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Composer Discussion / Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Last post by krummholz on Today at 07:27:20 AM »
The replacement finale is not really a light throwback; it is still one of the longest and most complex finales to a Beethoven quartet (493 bars; only the GF at 741 bars is longer). It only appears small by comparison with the GF. The main "problem" with it for listeners is that it doesn't attempt to solve the inherent dissociation of the piece, but rather heightens it; not bothering to integrate the various styles, instead introducing all kinds of new disruptions (e.g. its own section in A-flat which is "resolved", rather than through modulation, simply by being played again in E-flat and then B-flat—not a real resolution at all, in that sense; also all the extended contrapuntal interludes that intrude on the sonata-rondo structure, and whatever the hell is happening in bars 215-223) which continue all the way to the pianissimo fermata on the last sixteenth note of the antepenultimate bar. In this sense it creates an "open" ending similar to those in Op. 131 and, to a lesser extent, 135, one where the music is destabilised to the extent that any ending feels arbitrary.

Interesting take (and in-depth analysis!) on the replacement finale! Admittedly it has been literally decades since I listened to that finale and must revisit it soon... thanks for the thoughtful post.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 07:02:52 AM »
I think that is a wonderful set.

Right,some parts are really very beautifully sung, in my opinion the recordings are a bit too reverberant, anyway I'm glad I have them. My preference  goes to the motets, although the masses are not to be missed.  :)
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Composer Discussion / Re: Krzysztof Penderecki (b. 1933)
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:00:26 AM »
Well, you'll have to count me in as one who likes a wide variety of Penderecki's works from early to late. I'm sure John (MI) and some others feels the same way.

Yes, I think there's a lot to enjoy in all of Penderecki's oeuvre. Also, this belief that his earlier, more avant-garde works are somehow better just because they're wilder and more spontaneous is wrong-headed, IMHO. The composer has stated many times that he needed to move away from this style as he felt he had exhausted it, which I believe he did and the proof of this in the pudding as the saying goes. Penderecki's more tonal works are incredibly focused works that require more than a passing listen to get into and understand. One can very well just not like the music, but no one should make the mistake of completely writing these works off. Works like the Horn Concerto, String Quartet No. 3, "Leaves of an unwritten diary", Symphonies Nos. 6, 7 & 8, A Sea of Dreams Did Breathe on Me, the Sinfoniettas, the Sextet, Violin Sonata No. 2 et. al. all demonstrate a wide range of style. I think once a person actually starts digging into his oeuvre and not just superficially, they will begin to realize there's more variety in his writing then what was initially thought.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by amw on Today at 06:55:16 AM »
What I noticed is that Hough mentions how Chopin's preference for the Pleyel played such an import role in writing this music:

"There is significance too that his indications are generally faster than later norms (the much-loved Op 27 No 2 is a startling example). Chopin’s original tempi and long phrase markings encourage melodies to float in one breath across the bar lines; and his preferred Pleyel piano had a much faster decay of resonance than modern instruments, compelling the pianist to move on to the next note before the sound literally dies."

But of course, he doesn't use a Pleyel...   ::)
and he also ignores Chopin's original tempi if timings are any indication. Pianists often say these things but in the end they're always guided much more by the pianistic pedagogic tradition (& their preference for modern Steinways, Faziolis etc) than the actual intentions of the composers. It's very tiresome.

People often comment on how unnecessary it is that we have 500 recordings of the same piece, but what's always lost is that we have 500 incorrect recordings of the same piece that are all based on listening to each other rather than going back to the score. It's an endless circle-jerk.

(While I'm here and on my soapbox: listen to Tobias Koch's recording of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 06:51:57 AM »




What makes this recording stand out from all the other Missa Se La Face est pale? Is it worth having if you already have access to pleasant performances of the music?

The sound quality is excellent, radiant. And the ordinarium is interspersed with some lovely polyphonic propers, unrecorded elsewhere as far as I know - this is another valuable unique selling point.


The interpretation is very much about independent parts and sweet harmonious cross relations at the cadences, and calm rapt control - never showy. The tactus is well chosen IMO - the music breathes and
I have lots of time to smell the roses. I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of it is one to a part, it’s really hard to say. The recording is beefed up with some of Dufay’s motet, including a lovely rendition of Magnanime Gentis.
There’s a tenor who caught my attention. The countertenor sounds like a ♂

Looks like I'll have to add this one to my collection, thank you very much for this recommendation.  :)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 06:48:20 AM »
Bach

This is my oldest organ LP with the eight little preludes and fugues.
As a very young man I visited a Trappist monastery and as I walked into the church a theology student who was also proficient in playing the organ was playing these pieces. It was a lovely experience on a sunny winter morning.

Albert de Klerk and Meindert Boekel  (chorals) organ

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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 06:47:02 AM »
It's growing on me too.  :)


Thanks for posting, a beautiful recording indeed! My interest is always aroused when I see Lena Susanne Norin involved, ever since I got fairly hooked on her Figures of Harmony recording with Crawford Young. There's a spellbinding tranquillity about her voice, yet it's always full of nuance and feeling. The instrumental playing on the disc is quite something too.

Happy to read this  :)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 06:45:54 AM »




What makes this recording stand out from all the other Missa Se La Face est pale? Is it worth having if you already have access to pleasant performances of the music?

The sound quality is excellent, radiant. And the ordinarium is interspersed with some lovely polyphonic propers, unrecorded elsewhere as far as I know - this is another valuable unique selling point.


The interpretation is very much about independent parts and sweet harmonious cross relations at the cadences, and calm rapt control - never showy. The tactus is well chosen IMO - the music breathes and I have lots of time to smell the roses. I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of it is one to a part, it’s really hard to say. The recording is beefed up with some of Dufay’s motet, including a lovely rendition of Magnanime Gentis.

There’s a tenor who caught my attention. The countertenor sounds like a ♂





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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by André on Today at 06:44:20 AM »
André,

How did you like that album?  What did you think of the violin concerto in particular?
Love that LP cover!
Good to see more women getting appointed as music directors.  :)  I haven't heard any recordings/concerts with her conducting before, but am looking forward to it.

PD

Hi, PD. The disc is still in the player, I have to give it another spin before I can comment. I’ve had it for years but didn’t remember a thing when I put it on yesterday. One thing I can comment on is that the VC has been cut at a very low level and the violin is recorded distantly - which may be a realistic balance, but doesn’t help in terms of the listening experience. I note that there are a few versions on disc out there, so presumably the piece holds a certain interest to violinists. That of Benjamin Schmid looks interesting. He’s one of my favourite violinists and the coupling appeals to me (Klami’s concerto).
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by jlopes on Today at 06:38:31 AM »


A 2022 release.  I'll be patient.  I've not bought a new Mozart sonata cycle since, like, 2020.

Is this a new recording or a reissue? Well, must be new, I don't remember an earlier cycle by her.
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