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The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: vandermolen on April 08, 2007, 01:37:36 PM

Title: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on April 08, 2007, 01:37:36 PM
Often derided (by Shostakovich for one) and the composer of the massive "overblown" "Ilya Muromets" symphony, I have rather a soft spot for Gliere.  I had the great good fortune to hear Ilya Muromets live in London a few years ago (the first UK performance of the complete work since 1912!) and greatly enjoyed it.  Ok, it is a sprawling epic but wonderfully atmospheric and moving in the doomed apotheosis of the final movement.  I like Symphony 2 also.

any other views on Gliere?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on April 08, 2007, 02:00:07 PM
I think he's pretty much a hack myself but hey if you dig the big Romantic Wagnerian works then maybe you'll like him.

Like Shostakovich should be saying anything, didn't he come up with such hack-jobs like the 2nd and 3rd symphonies?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Catison on April 08, 2007, 02:06:15 PM
Ilya Muromets was one of my first loves.  I listen to it all the time.  I am not sure if it is quality or nostalgia, but it is still one of my favorite pieces.  His other music is OK.  My favorite recording is Downes.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 08, 2007, 02:08:58 PM
Well I have the Chandos recordings of his Symphonies, and I find them to be very good.
Some chamber works also.
I think him a melodic and creative composer, that has many things to say, and gets rather little exposure.
But I am grateful for what there is.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: carlos on April 08, 2007, 02:09:32 PM
Have his SQ 1 and 2, S.sextet, S.octet and violin concerto.
Love it all. Very russian and very romantic. Old fashioned?.Maybe. But I've russian blood and just looove romantic music. ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on April 08, 2007, 04:00:10 PM
Just listened to the first two movements of Ilya Muromets (Donald Johanos/Slovak Radio SO). Wow!!!!!!!! Really sumptuous fun music; I especially loved the opening bars of the second movement, with the creepy strings.  8)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: scottscheule on April 09, 2007, 11:51:23 AM
Know little of him.  But I believe he composed the Red Poppy, which I've enjoyed.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Catison on April 09, 2007, 12:53:15 PM
Know little of him.  But I believe he composed the Red Poppy, which I've enjoyed.

Do you have the full ballet?  Which recording?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 09, 2007, 01:06:52 PM
Well I discovered I have the Naxos recording, and my listening notes said good music, not so good performance.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: scottscheule on April 09, 2007, 01:11:23 PM
Do you have the full ballet?  Which recording?

I do not.  I heard it on ClassicalJunk, a while ago.

http://www.classicaljunk.net/
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Catison on April 09, 2007, 01:15:39 PM
Well I discovered I have the Naxos recording, and my listening notes said good music, not so good performance.

That is exactly my opinion.  The sound is horrible and the playing completely laughable occasionally, but the first 5 minutes or so is great.  I was wishing Chandos would release a complete performance, but I doubt they are going to any time soon.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Heather Harrison on April 09, 2007, 04:54:14 PM
I haven't heard much of his music (yet), but I love his Concerto for Coloratura Soprano and Orchestra.  It is a gorgeous, melodic, highly romantic piece and it has an unusual choice of solo instrument for a concerto.  I will have to check out more of his music.

Heather
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on April 09, 2007, 05:04:23 PM
Well I discovered I have the Naxos recording, and my listening notes said good music, not so good performance.
Last night, though, I was blown totally away by the Naxos discs of the Second and Third Symphonies. Unbelievable music! Wow. Everything about the music was stunning, the writing, the sheer epic epicness, the orchestration, the performances. And the Slovak Radio Symphony has never sounded better (they were almost world class!).
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 09, 2007, 09:31:11 PM
Last night, though, I was blown totally away by the Naxos discs of the Second and Third Symphonies. Unbelievable music! Wow. Everything about the music was stunning, the writing, the sheer epic epicness, the orchestration, the performances. And the Slovak Radio Symphony has never sounded better (they were almost world class!).

If you say so Brian, then I will try them next to the Chandos.
Will let you know if I agree. :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 09, 2007, 09:33:02 PM
That is exactly my opinion.  The sound is horrible and the playing completely laughable occasionally, but the first 5 minutes or so is great.  I was wishing Chandos would release a complete performance, but I doubt they are going to any time soon.

Its funny, that that was the exact thing I wrote, that after five minutes or so I switched it off, the unbearable sillyness of playing.
That's one big Naxos dud, as there ever was! ;D
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 09, 2007, 09:33:51 PM
I do not.  I heard it on ClassicalJunk, a while ago.

http://www.classicaljunk.net/

Yeah, that's were it belongs, Classic Junk!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: carlos on April 10, 2007, 02:58:17 AM
And his harp concerto is one of the most beautiful
I know.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on April 10, 2007, 03:03:03 AM
And his harp concerto is one of the most beautiful
I know.

True my friend it is beautiful!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on April 11, 2007, 03:50:46 PM
If you say so Brian, then I will try them next to the Chandos.
Will let you know if I agree. :)
Okay. I'd never heard anything by Gliere until the other evening when I tried the Naxos Symphonies 2 and 3, so if you judge a favored recording it may be on my shelf very soon.  :) 

Oh and the Slovak Radio Symphony actually has sounded better, on Kalman's operetta "Die Csardasfurstin". Forgot about that CD in my excitement  ;)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on May 22, 2007, 05:42:14 PM
Just wanted to bump this thread up because I've been listening to Gliere again lately and still love his music.  :)  Ilya Muromets is ... well unique. In a sprawling, sumptuous, wondrous way.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on May 22, 2007, 10:01:59 PM
Ilya Murometz is being played at the London Proms this summer on 19th July. Vassily Sinaisky BBC PO.  :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/1907.shtml#prom8
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: sound67 on May 22, 2007, 10:29:37 PM
"Ilya Murotmetz" is a masterpiece of Romantic tone poems and quite nicely sustains its epic length (which depending on performance, can vary a great deal). I've got four recordings, the Downes (Chandos, lovely), the Botstein (Telarc, also great), the Farberman (Unicorn/Regis, the slowest but most majestic) and the Johanos (Naxos, routine).

(http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/3484027.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/7042101.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/6216250.jpg)

Avoid Stokowski's truncated version which cuts the work down by half!

Also worthy is the Chandos CD containing the concertos for Harp and for Coloratura Soprano (yes, that's right):

(http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/6526999.jpg)

Coupled with Ginastera's masterful Harp Concerto.

Gliere was a minor composer to be sure. His other two symphonies are not as distinguished, and of the ballet scores only "The Red Poppy"   is compelling.

Thomas
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on May 23, 2007, 01:14:49 AM
I have all those recordings too and agree with your verdict. There was a fine Ormandy LP of the reduced version and the following CD is of historic interest:

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.classical.net/music/recs/images/e/emi66886.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/e/emi66887a.html&h=150&w=150&sz=21&hl=en&start=18&tbnid=xACBCAAepSXjMM:&tbnh=96&tbnw=96&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dgliere%2Bilya%26gbv%3D2%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Catison on May 23, 2007, 04:42:58 AM
Avoid Stokowski's truncated version which cuts the work down by half!

The Botstein recording also has several cuts, but yet I still enjoy it.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on May 23, 2007, 05:27:37 AM
Just wanted to bump this thread up because I've been listening to Gliere again lately and still love his music.  :)  Ilya Muromets is ... well unique. In a sprawling, sumptuous, wondrous way.

I would say go for the Chandos recordings, they are much better recorded, the overall quality of music making is much better.
It needs a good recording because of the somewhat thick scoring, so you must be able to follow it all, otherwise you loose track quickly.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brewski on May 23, 2007, 08:32:49 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/6216250.jpg)


I bought the Downes recording after hearing Charles Dutoit conduct the piece live a few years ago.  Loved both!  It's definitely a work that should show up in the concert hall more often. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: carlos on May 24, 2007, 07:23:42 AM
I've the classic recording of Nathan Rakhlin and
the Moscow Radio and TV 0. (1975), and I like
it very much.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 27, 2009, 08:26:23 AM
Gliere featured on BBC Radio 3 this week, so I thought I'd revive this old thread. Maybe he was born 50 or more years too late but symphonies 2 and 3 remain works I greatly enjoy and often return to.  Seeing the sprawling epic Ilya Murometz Symphony live in London was a great experience.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brewski on March 27, 2009, 08:35:06 AM
Gliere featured on BBC Radio 3 this week, so I thought I'd revive this old thread. Maybe he was born 50 or more years too late but symphonies 2 and 3 remain works I greatly enjoy and often return to.  Seeing the sprawling epic Ilya Murometz Symphony live in London was a great experience.

Did you hear this recently?  (I've only heard it live once.)

PS, can't believe no one posted anything in this thread in almost two years!

--Bruce
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 27, 2009, 08:47:55 AM
Did you hear this recently?  (I've only heard it live once.)

PS, can't believe no one posted anything in this thread in almost two years!

--Bruce

Prob. about 3/5 years ago Bruce, at the Barbican Centre. I think that it was the first British performance of the work since c 1912! A great occasion.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brewski on March 27, 2009, 08:57:25 AM
I think that it was the first British performance of the work since c 1912!

 :o  Is that just a crime, or what?  (Not that the U.S. is programming it nightly either; I don't think I've seen it on a program since the Dutoit performance I heard.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Dundonnell on March 27, 2009, 05:39:56 PM
I will join you in expressing my love for 'Ilya Murometz'(in the Chandos/Downes performance), the Second Symphony, the Harp Concerto etc but can I put in a word for the works which I don't think have been mentioned so far?

There is the Horn Concerto(coupled on Chandos with the Symphonic Suite from the Ballet "The Bronze Horseman"), the splendid Symphonic Poem "The Zaporozhy Cossacks"(the Chandos coupling for the Second Symphony), but most of all-and available on the Naxos disc of the Symphony No.1-the Symphonic Poem "The Sirens", a quite superb piece of nature portraiture whch sounds like Sibelius and Bax rolled together into an intoxicating whole :). If you haven't heard "The Sirens" then I strongly recommend it to you!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 28, 2009, 02:57:51 PM
I will join you in expressing my love for 'Ilya Murometz'(in the Chandos/Downes performance), the Second Symphony, the Harp Concerto etc but can I put in a word for the works which I don't think have been mentioned so far?

There is the Horn Concerto(coupled on Chandos with the Symphonic Suite from the Ballet "The Bronze Horseman"), the splendid Symphonic Poem "The Zaporozhy Cossacks"(the Chandos coupling for the Second Symphony), but most of all-and available on the Naxos disc of the Symphony No.1-the Symphonic Poem "The Sirens", a quite superb piece of nature portraiture whch sounds like Sibelius and Bax rolled together into an intoxicating whole :). If you haven't heard "The Sirens" then I strongly recommend it to you!

Fortunately I have that CD and will play it over the weekend. Am currently listening to the wonderfully sprawlingly indulgent Harold Faberman RPO recording of Ilya Muromets on Regis (from early early digital Unicorn LPs).
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: DFO on March 28, 2009, 04:01:09 PM
A friend trade me a CD copied from LP with Gliere's two string quartets; No1
op.2 and No2 op.20. The first is an early piece rather weak, but the second is a splendid and very Russian one, IMO as good as any of Glazunov's. Recommended.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 28, 2009, 05:21:41 PM
A friend trade me a CD copied from LP with Gliere's two string quartets; No1
op.2 and No2 op.20. The first is an early piece rather weak, but the second is a splendid and very Russian one, IMO as good as any of Glazunov's. Recommended.

Thanks, I shall look out for SQ No 2.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on March 28, 2009, 06:14:00 PM
Symphony #3 "Ilya Murometz" is at least on the same epic level as Rachmaninov's Isle of the Dead, albeit longer!

If it does not compete e.g. with Schoenberg's Gurrelieder or Pelleas und Melisande or the Mahler Tenth in pushing tonality to the limit and beyond, one can only say that Gliere, like Rachmaninov, saw no reason for it.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: schweitzeralan on April 03, 2009, 07:22:02 AM
Often derided (by Shostakovich for one) and the composer of the massive "overblown" "Ilya Muromets" symphony, I have rather a soft spot for Gliere.  I had the great good fortune to hear Ilya Muromets live in London a few years ago (the first UK performance of the complete work since 1912!) and greatly enjoyed it.  Ok, it is a sprawling epic but wonderfully atmospheric and moving in the doomed apotheosis of the final movement.  I like Symphony 2 also.

any other views on Gliere?
The 3rd is a quintessential masterpiece; much Scriabin influence but marvelously moves along on its own.  However, I am not nearly as impressed with the 2nd.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on April 03, 2009, 02:52:49 PM
The 3rd is a quintessential masterpiece; much Scriabin influence but marvelously moves along on its own.  However, I am not nearly as impressed with the 2nd.

Thanks. I largely agree. Symphony No 3 is Gliere's clain to posterity I think.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on June 13, 2009, 05:52:56 PM
For all of you Gliere/Murometz junkies, some kind soul downloaded the score to the Third Symphony to the Petrucci Music Library online!!!

See:  http://imslp.org/wiki/Symphony_No.3%2C_Op.42_%27Ilya_Murometz%27_%28Glière%2C_Reinhold%29 (http://imslp.org/wiki/Symphony_No.3%2C_Op.42_%27Ilya_Murometz%27_%28Glière%2C_Reinhold%29)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Moldyoldie on July 13, 2009, 05:59:57 AM
[Pasted from "What Are You Listening To?"]
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612APNRPP2L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Glière: Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murometz"
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Harold Farberman, cond.
UNICORN-KANCHANA

This is an interminable, nearly 100-minute exercise in Late Romantic non-expression.  The first hour might make for good background music, but only if one can abide a persistent drone of near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of massed strings -- Dramamine is not included.  I realize the symphony has a program, but this might work better as a silent movie soundtrack; several grueling listens have failed to convince me otherwise.

Glière's "Ilya Murometz" has its fervent fans, but if one truly wishes to be introduced to this bloated gargantua, I'd feel comfortable in suggesting almost any other recording (though I've yet to hear any of them and am well-nigh loath to do so), apparently all of which are either appreciably amended or reinterpreted for "listening compactness".  Farberman's recording is probably best left for cognoscenti...or for someone's extended sessions of morbid self-imposed sleep deprivation.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Harry on July 13, 2009, 08:13:16 AM
[Pasted from "What Are You Listening To?"]
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612APNRPP2L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Glière: Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murometz"
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Harold Farberman, cond.
UNICORN-KANCHANA

This is an interminable, nearly 100-minute exercise in Late Romantic non-expression.  The first hour might make for good background music, but only if one can abide a persistent drone of near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of massed strings -- Dramamine is not included.  I realize the symphony has a program, but this might work better as a silent movie soundtrack; several grueling listens have failed to convince me otherwise.

Glière's "Ilya Murometz" has its fervent fans, but if one truly wishes to be introduced to this bloated gargantua, I'd feel comfortable in suggesting almost any other recording (though I've yet to hear any of them and am well-nigh loath to do so), apparently all of which are either appreciably amended or reinterpreted for "listening compactness".  Farberman's recording is probably best left for cognoscenti...or for someone's extended sessions of morbid self-imposed sleep deprivation.

I suggest you listen to the chandos recordings, they are by far superior.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on July 13, 2009, 11:01:27 PM
I have CD versions of Gliere's Ilya Muromets Symphony conducted by:

Harold Faberman (Regis/Unicorn)
Nathan Rakhlin (Russian Disc)
Igor Golovchin (Russian Disc)
Donald Johanos (Marco Polo/Naxos)
Leon Botstein (Telarc)
Lepold Stokowski (EMI and Andante)
Edward Downes (Chandos)
Jacques Rachmilovich (EMI)
+ an LP version with Eugene Ormandy (RCA)

Whilst this is clearly indicative of an obsessive-compulsive disorder, I do like the work very much - either you allow yourself to wallow in the wagnerian/sibelian self-indulgence of the piece - or you don't. The final section The Heroic Deeds and Petrification of Ilya Muromets I find genuinely moving - a kind of doomed struggle, which appeals to my sense of looming catastrophe.

As for the different versions, my favourites are Nathan Rakhlin's on Russian Disc (my No 1 choice) but also excellent are the Downes recording on Chandos and I rather like the truncated Jacques Rachmilovich version with the Orchestra Dell'Academia Di Santa Cecilia, Roma - a very interesting CD (with Kabalevsky's Second Symphony and Glinka's Russlan and Ludmilla) dubbed from 78s and recorded in 1949. I had not come across Jacques Rachmilovich before - he died at sea in 1956 and was buried in the Strait of Gibralter. Unfortunately the CD is quite rare (I got it as a US import).

Here is an article about some different recordings:

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://classicalcdreview.com/gliere.jpg&imgrefurl=http://classicalcdreview.com/ilyafinal.html&usg=__Fz-6OL0Nk8II6KuqWn-dvI8qKV4=&h=240&w=179&sz=9&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=2kmiAyFwJvR-zM:&tbnh=110&tbnw=82&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dgliere%2Btalmi%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4ADBR_enGB327GB328%26sa%3DN%26um%3D1
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Moldyoldie on July 14, 2009, 04:08:01 AM
I swear, not more than five minutes after clicking on "Order" for the Downes/BBCSO/Chandos recording of Ilya Murametz, I came across this on another message board: :(

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/ (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2009, 09:33:19 AM
I swear, not more than five minutes after clicking on "Order" for the Downes/BBCSO/Chandos recording of Ilya Murametz, I came across this on another message board: :(

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/ (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/)

Yes, I too had just that type of experience today. Downes's death at the Dignitas clinic is the headline of the London Evening Standard today. The CD you ordered is a worthy tribute to this fine conductor and I hope that you will enjoy the work more in this recording. I saw the work live a few years ago in London - a concert I shall never forget (first complete performance in UK since 1912!)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: schweitzeralan on July 15, 2009, 03:11:47 AM
Thanks. I largely agree. Symphony No 3 is Gliere's clain to posterity I think.

You liked the 1st. Symphony.  From what you wrote it sounds interesting.  Wonder whether I should order it.  Hpefully it isn't infused with 19th century influences. I am a profuse lover of early 20th century musical harmoniesl modes, etc.  Bax, Scriabin, Debussy, Sibelius, rank high on my list.  Perhaps I shall give Gliere's 1st. a try.  It's just one of my many gambles over the years.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: schweitzeralan on July 18, 2009, 02:59:11 AM
I will join you in expressing my love for 'Ilya Murometz'(in the Chandos/Downes performance), the Second Symphony, the Harp Concerto etc but can I put in a word for the works which I don't think have been mentioned so far?

There is the Horn Concerto(coupled on Chandos with the Symphonic Suite from the Ballet "The Bronze Horseman"), the splendid Symphonic Poem "The Zaporozhy Cossacks"(the Chandos coupling for the Second Symphony), but most of all-and available on the Naxos disc of the Symphony No.1-the Symphonic Poem "The Sirens", a quite superb piece of nature portraiture whch sounds like Sibelius and Bax rolled together into an intoxicating whole :). If you haven't heard "The Sirens" then I strongly recommend it to you!

Just received the 1st Symphony and the "Sirens." Intriguing harmonies and chromatic structures conceived during the years he must have been exorcising his masterpiece, the beloved "Ilya." Superb.  Don't know how I could have missed that one.  His first two symphonies appear to be mere approaches  toward his ultimate fulfillment in the 3rd.  Other than"Sirens," and the "Ilya,' I don't know if there are any other significant works.  I personally think that the "Red Poppy" is a lightweight. Gliere, not unlike the plight of so many other Soviet era composers, had to survive during the Stalinesque nightmare.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: listener on November 05, 2009, 09:56:25 PM
An unofficial  transfer of a 2-disc Westminster LP set was not to be shipped to Canada.

Reinhold Glière       * Symphony #3 in B minor, Op. 42, "Ilya Murometz"

Vienna State Opera Orchestra/Hermann Scherchen
ReDiscovery RD025 ADD monaural 79:55

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on November 06, 2009, 03:08:16 PM
I was reading an internet article about the conductor Charles Gerhardt which mentioned that he'd always wanted to make a recording of Gliere's Ilya Mourometz. How sad that this was not to be - I have no doubt that it would have been a great performance.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: listener on November 06, 2009, 03:47:13 PM
If you've wondered if his output might have something smaller in it, there's the
12 Duets for 2 Violins, op.49
10 Duets for 2 Cellos op.3
8 Duets for Violin and Cello op. 39
on Discover 920 526  which won't wake the neighbors if used for late night listening
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on November 08, 2009, 01:12:22 AM
If you've wondered if his output might have something smaller in it, there's the
12 Duets for 2 Violins, op.49
10 Duets for 2 Cellos op.3
8 Duets for Violin and Cello op. 39
on Discover 920 526  which won't wake the neighbors if used for late night listening

That looks like a very interesting CD - thank you. In fact my wife has just instructed me to 'TURN THE MUSIC DOWN AS IT IS UNFAIR TO THE NEIGHBOURS! Personally I do not see what is wrong with playing Braga Santos's Third Symphony at top volume at 7.30 am on a Sunday morning  ;D.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 02, 2010, 12:12:22 PM
I find that the last movement of Symphony No 3 'Ilya Murometz' conveys one of the best examples of hopeless defiance or hopeless striving - something I always look out for in music. I really like this work although there is a generally fairly low critical opinion of it. I feel that Gliere deserves more attention.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: False_Dmitry on August 02, 2010, 12:32:03 PM
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building. 
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brewski on August 02, 2010, 12:41:33 PM
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building.

I love that!  And trying to imagine a parallel situation in any American city, e.g., as people enter Grand Central Station in New York, they hear Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man.

--Bruce
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: snyprrr on August 02, 2010, 07:07:57 PM

Whilst this is clearly indicative of an obsessive-compulsive disorder,  - a kind of doomed struggle, which appeals to my sense of looming catastrophe.

Tears,...coming out of my eyes, laughing :-*
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 02, 2010, 10:15:26 PM
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building.

Yes, I experienced this a couple of years ago. Shostakovich made fun of this in 'Testimony'. When my plane landed in Prague a few years ago they played an extract from Smetana (Ma Vlast) as the aircraft landed and taxid to a stop.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 02, 2010, 10:16:24 PM
Tears,...coming out of my eyes, laughing :-*

Well, we aim to please  :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on September 06, 2012, 02:14:21 PM
The Farberman recording is being reissued on Alto.

(http://i.prs.to/t_200/altoalc2019.jpg)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: madaboutmahler on March 28, 2013, 12:51:28 PM
Coming to the end of my first listen to the epic 3rd symphony, "Ilya Muromets". What an incredibly epic work! Captivating throughout the gigantic duration, full of gorgeous orchestration, thrilling climaxes, awesome depictions and moving emotions. Amazing!!

http://www.youtube.com/v/li0dr71wItc

Will be keen to get a copy of this performance from Downes very soon.

Did Gliere write anything else anywhere close to being as good as this? :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: listener on March 28, 2013, 01:56:11 PM
Coming to the end of my first listen to the epic 3rd symphony, "Ilya Muromets".
Will be keen to get a copy of this performance from Downes very soon.

Did Gliere write anything else anywhere close to being as good as this? :)
The Red Poppy may not be great, but it's a good piece.    Avoid the Faberman 3rd, I agree it makes bad Bruckner sound good.     The concertos - for coloratura soprano (vocalising, no words) and horn are quite pleasant too.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: madaboutmahler on March 28, 2013, 02:37:28 PM
The Red Poppy may not be great, but it's a good piece.    Avoid the Faberman 3rd, I agree it makes bad Bruckner sound good.     The concertos - for coloratura soprano (vocalising, no words) and horn are quite pleasant too.

Thanks for the feedback. Think I have heard most of the horn concerto before, I remember it being very enjoyable, and pleasant is certainly a good word to describe it! Less 'cutting edge' than the 3rd symphony though.... any other works where he is as adventurous?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on March 28, 2013, 04:26:30 PM
... Less 'cutting edge' than the 3rd symphony though.... any other works where he is as adventurous?

I would say no.  After the Symphony #3, for orchestral works at least, he stepped back and stayed with his rather conservative style from before 1912.

Somewhat similar to Richard Strauss abandoning the path which had led to Elektra.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 29, 2013, 02:36:55 PM
Just received the Bearac Reissue transfer of Symphony No 3 (Rakhlin). The transfer is incomporably better than the same performance on Russian Disc. I think that it's the greatest recorded performance of the work.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Daverz on March 29, 2013, 02:39:48 PM
Just received the Bearac Reissue transfer of Symphony No 3 (Rakhlin). The transfer is incomporably better than the same performance on Russian Disc. I think that it's the greatest recorded performance of the work.

I have the Locked In the Vault transfers (and also the CBS-Melodiya Lps).  Where can one get this transfer?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 30, 2013, 05:52:39 AM
I have the Locked In the Vault transfers (and also the CBS-Melodiya Lps).  Where can one get this transfer?

http://www.bearacreissues.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=335&category_id=1&keyword=gliere&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=12
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Daverz on March 30, 2013, 03:03:21 PM
http://www.bearacreissues.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=335&category_id=1&keyword=gliere&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=12

Thanks.  Maybe I'll try transfering my own copy.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on March 30, 2013, 04:51:04 PM
The Red Poppy may not be great, but it's a good piece.    Avoid the Faberman 3rd, I agree it makes bad Bruckner sound good.     The concertos - for coloratura soprano (vocalising, no words) and horn are quite pleasant too.
With due respect,I'm afraid I just have to,completely, disagree with that. The Faberman recording was my introduction to the symphony,as a teenager,courtesy of my local library. I like his approach. As one 'critic' observed,there is a sense of timelessness. His pacing is slow & measured,but this is justified,imho,by a feeling of scale,grandeur & atmosphere which is absent from the more hectic,technicolor approach favoured by many of his rivals. Yes,they are superficially exciting,if you like the Hollywood blockbuster approach;but that's the problem with allot of these recordings as far as I'm concerned. I think Faberman was spot on! A marvellous performance. Alto should have kept the original Unicorn cover 'painting',though. I remember rummaging through that library record rack,all those years ago & thinking,'Whoa! That's wierd!' I just had to take it out! ;D
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on March 31, 2013, 01:21:41 AM
With due respect,I'm afraid I just have to,completely, disagree with that. The Faberman recording was my introduction to the symphony,as a teenager,courtesy of my local library. I like his approach. As one 'critic' observed,there is a sense of timelessness. His pacing is slow & measured,but this is justified,imho,by a feeling of scale,grandeur & atmosphere which is absent from the more hectic,technicolor approach favoured by many of his rivals. Yes,they are superficially exciting,if you like the Hollywood blockbuster approach;but that's the problem with allot of these recordings as far as I'm concerned. I think Faberman was spot on! A marvellous performance. Alto should have kept the original Unicorn cover 'painting',though. I remember rummaging through that library record rack,all those years ago & thinking,'Whoa! That's wierd!' I just had to take it out! ;D

I agree about the Alto cover! The Regis one was better but not as good as the Unicorn.  Rakhlin remains my favourite for the epic Russian/soviet atmosphere of the playing and it is more deeply felt than some recordings; I think highly of the Faberman too. My own introduction was Ormandy's RCA LP which I have never seen on CD.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on June 06, 2013, 04:05:52 AM
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and JoAnn Falletta are the somewhat unlikely combo who will present the next CD version of "Ilya Murometz." Last month, between concerts in Buffalo and at Carnegie Hall, they recorded the piece for Naxos. Falletta writes, (http://www.naxos.com/news/default.asp?op=1065&displayMenu=Naxos_News&type=2) "People travelled to Buffalo and to New York City from all over the country to hear the performance(s).... The musicians of the Buffalo Philharmonic embraced the gorgeous fabric of this extraordinary work and—from the solo contrabassoon to the nine courageous horns to the large string section and everyone else—performed the work with complete conviction, passion and high drama. It was a very memorable week for all of the members of the orchestra, and has become a high point in our BPO musical history. The Buffalo Philharmonic performed and recorded the symphony complete and uncut."

Here's a tiny recording session clip on YouTube. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tpIskkC18EE)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on June 06, 2013, 11:04:36 AM
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and JoAnn Falletta are the somewhat unlikely combo who will present the next CD version of "Ilya Murometz." Last month, between concerts in Buffalo and at Carnegie Hall, they recorded the piece for Naxos. Falletta writes, (http://www.naxos.com/news/default.asp?op=1065&displayMenu=Naxos_News&type=2) "People travelled to Buffalo and to New York City from all over the country to hear the performance(s).... The musicians of the Buffalo Philharmonic embraced the gorgeous fabric of this extraordinary work and—from the solo contrabassoon to the nine courageous horns to the large string section and everyone else—performed the work with complete conviction, passion and high drama. It was a very memorable week for all of the members of the orchestra, and has become a high point in our BPO musical history. The Buffalo Philharmonic performed and recorded the symphony complete and uncut."

Here's a tiny recording session clip on YouTube. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tpIskkC18EE)

Great news about the new recording.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 06, 2013, 11:40:34 AM
Well, I shan't have any excuse not to listen to the piece now ; )
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on August 24, 2013, 03:10:23 PM
I don't think I've expressed my admiration for Gliere's music yet; allow me to do so now. His music may not be the most profound ever composed, but it is great fun for those (like myself) who enjoy a romantic wallow and is full of gorgeous and memorable tunes. He did write some embarrassingly trite, tub-thumping stuff, such as the late Heroic March (which goes on for a painful eleven minutes!), but the fact that he wrote such marvelous works as Symphony no. 3, The Sirens, The Red Poppy and the concertos for coloratura soprano, horn and harp far outweigh this fact.

What are everyone's favorite recordings of the irresistible Symphony no. 3? My favorite is Farberman's 93-minute (!) account which, surprisingly, keeps the dramatic tension going as much as any performance. It has, thankfully, been reissued on the Alto label along with his Cello Concerto, a fine but rather overlong piece, which, in the end, is rather disappointing and not one of Gliere's better efforts. It's still a worthwhile listen, though. Back to Symphony no. 3, my second favorite performance is Downes', which is captured in Chandos' opulent sound. I advise anyone new to this work to steer well clear of Botstein's and Stokowski's truncated recordings of the piece. I don’t find the piece one bit overlong and the cuts certainly don’t benefit it at all.

Is anyone familiar with this disc? I’m particularly interested in it because it includes the only recording of the first movement of Gliere’s unfinished VC:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tjAp%2BwXEL._SY300_.jpg)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 25, 2013, 09:42:07 PM
I don't think I've expressed my admiration for Gliere's music yet; allow me to do so now. His music may not be the most profound ever composed, but it is great fun for those (like myself) who enjoy a romantic wallow and is full of gorgeous and memorable tunes. He did write some embarrassingly trite, tub-thumping stuff, such as the late Heroic March (which goes on for a painful eleven minutes!), but the fact that he wrote such marvelous works as Symphony no. 3, The Sirens, The Red Poppy and the concertos for coloratura soprano, horn and harp far outweigh this fact.

What are everyone's favorite recordings of the irresistible Symphony no. 3? My favorite is Farberman's 93-minute (!) account which, surprisingly, keeps the dramatic tension going as much as any performance. It has, thankfully, been reissued on the Alto label along with his Cello Concerto, a fine but rather overlong piece, which, in the end, is rather disappointing and not one of Gliere's better efforts. It's still a worthwhile listen, though. Back to Symphony no. 3, my second favorite performance is Downes', which is captured in Chandos' opulent sound. I advise anyone new to this work to steer well clear of Botstein's and Stokowski's truncated recordings of the piece. I don’t find the piece one bit overlong and the cuts certainly don’t benefit it at all.

Is anyone familiar with this disc? I’m particularly interested in it because it includes the only recording of the first movement of Gliere’s unfinished VC:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tjAp%2BwXEL._SY300_.jpg)


Yes, I have that disc. I like Symphony 2, which gets a bad press. Didn't make much of the VC but must listen again. Rakhlin and Faberman are my favourite versions of Symphony No 3 with Downes not far behind.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 26, 2013, 03:32:02 AM
I like Symphony No 2 better!! ??? ;D And his first isn't bad! But I need another listen.
I agree with kyjo's first choice for No3. The Faberman has that feeling of 'timelesness' noted by one reviewer/critic (I can't remember who or where?). It evokes a remote past and has a sense of scale and architecture;a result of Faberman's often slow tempi;yet knowing where to move on when he needs to. Downes is initially exciting,but ultimately,after a few listens,too hard driven. It's all spectacle on the surface,but ultimately a rather hollow experience,good as it is.
A pity they couple the Faberman with the Cello Concerto. I don't want that,I just want the symphony. Who cares if the duration of cd 2 ends up being 'too short'. And yes,I know you can use the program button,or make cdrs!!!
What a pity Gliere doesn't seem to have conducted a recording. I'd have killed to hear him conduct even a cut version,through the swish,crackles & even boxy sound!

The Red Poppy Ballet on Naxos is very enjoyable. Some lovely music. And I didn't like the 'complete' version,at first! Does anyone here know if Melodiya ever recorded a 'complete' version. Various searches have produced no evidence of one,so far!

I believe that Melodiya did record one of his operas;but I may be wrong. It would be interesting to be able to hear one.

Update: Nothing here! :(

http://www.durbeckarchive.com/melodiya.htm
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on August 26, 2013, 04:32:34 PM
Thanks for the replies, Jeffrey and cilgwyn! I'll check out that ASV disc as well as the Rakhlin recording of the Third, which I don't yet own.

EDIT: I read a one-star Amazon review of the Rakhlin recording (which is quite hard to obtain) that said the audio quality of the transfer is horrendous! ??? (BTW 6 out of 7 customers agreed with this reviewer.) What transfer of this performance do you own, Jeffrey, and how is the audio quality?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2013, 02:16:12 PM
Thanks for the replies, Jeffrey and cilgwyn! I'll check out that ASV disc as well as the Rakhlin recording of the Third, which I don't yet own.

EDIT: I read a one-star Amazon review of the Rakhlin recording (which is quite hard to obtain) that said the audio quality of the transfer is horrendous! ??? (BTW 6 out of 7 customers agreed with this reviewer.) What transfer of this performance do you own, Jeffrey, and how is the audio quality?

Kyle, the Russian Disc transfer of the Rakhlin recording is poor. So, the version to get is the much better recent Bearac Reissues transfer:

http://www.bearacreissues.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=335&flypage=flypage.tpl&pop=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=12&vmcchk=1&Itemid=12
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on August 27, 2013, 04:13:32 PM
Kyle, the Russian Disc transfer of the Rakhlin recording is poor. So, the version to get is the much better recent Bearac Reissues transfer:

http://www.bearacreissues.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=335&flypage=flypage.tpl&pop=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=12&vmcchk=1&Itemid=12

Thanks, Jeffrey. :) Is that transfer available from Amazon? It doesn't seem to be.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2013, 09:42:58 PM
Thanks, Jeffrey. :) Is that transfer available from Amazon? It doesn't seem to be.

No Kyle, just from Bearac themselves. They are based in Greece I think but deliver quickly and are not too expensive.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: listener on September 02, 2013, 11:16:49 AM

What a pity Gliere doesn't seem to have conducted a recording. I'd have killed to hear him conduct even a cut version,through the swish,crackles & even boxy sound!

He did conduct his horn concerto for an recording (LP, never reissued as far as I know)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on December 30, 2013, 04:46:50 PM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/naxos8573161.jpg)

“The Glière Symphony No. 3 has always been a piece that shimmered on my horizon – a cult piece, in a way, renowned as the composer’s towering masterpiece but rarely played in concert. As long as a Mahler symphony and enormous in its instrumental requirements, it was a work that people spoke about reverently but almost never heard live. The recording was an adventure that changed our orchestra, strengthened us, and became an artistic benchmark for our musicians. We revelled in the gorgeous landscape of the Symphony – from mysterious bass murmurings to crushing walls of brass fortissimo to breathtaking impressionistic renderings of forests and birds. We performed and recorded this massive work uncut to preserve Glière’s extraordinary architecture. This work is a cathedral in sound that unfolds in breathtaking swashes of colour, poetry and monumental climaxes.” – JoAnn Falletta

Scheduled for release February 2014
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on December 30, 2013, 05:09:54 PM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/naxos8573161.jpg)

“The Glière Symphony No. 3 has always been a piece that shimmered on my horizon – a cult piece, in a way, renowned as the composer’s towering masterpiece but rarely played in concert. As long as a Mahler symphony and enormous in its instrumental requirements, it was a work that people spoke about reverently but almost never heard live. The recording was an adventure that changed our orchestra, strengthened us, and became an artistic benchmark for our musicians. We revelled in the gorgeous landscape of the Symphony – from mysterious bass murmurings to crushing walls of brass fortissimo to breathtaking impressionistic renderings of forests and birds. We performed and recorded this massive work uncut to preserve Glière’s extraordinary architecture. This work is a cathedral in sound that unfolds in breathtaking swashes of colour, poetry and monumental climaxes.” – JoAnn Falletta

Scheduled for release February 2014

The work is a barn-burner!  I have always heard the spirit of Scriabin hovering in the area. 

So the Buffalo Philharmonic is tackling this work!  I can well imagine that the work was something of an epiphany!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Brian on January 01, 2014, 08:31:26 AM
Track timings now available for the new Naxos recording - here's the PDF of the back cover of the CD (http://www.naxos.com/SharedFiles/pdf/rear/8.573161r.pdf#)! Several minutes faster than the old Johanos recording, and faster yet than Downes on Chandos.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on January 29, 2014, 02:01:40 PM
On the basis of JoAnn Falletta's excellent recent Moeran CD, I shall greatly look forward to hearing her take on the Gliere. I was very lucky to hear it live some years ago in London.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on February 09, 2014, 12:17:11 AM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/naxos8573161.jpg)

“The Glière Symphony No. 3 has always been a piece that shimmered on my horizon – a cult piece, in a way, renowned as the composer’s towering masterpiece but rarely played in concert. As long as a Mahler symphony and enormous in its instrumental requirements, it was a work that people spoke about reverently but almost never heard live. The recording was an adventure that changed our orchestra, strengthened us, and became an artistic benchmark for our musicians. We revelled in the gorgeous landscape of the Symphony – from mysterious bass murmurings to crushing walls of brass fortissimo to breathtaking impressionistic renderings of forests and birds. We performed and recorded this massive work uncut to preserve Glière’s extraordinary architecture. This work is a cathedral in sound that unfolds in breathtaking swashes of colour, poetry and monumental climaxes.” – JoAnn Falletta

Scheduled for release February 2014

I have greatly enjoyed this new release. A super performance and recording by JoAnn Falletta and the Buffalo PO. The ancient church chant, played, as the notes say, by a pleading bassoon and English horn near the start of the work is more affecting and Boris Godunov-like than I recall from other recordings and, it is all on one CD unlike the Regis version for example. The epic battle of the last movement - the best music in the symphony I think, when Muromets battles the armies of Heaven is as exciting as any other version. If you want a recording of this sprawling epic I think that this would be as good as any version. The Moeran and Gliere Naxos new releases have given me a lot of pleasure and I shall be looking out for more recordings by JoAnn Falletta.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 12, 2014, 10:27:37 AM
I have greatly enjoyed this new release. A super performance and recording by JoAnn Falletta and the Buffalo PO. The ancient church chant, played, as the notes say, by a pleading bassoon and English horn near the start of the work is more affecting and Boris Godunov-like than I recall from other recordings and, it is all on one CD unlike the Regis version for example. The epic battle of the last movement - the best music in the symphony I think, when Muromets battles the armies of Heaven is as exciting as any other version. If you want a recording of this sprawling epic I think that this would be as good as any version. The Moeran and Gliere Naxos new releases have given me a lot of pleasure and I shall be looking out for more recordings by JoAnn Falletta.

Cheers, Jeffrey, thanks for this.  I think I'll give this one a try!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on April 21, 2014, 06:08:04 AM
I advise anyone new to this work to steer well clear of Botstein's and Stokowski's truncated recordings of the piece.

The Botstein/LSO is supposed to be complete. Do you hear cuts in it?

Th Downes/BBC version is on Youtube with the score that you can follow along. It is a bit hard to see but if you have a big enough screen you can almost make out the notes.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 21, 2014, 06:23:17 AM
The Botstein/LSO is supposed to be complete. Do you hear cuts in it?

Th Downes/BBC version is on Youtube with the score that you can follow along. It is a bit hard to see but if you have a big enough screen you can almost make out the notes.

Dude! ...where have you been for the last three years?

Sarge
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on April 21, 2014, 06:31:35 AM
Dude! ...where have you been for the last three years?

Sarge

Sorry, had a couple of job changes due to the ever-changing economy here in the NYC metro area. Suffice to say job duties prevent me from being on this forum very much. Good to see all the old-timers are still here.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 21, 2014, 06:32:26 AM
Sorry, had a couple of job changes due to the ever-changing economy here in the NYC metro area. Suffice to say job duties prevent me from being on this forum very much. Good to see all the old-timers are still here.

And it's good to have you back  8)

Sarge
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Scion7 on September 04, 2014, 07:27:34 PM
Has anyone ever read why he changed his last name from the German form to a French-sounding one?

A composer of German-Polish parents born in Kiev who spoke Russian changes his last name to sound French.    :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: mc ukrneal on September 05, 2014, 04:02:03 AM
Has anyone ever read why he changed his last name from the German form to a French-sounding one?

A composer of German-Polish parents born in Kiev who spoke Russian changes his last name to sound French.    :)
French was popular in the court in those days (language, fashion, etc.), so it may have been linked to that.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 05, 2014, 04:03:23 AM
Has anyone ever read why he changed his last name from the German form to a French-sounding one?

A composer of German-Polish parents born in Kiev who spoke Russian changes his last name to sound French.    :)

Could it be connected with his Jewish origins? Don't know when he changed his name though.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Scion7 on September 05, 2014, 12:26:59 PM
Jewish?  He was baptized when born. I've never read anything that said his parents were Jews.  ???
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: relm1 on February 21, 2015, 08:05:57 PM
I was just listening to Igor Markevitch's recording of Liadov's "From the Apocalypse, op. 66" and felt an incredible kinship between this work and Gliere's Ilia Muromets (No. 3).  I also realized that Muromets was actually written before the Liadov so my first question is who influenced who?  Are these two separate composers who did not influence each other and miraculously arrived and a simultaneous influence from Rimsky-korsakov's late opera and mid/late Scriabin?  This is a very important period in late romantic Russian music because the seeds of Scriabin, Prokofiev, and Stravinsky's lush and violent pre-soviet music is in these evocative works.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 21, 2015, 08:17:53 PM
I was just listening to Igor Markevitch's recording of Liadov's "From the Apocalypse, op. 66" and felt an incredible kinship between this work and Gliere's Ilia Muromets (No. 3).  I also realized that Muromets was actually written before the Liadov so my first question is who influenced who?  Are these two separate composers who did not influence each other and miraculously arrived and a simultaneous influence from Rimsky-korsakov's late opera and mid/late Scriabin?  This is a very important period in late romantic Russian music because the seeds of Scriabin, Prokofiev, and Stravinsky's lush and violent pre-soviet music is in these evocative works.

I'm not going to make a serious speculation but I doubt that Lyadov knew of Gliere's Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Muromets". Lyadov was already a fully formed composer, although, of course, a lazy one, by the time he composed From the Apocalypse. :) But still, I think any similarities between the works that you're hearing is purely coincidental.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on February 22, 2015, 12:51:54 AM
Jewish?  He was baptized when born. I've never read anything that said his parents were Jews.  ???

Sorry to be replying to this so late; some sources describe him as of 'Belgian-Jewish descent' but obviously if he was baptised he wasn't Jewish. Maybe he had some Jewish relatives - who knows? Thank you for the info.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on February 22, 2015, 12:54:45 AM
I was just listening to Igor Markevitch's recording of Liadov's "From the Apocalypse, op. 66" and felt an incredible kinship between this work and Gliere's Ilia Muromets (No. 3).  I also realized that Muromets was actually written before the Liadov so my first question is who influenced who?  Are these two separate composers who did not influence each other and miraculously arrived and a simultaneous influence from Rimsky-korsakov's late opera and mid/late Scriabin?  This is a very important period in late romantic Russian music because the seeds of Scriabin, Prokofiev, and Stravinsky's lush and violent pre-soviet music is in these evocative works.

I'm not sure about this either but I see what you mean about the Liadov/Gliere connection; both composers whom I admire.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on February 22, 2015, 03:39:47 AM
Is this from the DG cd? I presume it is. Some fantastic recordings on there,including R-K's The Golden Cockerel-Suite and Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini. I think the Markevitch Liadov is my favourite recording after Svetlanov's on Melodiya (or next to?!) I can see what you mean in terms of the general atmosphere of the piece;but Gliere's score is obviously more varied and quite a bit longer! ;D
Incidentally,my old Penguin guide (to compact discs and cassettes) tells me that Miaskovsky's third symphony "is an epic,ambitious work,conceived in a grand manner and cast in two long movements;it's world is close to that of Gliere's Ilya Mourmetz Symphony." Is that true? I've never heard it. Maybe vandermolen (or someone else) will know?!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: relm1 on February 22, 2015, 09:40:23 AM
Is this from the DG cd? I presume it is. Some fantastic recordings on there,including R-K's The Golden Cockerel-Suite and Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini. I think the Markevitch Liadov is my favourite recording after Svetlanov's on Melodiya (or next to?!) I can see what you mean in terms of the general atmosphere of the piece;but Gliere's score is obviously more varied and quite a bit longer! ;D
Incidentally,my old Penguin guide (to compact discs and cassettes) tells me that Miaskovsky's third symphony "is an epic,ambitious work,conceived in a grand manner and cast in two long movements;it's world is close to that of Gliere's Ilya Mourmetz Symphony." Is that true? I've never heard it. Maybe vandermolen (or someone else) will know?!

Yes, that is the CD.  It is good!  I typically think of Liadov to be very conservative but in this work, Fragment from the Apocalypse, there seems to be some really interesting era transitions.  For instance the orchestration is unusual - 2 sets of timpani and 2 tubas for example.  Which darkens the colors and adds to the sense of darkness plus those building climaxes with percussion playing their own (just like Gliere's bass drum + tam-tam climaxes).  Also the poly-chord at the end of Liadov (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw7YXNXaaYk&feature=player_detailpage#t=496) at 8:20 of this recording has G augmented and F Augmented at the same time.  Very Stravinsky-esque and Prokofievian!!

I do agree Myaskovsky's Symphony No. 3 also has a similar esthetic to the Gliere No. 3 in its heavy reliance on low register tremolos and brassy heroics.  It feels programmatic and nostalgic. 
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on February 22, 2015, 10:18:11 AM
Is this from the DG cd? I presume it is. Some fantastic recordings on there,including R-K's The Golden Cockerel-Suite and Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini. I think the Markevitch Liadov is my favourite recording after Svetlanov's on Melodiya (or next to?!) I can see what you mean in terms of the general atmosphere of the piece;but Gliere's score is obviously more varied and quite a bit longer! ;D
Incidentally,my old Penguin guide (to compact discs and cassettes) tells me that Miaskovsky's third symphony "is an epic,ambitious work,conceived in a grand manner and cast in two long movements;it's world is close to that of Gliere's Ilya Mourmetz Symphony." Is that true? I've never heard it. Maybe vandermolen (or someone else) will know?!

I agree that Miaskovsky's Third Symphony, his first really excellent one in my view, has echoes of Gliere. It also sounds a bit like Cesar Frank's Symphony. Miaskovsky's Third Symphony ends in the deepest gloom, rather like the Gliere - which appeals to me. :(
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on February 22, 2015, 04:29:09 PM
Thank you for your reply. Sounds very intriguing,and tempting,vandermolen! Unfortunately,as usual,for me anyway,the prospect and expense of a further twenty five symphonies that aren't in my collection (got two No's 21!) may prove too much! ??? :(
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on August 16, 2015, 05:37:31 PM
Guys, Gliere is one my favourite composers! Eversince I came to know his orchestral works, I can't live my life without thinking about Gliere.
Usually most people think very high of his 3rd Symphony, but his rest of his works do not fail to deliver.

For instance, I was taken completely aback by the 5th disc with Vassily Sinaisky that Chandos presented.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Oct11/Gliere_CHAN106795X.htm
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Nov11/Gliere_collection_CHAN10679X.htm
It is one of my favourite brain foods to have exoticism combined with lavish, sumptuous, rich, extravagant, hyper-coloured and elephantine orchestrations. And who else could deliver better than Gliere?
I mean, the 5th disc is pure eargasm (Gyul'sara, Shakh-Senem Overture, Heroic March of Buryiat-Mongolian ASSR, Overture on Slavonic Themes)
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There is also Gliere's Taras Bulba Suite, a rarity, but worth listening for all the fans.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2000/oct00/gliere.htm
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The only recording to find a DDD reading of the Symphonic Poem Sirens
http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/n/nxs50898a.php
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2000/nov00/gliere.htm
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Macal's Gliere shouldn't be missed
https://sdtom.wordpress.com/2011/07/05/symphony-no-2-in-c-minor-op-25red-poppy-ballet-suite-op-70gliere/


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(http://militscky.narod.ru/GLIERE-Shakh-Senem.jpg)
http://militscky.narod.ru/cd-r2.html


GLIERE, REINHOLD Shakh-Senem, Opera excerpts, Concerto

VSG/Melodiya, Mono M10-36867 GOST 5289-73
"Shakh-Senem", Opera excerpts
Anatoly Orfenov
K.Rachevskaya
All-Union Radio Orchestra, Reinhold Gliere, G.Stolyarov conductors

Concerto for Voice and Orchestra, op.82
Bella Rudenko soprano
Kiev Philharmonic Orchestra, Stepan Turchak conductor
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gliere's Khrizis and Sheep's Spring
http://www.allmusic.com/album/reinhold-moritzovich-gli%C3%A8re-ballet-suite-ii-from-chrysis-eight-duets-for-violin-and-cello-op-39-mw0001534992
http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/reinhold-gliere-ballet-suites-nos1-and-2-mr0002156964

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Well the question is : what are the chances to see DDD recordings for Gliere's lesser know works?

Op.65 Khrizis [Хризис], Mimes ballet in 3 acts [or alternatively, Op.65a - Suite No.1 ; Op.65b - Suite No.2]
Op.66 Trizna, Symphonic Poem in F♯ minor (1911-1915)
Op.69a Suite for Symphonic Orchestra from the opera Shakh-Senem
Op.73 Zapovit (The bequest) Symphonic poem in E minor (1941)
Op.78 Cleopatra, Egyptian nights, Ballet mime in one act (1925)
Op.79 The friendship of the peoples Overture for symphonic orchestra in A major (1941)
Op.80 Symphonic Fantasy for Folk-Instruments orchestra in F major (1943)
Op.85 Music to the play Farhad and Shirin (1946)
Op.86 Victory Overture for symphonic orchestra in B♭ minor (1944)
Op.93 Glory of the Soviet army Cantata for soloists, choir, narrator, symphonic- and wind orchestra (1953)
Op.97 Festive overture for symphonic orchestra in D major (1955)
Op.94 Leili and Medshnun, opera in 4 acts (1940)

-Symphonic Fragment (1934)
-For the Happiness of the Fatherland, Overture for symphony orchestra (1942)
-The Imitation of Ezekiel, Symphonic Poem (Melodram) for narrator AND orchestra (1919)
-Esmeralda, for symphony orchestra (1926)
-The Cossacks whistled it, Ukrainian folk song. For mixed Choir with big symphony orchestra. (1935)


http://www.sikorski.de/475/en/0/a/0/orchestral_music/1007939_sinfonisches_fragment_fuer_orchester.html
http://www.sikorski.de/475/en/0/a/0/orchestral_music/1005591_das_verm_chtnis_sinfonisches_poem_fuer_orchester.html
http://www.sikorski.de/475/en/0/a/0/orchestral_music/1005593_schah_senem_ouvert_re_fuer_orchester.html
http://www.sikorski.de/475/en/0/a/0/orchestral_music/1005594_die_saporoger_kosaken_sinfonisches_bild_fuer.html
http://www.sikorski.de/475/en/0/a/0/orchestral_music/1000467_roter_mohn_suite_nr_1_fuer_orchester.html




Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Christo on August 16, 2015, 10:17:07 PM
Sorry to be replying to this so late; some sources describe him as of 'Belgian-Jewish descent' but obviously if he was baptised he wasn't Jewish. Maybe he had some Jewish relatives - who knows? Thank you for the info.

According to Wikipedia 'About 1900 he changed the spelling and pronunciation of his surname to Glière, which gave rise to the legend, stated by Leonid Sabaneyev for the first time (1927), of his French or Belgian descent.[2]'

BTW, French was THE European lingua franca in that time, certainly in the Russian Empire. Other composers - e.g. Stravinsky, Prokoviev ('Prokofieff'), or 'Rachmaninoff' - also preferred the French spelling (transliteration) of their names.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 18, 2015, 07:39:24 AM
Nice to see some renewed interest in Gliere. 'The Sirens' is a work I like very much. Gliere taught Miaskovsky and there are echoes of Miaskovsky's fine tone poem 'Silence' in the Gliere work.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on August 18, 2015, 11:42:51 AM
Well, Let the Gliere power be unleashed! Can't wait to have more of Gliere's orchestral power.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2000/nov00/Glieremultiple.htm
My only hope is Naxos now, since Chandos doesn't seem to plan to record more of his opuses (they ceased their Gliere activities back in the 90s).
Need to check Myaskovsky's tone poem.


Obviously, the latest Gliere entry by Naxos and JoAnn Falletta is all the buzz now
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/falletta-buffalo-define-glieres-monumental-third-symphony/
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Mar14/Gliere_sy3_8573161.htm
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Feb/Gliere_sy3_NBD0041.htm
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Sep14/Gliere_sy3_NBD0041.htm

http://www.sa-cd.net/showtitle/10058
http://audaud.com/2014/09/gliere-symphony-no-3-ilya-muromets-buffalo-philharmonic-orch-joann-falletta-naxos-audio-only-blu-ray/ (http://audaud.com/2014/09/gliere-symphony-no-3-ilya-muromets-buffalo-philharmonic-orch-joann-falletta-naxos-audio-only-blu-ray/)
http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_cd_review.php?id=12102

http://www.classicalmusicsentinel.com/KEEP/keep-gliere.html
http://classicalmodernmusic.blogspot.gr/2014/04/reinhold-moritsevich-gliere-symphony-no.html

http://maestrosteve.xanga.com/2014/04/03/fabulous-new-monumental-gliere/
http://www.classical-cd-reviews.com/2014/02/gliere-symphony-no-3-falletta-buffalo.html




(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Mar11/ippolitov_caucasian_4802428.jpg)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Mar11/ippolitov_caucasian_4802428.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Mar11/ippolitov_caucasian_4802428.htm)


(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/Gliere_dom292996.jpg)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/Gliere_DOM292996.htm
http://www.sa-cd.net/showtitle/4696



(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/058/MI0001058896.jpg)
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-8347/
http://www.allmusic.com/album/gli%C3%A8re-violin-concerto-op-100-symphony-no-2-in-c-minor-mw0001941204





http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=CHAN%2010166

Svetlanov conducted Gliere's Solemn Overture Op. 72 for full symphony orchestra. This Svetlanov reading has made it to an '80s Olympia CD
(http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/Aggelos_05/Music%20Related/Gliere%20front_side_zpsnuz6sdk5.jpg)
(http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/Aggelos_05/Music%20Related/Gliere%20back_side_zpskbzrjbg2.jpg)



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A nice page dedicated to Gliere's life and work
http://www.reinhold-gliere.net/index8.htm

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956) re: his DNA .....
Post by: Scion7 on August 18, 2015, 02:51:23 PM
" Glière was born in Kiev, Ukraine, then in the Russian Empire. He was the second son of the wind instrument maker Ernst Moritz Glier (1834–1896) from Saxony (Klingenthal), who emigrated to the Russian Empire and married Józefa (Josephine) Korczak (1849–1935), the daughter of his master, from Warsaw, Poland. His original name, as given in his baptism certificate, was Reinhold Ernest Glier.  About 1900 he changed the spelling and pronunciation of his surname to Glière, which gave rise to the legend, stated by Leonid Sabaneyev for the first time (1927), of his French or Belgian descent. "

By the way, did you know he is considered the 'founder of Soviet ballet' ?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956) re: his DNA .....
Post by: Christo on August 18, 2015, 09:49:14 PM
" Glière was born in Kiev, Ukraine, then in the Russian Empire. He was the second son of the wind instrument maker Ernst Moritz Glier (1834–1896) from Saxony (Klingenthal), who emigrated to the Russian Empire and married Józefa (Josephine) Korczak (1849–1935), the daughter of his master, from Warsaw, Poland. His original name, as given in his baptism certificate, was Reinhold Ernest Glier.  About 1900 he changed the spelling and pronunciation of his surname to Glière, which gave rise to the legend, stated by Leonid Sabaneyev for the first time (1927), of his French or Belgian descent. "

According to Wikipedia 'About 1900 he changed the spelling and pronunciation of his surname to Glière, which gave rise to the legend, stated by Leonid Sabaneyev for the first time (1927), of his French or Belgian descent.[2]'

BTW, French was THE European lingua franca in that time, certainly in the Russian Empire. Other composers - e.g. Stravinsky, Prokoviev ('Prokofieff'), or 'Rachmaninoff' - also preferred the French spelling (transliteration) of their names.

 ;)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on August 19, 2015, 04:51:10 AM
Another LP by Melodiya. Features
Nathan Rakhlin conducting Zaporozhye Cossacks Op. 64,
Kirill Kondrashin conducting Holiday at Ferghana Op. 75,
and eventually Alexander Gauk conducting Sirens Op. 33

(http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/Aggelos_05/Music%20Related/Gliere_zpsinvnbki6.jpg)
(http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/Aggelos_05/Music%20Related/Gliere_03_zpsfbissul4.jpg)

I wonder why Olympia didn't get this one on its remastered CDs list....


Svetlanov conducts Gliere's Solemn Overture Op. 72 for full symphony orchestra
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nx7gxMQJrW0

Alexander Gauk conducts Sirens Op. 33
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjjmFS5-Ga4


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It's nice to have some links that review Gliere's various recordings of the 3rd Symph
http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/music/0904/classical/gliere.htm (http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/music/0904/classical/gliere.htm)
http://www.classicalcdreview.com/ilyafinal.html
http://www.classicalcdreview.com/rgilyals.html
http://www.classicalcdreview.com/rgilyaeo.htm

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 20, 2015, 10:08:04 PM
Thanks for posting the reviews. The Rakhlin is perhaps my favourite. I have many recordings as I like the epic, technicolor qualities of the work and the overwhelming climax of the last movement.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on August 21, 2015, 08:21:50 AM
Now with the internet, it is obvious that one can find-acquire multiple recordings without much effort and obstruction. I wouldn't disagree that Natan Rakhling's reading makes the 3rd Symph an arresting experience.
Among all the available covers and booklet artwork for Gliere's 3rd, which one do you prefer?


Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on August 21, 2015, 10:53:48 PM
Now with the internet, it is obvious that can find-acquire multiple recording without much effort and obstruction. I wouldn't disagree that Natan Rakhling's reading makes the 3rd Symph an arresting experience.
Among all the available covers and booklet artwork for Gliere's 3rd, which one do you prefer?

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on August 23, 2015, 02:40:44 PM
I would say Chandos.
The Chandos engineering is pretty stellar (audio quality is fantastic), the performances are top-notch, and the overall covers and booklets are very fascinating to leaf through and read (and very informative-authoritative). What more would a Gliere fan-buff want?
(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Oct11/Gliere_CHAN10679X.jpg)



Two more Gliere entries by Naxos.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/968/MI0000968530.jpg)
http://www.allmusic.com/album/gli%C3%A8re-the-red-poppy-complete-ballet-mw0001797941
https://sdtom.wordpress.com/2008/04/04/the-red-poppy-complete-balletgliere/
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=NA%203496



(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/979/MI0000979084.jpg)
http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/gli%C3%A8re-orchestral-works-mr0002704496
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=MP%203675
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 14, 2015, 11:28:39 PM
I've been listening to Nathan Rakhlin's CD of Symphony 3 'Ilya Murometz' and think it the greatest of all recorded performances. But the transfer made by the private company Bearac Reissues is far better than the one on Russian Disc and that is the one to get. I have never been so moved by a performance of this work.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on September 20, 2015, 06:07:19 PM
Yes, indeed. It has been suggested by the reviewer to steer clear from the Russian Disc release, since its transfer is a bitter disappointment. On the other hand, Nathan Rakhlin certainly delivers an unforgettable rendering/reading of Gliere's 3rd.

I would be interested in an ADD Melodiya CD of the Vinyl that features Rakhlin, Kondrashin and Gauk conducting Gliere.

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Daverz on September 20, 2015, 09:59:31 PM
           



Seconded, and I'd add Ormandy's second recording

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=180374

It is cut, but not with the ruthlessness of the Stokowski recording -- there are 59 minutes of the music here.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 20, 2015, 10:10:47 PM
Yes, indeed. It has been suggested by the reviewer to steer clear from the Russian Disc release, since its transfer is a bitter disappointment. On the other hand, Nathan Rakhlin certainly delivers an unforgettable rendering/reading of Gliere's 3rd.

I would be interested in an ADD Melodiya CD of the Vinyl that features Rakhlin, Kondrashin and Gauk conducting Gliere.
That sounds interesting! Which works are featured?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 20, 2015, 10:11:47 PM
           Seconded, and I'd add Ormandy's second recording

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=180374

It is cut, but not with the ruthlessness of the Stokowski recording -- there are 59 minutes of the music here.
The Ormandy on the RCA LP was my introduction to this fine work. I hope it gets issued on CD one day.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Angelos_05 on September 22, 2015, 12:18:59 PM
That sounds interesting! Which works are featured?

I posted the Vinyl covers a couple of posts above
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,137.msg915470.html#msg915470
 Features
Nathan Rakhlin conducting Zaporozhye Cossacks Op. 64,
Kirill Kondrashin conducting Holiday at Ferghana Op. 75,
and eventually Alexander Gauk conducting Sirens Op. 33
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on June 22, 2016, 07:53:48 AM
Enjoying this now:


Sprawling, rambling, drawn-out but magnificent in its way.
Always has me gripped, like a piece of epic cinema, from beginning to end.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Maestro267 on June 23, 2016, 06:33:39 AM
Il'ya Muromets is one of the great programme symphonies.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Scion7 on June 24, 2016, 09:15:27 PM
A little late-nite Spanish Rice, with home-grown tomatoes, and Gliere.   :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on June 24, 2016, 09:42:17 PM
A little late-nite Spanish Rice, with home-grown tomatoes, and Gliere.   :)
Which Gliere?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on June 25, 2016, 04:32:43 AM
And all washed down with a nice glass of fizzy Popov! :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on June 25, 2016, 04:51:20 AM
The Rakhlin recording is available on Russian disc s/h (from a certain ubiquitous Seller,I might add!) and Bearac. I think the latter is a download,or they can provide a cd copy? (Would that be a cd-r?) I will have a good look at their website a bit later. How does the sound quality differ from the Russian Disc,I wonder?
I have to say,my all time favourite is the old Unicorn recording. It's the one I grew up with. I love the glacial tempi,the feeling of timelessness and a remote,mysterious past it evokes. Every other performance I have heard sounds too rushed. I am perfectly happy with it. Very happy,indeed! That said,I know some people don't like his approach at all. If you like your Gliere more up tempo,I can't fault Downes;which has the advantage of the celebrated (I love it!) Chandos sound. That said,my copy went to the charity shop two or three years ago!

NB: According to a review under the relevant cd,Russian Disc "totally botched" the sound! ???
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 25, 2016, 05:09:39 AM
I really enjoy this recording of Ilya Murometz from Harold Farberman/RPO:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_1080/MI0003/448/MI0003448281.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

 I can't say I know many others but I have heard, and own, the Downes and Bostein, but don't remember much about them.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on June 25, 2016, 05:46:21 AM
That's the one. I've got the original Unicorn (fat box) release without the Cello Concerto! The only one I need or want,quite frankly. We all respond differently,however;so if Rakhlin gets Vandermole going,or Downes;I can quite understand. For me it's the slow tempi that makes it for me. Yet,Faberman's approach is never flabby. He has an iron grip which never lets go;and he knows how to make the music breathe in the slower,quieter bits. The second movement is sensuous,you really feel the lure of those forest maidens. They'd have me! I'd be be doing the washing up and (*censored!*) more!! ??? ;D
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on June 25, 2016, 06:32:51 AM
That's the one. I've got the original Unicorn (fat box) release without the Cello Concerto! The only one I need or want,quite frankly. We all respond differently,however;so if Rakhlin gets Vandermole going,or Downes;I can quite understand. For me it's the slow tempi that makes it for me. Yet,Faberman's approach is never flabby. He has an iron grip which never lets go;and he knows how to make the music breathe in the slower,quieter bits. The second movement is sensuous,you really feel the lure of those forest maidens. They'd have me! I'd be be doing the washing up and (*censored!*) more!! ??? ;D
I have the Faberman too - in all its CD incarnations (fat box, Regis, Alto  ::)). It is a terrific version - one of the best. Rakhlin is certainly my favourite one disc version and I have recently been enjoying the Downes recording.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Scion7 on June 25, 2016, 07:40:23 AM
The string quartets - but I went to bed before the 2nd was over.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on June 25, 2016, 09:47:19 AM
The string quartets - but I went to bed before the 2nd was over.
Thank you!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on September 30, 2016, 01:26:46 PM
Anyone know if there is a complete RED POPPY other than this one?
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51cgI53UIwL._SS500.jpg)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 30, 2016, 11:32:29 PM
Anyone know if there is a complete RED POPPY other than this one?
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51cgI53UIwL._SS500.jpg)
Not that I'm aware of. I suspect there was an LP version.
Maybe this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Gliere-Symphony-Mourometz-Poppy-Ballet/dp/B003JCLTQ0/ref=pd_sbs_15_t_1/158-5617415-4527956?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=1WDES2ZFRZ370FKN6FBY
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on October 02, 2016, 06:21:18 AM
I thought it was Brian Blessed for a moment!! ???
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: arpeggio on October 02, 2016, 07:20:55 AM
Anyone know if there is a complete RED POPPY other than this one?
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51cgI53UIwL._SS500.jpg)

Added this to my wish list.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on October 02, 2016, 08:05:34 AM
I thought it was Brian Blessed for a moment!! ???
huh?
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on October 02, 2016, 11:34:16 AM
Added this to my wish list.
yes it is very cheap on Amazon. I suppose the plot of the ballet doesn't lend itself well to present day politics so no one is going to record it.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on October 02, 2016, 01:15:27 PM
I thought it was Brian Blessed for a moment!! ???
Very funny!  :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: cilgwyn on October 02, 2016, 01:47:01 PM
(http://i1362.photobucket.com/albums/r688/dinasman/s-l1600_zpsoodnbwzt.jpg)


(http://i1362.photobucket.com/albums/r688/dinasman/s-l1600bb_zpsg41hvosr.jpg)

I'M AN ACT-ORR,VANDERMOLEN!! ;D
I'm surprised,and a little disappointed,that the Soviets never seemed to have recorded the ballet complete. I thought I remembered seeing it in those old catalogues from Collets and the Russian Record Company. This could be the recording;although the one listed may have had different artwork. I would like to hear it with the old style Russian brass rasping away! The cd reissue on the Olympia label was coupled with Knipper's Fourth,which may not be for the faint hearted,even if you could find,or afford a secondhand copy. (Although,I note that Knipper has at least one fan,judging by the review left next to the Amazon uk listing!)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 26, 2018, 07:56:17 PM
Time to revive this thread.

I don't know why I waited so long to listen to this CD with two lovely works: the String Octet in D major and the String Sextet Nr. 3 in C major

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/613inCv1KjL._SS500.jpg)

Both works have that so characteristic tasteful Russian air with strong melodic material. However, the Octet made a bigger impression on me. There are simply incredible and catchy melodies that haunt you for some days, especially on the 1st movement, some incredibly lovely music that melts your heart, at least it was made on me. The movements 2 and 4 have infectious folksy nature, while the 3rd is almost elegiac but not much, therefore is rather touching.

Glière was not only a master in orchestral works but also in chamber ones, and these works are proof of it.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on July 26, 2018, 09:36:36 PM
Time to revive this thread.

I don't know why I waited so long to listen to this CD with two lovely works: the String Octet in D major and the String Sextet Nr. 3 in C major

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/613inCv1KjL._SS500.jpg)

Both works have that so characteristic tasteful Russian air with strong melodic material. However, the Octet made a bigger impression on me. There are simply incredible and catchy melodies that haunt you for some days, especially on the 1st movement, some incredibly lovely music that melts your heart, at least it was made on me. The movements 2 and 4 have infectious folksy nature, while the 3rd is almost elegiac but not much, therefore is rather touching.

Glière was not only a master in orchestral works but also in chamber ones, and these works are proof of it.

I know none of his chamber music so many thanks for posting this Cesar. More temptation of course but clearly I need to hear this one!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 27, 2018, 01:14:35 PM
I know none of his chamber music so many thanks for posting this Cesar. More temptation of course but clearly I need to hear this one!

These works are good fun. They should appeal to your tastes!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 26, 2018, 10:12:29 AM
Just I found this on YouTube:

String octet in D major

https://www.youtube.com/v/g8hw5X92xhE


and the String sextet No. 3 in C major

https://www.youtube.com/v/tI13ZUJp4CQ


As I said previously on this thread, this is LOVELY stuff. Please, take a listen to these works. Some early pieces with an incredible potential.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on September 26, 2018, 11:21:06 AM
Just I found this on YouTube:

String octet in D major

https://www.youtube.com/v/g8hw5X92xhE


and the String sextet No. 3 in C major

https://www.youtube.com/v/tI13ZUJp4CQ


As I said previously on this thread, this is LOVELY stuff. Please, take a listen to these works. Some early pieces with an incredible potential.

Well, I just listened, with much pleasure, to the String Octet and find your analysis, Cesar, to be spot on. It is a delightful work, catchy and engaging. It reminded me a bit of Borodin brought into the Twentieth Century although it is hardly modernistic (composed in 1900). The tunes are memorably inspiriting. I can see that this is another CD which may have to be smuggled into the house. My cat enjoyed it too. Thanks very much for posting them here. On to the String Sextet next.  :)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 26, 2018, 01:05:04 PM
Well, I just listened, with much pleasure, to the String Octet and find your analysis, Cesar, to be spot on. It is a delightful work, catchy and engaging. It reminded me a bit of Borodin brought into the Twentieth Century although it is hardly modernistic (composed in 1900). The tunes are memorably inspiriting. I can see that this is another CD which may have to be smuggled into the house. My cat enjoyed it too. Thanks very much for posting them here. On to the String Sextet next.  :)

Nice, Jeffrey! My pleasure

The Borodin link is quite right, his 2 string quartets came to my mind when listened to these pieces.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on January 16, 2019, 06:22:37 AM
New release with review of concert by the same forces:


https://bachtrack.com/review-gliere-ilya-muromets-feltz-belgrade-philharmonic-march-2018

Possible candidate for the interesting orchestra names thread.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on December 10, 2019, 04:52:11 PM
The only video recording of Ilya Muromets I'm aware of. Yuri Simonov conducting the Orchestras of Zurich University of the Arts and Haute école de musique de Geneve. There should be more fans of this colossal work out there.

https://www.youtube.com/v/4MClLBA5o1w&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Maestro267 on December 11, 2019, 02:56:47 AM
Thanks for linking to it. Why oh why is it unlisted? This needs to be in the public!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on December 11, 2019, 05:30:08 AM
Thanks for linking to it. Why oh why is it unlisted? This needs to be in the public!

Yes, many thanks! 

In scouring YouTube for other live performances, I cam across this curiosity:

https://www.youtube.com/v/LZGypdJoPSc

If anyone would like to analyze the connection of that picture to the works involved, I would be interested in reading it!   ;)   Possibly it is meant to be symbolic of the slow eroticism in the Scriabin Symphony #4, but...are snails on the face erotic?!   ???
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: relm1 on December 11, 2019, 07:46:37 AM
If anyone would like to analyze the connection of that picture to the works involved, I would be interested in reading it!   ;)   Possibly it is meant to be symbolic of the slow eroticism in the Scriabin Symphony #4, but...are snails on the face erotic?!   ???

The image is a commentary on society's obsession with youth and fleeting beauty.  Woman use snails on their face as a beauty treatment because of the proteins in their slime however this woman is already beautiful so is beauty obsessed so the image is showing that beauty has a dark and obsessive side...just like the beautiful music in the recording.  :-*

https://www.wowamazing.com/trending/rare/live-snails-slither-across-face-beauty-treatment/
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Cato on December 11, 2019, 01:57:27 PM
The image is a commentary on society's obsession with youth and fleeting beauty.  Woman use snails on their face as a beauty treatment because of the proteins in their slime however this woman is already beautiful so is beauty obsessed so the image is showing that beauty has a dark and obsessive side...just like the beautiful music in the recording.  :-*

https://www.wowamazing.com/trending/rare/live-snails-slither-across-face-beauty-treatment/

Snail Slime for Beauty!  Sounds like a (fairly small) niche market to me!
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: dissily Mordentroge on December 11, 2019, 02:50:15 PM
The only video recording of Ilya Muromets I'm aware of. Yuri Simonov conducting the Orchestras of Zurich University of the Arts and Haute école de musique de Geneve. There should be more fans of this colossal work out there.

https://www.youtube.com/v/4MClLBA5o1w&feature=youtu.be
Wonderful! Thanks for posting the link. Simonov has the most lyrical and expressive means of conducting since Bernstien. ( I’ll probably get my head bitten off for that claim)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on December 11, 2019, 06:58:24 PM
Snail Slime for Beauty!  Sounds like a (fairly small) niche market to me!

Snail slime works to remove facial wrinkles and heal faster. It's curious indeed.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on December 11, 2019, 10:34:43 PM
Snail slime works to remove facial wrinkles and heal faster. It's curious indeed.

I wonder if you can buy it in a tube rather than having to find a cooperative snail. I wonder if Gliere used this treatment.
 ;D
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Roasted Swan on December 12, 2019, 04:40:59 AM
Wonderful! Thanks for posting the link. Simonov has the most lyrical and expressive means of conducting since Bernstien. ( I’ll probably get my head bitten off for that claim)

I saw Simonov conducting just last month and he is really very good indeed.  Yes quite a bit of it is playing to the gallery but at the same time there is enough there to really help the orchestra too so its not just showmanship.

He came and conducted the Guildhall Symphony Orchestra when I was there back in the early 80's.  He brought the Bolshoi's own set of the Prokofiev Romeo & Juliet Ballet Suites and we played that in concert with him.  I remember so well how brilliantly he galvanised the orchestra even though he spoke very little English - it was very exciting and inspiring. 
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on December 18, 2019, 11:33:23 AM
Just recently discovered Glière’s wonderful Horn Concerto, which despite its late date (1951) is a throughly late-romantic work with not a hint of Shostakovichian irony or bitterness. It has great tunes and colorful orchestration, and a particularly gorgeous slow movement. It is now one of my favorite concerti for the instrument along with those by Atterberg, Damase, Gipps, and Tomasi. I listened to the Chandos recording below, which is excellent:

Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on December 18, 2019, 12:37:16 PM
Just recently discovered Glière’s wonderful Horn Concerto, which despite its late date (1951) is a throughly late-romantic work with not a hint of Shostakovichian irony or bitterness. It has great tunes and colorful orchestration, and a particularly gorgeous slow movement. It is now one of my favorite concerti for the instrument along with those by Atterberg, Damase, Gipps, and Tomasi. I listened to the Chandos recording below, which is excellent:



I heard Radek Baborák playing this concerto live. A great experience.

Actually, I like all his concertos, even the ones for violin and cello.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on December 18, 2019, 01:18:45 PM
I heard Radek Baborák playing this concerto live. A great experience.

Actually, I like all his concertos, even the ones for violin and cello.

How exciting that you got to hear it live! I like all of Glière’s concerti too - even the admittedly rather overlong one for cello - although I haven’t heard the one for violin yet.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on December 18, 2019, 05:06:58 PM
Just recently discovered Glière’s wonderful Horn Concerto, which despite its late date (1951) is a throughly late-romantic work with not a hint of Shostakovichian irony or bitterness. It has great tunes and colorful orchestration, and a particularly gorgeous slow movement. It is now one of my favorite concerti for the instrument along with those by Atterberg, Damase, Gipps, and Tomasi. I listened to the Chandos recording below, which is excellent:



I also like that CD for 'The Bronze Horseman Suite'.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: relm1 on December 18, 2019, 05:22:52 PM
I also like that CD for 'The Bronze Horseman Suite'.

+1 for same reason
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on December 18, 2019, 05:45:22 PM
I was delighted to find this on CD from a Japanese company and not too expensive. It was my first encounter with the work on an RCA LP and, as far as I'm aware, had never been reissued on CD. I think that Ormandy's versions featured some cuts but I recall it as a very exciting and gripping performance. Also, this CD release, I just noticed, features Rachmaninov's 'Three Russian Songs' which was a great discovery for me over the last couple of years:
(http://)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: kyjo on December 19, 2019, 10:22:47 AM
I also like that CD for 'The Bronze Horseman Suite'.

I’ve yet to listen to that, but I recall hearing an extract from it a while ago that was very promising.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: vandermolen on January 08, 2020, 07:16:30 AM
I was delighted to find this on CD from a Japanese company and not too expensive. It was my first encounter with the work on an RCA LP and, as far as I'm aware, had never been reissued on CD. I think that Ormandy's versions featured some cuts but I recall it as a very exciting and gripping performance. Also, this CD release, I just noticed, features Rachmaninov's 'Three Russian Songs' which was a great discovery for me over the last couple of years:

This fully lived up to expectations:
(http://)
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Roy Bland on January 08, 2020, 04:28:19 PM
I also like that CD for 'The Bronze Horseman Suite'.
Surely BBC recordings series is the most complete.IMHO sound quality isn't at height.
Title: Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on January 28, 2021, 02:45:15 PM
I just thought that I could make Ilya Muromets without the 3rd movement. That's the most recommendable 'excision' I could think of when this symphony is concerned.  8)

The other movements are just splendid as they are.