreciate Rubsam more one day. I'm curious.

No, they're here and worth hearing.

https://www.wolfgangrubsam.com/listen

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

Quote from: milk on February 19, 2022, 06:14:04 AM

Weiss is reliably good.

I just listened to Weiss play the c minor. Big conception, noble and eloquent playing - a pleasure to hear.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

milk

Quote from: Mandryka on February 20, 2022, 06:58:12 PM
I just listened to Weiss play the c minor. Big conception, noble and eloquent playing - a pleasure to hear.
his WTC is very fine too.