GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Brewski on May 08, 2008, 01:19:52 PM

Title: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Brewski on May 08, 2008, 01:19:52 PM
I've been listening to Dark Waves (2007), John Luther Adams's mysterious piece for orchestra and electronics, and it's totally fascinating.  It's in a link at the end of Alex Ross's profile (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/05/12/080512fa_fact_ross) of the composer in The New Yorker, written after a meeting in Alaska, where Adams lives.

Adams would probably be called a minimalist, but he is unlike any other minimalist I have heard.  This piece is like the aural equivalent of hearing fog roll in; at least, that's my inadequate description for the moment.  Now I really feel like I need to get up to speed and hear some of these recordings (http://www.johnlutheradams.com/recordings/index.html).

Anyone else familiar with his work? 

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: bwv 1080 on May 08, 2008, 01:31:39 PM
Sounds interesting

Just downloaded Red/Arc Blue Veil and The Song that Fills the World from the Zune all you can eat thing

Must suck from a marketing perspective to have the same name as a more famous composer.  He should think about changing his last name to King or Vandross

Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Brewski on May 08, 2008, 01:49:35 PM
In the article, Adams talks about being mistaken for John Adams and exchanging e-mails with him about it.  The "Vandross" idea made me laugh... :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: bwv 1080 on May 20, 2008, 10:06:54 AM
Have listened to Red/Arc Blue Veil a few times now.  It is very ambient - would compare it to Brian Eno in effect but not its tonal language.  With music like this I have to be in the right frame of mind to like this sort of music.  Its textural, but much more static than, say 60s Ligeti. 
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Guido on May 20, 2008, 11:52:03 PM
This is lovely stuff. IS there a way of downloading the piece from that player?
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on May 21, 2008, 01:10:13 AM
I've been listening to Dark Waves (2007), John Luther Adams's mysterious piece for orchestra and electronics, and it's totally fascinating.  It's in a link at the end of Alex Ross's profile (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/05/12/080512fa_fact_ross) of the composer in The New Yorker, written after a meeting in Alaska, where Adams lives.

Adams would probably be called a minimalist, but he is unlike any other minimalist I have heard.  This piece is like the aural equivalent of hearing fog roll in; at least, that's my inadequate description for the moment.  Now I really feel like I need to get up to speed and hear some of these recordings (http://www.johnlutheradams.com/recordings/index.html).

Anyone else familiar with his work? 

--Bruce

Enjoyed the link Bruce.  Very atmospheric stuff. Nice photo of the composer lying in the snow!
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Chrone on May 21, 2008, 06:52:39 PM
Adams would probably be called a minimalist, but he is unlike any other minimalist I have heard.  This piece is like the aural equivalent of hearing fog roll in; at least, that's my inadequate description for the moment. 
--Bruce

Interesting description, as the first thing I thought of was the similarity to "Fog Tropes" by Ingram Marshall!
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Brewski on May 22, 2008, 06:08:30 AM
Interesting description, as the first thing I thought of was the similarity to "Fog Tropes" by Ingram Marshall!

Yes, good comparison!  I haven't thought about that piece in quite a long time. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Ugh on August 23, 2010, 09:03:22 AM
... and of course John Adams has conducted Fog Tropes, with the Orchestra of St. Lukes - that's the recording that was featured in the soundtrack of Scorsese's Shutter Island. It really made me curious about Ingram Marshall - a completely new discovery for me.... Doesn't happen as often as it used to, so I am quite thrilled actually ;)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: kentel on August 24, 2010, 12:10:10 AM
Adams would probably be called a minimalist, but he is unlike any other minimalist I have heard.  This piece is like the aural equivalent of hearing fog roll in; at least, that's my inadequate description for the moment.  Now I really feel like I need to get up to speed and hear some of these recordings (http://www.johnlutheradams.com/recordings/index.html).

Anyone else familiar with his work? 

--Bruce

Hi Bruce

I agree for J-L Adams, but I wouldn't call John Adams a minimalist anymore; his language is more inherited from Schoenberg's 2nd Chamber Symphony than from Glass or Feldman.

I heard this other cd by J-L Adams; it matches quite well your description of his music :

(http://www.newalbion.com/NA061/NA061.full.jpg)

and it is a New Albion cd; the label which also published several of Ingram Marshall's cd's.

Talking about John Adams : there is a "work of youth" (1983), a long piece for tapes untitled "Light over Water" which sounds quite similar to J-L Adams ambient style. That's not the same thing though, but it's interesting anyway. As a matter of fact, it is also a New Albion cd :

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41-ZkpRkoRL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

--Gilles
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Brewski on August 24, 2010, 07:23:02 AM
Gilles, thanks for those comments.  You've probably heard more of Adams's work than I have (hence my "minimalist" comment).  But the Schoenberg comment intrigues me; what connection do you sense between the two?

The other piece of his I've heard is The Mathematics of Resonant Bodies (2002), which seems to be concerned with the properties of pure sound.

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: kentel on August 24, 2010, 07:56:50 AM
Gilles, thanks for those comments.  You've probably heard more of Adams's work than I have (hence my "minimalist" comment).  But the Schoenberg comment intrigues me; what connection do you sense between the two?

The other piece of his I've heard is The Mathematics of Resonant Bodies (2002), which seems to be concerned with the properties of pure sound.

--Bruce

As a matter of fact, there is absolutely no connection between J-L Adams' music and Schoenberg's  :D - I thought you were talking about the other John Adams... my fault.  I don't know why I mixed it up...

Don't overestimate my knowledge of J-L Adams' music ! I've only heard this cd I mentionned  :) And the other cd is by John Adams (the Great, I don't know what's his second name...).
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Ugh on September 05, 2010, 09:31:12 AM
Ah, so did I - it was John Adams, let's say the better known of the two, who conducted the Ingram Marshall piece I mentioned above.... ;) Now I need to get to know this Luther Adams as well ;)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on September 05, 2010, 11:16:25 AM
And the other cd is by John Adams (the Great, I don't know what's his second name...).

His second name is Coolidge, of all things. Just to add more to the presidential aspect of his name, I suppose.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on April 14, 2014, 12:03:09 PM
2014 Pulitzer Prize

Become Ocean by John Luther Adams (Taiga Press/Theodore Front Musical Literature)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on April 17, 2014, 12:24:07 AM
I'm just listening to JLA for the first time today. I've been listening to Clouds of Forgetting and the release called The Light That Fills the World. My first reaction is a little skeptical. But I need some time. Clouds of forgetting did have a resemblance to Morton Feldman though lacking that certain something in the details that makes Feldman so special. TLTFTW is more original I think. And so is For Lou Harrison. However, something makes me skeptical so far. There is something rather clean about this music - and faintly new-age-y. But let's see if I get over it. I will persist a bit.     
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 17, 2014, 03:07:44 AM
His second name is Coolidge, of all things. Just to add more to the presidential aspect of his name, I suppose.

Well, the family is sturdy New England stock.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 17, 2014, 03:09:32 AM
Thread Duty:

I've not heard any entire piece by JLA, but I did find myself intrigued by the samples of a CD;  will listen to the entire work.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on April 17, 2014, 04:47:57 AM
"In the White Silence" is the piece I'm liking best.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on April 18, 2014, 04:53:20 PM
LETTER FROM THE ARCHIVE: JOHN LUTHER ADAMS
POSTED BY JOSHUA ROTHMAN

Quote
On Tuesday, the composer John Luther Adams won a Pulitzer Prize for “Become Ocean,” a forty-two-minute piece for orchestra. Reviewing the work’s première, in 2013, Alex Ross wrote that it “may be the loveliest apocalypse in musical history”: “Like the sea at dawn, it presents a gorgeous surface, yet its heaving motion conveys overwhelming force.” The piece builds slowly to a series of crescendos, and then begins running in reverse, “in the manner of a palindrome.” Adams, Ross writes, placed a brief note in the score: “Life on this earth first emerged from the sea. As the polar ice melts and sea level rises, we humans find ourselves facing the prospect that once again we may quite literally become ocean.” The tempo is marked as “Inexorable.”

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/backissues/2014/04/letter-from-the-archive-john-luther-adams.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter (http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/backissues/2014/04/letter-from-the-archive-john-luther-adams.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on May 07, 2014, 03:31:06 PM
LETTER FROM ALASKA
SONG OF THE EARTH: composer takes inspiration from the Arctic.
BY ALEX ROSS


http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/05/12/080512fa_fact_ross?currentPage=all (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/05/12/080512fa_fact_ross?currentPage=all)

On-Demand Audio: John Luther Adams's Become Ocean Live at Carnegie Hall
The New York Premiere of 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Music-winning 'Become Ocean'


http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/ny-premiere-john-luther-adamss-become-ocean/ (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/ny-premiere-john-luther-adamss-become-ocean/)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on May 07, 2014, 06:13:05 PM
MUSIC REVIEW

Out of the Northwest, Through Sea and Desert
Seattle Symphony Explores Nature at Spring for Music


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/arts/music/seattle-symphony-explores-nature-at-spring-for-music.html?ref=music (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/arts/music/seattle-symphony-explores-nature-at-spring-for-music.html?ref=music)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on June 19, 2014, 01:38:09 AM
I found myself giving Adams a chance tonight and enjoying:
(http://www.johnlutheradams.com/recordings/images/clouds.jpg)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on June 20, 2014, 04:22:42 AM
Yes, very fine late-night listening. Inspiring!
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/588/MI0001588414.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 20, 2014, 04:26:06 AM
Yes, very fine late-night listening. Inspiring!
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/588/MI0001588414.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

I found the samples engaging; will try the actual piece out soon.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on June 20, 2014, 06:15:18 AM
I found the samples engaging; will try the actual piece out soon.
I had a little trouble a while back accepting J.L. Adams. At first, his music seemed so nice - in a bad way. But I've given it some time and tried to remove some prejudices from view, to accept him on his own terms. I'd have to agree with Mr Hurwitz about this piece (White Silence):
"it really does make the best possible case for his personal artistic vision."
And I think the more I listen to this one, the more I find. I've kept going with it past the first listen. 
 
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on June 25, 2014, 03:37:37 AM
WQXR Meet the Composer
John Luther Adams: Bad Decisions and Finding Home (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/john-luther-adams-poor-career-choices-finding-home-alaska/?utm_source=local&utm_media=treatment&utm_campaign=carousel&utm_content=item0)
streaming audio
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on June 30, 2014, 06:32:25 PM
"In the White Silence" is the piece I'm liking best.
I am indulging in this beautiful music. Thank you.

I am looking forward to this album, to be released in January 2015.

The Wind in High Places
(http://www.coldbluemusic.com/media/JLA-Wind-mock2%20for%20web.jpg)

http://www.coldbluemusic.com/pages/forthcoming.html (http://www.coldbluemusic.com/pages/forthcoming.html)
Quote
Beautiful, vaporous string music, featuring the highly regarded and well known JACK Quartet performing the four-movement title piece and Dream of the Canyon Wren (Adams's first two works written solely for string quartet) and the Northwestern Cello Ensemble, directed by Hans Jensen, performing the four-movement cello choir work Canticles of the Sky.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on July 03, 2014, 09:31:45 PM
Adams/Cox/Fink/Fox



The sound of bass clarinet fits Adams's music very well. His Dark Wind (written for Marty Walker, the clarinetist) is the most impressive piece on this album. (I like Jim Fox's work too.)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: AdamFromWashington on July 04, 2014, 03:34:30 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Inuksuit yet! It's an amazing piece. Really different from anything else I've heard by Adams. Some of the craziest percussion you'll ever hear.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on July 04, 2014, 06:17:54 PM
Adams/Cox/Fink/Fox



The sound of bass clarinet fits Adams's music very well. His Dark Wind (written for Marty Walker, the clarinetist) is the most impressive piece on this album. (I like Jim Fox's work too.)
The sample does sound pretty cool.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953) NEW NONESUCH?
Post by: snyprrr on July 06, 2014, 07:05:11 AM
Anyone heard the 'Noir' bit with the Saxophone Concerto?
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953) NEW NONESUCH?
Post by: not edward on July 06, 2014, 08:04:48 AM
Anyone heard the 'Noir' bit with the Saxophone Concerto?
Wrong John Adams. :P
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953) NEW NONESUCH?
Post by: snyprrr on July 07, 2014, 07:06:12 AM
Wrong John Adams. :P

DOOOH! :P :laugh:

And here I REALLY TRIED, looking at the Thread to make sure!! :laugh:
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on July 07, 2014, 05:46:21 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Inuksuit yet! It's an amazing piece. Really different from anything else I've heard by Adams. Some of the craziest percussion you'll ever hear.

This is wonderful. Thank you. It reminds me of David Tudor's Rainforest IV.

https://www.youtube.com/v/fnoxu4ocQb0
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on July 29, 2014, 04:04:33 PM


(http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/07/28/arts/music/20140728ADAMS-slide-6FVX/20140728ADAMS-slide-6FVX-jumbo.jpg)
Sloshing in Symphonic Waters (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/arts/music/a-new-work-by-john-luther-adams-debuts-at-lincoln-center.html?_r=0)
A New Work by John Luther Adams Debuts at Lincoln Center (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/arts/music/a-new-work-by-john-luther-adams-debuts-at-lincoln-center.html?_r=0)
By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
JULY 27, 2014
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 03:46:02 PM
I am indulging in this beautiful music. Thank you.

I am looking forward to this album, to be released in January 2015.

The Wind in High Places
(http://www.coldbluemusic.com/media/JLA-Wind-mock2%20for%20web.jpg)

http://www.coldbluemusic.com/pages/forthcoming.html (http://www.coldbluemusic.com/pages/forthcoming.html)

This looks rather nice. Definitely will be buying this one upon its release.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 03:54:36 PM
I found myself giving Adams a chance tonight and enjoying:
(http://www.johnlutheradams.com/recordings/images/clouds.jpg)

I need to get this recording. To the Christmas wishlist it goes...
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 04:05:38 PM
I feel such a strong connection with JLA's music (much, much more than the other Adams) and I think a part of this has to do with the wide-open canvases he paints his music on. It may be strange what I'm about to write, or not, but his music takes me back to a time in my life when I was in Boy Scouts and was visiting the Appalachian Mountains almost on a weekly basis. Just the feeling of being out in the middle of nowhere where you have to accept nature and forget about your own life to realize how vast this planet really is and how we're all insignificant in the end. JLA's music seems to give me these kinds of feelings and allows me to appreciate the beauty of the land much more, but also how we shouldn't take things for granted. His music allows me to cherish those special moments.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: EigenUser on November 24, 2014, 05:27:42 PM
I feel such a strong connection with JLA's music (much, much more than the other Adams) and I think a part of this has to do with the wide-open canvases he paints his music on. It may be strange what I'm about to write, or not, but his music takes me back to a time in my life when I was in Boy Scouts and was visiting the Appalachian Mountains almost on a weekly basis. Just the feeling of being out in the middle of nowhere where you have to accept nature and forget about your own life to realize how vast this planet really is and how we're all insignificant in the end. JLA's music seems to give me these kinds of feelings and allows me to appreciate the beauty of the land much more, but also how we shouldn't take things for granted. His music allows me to cherish those special moments.
Good post, and it makes me want to listen to more JLA. Interestingly (and I know you don't like him and particularly dislike this work, yada yada yada...), but that is one reason I love Messiaen's Des Canyons aux Etoiles.

What is your favorite JLA work? I haven't heard many, but I do like what I have heard.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 05:47:36 PM
Good post, and it makes me want to listen to more JLA. Interestingly (and I know you don't like him and particularly dislike this work, yada yada yada...), but that is one reason I love Messiaen's Des Canyons aux Etoiles.

What is your favorite JLA work? I haven't heard many, but I do like what I have heard.

Favorite JLA work? It's really too early for me to pick an absolute favorite right now. I still have so much to hear, but a few works that have made a strong impression on me so far have been The Far Country of Sleep, Red Arc / Blue Veil, and The Immeasurable Space of Tones.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 08:00:23 PM
There are several books on JLA, but this one really caught my attention and it comes with a bonus CD of three works that have never been recorded:

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0819567426.01.L.jpg)

To the Christmas wish list it goes.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on November 24, 2014, 08:23:34 PM
If you have a chance to see anything in concert by JLA, do it. With any composer, that if a given, but with his music, that is more so something that one needs to do. I have only seen one work live, Strange and Sacred Noise, but it was without a doubt one of the most significant concerts I have been to in my (relatively short compared to many of you) concert-going life. JLA's music is music of space, and the best sound system with a studio copy recording cannot still even come close to the power of this music when seen and experienced live.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2014, 02:59:47 AM
If you have a chance to see anything in concert by JLA, do it. With any composer, that if a given, but with his music, that is more so something that one needs to do. I have only seen one work live, Strange and Sacred Noise, but it was without a doubt one of the most significant concerts I have been to in my (relatively short compared to many of you) concert-going life. JLA's music is music of space, and the best sound system with a studio copy recording cannot still even come close to the power of this music when seen and experienced live.

Trust me, I definitely will see a JLA work in concert as soon as I hear an announcement that one of his works is being performed near me. You're right in saying that a good stereo setup doesn't even begin to touch what his music must sound like live. I'd love to hear even some of his chamber works like Red Arc / Blue Veil or the two-piano version of Dark Wave. This certainly would be awesome. 8)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on November 25, 2014, 07:26:43 AM
I've also seen the two piano version of Dark Waves in concert. It's also quite an experience, being able to hear the washes of sound of the piano flurries combine with the electronics. Unfortunately, the concert I attended put that as the first piece on the program, and I was unfortunately late, so I got there midway.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2014, 08:00:48 PM
I've also seen the two piano version of Dark Waves in concert. It's also quite an experience, being able to hear the washes of sound of the piano flurries combine with the electronics. Unfortunately, the concert I attended put that as the first piece on the program, and I was unfortunately late, so I got there midway.

Very nice. Well at least you got to see some of it. ;) In other news, I received Become Ocean today in the mail -

(http://a1.mzstatic.com/us/r30/Music3/v4/39/a4/92/39a492aa-0bde-6ca2-9c72-863ae9938b87/713746310127.1200x1200-75.jpg)

All I have to say right now is OH MY GOODNESS!!! I believe I have found my musical soulmate. 8) I love JLA's whole philosophy about music and how nature has affected his music. Become Ocean is an incredible work that completely envelopes you into this vast plethora of sounds and moods. This truly is a work of pure brilliance. I don't like to tote around the word brilliant, but I think it aptly applies here and to many works I've heard by JLA. Still, I have so much to hear.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2014, 08:20:21 PM
Nate, you've got to hear Become Ocean. That's all I'll say here. 8)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2014, 09:19:49 PM
Really enjoying In The White Silence at the moment. Hauntingly beautiful.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on November 25, 2014, 10:56:34 PM
I heard the premiere of Become Ocean, along with the companion Become River. I also heard his new work Sila: The Breath of the World recently, which is an extension of this compositional train of thought. I really love this monolithic sort of JLA, with its huge washes of sound and gradual build ups. It's music to lose yourself in, and music that begs to be performed often with what it demands (spatialized instrumental placement, audience members weaving through the instrumental forces, etc).
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on November 26, 2014, 08:01:54 AM
I didn't know there is a Become River!
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: EigenUser on November 26, 2014, 08:53:06 AM
I didn't know there is a Become River!
*waits for Become Puddle*

Nate, you've got to hear Become Ocean. That's all I'll say here. 8)
I certainly will! I think I heard In the White Silence a while ago. I also remember hearing In a Treeless Place, Only Snow a couple of years ago.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 26, 2014, 07:19:54 PM
I heard the premiere of Become Ocean, along with the companion Become River. I also heard his new work Sila: The Breath of the World recently, which is an extension of this compositional train of thought. I really love this monolithic sort of JLA, with its huge washes of sound and gradual build ups. It's music to lose yourself in, and music that begs to be performed often with what it demands (spatialized instrumental placement, audience members weaving through the instrumental forces, etc).

Yes, I can only imagine what JLA sounds like live. Must be such enriching musical experience.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 26, 2014, 07:20:54 PM
I certainly will! I think I heard In the White Silence a while ago. I also remember hearing In a Treeless Place, Only Snow a couple of years ago.

In the White Silence is a great piece. I haven't heard In a Treeless Place, Only Snow. What kind of work is this? What's the instrumentation?

Edit: Never mind I looked up on JLA's website and this work, In a Treeless Place, Only Snow, was written for celesta, harp (or piano), two vibraphones, string quartet. Sounds like a nice work already. I LOVE the vibraphone. 8)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: AdamFromWashington on November 26, 2014, 08:44:45 PM
Yes! So much talking! Everyone should know about John Luther Adams' music.

It's completely sublime. Like a hike in the mountains, or a swim in the Puget Sound. He seems to distill natural essence down to a perfectly simple yet profound musical expression. Does that sound silly? Hmm... Well, it sounds like mountains to me, his music. Strauss is great, but too messy! Bruckner's closer, but too grand, almost too human for it. But John Luther Adams achieves that freezing cold mountain feel with no fuss whatsoever. It's nearly inhuman, but... Does anyone know what I mean? By all counts it almost shouldn't succeed. The way Adams talks, you'd expect a "new age" sound, but nope, he avoids that completely (at least in my opinion).

Probably my favorite work is Inuksuit, which is the piece that introduced me to his work. I also love The Far Country of Sleep, which opens with what I would call a Zarathustra's Prelude for the Arctic Circle. I actually have that piece on a signed CD, though sadly it's signed to someone else, since I bought it used off Amazon. Makes up for the cruelly short run-time, at least.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 26, 2014, 09:09:45 PM
Yes! So much talking! Everyone should know about John Luther Adams' music.

It's completely sublime. Like a hike in the mountains, or a swim in the Puget Sound. He seems to distill natural essence down to a perfectly simple yet profound musical expression. Does that sound silly? Hmm... Well, it sounds like mountains to me, his music. Strauss is great, but too messy! Bruckner's closer, but too grand, almost too human for it. But John Luther Adams achieves that freezing cold mountain feel with no fuss whatsoever. It's nearly inhuman, but... Does anyone know what I mean? By all counts it almost shouldn't succeed. The way Adams talks, you'd expect a "new age" sound, but nope, he avoids that completely (at least in my opinion).

Probably my favorite work is Inuksuit, which is the piece that introduced me to his work. I also love The Far Country of Sleep, which opens with what I would call a Zarathustra's Prelude for the Arctic Circle. I actually have that piece on a signed CD, though sadly it's signed to someone else, since I bought it used off Amazon. Makes up for the cruelly short run-time, at least.

None of your post sounded silly. I understand where you're coming from. One thing I walk away from when listening to JLA is that 'time stood still' type of quality to the music. Yes, we probably could associate so much of his music with nature and quite understandably so considering his advocacy of environmental causes and trying to invoke the natural world in some way, but, at the end of the day, his sound palette is so vast and so far-reaching that I would hate to limit it to just nature. I do believe, however, that there is a human element in his music as so much of it is so touching that you would think he's communicating his soul directly to the listener. It doesn't really bother me if people want to label his music 'Minimalism' or whatever category people should try to pigeonhole him with. His music is so unique and belongs to it's own idiom that the only label I feel comfortable with is 'JLA music'. He is an idiom unto himself.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: AdamFromWashington on November 26, 2014, 09:58:40 PM
None of your post sounded silly. I understand where you're coming from. One thing I walk away from when listening to JLA is that 'time stood still' type of quality to the music. Yes, we probably could associate so much of his music with nature and quite understandably so considering his advocacy of environmental causes and trying to invoke the natural world in some way, but, at the end of the day, his sound palette is so vast and so far-reaching that I would hate to limit it to just nature. I do believe, however, that there is a human element in his music as so much of it is so touching that you would think he's communicating his soul directly to the listener. It doesn't really bother me if people want to label his music 'Minimalism' or whatever category people should try to pigeonhole him with. His music is so unique and belongs to it's own idiom that the only label I feel comfortable with is 'JLA music'. He is an idiom unto himself.

Indeed he is.

And you're right, inhuman wasn't quite the right word... Eh, it's a day before Thanksgiving, and I'm a bit tired, so what can you do? When I said "sublime," I was closer to the mark, and I mean "sublime" with all its philosophical connotations, that is, something beautiful, but crushing, and consuming--"inhuman." Of course, what's necessary for this is precisely the human element, because sublimation would be impossible without a sublimated party (hooray for semantics!). So, in a way, his music is "inhuman," but a better way to describe it would be this: it taps into the human experience of indifferent nature. A human expression of the inhuman, if you will. JLA talks a lot about biblical-scale floods, and melting ice caps, and volcanoes, and earthquakes. All equally beautiful and terrifying. I feel he expresses those feelings better than most anyone. But, like you, I would also hate to stuff his music into some sort of "nature" box, no matter how tempting it is with his birdsong inclusions, earthquake interpretations, and mountainous album covers. He's definitely more than that. A meditative quality inhabits his music, and a strange sort of sadness. Like you said, again, "an idiom unto himself."
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 27, 2014, 06:34:08 AM
Indeed he is.

And you're right, inhuman wasn't quite the right word... Eh, it's a day before Thanksgiving, and I'm a bit tired, so what can you do? When I said "sublime," I was closer to the mark, and I mean "sublime" with all its philosophical connotations, that is, something beautiful, but crushing, and consuming--"inhuman." Of course, what's necessary for this is precisely the human element, because sublimation would be impossible without a sublimated party (hooray for semantics!). So, in a way, his music is "inhuman," but a better way to describe it would be this: it taps into the human experience of indifferent nature. A human expression of the inhuman, if you will. JLA talks a lot about biblical-scale floods, and melting ice caps, and volcanoes, and earthquakes. All equally beautiful and terrifying. I feel he expresses those feelings better than most anyone. But, like you, I would also hate to stuff his music into some sort of "nature" box, no matter how tempting it is with his birdsong inclusions, earthquake interpretations, and mountainous album covers. He's definitely more than that. A meditative quality inhabits his music, and a strange sort of sadness. Like you said, again, "an idiom unto himself."

Good post and, of course, I agree with every word. 8)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on November 27, 2014, 07:03:50 AM
I didn't know there is a Become River!

It's a companion piece to Become Ocean that was written for the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra.

https://content.thespco.org/music/compositions/become-river-john-luther-adams/
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 27, 2014, 07:47:33 AM
I await a recording of Become River. Really would like to hear how the genesis of this work flowed right into Become Ocean. JLA explains both works here, thanks to lescamil's link:

https://www.youtube.com/v/2HxNKbr5TOg
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on November 27, 2014, 11:57:05 AM
It's beautiful.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on December 05, 2014, 08:11:16 AM
I finally have my own copy of Become Ocean. Nice to have something better than streaming.  :)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on December 05, 2014, 08:22:03 AM
I finally have my own copy of Become Ocean. Nice to have something better than streaming.  :)

Indeed. I'm not entirely impressed with the CD package itself, but it is what's inside that package that's most important, right? ;)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on December 05, 2014, 08:53:08 AM
Indeed. I'm not entirely impressed with the CD package itself, but it is what's inside that package that's most important, right? ;)

I wasn't expecting a DVD too. Looks like they spent a lot of money on the packaging. Everybody got a credit!
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on December 05, 2014, 08:15:23 PM
I wasn't expecting a DVD too. Looks like they spent a lot of money on the packaging. Everybody got a credit!

But there's virtually no notes from the composer about the work or any kind of essay about the possible genesis and how things came to be. The DVD isn't anything to write home about to be honest. The 5.1 surround sound is quite nice, but there doesn't seem to be much inventiveness when it came to the actual slideshow that accompanies the music. Anyway, all my negatives aside, Become Ocean has been one of my musical highlights this year. Simply a gorgeous work from start to finish.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on December 05, 2014, 08:50:13 PM
Liner notes would be nice, they could have even included them on the DVD.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on December 08, 2014, 05:12:39 PM
Someone mentioned this forthcoming release earlier, but we finally have a timeline on it, January 13th:

Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on January 13, 2015, 04:09:57 PM
It is now WQXR Q2 Music Album of the Week. I just started listening to it.

John Luther Adams Harnesses Sound and Silence in 'The Wind in High Places' (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/john-luther-adams-harnesses-sound-and-silence-wind-high-places/)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on January 14, 2015, 04:53:53 AM
It is now WQXR Q2 Music Album of the Week. I just started listening to it.

John Luther Adams Harnesses Sound and Silence in 'The Wind in High Places' (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/john-luther-adams-harnesses-sound-and-silence-wind-high-places/)
Thanks for posting. I'm looking forward to this.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on January 17, 2015, 11:06:24 AM
Someone mentioned this forthcoming release earlier, but we finally have a timeline on it, January 13th:



I've heard it a few times, now I'll have to buy it.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on January 18, 2015, 08:00:04 AM
John Luther Adams Discography (https://harmonicsdb.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/john-luther-adams-discography/) - More of a checklist with links than a discography.
video: John Luther Adams: Red Arc/Blue Veil (https://harmonicsdb.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/john-luther-adams-red-arcblue-veil-for-percussion-piano-and-electronics/) (for percussion, piano and electronics)
MUSIC FOR WRITERS: JOHN LUTHER ADAMS – ‘TO BECOME AN AEOLIAN HARP MYSELF’ (http://all.theglobalpoint.com/2015/01/music-for-writers-john-luther-adams-to-become-an-aeolian-harp-myself/)



John Luther Adams - the Far Country (http://youtu.be/Q07GEJ145CY?list=PL4sapy99eYWqowItqga09kCrR6FfXdIzR)
Whole album streaming...out of print on CD, New Albion stopped CD production on their catalog a few years ago.




Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on January 18, 2015, 01:15:12 PM
John Luther Adams Discography (https://harmonicsdb.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/john-luther-adams-discography/) - More of a checklist with links than a discography.
video: John Luther Adams: Red Arc/Blue Veil (https://harmonicsdb.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/john-luther-adams-red-arcblue-veil-for-percussion-piano-and-electronics/) (for percussion, piano and electronics)
MUSIC FOR WRITERS: JOHN LUTHER ADAMS – ‘TO BECOME AN AEOLIAN HARP MYSELF’ (http://all.theglobalpoint.com/2015/01/music-for-writers-john-luther-adams-to-become-an-aeolian-harp-myself/)



John Luther Adams - the Far Country (http://youtu.be/Q07GEJ145CY?list=PL4sapy99eYWqowItqga09kCrR6FfXdIzR)
Whole album streaming...out of print on CD, New Albion stopped CD production on their catalog a few years ago.

A lot of good music & info, thank you! I didn't know about the early two albums (A Northern Suite/Night Peace & Forest Without Leaves), which seem releases only on LP. Also didn't know Cornelius Dufallo's Journaling. I'll check it out.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on January 20, 2015, 05:05:32 PM
picked up a copy of In the White Silence yesterday, I'm on my third listen. I'm obsessed now.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on January 24, 2015, 12:39:17 PM
The string quartet The Wind in High Places is the most interesting piece. Unusual, and beautiful. [/i]“Over the course of almost twenty minutes, the fingers of the musicians never touch the fingerboards of the instruments.”[/i] (Adams) I have an album of aeolian harps, which sounds very different, but I feel I understand what he said: "I think I’ve wanted to resonate with the wind…to become an Aeolian harp myself."
And I was overwhelmed with the cello ensemble piece. Just gorgeous. Dream of the Canyon Wren is a strange piece. Mimicking a wren song?
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on January 24, 2015, 07:11:58 PM
The string quartet The Wind in High Places is the most interesting piece. Unusual, and beautiful. [/i]“Over the course of almost twenty minutes, the fingers of the musicians never touch the fingerboards of the instruments.”[/i] (Adams) I have an album of aeolian harps, which sounds very different, but I feel I understand what he said: "I think I’ve wanted to resonate with the wind…to become an Aeolian harp myself."

Is it anything like Louis Andriessen's Symphony for Open Strings (uses a small ensemble of scordatura strings played entirely on their open strings)?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2LG0Tmredg
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on January 24, 2015, 09:11:29 PM
Is it anything like Louis Andriessen's Symphony for Open Strings (uses a small ensemble of scordatura strings played entirely on their open strings)?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2LG0Tmredg

I think there are some similarities in sounds, but the styles are very different. Andriessen's piece is rhythmical & repetitive, while Adams's is slow and meditative, played mostly in high registers. The way the sounds of strings entangle is reminiscent of aeolian harps.

You can listen to The Wind in High Places on youtube.
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0FmGIVOFiHr9w3EtWppSzcfea0y2DcZO (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0FmGIVOFiHr9w3EtWppSzcfea0y2DcZO)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on January 24, 2015, 10:47:06 PM
The album was recently for streaming on Q2, a blog on WQXR.org, and I managed to download it off of there. It actually might still be there, in case anyone wants to get it, instead of hassling with YouTube.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on February 07, 2015, 04:58:01 AM
The string quartet The Wind in High Places is the most interesting piece. Unusual, and beautiful. “Over the course of almost twenty minutes, the fingers of the musicians never touch the fingerboards of the instruments.” (Adams) I have an album of aeolian harps, which sounds very different, but I feel I understand what he said: "I think I’ve wanted to resonate with the wind…to become an Aeolian harp myself."


La Monte Young's string qt Kronos Kristala is played entirely with harmonics on open strings.


([size=78%]I think I remember that correctly)[/size]




Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on February 15, 2015, 06:39:52 AM
John Luther Adams Discography (https://harmonicsdb.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/john-luther-adams-discography/) - More of a checklist with links than a discography.

now with audio links...entire albums on uTube.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on February 15, 2015, 01:09:50 PM
now with audio links...entire albums on uTube.
Thank you for it. I listened to Three High Places (2007) on Cornelius Dufallo's Journaling. It is basically the same music as The Wind in High Places (2011), only shorter and for solo violin. It sounds a little bit more hoarse, but a fascinating piece as well.


The second section can be heard on soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/innovadotmu/8-john-luther-adams-three-high (https://soundcloud.com/innovadotmu/8-john-luther-adams-three-high)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on February 15, 2015, 01:30:11 PM
Thanks.

on a different note...

uTube is, of course, no substitute for a CD. JLA's music is so hifi.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: 7/4 on February 25, 2015, 03:57:39 AM
Making Music in the Anthropocene (http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2015/02/john_luther_adams_grammy_winner_for_become_ocean_discusses_politics_and.html)
How should artists engage with times of crisis? (http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2015/02/john_luther_adams_grammy_winner_for_become_ocean_discusses_politics_and.html)
By John Luther Adams
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on April 30, 2015, 11:25:38 AM
I blogged today about this composer and his work, Become Ocean.

Celebrate John Adams (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/04/29/celebrate-john-adams/)

And, no, I am not talking about John Adams, the composer of gargantuan inanities such as the opera The Death of Klinghoffer, in which John Adams parades his profound ignorance about the history of the Middle East and attempts to humanize monsters that pitched a wheelchair-bound man overboard the Italian MS Achille Lauro liner for the irredeemable crime of cruising while Jewish.

I am going to write about the other composer named John Adams, more accurately, John Luther Adams: born January 23, 1953; an American composer whose music is inspired by nature, especially the landscapes of Alaska where he has lived since 1978.  Specifically, I will write about his orchestral work Become Ocean which was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

I think it's crystal clear that you don't like the other John Adams now, David. No need to beat a dead horse. Anyway...back to JLA.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 17, 2015, 07:21:06 AM
Have just ordered 'Become Ocean' having come across it on You Tube. Debated with myself for a long time as to whether to get it but it so unlike almost anything else in my collection that I gave in and ordered it.   >:D >:D/ 0:)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 17, 2015, 07:55:52 AM
Although a few GMG-ers have been underwhelmed by it, I am a fan - of not only Becoming Ocean, but of his entire oeuvre.

Hope you enjoy it.

 :)

Thank you. I can well believe that it divides opinion. One review I read said that it's best heard at night when you are asleep but others were very enthusiastic about it. Is there anything else that you would especially recommend by this composer?
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: North Star on September 17, 2015, 09:20:09 AM
A particular favorite of mine is The Wind in High Places for string quartet.  String harmonics, subtly shifting among the quartet, create a beautiful expression of stillness and wind, IMO.  Most of his work is a celebration of the magnificence of the natural world: wind, mountains, ocean.

Also, In the White Silence (1998) for celesta, harp, string quartet, 2 vibraphones, and string quintet or orchestra.
I think I'll try The Wind in High Places (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vx1rLZ9W5Ak&list=PL0FmGIVOFiHr9w3EtWppSzcfea0y2DcZO) later tonight on Youtube.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Brewski on September 17, 2015, 11:58:22 AM
I thought Become Ocean was fascinating - have only heard it once, via the radio broadcast of the Carnegie Hall performance. At 45 minutes, it might be longer than some expect, or would like, but as I like to say, one person's boredom is another's trance, and I found it mesmerizing. That said, for someone who has had a rough day or is feeling impatient, it might not be the wisest choice.

Another interesting piece is this one, The Mathematics of Resonant Bodies. Each section uses a specific instrument, e.g., a gong, or a siren, and explores its timbres and overtones. Like Become Ocean, it's not a piece about melody.  ;D



And one more (in addition to the excellent suggestions above): Inuksuit, which again, I've only heard live, and a recording may lack something of the experience, since it is intended to be immersive - to occur all around you. It's for a huge number of percussionists, spread out over a large area, and lasts roughly 30-45 minutes. Here's a good blog post by percussionist Michael Bettine, who was one of 99 musicians (!) who performed it in Milwaukee. At the end of the post are links to the performance, on YouTube.

http://percussiondeconstruction.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-experience-of-inuksuit.html

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on September 17, 2015, 06:09:27 PM
Have just ordered 'Become Ocean' having come across it on You Tube. Debated with myself for a long time as to whether to get it but it so unlike almost anything else in my collection that I gave in and ordered it.   >:D >:D/ 0:)

As one of my many avatars can attest, I'm a big fan of JLA, Jeffrey. 8) Become Ocean is a gorgeous work. I actually wrote a review of it on Amazon (if you will allow me to indulge you here):

Title of review: An Orchestral Masterpiece from John Luther Adams -

John Luther Adams, born in Meridian, MS, is a composer that has made his home in Fairbanks, Alaska since the mid-70s. Upon making his home in Alaska, he has been an integral part of this state's artistic and environmental causes. These landscapes, and the surroundings in general, have deeply affected Adams' music. There's even a book written by Adams titled "Winter Music: Composing The North" if this is any indication to what his music seems to invoke. With this new recording of the Pulitzer Prize winning "Become Ocean," the listener is reminded yet again that the natural world is something that has continuously kept Adams' mind occupied. As another review pointed out, the precursor to "Become Ocean" is the chamber orchestral work "Become River." Adams actually stopped composing "Ocean" to work on "River." I have not heard "Become River" unfortunately, so I can't speak how one work has led into the other. Hopefully, an enterprising label like Cantaloupe will record this work as well.

The sound-world of "Become Ocean" is pretty much everything the title suggests: it's vast, textured, hypnotic, and ultimately engulfing. This isn't to say, however, that the work floats gently by without any kind of rhyme or reason. There are several crescendos in the work that, like a powerful tidal wave, can completely drown you. It's hard for me to categorize this kind of music because I think any kind of label you put on it does it an injustice of some kind. JLA is constantly being categorized as a 'Minimalist,' but, again, this is trying to restrict his art and put it into some kind of bubble. His music is, in my opinion, an idiom unto itself and after hearing "Become Ocean," I'm sure you'll come away with some kind of appreciation for what he's achieved here.

The sound quality is superb and the performance from the Seattle Symphony under Ludovic Morlot couldn't be any more compelling. In fact, I would wager that if another recording of this work is ever released, it won't match Morlot's performance. All of the nuances and attention to detail is in this performance.

The only negative I have doesn't even pertain to the music but rather the presentation of the music. The digipack it comes in overall design, while containing beautiful artwork and nice booklet, is quite flawed. It's hard to take the discs in and out of the pack as it's simply too tight and I wish they would have went with either a standard jewel case or at least make some kind of CD tray where there's a way to hold the CDs in place so you can get them out easier. Other than this, it's a nice package.

All of this said, I'll leave you with a quote from the composer himself (which is found on the inside of the digipack):

"Life on this earth first emerged from the sea. Today, as the polar ice melts and sea level rises, we humans face the prospect that we may once again, quite literally, become ocean."

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One of the things I love about JLA is he provides a great anecdote to a lot of the more dramatic, and darker hued, music I normally flock to. Some other favorite works of mine from him:

Strange Birds Passing
Red Arc/Blue Veil
Night Peace
The Far Country of Sleep
Canticles of the Sky
The Light That Fills The World

Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 18, 2015, 01:09:49 AM
A particular favorite of mine is The Wind in High Places for string quartet.  String harmonics, subtly shifting among the quartet, create a beautiful expression of stillness and wind, IMO.  Most of his work is a celebration of the magnificence of the natural world: wind, mountains, ocean.

Also, In the White Silence (1998) for celesta, harp, string quartet, 2 vibraphones, and string quintet or orchestra.

There are two newer works, written since Become Ocean, I have not heard yet, but wish to:

Ten Thousand Birds (2014) for chamber orchestra (fl, ob, 2 cl, bsn, hn, tpt, tbn, 2 perc, pno/cel, 2 vlns, vla, vc, cb).   

Sila: The Breath of the World (2013) for large ensemble and voices.
Very many thanks for the recommendations. 'The Wind in High Places' sounds interesting.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 18, 2015, 01:16:37 AM
Thanks Bruce and John for the comments and recommendations. I'm really looking forward to receiving 'Become Ocean' and like North Star will be investigating more of his work although Melikov's 'Legend of Love' is taking up much of my listening time at the moment.  ::)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 18, 2015, 02:04:12 AM
I revisited Become Ocean yesterday, and I remain a member of The Loyal Opposition  8)  I shan't recapitulate my review, but summarize simply as Much to like, I do have a couple of compositional quarrels.

That said, I emphasize that this is simply my response, as an artist with my own work to do;  I do not expect any others to feel the same about the piece, or to feel the same about the piece for my reasons.  And the bottom line is, I agree that it is a fine piece, and worth listening to.

Another thing is, I take my response, this year, as an affirmation only of my musical thoughts and responses at present.  Ask me again in five years  ;)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 18, 2015, 04:51:01 AM
I revisited Become Ocean yesterday, and I remain a member of The Loyal Opposition  8)  I shan't recapitulate my review, but summarize simply as Much to like, I do have a couple of compositional quarrels.

That said, I emphasize that this is simply my response, as an artist with my own work to do;  I do not expect any others to feel the same about the piece, or to feel the same about the piece for my reasons.  And the bottom line is, I agree that it is a fine piece, and worth listening to.

Another thing is, I take my response, this year, as an affirmation only of my musical thoughts and responses at present.  Ask me again in five years  ;)
I had ambivalent feelings about it when I heard it on You Tube and can understand why it tends to polarise views. I'll write more when I hear the CD.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: CRCulver on September 18, 2015, 09:28:33 AM
I'll write more when I hear the CD.

Hear the DVD. Surround sound makes a difference for this composer.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on September 19, 2015, 12:09:40 AM
Hear the DVD. Surround sound makes a difference for this composer.
Thank you.  :)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on September 27, 2015, 09:44:33 PM
Ilimaq (2012) for solo percussionist and electronic sounds - Glenn Kotche
(https://f1.bcbits.com/img/a3157392841_14.jpg)
https://johnlutheradams.bandcamp.com/album/ilimaq (https://johnlutheradams.bandcamp.com/album/ilimaq)
releases 30 October 2015
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on October 10, 2015, 12:55:52 AM
I listened to 'Become Ocean' yesterday and was gripped throughout - more than expected really. I guess that if you enter into the spirit of the work it can be a powerful and moving experience, as it was for me, but I can still understand that it polarises opinion.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 10, 2015, 05:24:39 AM
Glad you enjoyed it, Jeffrey!  Many do  :)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on October 10, 2015, 06:45:29 AM
Glad you enjoyed it, Jeffrey!  Many do  :)
Thanks Karl. I guess that you have to be in the right mood but that applies to much music. It gripped me more than I expected.  :)
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: Mirror Image on October 10, 2015, 07:32:47 AM
Excellent, Jeffrey! I really like many of JLA's works. He has a unique, singular compositional voice. Check out The Far Country of Sleep next.

https://www.youtube.com/v/EViyRg3e-ts
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: vandermolen on October 10, 2015, 10:47:29 PM
Excellent, Jeffrey! I really like many of JLA's works. He has a unique, singular compositional voice. Check out The Far Country of Sleep next.

https://www.youtube.com/v/EViyRg3e-ts
Will do. Thanks John 😀
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on November 02, 2015, 12:31:06 AM
Ilimaq (2012) for solo percussionist and electronic sounds - Glenn Kotche
(https://f1.bcbits.com/img/a3157392841_14.jpg)
https://johnlutheradams.bandcamp.com/album/ilimaq (https://johnlutheradams.bandcamp.com/album/ilimaq)
releases 30 October 2015
How is this one?
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on November 02, 2015, 08:34:07 AM
How is this one?

It's an electroacoustic piece with percussion and drum kit. No melodic instrument like vibraphone or marimba is used. The powerful rhythm in the electronic soundscape sounds primitive and earthy, but it's preciously played. I liked the energetic sound. If you enjoyed Inuksuit, I think you would like it.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on November 02, 2015, 05:14:40 PM
Listen to it here this week:

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/john-luther-adams-and-wilcos-glenn-kotche-epic-percussive-ilimaq/
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on November 02, 2015, 06:18:28 PM
Thank you for all the replies. I appreciate it.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on February 13, 2016, 10:03:00 AM
According to the liner notes, this is the first CD of the complete acoustic music for solo piano by John Luther Adams. Among Red Mountains was recorded on a Cold Blue album, but I don't know if the others have been recorded before. The works of Adams are grand, and the other composers' works are very good too. A powerfull, uplifting and beautiful album.

The Stone People - Lisa Moore (Cantaloupe Music)



John Luther Adams: Tukiliit, Among Red Mountains, Nunataks
Martin Bresnick: Ishi's Song
Julia Wolfe: Compassion, Earring
Missy Mazzoli: Orrizonte
Kate Moore: Silabh Beagh
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: lescamil on May 25, 2016, 09:00:48 AM
http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/listen-west-coast-premiere-of-john-luther-adams-become-river/

In case any of you missed last year's Ojai Festival, you can hear John Luther Adams' Become River right here.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: milk on June 05, 2016, 05:46:05 AM
Lots of seemingly interesting compositions from Adams the last couple of years, including "Ten Thousand Birds." I wonder when we'll have a new recording.
Title: Re: John Luther Adams (b. 1953)
Post by: torut on February 24, 2017, 12:09:00 AM
from Cantaloup Music Newsletter

"On May 12, John Luther Adams’ epic Canticles of the Holy Wind, recorded by The Crossing, will see its official release, as well as another NYC performance on the same day, courtesy of the Symphony Space (http://www.symphonyspace.org/event/9392/Music/canticles-of-the-holy-wind)."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JeFaMpucVg
Title: John Luther Adams world premiere with JACK Quartet
Post by: Brewski on November 12, 2021, 06:51:48 PM
The JACK Quartet just performed the world premiere of JLA's Waves and Particles at Black Mountain College, and you can watch the video here:

https://www.blackmountaincollege.org/waves-and-particles/

--Bruce
Title: Re: John Luther Adams world premiere with JACK Quartet
Post by: vers la flamme on November 12, 2021, 06:54:52 PM
The JACK Quartet just performed the world premiere of JLA's Waves and Particles at Black Mountain College, and you can watch the video here:

https://www.blackmountaincollege.org/waves-and-particles/

--Bruce

A friend of mine was at this premiere. Looks interesting.