GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Great Recordings and Reviews => Topic started by: Que on July 08, 2007, 10:09:09 PM

Title: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 08, 2007, 10:09:09 PM
Here is a thread to discuss works by other composers of the German baroque than Bach.

Recommendations - queries - discussions.

Btw, "German" in the title of this thread means that I'm refering to all baroque composers from the Germanic Empire (or Holy Roman Empire) and/including Bohemia.
Oh, and yes, and I assume someone will give Georg Friedrich Händel his own thread! 8)

Several composers come to mind:

Composers linked to a site specially dedicated to them, are indicated in bold.
BTW I'll continously update the list of composers, and will add links to websites on them - if anyone knows interesting sites, please PM them to me!

Thanks! :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 08, 2007, 10:27:46 PM
Erlebach, Kuhnau, Knupfer, Pachelbel, Rosenmuller, to mention only a few others represented in my collection and who has written works I've enjoyed.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 08, 2007, 10:44:42 PM
I'll do the kick off with a post on Heinrich Ignaz von Biber.

A really superb composer and a real eye opener for me. His music is virtuosic, very imaginative and idiosyncratic  - hypnotic stuff. Anything but dull - he's downright wild!   ;D

Some favourites - but I need recommendations myself, especially on his vocal/choral music!
Andrew Manze excels in Biber IMO - invigorating.

(http://www.jpc.de/image/cover/front/0/2894120.jpg) (http://www.alapage.com/resize.php?&ref=509218&type=2&r=0&s=0&m=r)


Chamber music by The Rare Fruits Council - an appropriate name for this very adventurous music!  8)
(http://www.alapage.com/resize.php?&ref=541289&type=2&r=0&s=0&m=r)
                  samples here (http://www4.fnac.com/Shelf/article.aspx?PRID=1412533&OrderInSession=1&Mn=2&SID=eee8aff0-3127-4524-dedd-f02821083a76&TTL=100720070942&Origin=FnacAff&Ra=-29&To=0&Nu=2&UID=04E9FEC61-12D6-528A-A1EA-51FC757A1321&Fr=0)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 08, 2007, 10:47:40 PM
Erlebach, Kuhnau, Knupfer, Pachelbel, Rosenmuller, to mention only a few others represented in my collection and who has written works I've enjoyed.

That demonstrates how much there is to discover - did not hear of Erlebach before!  :)

Favourite works & recordings on any of those?

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 08, 2007, 11:17:26 PM
I'll try to come bach on this - I'm at work now!

And don't forget Westhoff, Fischer and several Walthers!   ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 09, 2007, 01:02:08 AM
Well, strictly speaking, Zelenka was not German, he was a Czech Bohemian (which means that he did not come from any of the states of the Holy Roman Empire of German nation either because Bohemia, while part of the territories ruled over by the Emperor in Vienna who also presided over the German states, was not part of that), but he spent most of his artistic life in Dresden, and he also studied in Vienna, so his work can not be looked at separated from that of his German contemporaries and colleagues.

Zelenka composed a number of highly interesting works. Among my favorites are the trio sonatas for oboes and basso continuo which I have all played a number of times. They have also been recorded numerous times. I particularly like these:

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/31HHJW6TGZL._AA240_.jpg)(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41GMTCG0QQL._AA240_.jpg)

The one on the left features Goritzki and Glaetzner, the one one the right Holliger and Bourgue. Both are on modern instruments, Holliger/Bourgue more "modern" in style while Goritzki/Glaetzner incorporate "HIP" elements in a very intelligent and stylish way in the way it can also be heard from the Neues Bachisches Collegium Musicum Leipzig under Pommer from this period (and the accompanying musicians come from that environment, too).
Oboe players love these works because they are very inventive and demanding in their use of the instrument. Zelenka was a bass (or violone as it was usually called then) player and that is reflected in the interesting bass parts, too.

Dresden, then as now was one of the most important musical centers in Germany, musicians enjoyed excellent working conditions and the Hofkapelle (which still exists today in the form of the Staatskapelle) was renowned all over Europe. Vivaldi also wrote concertos for them. Zelenka's colleague, Johann Adolf Hasse who I believe has not been mentioned here yet, was one of the most celebrated composer of operas in the Italian style during that time.
Here is an interesting article about music in Dresden in that period. (http://www.earlymusicworld.com/id16.html)
Hasse had succeeded Heinichen as Hofkapellmeister. These are great albums of their music:
(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SMBO3hslL._AA240_.jpg)(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/41V3GGBB8XL._AA240_.jpg)

Other important German composers of the time not yet mentioned were Johann Joachim Quantz and Carl Heinrich Graun who both worked at the court of the king of Prussia, Frederick II ("the Great") who played the flute and indeed also composed himself. We are getting more into the late baroque era here, but there are no strict "borders" between "high baroque" and later styles anyway.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 09, 2007, 02:28:50 AM
The Hasse/Goebel looks very interesting and right up my alley....unfortunately it seems to be OOP.

re the ECM -there's an ECM offer on mdt currently. I have the older Archiv/Holliger recordings of Zelenka, but is open for more recent stuff, the Archiv sets were on modern instruments I think.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 09, 2007, 02:50:40 AM
I think the older Holliger recording on Archiv was on "modern" instruments as well (I don't think I have ever heard of him playing on period instruments). So is the Goritzki/Glaetzner, but it is extremely stylish and incorporates "HIP" insights intelligently and seamlessly into a very attractive "modern" style. My first recommendation for these great pieces.

The Goebel disc is scheduled for re-release by DG later this year, in case you can't find a used copy.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: val on July 09, 2007, 02:52:53 AM
Regarding vocal and choral music, Schütz is to me the greatest German composer before Bach (and Händel). The Psalms of David, the Symphoniae Sacrae, the Geistliche Chormusik, among other masterpieces, are wonderful.

Regarding the organ, Buxtehude and Bruhns are my favorites, in special their Preludes and Fugues. Lübeck has good works, but perhaps more superficial.

In the harpsichord, Froberger seems to me the greatest German composer before Bach. His Lamentations on the death of Blancrocher and Ferdinand III are strange but how impressive works.

In the orchestral music, Telemann. He was a great, very great composer. He composed too much, and sometimes the works are not inspired. But when they are (just as an example, I would mention the Suite in A minor or the Concerto in E minor for recorder and transverse flute, or the 12 Fantasies for flute solo), Telemann is not inferior to Händel's instrumental music. At least, this is my opinion.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 09, 2007, 03:04:13 AM
Excellent thread Que!

I am a fan of most of these composers but I am not familiar with all of them. I don't have music (yet) from Abel, Heinichen, Froberger, Pisendel, Zelenka and Knüpfer.

These two mighty composers haven't been mentioned yet

Matthias Weckmann (c. 1616-1674)
Franz Tunder (1614-1667)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 09, 2007, 03:07:46 AM
There is a composer named Lübeck? I didn't know that.

See, you don't know everything. I did know this composer existed and someday I will buy his music.

(http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/491/6138g98rhwlaa240nq9.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 09, 2007, 03:12:02 AM
See, you don't know everything.

And neither did I ever claim I do. In fact, didn't I just say a day or so ago that I probably don't know 99% of the music out there? The difference here is that I know what I know and understand and what I don't know and don't understand, and you know very little and understand even less, but you don't know that you understand very little. Which is your loss. You have no idea what you closed mind is prohibiting you from seeing. But again, you loss. And a little bit our loss, unfortunately, as you proudly keep spamming these forums with irrelevant random nosense.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 09, 2007, 03:14:43 AM
Regarding vocal and choral music, Schütz is to me the greatest German composer before Bach (and Händel). The Psalms of David, the Symphoniae Sacrae, the Geistliche Chormusik, among other masterpieces, are wonderful.


Totally agree.

And then you have Schein, Scheidt and Scheidemann. Scheins Israels Brunnlein, a series of madrigals over spiritual texts, is a very fine work.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 09, 2007, 03:24:43 AM
And neither did I ever claim I do. In fact, didn't I just say a day or so ago that I probably don't know 99% of the music out there? The difference here is that I know what I know and understand and what I don't know and don't understand, and you know very little and understand even less, but you don't know that you understand very little. Which is your loss. You have no idea what you closed mind is prohibiting you from seeing. But again, you loss. And a little bit our loss, unfortunately, as you proudly keep spamming these forums with irrelevant random nosense.

It's good you know your own limits. I know mine but why do you belittle people whose knowledge differs from yours? You know perhaps a lot about how Brahms used brass instruments but perhaps I have a better insight of German middle baroque? I mean, you were reading Brahms' scores while I was listening to Weckmann's organ works. I am an acoustics engineer. My education includes very little of music theory (some due to the acoustics of musical instruments). I don't have the skills to read scores like musically educated people do, I haven't even tried much. So, for a person without musical education I think I have a very large and deep knowledge about classical music (and some other forms of music too). That's why it pisses me off when people belittle me in this issue.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 09, 2007, 03:26:33 AM
Regarding vocal and choral music, Schütz is to me the greatest German composer before Bach (and Händel). The Psalms of David, the Symphoniae Sacrae, the Geistliche Chormusik, among other masterpieces, are wonderful.

Wonderful indeed but I still rank Buxtehude the greatest German composer before Bach.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 09, 2007, 03:30:05 AM
In the orchestral music, Telemann. He was a great, very great composer. He composed too much, and sometimes the works are not inspired. But when they are (just as an example, I would mention the Suite in A minor or the Concerto in E minor for recorder and transverse flute, or the 12 Fantasies for flute solo), Telemann is not inferior to Händel's instrumental music. At least, this is my opinion.

Val, have you heard Fasch's orchestral music? Gotta love his concertos for chalumeau.  8)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Sergeant Rock on July 09, 2007, 03:32:21 AM
Well, strictly speaking, Zelenka was not German, he was a Czech Bohemian (which means that he did not come from any of the states of the Holy Roman Empire of German nation either because Bohemia, while part of the territories ruled over by the Emperor in Vienna who also presided over the German states, was not part of that

Bohemia was certainly part of the Holy Roman Empire. The King of Bohemia was even one of the Electors! Here's a map of the Empire, 1786

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/ngmg/map1786_500.jpg)


Sarge
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Soundproof on July 09, 2007, 03:34:23 AM
I was in my car on the late afternoon of June 10th, this year, when I was exposed to von Biber. A programme where they played his Christi Himmelfahrt, sonate in C-dur with Musica Antiqua Köln; Missa Bruxellensis under Jordi Savall and the La Capella Reial de Catalunya; and to top it off (!) Sonata Representativa, with Romanesca playing.

As I had never heard his music before, we drove to a nice look-out point, shut off the engine, turned up the volume and had a wonderful hour of music.
I'm not completely ignorant of the era but will be plucking suggestions off the thread. That radio transmission was wonderful because it exposed me to music that seemed familiar, while being anything but. I understood from the radio commentary that there has been a strong rebirth of interest in Germany in these composers?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 09, 2007, 03:37:12 AM
Bohemia was certainly part of the Holy Roman Empire.

Well, whatever the historical circumstances, it was my intention to include Bohemian baroque composers for the purpose of this thread. I hope we all can live with that.  ;)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 09, 2007, 03:42:10 AM
Well, whatever the historical circumstances, it was my intention to include Bohemian baroque composers for the purpose of this thread. I hope we all can live with that.  ;)

You are right, especially because we are talking about a continuous cultural sphere which extended over political or language boundaries (Zelenka is a good example for that). But it is such a fascinating and complex subject, even though it is ver confusing sometimes because political configurations changed all the time and were often so complicated that it takes a long time to figure out what exactly was going on. We learned a lot about that in school, and I have spent a lot of time reading about it, but I still get confused by aspects of the long and compicated history of the Holy Roman Empire.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Kullervo on July 09, 2007, 04:31:48 AM
I like this disc, but it is OOP.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/c0/48/8d3662e89da01e55bc443110.L.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 09, 2007, 11:51:26 AM
I fell in love with Bach in the 70-ies through the Teldec series of cantatas, but it was with the CD explosion of the early 90-ies I could start to explore the Baroque more systematically, having amassed some hundred CDs by the like of Bach, Handel and Rameau, but also exploring somewhat systematically other trails.

Here are, in no particular order, some of my discoveries from this period in Germany

I agree that Schutz, by far, Is the most important German composer before Bach. Anyone wanting to check on that can spend a lot of money by buying virtually anything in the Harmonia Mundi catalogue by the likes of Junghanel or Jacobs.  For a cheaper alternative, the Brilliant series is never less than serviceable, and often (Kleine Geistliche Konzerte) very good.

Here goes in no particular order (I’ve avoided composers like Buxtehude and Zelenka, which I consider established masters with well documented catalogues):

The best recording of German vocal music I know of by a contemporary of Schutz, is this:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/HMA1951574.jpg)

The shortlived student of Buxtehude, Nikolai Bruhns, wrote some fine cantatas documented on this superb record:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/HMC901752.jpg)

An early Dresden violin virtuosos is Walther

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/ZZT060902.jpg)

Superb recordings of interesting violin suites in a consort like style.

Another somewhat later Dresdener, contemporary with Zelenka and Heinichen, with some superbly virtuosic violin sonatas in more traditional style, is Pisendel:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/9999822.jpg)

A student friend of Heinichen and Pisendel, Fasch ended up in Leipzig under Kuhnau at one time.

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/FUG502.jpg)

Superb playing, rhytmically precise of some very good music..

A final Dresdener, Westhoff, born in 1656 and destined to become Bachs teacher, represents one of the best records of Baroque chamber music I know:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/ZZT050201.jpg)

The aforementioned Kuhnau, Thomaskantor in the ThomasKirche before Bach took the post, is represented by the best record in Hyperions 5 CD miniseries of contemporaries of Bach:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/CDA67059.jpg)

The Bohemian Fischer was contemporary with Bruhns and Westhoff, and mainly active in Prague:

(http://www.boysoloist.com/albumimages/3924_boni-pueri-fischer3.jpg)

And finally an Italian, Conti, I have included since his professional life was spent in Vienna, because he is virtually unknown, and because this record of cantatas being absolutely charming:

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2002/Nov02/conti.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on July 09, 2007, 02:47:44 PM
I like this disc, but it is OOP.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/c0/48/8d3662e89da01e55bc443110.L.jpg)

Has been re-released as part of the Baroque Espirit series (budget line).   :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on July 09, 2007, 03:10:41 PM
(http://img516.imageshack.us/img516/6360/6114828fd7a0bfe4ededf01cr9.jpg) (http://imageshack.us) (http://img211.imageshack.us/img211/6176/9270828fd7a011699dedf01qa9.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

Best performances of the Zelenka trios for me, and all HIP!  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on July 09, 2007, 03:44:38 PM
The German Frescobaldi, Johann Jakob Froberger, wrote utterly compelling music for the keyboard.  Leonhardt has returned to his works time and time again in recordings (the 1964 classic using a Johannes Ruckers instrument is a must) but there are great performances from other musicians as well.  This 2-for-1 set is a great bargain in many senses of the word:

(http://img68.imageshack.us/img68/2716/31tp5vypatlss500lt5.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Tancata on July 10, 2007, 05:14:38 AM
(http://addons.books.com.tw/G/002/8/0020012068.jpg)

Nice thread. There exists this recital CD by Andreas Scholl, called simply Kantate, which is a delightful way to sample a number of the composers mentioned so far including Schutz, Buxtehude, Tunder, Erlebach, various non-JS Bachs and other German baroque composers who lived before JS Bach.

It's a lovely disc - from the period when Scholl's voice was at its peak, with excellent, sensitive continuo - different combinations of lutes and viols - provided by the Basel Consort and others. All the works featured are short (less than 10 minute) German baroque cantatas. The music is universally interesting, with Schutz, Buxtehude and JC Bach's numbers being particularly special.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 10, 2007, 05:49:36 AM
Well, Ditters was his actual name, and he added von Dittersdorf to it when he was made a noble. There is actually a place called Dittersdorf somewhere in East Germany, I drove past it on the Autobahn many times.

BTW, Dittersdorf wrote an autobiography which is a *highly interesting* book, a first hand account of what the life of a musician was like in the 18th century. Extremely readable, and also quite funny.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: M forever on July 10, 2007, 07:54:07 AM
It may help you to know that the U is not pronounced as in "bump" but as in "bull".
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 10, 2007, 08:15:07 AM
But anyway, we better get back on topic or Q will be cross with us.

Very good thinking....  ;D 8)

I'm overwhelmed by all the recommendations on composers and recordings that have been made! :)
I have a lot of questions, let's start with a few.

I interested in expanding my knowledge on Biber's music - any additional recommendations are welcome.

Also I will focus on Zelenka, I'll keep the recommendations by Masolino in mind.

Question on Zelenka: is this set any good?
Looks like a nice starter?

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HQCQ0FS6L._AA240_.jpg)

EDIT: I get the impression that it's on modern instruments - is this the "Holliger set" referred to earlier?



Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 10, 2007, 08:34:13 AM
I don't have it or heard it, but is any of you familiar with the series (10 volumes) on Ricercar called "Deutsche Barock Kantaten" of some years ago? (Probably eligible for reissue) I was told it is exceptionally good.

(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/61dJawrxPBL._AA240_.jpg)   (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51525A9EZ9L._AA240_.jpg)

Q

Those Ricercar discs are totally OOP. I have hunted Bruhns disc for almost 10 years without success.  :-\
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Kullervo on July 10, 2007, 08:38:48 AM
Has been re-released as part of the Baroque Espirit series (budget line).   :)

Thanks for that!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Tancata on July 10, 2007, 10:32:08 AM
The trouble with this thread is that it presents far too many new avenues to explore  :P.

I suppose this would be as good a place as any to mention Ton Koopman's Buxtehude Opera Omnia series - the complete Buxtehude.

As most of you probably know, it's planned to be a series of 20 or so volumes, 1 or 2 CDs each.

I have the first two volumes - both double-disc sets.

(http://www.rondomagazin.de/klassik/b/buxtehude/cover/db08.jpg)

Volume 1 is (almost) the complete surviving harpischord music. The performance is exactly what you expect from Koopman. Exuberance and exhilaration. I might say it is insanely fast in parts - particularly in the two Arias with Variations...but I can't compare it to any other recordings, so I won't.

What struck me most strongly listening to this music was how much it reminded me of JS Bach's keyboard stuff. It is simply very good high Baroque music. Buxtehude's vocal music dates fairly obviously with its Schutzian and Purcellian influences, but his keyboard music sounds IMO ahead of its time.

(http://www.huisvolmuziek.nl/ProdImages/bladmuziekcentrale_680177_es_01_resize.jpg)

The second volume is the first dedicated to vocal music. It's an oratorio that may or may not have actually been written by Buxtehude ("Wacht! euch zum Streit"). It's well-performed by Koopman's team, many of them carried over from his Bach cantatas series (and has the bracing lack of polish of those performances, too...) but, IMO, the music isn't massively interesting. It's good, but - again, IMO - not exactly a major Baroque oratorio. Purcell's influence is strongly felt throughout, along with a folksy Germanic twang.

There are several more releases in the series - including the organ music, which is definitely major stuff. I haven't investigated these yet, though. One thing holding me back is the hefty price of each set - €20 even for the one-disc releases...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on July 10, 2007, 03:24:55 PM

Question on Zelenka: is this set any good?
Looks like a nice starter?

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HQCQ0FS6L._AA240_.jpg)

EDIT: I get the impression that it's on modern instruments - is this the "Holliger set" referred to earlier?

Q


Unless you want Zelenka on modern instruments....   Camerata Bern is a precursor of today's "modern
instruments but more-or-less exactly like HIP" outfits and they recorded for labels like Denon in Japan
as well.  Yes Holliger's first recording of the trios (Archiv) is included in the set, along with the Capricci
and other concertante works.  CPO released a three-discs-for-the-price-of-one set of complete Zelenka
orchestral works recorded by Jurgen Sonnentheil and his Neu-Eroffnete Orchestre.  This is on period
instruments so the capricci, with their HIGH-lying parts for the corni da caccia, can sound downright scary
for the demands they make on the soloists.  Ensemble isn't exactly tight or neat and inspiration runs
kind of unevenly but for the price (and the valiant performances from the horn players) it is worthy
getting...

(http://img170.imageshack.us/img170/3599/zelenkasaemtlicheorchesrs6.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 11, 2007, 03:08:52 AM
The trouble with this thread is that it presents far too many new avenues to explore  :P.

German baroque music is a cornucopia.  ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Soundproof on July 13, 2007, 09:22:37 AM
A cornucopia from which flows forth the greatest of music.

Today I got hold of this one, the complete Mysterien Sonaten by Biber:

(http://www.winterandwinter.com/typo3temp/pics/35c72ca203.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 13, 2007, 09:14:25 PM
A cornucopia from which flows forth the greatest of music.

Today I got hold of this one, the complete Mysterien Sonaten by Biber:

(http://www.winterandwinter.com/typo3temp/pics/35c72ca203.jpg)

Soundproof, I would say those are key pieces in German baroque.
The repertoire by Biber for the violin raised my interest to look further than Bach! Will be interested in your impressions on this particular recording btw - Winter & Winter has always very interesting issues (always superbly recorded)...

I can recommend also the "other" violin sonatas by Biber from 1681.
Manze did them brilliantly (see my earlier post), but Marianne Rônez did them too (haven't heard it).
(From the online Biber discography here (http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/index.htm))

(http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/1999/RonezBIG.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Tancata on July 18, 2007, 07:26:16 AM
I'm also interested in harpsichord music from the German baroque.
It seems that the general consensus is that after Bach, Johann Jakob Froberger is the man! 8)
I would very much like some advice on this!

I haven't heard Froberger, but let me once again emphasize Buxtehude's harpsichord music - it is extremely good.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 18, 2007, 07:32:31 AM
I haven't heard Froberger, but let me once again emphasize Buxtehude's harpsichord music - it is extremely good.

Ah! OK, so Buxtehude's harpsichod music is also worthwhile.
Thanks for the info - any recordings I should check out?  :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 18, 2007, 07:33:41 AM
I haven't heard Froberger.

Ditto. But how about the Bøhm double set on Glossa:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/GCD921801-2.jpg)

Was about to mention it in my previous post, but it slipped my mind.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Tancata on July 18, 2007, 07:48:11 AM
Ah! OK, so Buxtehude's harpsichod music is also worthwhile.
Thanks for the info - any recordings I should check out?  :)

Q

Check out my post a few posts up from here, wherein I recommend Ton Koopman  :). The first volume of his Complete Buxtehude series is a 2-disc set of the harpsichord music, played in an extremely lively fashion.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Don on July 18, 2007, 08:03:24 AM
I'm also interested in harpsichord music from the German baroque.
It seems that the general consensus is that after Bach, Johann Jakob Froberger is the man! 8)
I would very much like some advice on this!


I wouldn't put much stock in the "consensus" premise.  Since Froberger's music is much more reflective and inward than Bach's, I consider Froberger more an alternative to Bach depending on what mood the listener is in.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 18, 2007, 08:13:04 AM
I wouldn't put much stock in the "consensus" premise.  Since Froberger's music is much more reflective and inward than Bach's, I consider Froberger more an alternative to Bach depending on what mood the listener is in.

No consensus and a lot of different favourites - that's fine by me! :)

Don, any favourite recordings on any German baroque harpsichord music other than Bach? 8)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Don on July 18, 2007, 08:16:12 AM
No consensus and a lot of different favourites - that's fine by me! :)

Don, any favourite recordings on any German baroque harpsichord music other than Bach? 8)

Q

I"m smiling at the above question, because my answer has to be Froberger.  My favored Froberger recordings are from Verlet on Naive and Remy on CPO.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on July 18, 2007, 01:51:12 PM
My favorite Buxtehude harpsichord CDs are the three-CD set by Lars Ultik Mortensen on Da Capo. Played on a mean tuned instrument. Colourful, brilliant,exuberant.
Next comes a Naxos CD by Glen Wilson and an Astreé CD by Rinaldo Alessandrini. Wilson a tad more reflective than Mortensen, Alessandrini even colourful and brilliant, if not quite on Mortensens level.

Froberger is one of the least accessible harpsichord composers.

Leonhardt is very austere, his style suits Frobergers introvert music well, but it took me some time to get accustomed to it.

Asperen is more elegant, I would say a concentrated beauty of sound.

Lars Ulrik Mortensen has made a Froberger-CD for Kontrapunkt. Colourful as expected, much more accessible than Leonhardt.

And Sergio Vartolo on Naxos, very introvert too.

I also own Rousset and Remy and some Rampe CDs, -haven´t listened concentrated to them yet, though. I can only listen to Froberger, when I am very good form mentally.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on July 19, 2007, 02:24:12 AM
My favorite Buxtehude harpsichord CDs are the three-CD set by Lars Ultik Mortensen on Da Capo. Played on a mean tuned instrument. Colourful, brilliant,exuberant.

I have volume 1 of these. Nice disc indeed!  :)

Froberger's music I have never heard.  :-\
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 27, 2007, 11:02:27 PM
I "rediscovered" this morning a recording by Andrew Manze of Johann Heinrich Schmelzer's violin music.
At the the time I bought the twofer below ("Fantastic Style") I was more focused on the Italian violin music on the first half of this issue! ;D Picture of original issue on the right.
But the Schmelzer is wonderful kind of pre-Biber. It shares the virtuosity and intensity and has lyrical elegance. Very nice indeed. High time I'd check the earlier rec. by erato (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52460.html#msg52460) of the violin music recordings of Westhoff and Walther on Zig Zag Territores, which I already sampled and sounded very interesting.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/61ABMP9XGPL._SS400_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Fantastic-Style-17th-Century-Violin-Music/dp/B00099FVCY/ref=sr_1_8/102-8405791-6225701?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1185605753&sr=1-8) (http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/1996/ManzeBIG.jpg)
AUDIO CLIPS of the Schmelzer (http://www.amazon.com/Johann-Heinrich-Schmelzer-Violin-Sonatas/dp/B0000007ES/ref=pd_ecc_rvi_2/102-8405791-6225701?ie=UTF8&qid=1185605753&sr=1-8)

Johann Heinrich Schmelzer
"Sonate unarum fidium seu" for violin & continuo, sonatas 4-6
Sonata "Cucu" for violin & continuo
Sonata "Victori der Christen" for violin & continuo in A minor (after H.I.F. Biber's Tenth "Rosary Sonata")
"Sonate unarum fidium seu" for violin & continuo, sonatas 1-3


Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 28, 2007, 11:39:42 PM
There has been some talk on the listening thread about the Requiem à 15 in Concerto (C.7) by Biber.

Which one should I get? Could anyone comment on any of these recordings?
Any other recommendations of Biber's other choral works - the Requiem in F (C.8 ) for example - are also most welcome. :)

The contenders seems all excellent: Savall (Alia Vox - 2002), Leonhardt (DHM - 1995), Van Nevel (Ricercar - 1995) and Koopman (Erato - 1994). The Ricercar is (of course) OOP, but Erik van Nevel seems a very interesting interpreter as he is very experienced in Early Music.

(http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/2002/SavallBIG.jpg) (http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/1995/LeonhardtBIG-2004.jpg)
(http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/1995/NevellBIG.jpg) (http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/discography/1994/KoopmanBIG.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on August 06, 2007, 02:13:23 AM
Anyone?  :) :) :)

Q

I have the (?) Leonhardt recording of à 15 (accompanied by Steffani's Stabat Mater).

In my opinion the CD lacks baroque warmth but is somewhat enjoyable anyway. Steffani's work is almost more interesting... 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on August 07, 2007, 08:32:27 AM
I "rediscovered" this morning a recording by Andrew Manze of Johann Heinrich Schmelzer's violin music.
At the the time I bought the twofer below ("Fantastic Style") I was more focused on the Italian violin music on the first half of this issue! ;D Picture of original issue on the right.
But the Schmelzer is wonderful kind of pre-Biber. It shares the virtuosity and intensity and has lyrical elegance. Very nice indeed. High time I'd check the

Q
 (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52460.html#msg52460)

I was pleasantly surprised when I bought this twofar. Fine music, well performed, and a good insight in the composing styles at that time.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 10, 2007, 10:36:58 PM
I have no experience with other Froberger recordings to compare it to, but I'll post about this wonderful recording anyway. I can still recognise superb harpsichord playing! 8)
Came across it whilst bargain hunting and picked it up just to taste some Froberger.
It's really excellent - in performance as well as the recording quality. I was unfamiliar with Italian harpsichordist Enrico Baiano - he deserves wider fame! But maybe I was just ignorant... ;D
I've already spotted some very interesting discs  and repertoire with him.
He has a "free", imaginative, light and virtuosic style and plays a copy of an Italian instrument, with a bright an luscious sound.

(http://www.cdmail.fr/jaquettes/cd/recto/8012783961524xr.gif) (http://www.amazon.com/Froberger-Diverse-curiose-Partite-Cembalo/dp/B000003XQJ)
            click on picture for audio clips

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 05, 2007, 12:46:54 AM
(http://classique.abeillemusique.com/images/references/a338.jpg)

This disc crossed my way as a bargain and I picked it up.
I wasn't familiar before with Johann Joseph Fux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Joseph_Fux). This disc contains three orchestral serenades/overtures based on dances, which - to my ears - show many similarities in musical style with Händel's orchestral output.
And I honestly cannot say that Fux does anyhow less well in comparison to his colleague!  :)
Though his personal style is less "bright" and upbeat than Händel's - more mellow and reflective. These are very enjoyable pieces with a nice variety in instrumentation: trumpets, a bassoon, oboes and a recorder, elaborate writing for the strings. Fux maybe doesn't display much "oomph", but - on close listening to the detailing - plenty of profundity in his musical writing.

But the disc does conclude with a juxtaposition of pieces - all inspired by the Turkish siege of Vienna - with plenty of "oomph"! ;D Exotically instrumented with (military) drums, flutes and bells. But again, Fux doesn't go for the big "thrill". There are many interludes with intimate dances.

Apart from this encounter with Fux, with this disc I discovered a first rate HIP ensemble: the Armonico Tributo Austria (http://www.armonicotributo.com/deutsch/english/armonico_e.html). Really excellent and on par with any major period instruments ensemble - they clearly need and deserve more exposure and recording.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: DavidW on October 05, 2007, 02:48:17 AM
Cool Que, he sounds worth checking out, I'll put 'em on my list. :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on October 05, 2007, 03:51:49 AM
(http://classique.abeillemusique.com/images/references/a338.jpg)

This disc crossed my way as a bargain and I picked it up.
I wasn't familiar before with Johann Joseph Fux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Joseph_Fux). This disc contains three orchestral serenades/overtures based on dances, which - to my ears - show many similarities in musical style with Händel's orchestral output.
And I honestly cannot say that Fux does anyhow less well in comparison to his colleague!  :)
Though his personal style is less "bright" and upbeat than Händel's - more mellow and reflective. These are very enjoyable pieces with a nice variety in instrumentation: trumpets, a bassoon, oboes and a recorder, elaborate writing for the strings. Fux maybe doesn't display much "oomph", but - on close listening to the detailing - plenty of profundity in his musical writing.

But the disc does conclude with a juxtaposition of pieces - all inspired by the Turkish siege of Vienna - with plenty of "oomph"! ;D Exotically instrumented with (military) drums, flutes and bells. But again, Fux doesn't go for the big "thrill". There are many interludes with intimate dances.

Apart from this encounter with Fux, with this disc I discovered a first rate HIP ensemble: the Armonico Tributo Austria (http://www.armonicotributo.com/deutsch/english/armonico_e.html). Really excellent and on par with any major period instruments ensemble - they clearly need and deserve more exposure and recording.

Q

I seem to have heard that the Arcana label has been discontinued. My favourite Conti record with Bernarda Fink is on that label. Pity if so is the case.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 05, 2007, 04:21:42 AM
I seem to have heard that the Arcana label has been discontinued. My favourite Conti record with Bernarda Fink is on that label. Pity if so is the case.

Yes, it stopped its business due to the death of co-founder Michel Bernstein.
I picked up some left overs now on sale. The catalogue is of great interest and will undoubtedly be picked up by another company - let's hope they will be reissued soon. Would love to get my hands on that issue with Bernarda Fink BTW..

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on October 05, 2007, 04:49:37 AM
Yes, it stopped its business due to the death of co-founder Michel Bernstein.
I picked up some left overs now on sale. The catalogue is of great interest and will undoubtedly be picked up by another company - let's hope they will be reissued soon. Would love to get my hands on that issue with Bernarda Fink BTW..

Q
I can foresee a Brilliant 200 CD Arcana box at USD 50.

I should be so happy. Instead there will be another complete 100CD Beethoven box.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on October 07, 2007, 01:10:10 AM
I can foresee a Brilliant 200 CD Arcana box at USD 50.

I should be so happy. Instead there will be another complete 100CD Beethoven box.

Brilliant will never reproduce Arcana's exquisite booklet essays and cover art even
if they reissue the recordings.  Get them now before they are never more.  :-[
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on October 07, 2007, 01:23:44 AM
Brilliant will never reproduce Arcana's exquisite booklet essays and cover art even
if they reissue the recordings.  Get them now before they are never more.  :-[
Just joking!

And with arcane (!) repertoire like Fux and Conti the complete experience is about so much more than only the disc. Whereas I would be happy to buy my 5th Beethoven cycle without significant notes as long as they are cheap and compactly packaged, I really can't imagine doing thatwith more obscure repertoire.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 14, 2007, 12:05:55 AM
.



Another set with harpsichord music by Johann Jakob Froberger, whose first rate harpsichord music seems to be as enigmatic and elusive as F. Couperin's. :) First volume (2 CD's) by Dutch harpsichordist Bob van Asperen in what will be a complete keyboard music series (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/all_discs/editions/froberger_edition) on the small German label Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en).

The recording is absolutely wonderful (the founders of the label are sound engineers): my ideal harpsichord recording - not to bright and up-close, but not too "spacious" or reverberant either. Very natural and clear.
Van Asperen plays a Ruckers harpsichord from 1640 with a firm and deep tone.
As of the interpretation. I have still very little to go on as means of comparison, owning just the superb Baiano disc on Symphonia (see earlier post) to date. And as I said, Froberger's music is elusive and I haven't settled on a "ideal Froberger" in my mind, if ever. :) Though this recording is another step forward in that process. Van Asperen does not take the intellectually probing approach of Baiano, his style is ....more leisurely, genial, benign, playful at times. Van Asperen lets things unfold with emphasis on the careful development of phrases and the blending of the sound. And it is that transparant sound picture and the seemingly uncomplicated way the music develops, that are the key attractions of his playing.

Very good indeed, though at some instances I wished for more "grip" and more extrovert "brilliance". I think I will continue this series and try some other interpretations at the same time.

Heartily recommended.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on October 14, 2007, 02:02:43 AM
Just joking!

And with arcane (!) repertoire like Fux and Conti the complete experience is about so much more than only the disc. Whereas I would be happy to buy my 5th Beethoven cycle without significant notes as long as they are cheap and compactly packaged, I really can't imagine doing thatwith more obscure repertoire.

In early music, Arcane is perhaps better than Naive?  ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on November 03, 2007, 05:29:35 AM
Venturing further into unknown German baroque territory with Phillipp Heinrich Erlebach (1657-1714).

(http://www.outhere-music.com/data/cds/114/BIG.JPG) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/4350426?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
click picture for more but shorter & lower quality clips
[mp3=200,20,0,left]http://www.outhere-music.com%2Fdata%2Fcds%2F114%2Fclip.mp3[/mp3]

Tragic. Because little of Erlebach's music was published during his lifetime and most manuscripts (nearly 700) were lost during a fire in the castle of Rudolstadt in 1735.
This disc consists of six baritone arias with simple accompaniment, mixed with three (5 part) sonatas for chamber ensemble. Simplicity is the key word here, but also intimacy and expressiveness. The works are written in "Italian" style. Singing by baritone Victor Torres is exemplary, as is the contribution by the ensemble Stylus Phantasticus with familiar names like violinists Pablo Valetti and David Plantier.
The combination of the introduction to a relatively unknown German baroque composer who wrote music of good quality and sufficient distinction and superb renditions by these performers makes this disc very much worthwhile. Provided that the idea of "plain" baroque arias for baritone appeal to you.

BTW The cover is bound to raise interest. It's a painting by Dutchman Domenicus van Wijnen (Wynen) (1661 - c1700) - also known as "Ascanius", and its called "The Temptation of St Anthony".
Appropriately "fantastic" in style  :) and reminiscent of Jeroen Bosch.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 04, 2007, 12:52:46 AM
A recommended post from erato:  :)


The shortlived student of Buxtehude, Nikolaus Bruhns, wrote some fine cantatas documented on this superb record:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/HMC901752.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on November 24, 2007, 02:39:50 AM
(http://www.preludeklassiekemuziek.nl/arta/zelenka_nibiru01462211.jpg) (http://www.nibiru-publishers.com/index.php?lang=EN_&action=Vypis&rubrika=Hudba)
          click picture for link with samples.

ZELENKA: Il Serpente di bronzo / Ensemble Inégal

The music of this dramatic cantata is nice, but not as original as other works of Zelenka. Curiously one of the characters is God himself - a bass voice of course.

Very good interpretation.

This cantata by Zelenka shows how close relations between German (Germanic) and Italian baroque sometimes are. The music is basically in Italian oratorio style of the period, comparable with Scarlatti, Caldara, cantatas by Vivaldi, but also the "Italian cantatas" by Händel. This means, as Val pointed out, that this is atypical Zelenka.

Nevertheless, if taken for what it is, this is a cute piece of music which stands its ground against the composers mentioned. Colourful instrumentation and plenty of momentum. Excellent performance, so we can welcome another Czech HIP group! We'll undoubtedly hear from them more in the future.

Maybe not the greatest musical discovery of the decade, but anyone with an interest in this particular genre should not pass on this one. :)

Some quotations from reviews:
"CD J. D. Zelenka: Il serpente di bronzo – Bronze snake
It is very rare that a recording evokes at once so much of pure joy, admiration and fully pleases a lover of art with its musical “rightness” and beautiful melodies. It is great how much understanding was Zelenka – this great Czech, accorded in connection with the realization of this charming recording whose depth is the same as its beauty. This great success is above all embodied in the interpretation under the direction of Adam Viktora who accomplished to paint the wild and lonely places of Zelenka’s unique work in an excellent way with typical Czech flavour… From the singers hold our interest above all Peter Kooij, confronted with the demanding part of the angry God and the sweet tenor of the Moses prformed by Jaroslav B?ezina. Absolute discovery!"

Olivier Rouviere, Diapason, FR 2007/04

"… Oratorio Il serpente opens in electrifying manner with a chorus of angry Israelites; the music seethes with a demonic energy and drive … Adam Viktora inspires singing and playing of such breathtaking fervor that the very lives of the singers and players seem to depend on it. As already suggested, the performance of this remarkable oratorio fully lives up to the quality of the work, driven as it is by the passionate conviction of Viktora’s direction ...There are people, particularly those whose blinkered vision extends little further than the 19th century, who try to tell us there are no hidden masterpieces remaining to be rediscovered. Il serpente di bronzo is one work that proves them to be utterly, spectacularly wrong."
Brian Robins, Fanfare, USA, 2006/08

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on November 30, 2007, 02:42:35 AM
(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/11/932111.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/6095851?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
           click on picture for link to samples

Got this cheap at jpc. The music by Georg Böhm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Böhm) reminds me most of early keyboard works by Bach. Nice, but not as original as, say Froberger. An important attraction here is the sound of the lute-harpsichord (Lautenwerck), which is wonderful and full of character. Geoffrey Thomas is a sensible and competent player, but misses that extra imaginative approach that could have given this music just an extra edge.
Nevertheless - a very nice bargain for lovers of the lute-harpsichord! :)

Q

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on November 30, 2007, 04:18:11 PM
Maybe not the greatest musical discovery of the decade

Zelenka is one of the better Baroque composers, superior to the over-rated Italians and all the Telemanns of the era.

I'd urge anybody to acquire his last masses, as well as his set of trio sonatas. Amazing stuff. Considering how much of his music was vaporized during the bombing of Dresden (something i read on the internetz, don't quote me on this), every new discovery could turn out to be a major one.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on November 30, 2007, 09:41:13 PM
Zelenka is one of the better Baroque composers, superior to the over-rated Italians and all the Telemanns of the era.

The Italians and Telemann's of the era are actually underrated, given how little their stuff is known to the public.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 30, 2007, 10:32:12 PM
Zelenka is one of the better Baroque composers, superior to the over-rated Italians and all the Telemanns of the era.

Sadly, I don't have anything from Zelenka (working on it!) but the clips I have heard indicate he really is much more interesting than Telemann who I find one of the most boring baroque composer (sorry Harry  :( ). Italians are overrated in the sense that Northern-Germany baroque is usually more interesting.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on December 01, 2007, 08:13:55 PM
They already have more exposure then what they deserve.

What proof have you got for this?  ;) 

ps. Bach and Handel both rated Telemann highly, in fact so much so they were known subscribers
to his published works.   And don't forget Bach's many transcriptions of Italian works.  (Pergolesi!)
 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on December 02, 2007, 02:03:19 AM
What proof have you got for this?  ;) 

My ears are proof enough, and if you disagree, you are an ignorant fool.

The only truly great Italian composer after Monteverdi was Scarlatti (Domenico). Everybody else runs from decent to good, but nothing more. Vivaldi started with a lot of promise with his Opus 3 but he never progressed from there so that's his loss. Pergolesi could have been one of the greats though, had he lived longer.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 02, 2007, 02:36:51 AM
The only truly great Italian composer after Monteverdi was Scarlatti (Domenico).

Corelli?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 02, 2007, 02:50:14 AM
I'd urge anybody to acquire his last masses, as well as his set of trio sonatas. Amazing stuff.

Any suggestions on recordings for the Zelenka masses?
BTW the site I linked in the post on "Il serpente" also contains a new recording of some sacred works:

(http://nibiru.elgra.net/Products/59.jpg) (http://nibiru.elgra.net/index.php?lang=EN_&action=Vypis&rubrika=Hudba)

And guys, please stay on topic (here is the thread on Italians: Italian Baroque Music - beyond Vivaldi (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2376.0.html)).

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on December 02, 2007, 11:37:24 AM
Any suggestions on recordings for the Zelenka masses?

I have a couple of the recordings made by Frieder Bernius, and they are very good, but i'm not qualified to answer this question since i haven't been able to explore all that was available (lack of cash more then anything).

Either way, this are his last masses: Missa Dei Patris, Missa Dei Filii (left unfinished), Missa Sanctissime trinitatis, Missa Omnia Sanctorum, and Missa Votiva. The Requiem in c minor is also among his better works, though not as good as those masses.

For the Trio sonatas, i have the second set made by Holliger which is very good, but it's the only one i heard so who knows what else is out there.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on December 02, 2007, 11:37:58 AM
Corelli?

He's on a rank with Vivaldi.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 02, 2007, 07:58:54 PM
I have a couple of the recordings made by Frieder Bernius, and they are very good, but i'm not qualified to answer this question since i haven't been able to explore all that was available (lack of cash more then anything).

I am familiar with Frieder Bernius, IMO a really excellent choral conductor - sounds just the man for the job!
Thanks   :) - looked the recordings up, will check these out.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51PT79MT6SL._AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41DZP7WN66L._AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/415SB8W4DWL._AA240_.jpg)

Anyone else have suggestions on Zelenka's masses?  :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 03, 2007, 03:17:32 AM
I hate it how neglected German middle baroque is. For reasons I don't fully understand Renaissance/early baroque is "popular" as is late baroque. Many are not interested what happened between Schütz and J.S. Bach. So much happened during this middle baroque era and for me it's one of the most interesting periods in music history.

Buxtehude is recognised but for example Rosenmüller, Tunder, Kuhnau, Weckmann aren't enough. Recordings with their works are rare and go OOP fast (available copies cost fortunes). Record companies do not believe people would buy Tunder's music. Well, I buy. Most of the CDs released are themed "German 17th century church music" compilations that makes the composers seem unimportant and the music a curiosity: "nothing important happened between Schütz and Bach but if you want to hear the music it sounds like this".

It would be great to buy complate sets of these composers, everything that they ever composed and survived to us. Systematic study of this music is almost impossible. What we hear is random samples.

Ricercar released lots of this stuff over 10 years ago but they went OOP immediately, just before I got into classical music.  :'(
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on December 03, 2007, 06:35:28 AM
I hate it how neglected German middle baroque is. For reasons I don't fully understand Renaissance/early baroque is "popular" as is late baroque. Many are not interested what happened between Schütz and J.S. Bach. So much happened during this middle baroque era and for me it's one of the most interesting periods in music history.


Just like there are people who believe no Italian baroque composer existed between Monteverdi and Domenico Scarlatti.  They haven't heard it, that's all.   ;)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 03, 2007, 07:10:33 AM
They haven't heard it, that's all.   ;)

Of course they haven't because nobody is marketing that music to them.

I was lucky the classic FM radio in Finland was very good when I started listening to classical music. I was introduced to all kind of unknown stuff. Later the radio station got new owners and new crappy style. Now it's favorite opera arias and other "velvet" crap.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on December 03, 2007, 08:21:41 AM
I hate it how neglected German middle baroque is. For reasons I don't fully understand Renaissance/early baroque is "popular" as is late baroque. Many are not interested what happened between Schütz and J.S. Bach. So much happened during this middle baroque era and for me it's one of the most interesting periods in music history.


I forsee a great career for you in the academia should you choose to study this period in extreme detail. That is not a joke.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on December 03, 2007, 11:39:15 AM
They haven't heard it, that's all.   ;)

I heard it. Wasn't impressed. Perhaps i'm missing something?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 03, 2007, 11:57:14 AM
Ricercar released lots of this stuff over 10 years ago but they went OOP immediately, just before I got into classical music.  :'(

71 dB, the good news is that Ricercar (http://www.fugalibera.com/discmonth.php?label=ricercar) - now a subsidiairy of Alpha - is busy reissuing:

(http://www.fugalibera.com/data/cds/240/300pxwide.JPG) (http://www.fugalibera.com/readmorecd.php?cd=240&label=ricercar&language=en) (http://www.fugalibera.com/data/cds/40/300pxwide.JPG) (http://www.fugalibera.com/readmorecd.php?collection=&cd=40&label=ricercar&langue=en)

(pictures are linked)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 03, 2007, 11:57:29 AM
I heard it. Wasn't impressed. Perhaps i'm missing something?

Exactly what did you hear? Perhaps you where not impressed because you don't understand what the music is about? Perhaps you didn't put things in the context?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 03, 2007, 12:12:15 PM
71 dB, the good news is that Ricercar (http://www.fugalibera.com/discmonth.php?label=ricercar) - now a subsidiairy of Alpha - is busy reissuing:
That's great, there really is a need for reissues!  :P  I hope they will reissue Bruhns' cantatas too.

Thanks Que.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on December 05, 2007, 09:11:07 AM
Perhaps you where not impressed because you don't understand what the music is about?

Perhaps i wasn't clear. I'm not arguing that there aren't interesting composers from this period, only that there are no 'great' ones (great in the same order as a Bach, or a Handel). Not even Buxtehude compares and he's the best of the lot.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 05, 2007, 09:28:58 AM
Perhaps i wasn't clear. I'm arguing that there aren't interesting composers from this period, only that there are no 'great' ones (great in the same order as a Bach, or a Handel). Not even Buxtehude compares and he's the best of the lot.

If you are interested of the "great" ones only your selection is very limited. I rank Buxtehude a great composer, not as great as Bach but great anyway. Bruhns didn't live long but I think he was extremely talented. Thanks to the work done by talented 17th-century composers Bach was able to take his music to the divine level he did.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: karlhenning on December 05, 2007, 09:32:32 AM
Perhaps you where not impressed because you don't understand what the music is about?

Perhaps he was not impressed because he completely understood what the music is about.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Don on December 05, 2007, 09:44:12 AM
Perhaps he was not impressed because he completely understood what the music is about.

Understanding Telemann's music is almost as easy as understanding "Pop goes the weasel".  I very much enjoy Telemann's music, but a little of it goes a long way.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on December 05, 2007, 09:52:47 AM
Understanding Telemann's music is almost as easy as understanding "Pop goes the weasel".  I very much enjoy Telemann's music, but a little of it goes a long way.
I am happy to say that I have no single Telemann CD :)
There may be a Telemann piece as a filler on another CD but I can't do anything about that.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Don on December 05, 2007, 09:54:34 AM
I am happy to say that I have no single Telemann CD :)
There may be a Telemann piece as a filler on another CD but I can't do anything about that.

I own about 30 Telemann recordings, much preferring his sacred choral works to his other output.  When was the last time I listened to one of these discs?  Can't even remember, it was so long ago.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on December 05, 2007, 10:01:59 AM
I am happy to say that I have no single Telemann CD :)
There may be a Telemann piece as a filler on another CD but I can't do anything about that.

And I am happy to say, that I have more the 50 recordings of Telemann's excellent music, so what?
You are happy, I am happy,.
What about this: I am happy to say, that I have not one CD from Wagner, not even as a filler.... :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on December 05, 2007, 10:02:59 AM
Bruhns didn't live long but I think he was extremely talented.

Indeed he was........ :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on December 05, 2007, 10:03:28 AM
What about this: I am happy to say, that I have not one CD from Wagner, not even as a filler.... :)
Good, you are happy, then I am happy for you :D
Oh stop lying, you have CDs with Wagner. I saw you buying a bunch of Siegfried Wagner CDs sometime last year ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on December 05, 2007, 10:04:46 AM
. You never take me seriously and that is insulting.

Not true my friend, I take serious, what you meant to be that...
I respect your opinion, not always agreeing...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: karlhenning on December 05, 2007, 10:23:02 AM
Perhaps i wasn't clear. I'm not arguing that there aren't interesting composers from this period, only that there are no 'great' ones (great in the same order as a Bach, or a Handel). Not even Buxtehude compares and he's the best of the lot.

This thread is about lesser composers of that era;  if anyone tries to make it about how people who don't like to spend hours and hours listening to this boilerplate, somehow "don't understand" it, well, he's careening towards some fresh frustration.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 08, 2007, 02:45:50 AM
It's time to go back to bussines on this thread.... :)

With this Zelenka set (vols. 1-3, previously issued separately) I got on recommendation of several posters here:

CPO released a three-discs-for-the-price-of-one set of complete Zelenka
orchestral works recorded by Jurgen Sonnentheil and his Neu-Eroffnete Orchestre.  This is on period
instruments so the capricci, with their HIGH-lying parts for the corni da caccia, can sound downright scary
for the demands they make on the soloists.  Ensemble isn't exactly tight or neat and inspiration runs
kind of unevenly but for the price (and the valiant performances from the horn players) it is worthy
getting...

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/475414.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/cpo/detail/-/lang/en/currency/EUR/hnum/5210356/rk/home/rsk/hitlist)
Picture is linked for samples & bargain price at jpc

Great set! :) This is most wonderful, imaginative music for chamber orchestra with a prominent role for brass and/or woodwinds. It's executed in very nice idiomatic HIP performances that are warm and intimate and carefully detailed. The only quibble I can think of, is that at times it is maybe just a bit too "cosy" and an extra edge would help to bring out Zelenka's expressiveness more. But as a complete set this will be very hard to beat - and at bargain price as well - strongly recommended! :)

Reviews at Goldbergweb: volume 2 (http://www.goldbergweb.com/en/discography/1998/4573.php) & volume 3 (http://www.goldbergweb.com/en/discography/1999/4956.php)

Good heavens, even anti-HIP "Hurwitzer" likes them... but no need to worry. ;D volume 2 (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=342) & volume 3 (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=2996).

A good and balanced review by Jonathan Woolf (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev//2002/Dec02/Zelenka.htm) on Musicweb.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on December 08, 2007, 04:00:13 AM
It's time to go back to bussines on this thread.... :)

With this Zelenka set (vols. 1-3, previously issued separately) I got on recommendation of several posters here:

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/475414.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/cpo/detail/-/lang/en/currency/EUR/hnum/5210356/rk/home/rsk/hitlist)
Picture is linked for samples & bargain price at jpc

Great set! :) This is most wonderful, imaginative music for chamber orchestra with a prominent role for brass and/or woodwinds. It's executed in very nice idiomatic HIP performances that are warm and intimate and carefully detailed. The only quibble I can think of, is that at times it is maybe just a bit too "cosy" and an extra edge would help to bring out Zelenka's expressiveness more. But as a complete set this will be very hard to beat - and at bargain price as well - strongly recommended! :)

Reviews at Goldbergweb: volume 2 (http://www.goldbergweb.com/en/discography/1998/4573.php) & volume 3 (http://www.goldbergweb.com/en/discography/1999/4956.php)

Good heavens, even anti-HIP "Hurwitzer" likes them... but no need to worry. ;D volume 2 (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=342) & volume 3 (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=2996).

A good and balanced review by Jonathan Woolf (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev//2002/Dec02/Zelenka.htm) on Musicweb.

Q

This quibble you have with the cosyness of this set may be remedied with the complete set on Archiv, I am pretty sure you will get the kind of attack you miss in the CPO set, I have both, and I think so..... :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on December 08, 2007, 08:39:59 AM
This quibble you have with the cosyness of this set may be remedied with the complete set on Archiv, I am pretty sure you will get the kind of attack you miss in the CPO set, I have both, and I think so..... :)

Or Supraphon's own disc with "Collegium 1704" which, unlike the Archiv Camerata Bern, plays on period instruments.  The recording has sold so well I have seen no fewer than three reissues.  Some of its musicians reappear in another Czech HIP group called "Musica Florea" (led by cellist Marek Stryncl) whose performance of the Sinfonia "to the Melodrama de Sancto Wenceslao" (in a complete recording) has so much more intensity than the one in the CPO set that I actually played it in repeat for five times in a row when I first got the set. Thrilling!  Too bad they have not recorded more instrumental works by this composer. 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 08, 2007, 09:09:54 AM
Or Supraphon's own disc with "Collegium 1704" which, unlike the Archiv Camerata Bern, plays on period instruments.  The recording has sold so well I have seen no fewer than three reissues.  Some of its musicians reappear in another Czech HIP group called "Musica Florea" (led by cellist Marek Stryncl) whose performance of the Sinfonia "to the Melodrama de Sancto Wenceslao" (in a complete recording) has so much more intensity than the one in the CPO set that I actually played it in repeat for five times in a row when I first got the set. Thrilling!  Too bad they have not recorded more instrumental works by this composer. 

Excellent!  :) I noticed them before when browsing for more Zelenka, thanks for the reccomendation.

(http://www.musicfayre.com/data/music/covers-2/828/0099925385828.jpg)  (http://www.musicfayre.com/data/music/covers-2/028/0099925352028.jpg)

Anyone familiar with this?

(http://www.musicaflorea.cz/cd/zelenka.jpg)(http://www.musicaflorea.cz/pics/diapason.gif)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 22, 2007, 01:46:03 AM
A short note on this wonderful recording. I seem to have taken a particular liking for baroque violin sonatas. :) Anyone having the same interest, needn't hesitate on this one. Most important point: this is actually interesting and wonderful music. Not in the "Stylus Phantasticus" like Biber or Schmelzer, but still of "virtuosic" nature and actually reminiscent of Bach's work and of Italian repertoire.
Steck has a bold, intense style and a firm tone, but with good taste - he never overdoes it. A very good baroque violinist indeed.

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/61/519161.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/cpo/detail/-/hnum/8471958?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
             click picture for samples

REVIEW on MusicWeb (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2004/Aug04/Pisendel_JV.htm)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 22, 2007, 02:06:32 AM
Thanks Que for the Pisendel recommendation!
This is a new composer for me and I listened to the clips at JPC website.
You are right, this is enjoyable "Italialized" Bach.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on December 22, 2007, 02:51:39 AM
A short note on this wonderful recording. I seem to have taken a particular liking for baroque violin sonatas. :) Anyone having the same interest, needn't hesitate on this one. Most important point: this is actually interesting and wonderful music. Not in the "Stylus Phantasticus" like Biber or Schmelzer, but still of "virtuosic" nature and actually reminiscent of Bach's work and of Italian repertoire.
Steck has a bold, intense style and a firm tone, but with good taste - he never overdoes it. A very good baroque violinist indeed.

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/61/519161.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/cpo/detail/-/hnum/8471958?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
             click picture for samples

REVIEW on MusicWeb (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2004/Aug04/Pisendel_JV.htm)

Q

I second that, indeed I do.... :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on December 22, 2007, 04:14:26 AM
Link to reviw here (scroll):

http://www.newolde.com/early_music_cd_awards_2004.htm (http://www.newolde.com/early_music_cd_awards_2004.htm)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 22, 2007, 01:20:43 PM
I remember the times just 10 years ago when I heard Buxtehude's cantatas on radio and I was blown away. There wasn't much selection regarding the recordings available but there was one excelent disc on Channel Classics. Naturally I bought it. Today, 10 years later the market is FILLED with Buxtehude cantata recordings!  :o It takes a small fortune to buy them all!

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 20, 2008, 02:35:28 AM
.



Part two of Bob van Asperen's Froberger Edition (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/all_discs/editions/froberger_edition) on the small German label Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en). (See my comments on the first volume HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg93269.html#msg93269).)
I'm very glad I went through with this and got the second volume, because reservations I had before - the occasional diminished "structural grip" and moments the music felt "static" without sufficient forward thrust, have entirely dissapated with this volume. And all the positives remain: Van Asperen is a master in letting the music enfold naturally, and in evoking a lush and exotic sound picture. Again brilliantly recorded, but this time another harpsichord is used: a Couchet-Blanchet-Taskin. A flemish/french harpsichord, whith a sound that is slighly softer edged and less bright than the Ruckers in the first volume, but which sounds as rich.

A short note on the music: the more I hear of it, the more I'm fascinated by Froberger's enigmatic and "fantastical" music. But an acquired taste, I'm sure. 8)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 02, 2008, 02:43:31 AM
A short note to heartily second the recommendation of the Buxtehude chamber music recordings on Naxos, a reissue of issues by Danish Dacapo (http://www.dacapo-records.dk/?page=home). This is what is commonly called a "no-brainer": very interesting and beautiful music with magnificent peformers at a right price. The crisp and astute playing by Mortensen steals the show here, but the lean and sober style of both Ter Linden and Holloway fit perfectly as well. Still one volume of chamber music to go, and Mortensen also did three volumes of Buxtehude's harpsichord music! :)

Q

Buxtehude, Dietrich (1637-1707) - Seven Sonatas, Op. 1 & Op. 2 w/ Holloway on violin, Linden on viola da gamba, & Mortensen on harpsichord; first volume got rave comments from Scott Morrison (http://www.amazon.com/Buxtehude-Seven-Sonatas-Op-1/dp/B0007XHKYY/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3/104-4487663-4298324?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1194113387&sr=1-3) (and also in the liner notes from the American Record Guide)!

I bought the first disc last month, and was just thrilled w/ the music & performances, hence the purchase of the other recording - this is the guy JS Bach walked MILES (like 250!) for to hear to him play the organ!
  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5199MQTSHCL._AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EG619VA5L._AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on February 02, 2008, 03:03:08 AM
I, and many others told you so Que! :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 02, 2008, 05:41:01 AM
For Naxos own productions, don't forget the ongoing series of Silvius Leopold Weiss lute music (8 volumes so far) which feature the superb playing of Robert Barto.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 02, 2008, 07:00:50 AM
For Naxos own productions, don't forget the ongoing series of Silvius Leopold Weiss lute music (8 volumes so far) which feature the superb playing of Robert Barto.

I'm lately also into lute music, so a welcome rec. - thanks FL.  :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on February 02, 2008, 07:04:39 AM
I'm lately also into lute music, so a welcome rec. - thanks FL.  :)

Q

Do you have this one Que?:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6168Q0TREDL._AA240_.jpg)

Samples here:

http://www.amazon.com/Lusty-Gallant-Englands-Golden-Age/dp/B00099FVCE/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1201964628&sr=8-1
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 02, 2008, 07:12:09 AM
Do you have this one Que?:

Bill, no I wasn't even aware of its existence - thanks! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on February 02, 2008, 07:25:17 AM
Bill, no I wasn't even aware of its existence - thanks! :)

Q

Dave (Sonic) lead me to it many moons ago.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 03, 2008, 01:03:40 AM
Bill, no I wasn't even aware of its existence - thanks! :)

Q

Perhaps because it consists rather of English Renaissance music than that of German Baroque?  ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 03, 2008, 01:08:11 AM
(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/CKD300.jpg)

This very fine 4 CD box was on sale at 11 GBP at mdt.co.uk until a few days ago, now it's back at 14 GBP and still a very good buy.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 03, 2008, 03:38:31 AM
Let me add to earlier positive comments by fl.traverso on this one:

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/598414.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/cpo/detail/-/hnum/2727183?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
                     (click picture)

Violinist Anton Steck (http://www.antonsteck.de/) has become a favourite of mine lately, and this issue with him is yet another winner.
This issue contains violin sonatas which can be with various degrees of certainty attributed/ascribed to Biber. There is only one (short) sonata (nr. VI) from the 1681 Salzburg collection (not to be confused with the "Rosenkrantz Sonatas"), previously recorded by Andrew Manze and the ensemble Romanesca. They all sound very much like Biber to me, but in the end it is of no real importance for the listener since their musical quality is absolutely on the high level of Biber.
Steck's approach to Biber is somewhat less theatrical and "warmer" - both in tone and in sentiment - than Manze, who emphasises more the exoticism of the "Stylus Phantasticus" and the virtuosic sides of the music.

Strongly recommended, and complementary to the Manze set of the 1681 Salzburg sonatas. Anyone into Biber's and Schmeltzer's violin repertoire should not hesitate. Note that regulars at jpc can still pick up this hybrid SACD for the modest price of €8.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 03, 2008, 03:41:30 AM
And for Biber fans mdt has this unique recording at a good price:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/9992582.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 23, 2008, 07:49:48 AM
Just adding my voice to the chorus of previous recommendations by others posters! :)
Westhoff and Walther, contemporaries and close colleagues, wrote in quite different styles. Both virtuosic and highly imaginative, Westhoff in a bold and intense style, Walther reflective and "other worldly". I'm willing to go as far to dub these must haves for anyone interested in the baroque violin repertoire.

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/40/42/7951024128a0625fb7fc7010.L.jpg) (http://www.zigzag-territoires.com/article.php3?id_article=277&lang=en)   (http://discplus.ch/login/1547894/shop/upload/34475.jpg) (http://www.zigzag-territoires.com/article.php3?id_article=804&lang=en)
                                           
Click pictures for samples          Click pictures for samples           Click pictures for samples

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: bassio on March 19, 2008, 11:41:54 AM
I just heard on the radio some fine concertos by a composer named Stolzel (Stoelzel). The concertos include flute, oboes, harpsichord, contiuo etc etc one of them was a concerto grosso.

As I listened waiting for the announcer to say who the composer was at the end, As someone who is still waiting to here Handel's Concerti, I thought these may be Handel but it didn't feel like Handel. I thought that this was German Baroque no doubt, no Italians here, The concertos struck me as typical baroque but what stood there is some fine tunes in some of them with some "pre-Bachish" counterpoint if I may coin such a term. It was very interesting, to get a glimpse of how Bach's counterpoint technique was synthesized .. particularly if these are the composers who predated him. But it was clever and refreshing nonetheless.

With a quick googling, I failed to find any of the concertos the announcer declared on record!! Only a trumpet concerto .. rest is vocal!

Anyone heard of this composer, whose compositions acc. to Wikipedia were lost and did not reach us except a trifle of his works?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 19, 2008, 11:58:04 AM
CPO label has released many CDs of Stölzel (vocal music). I am interested but haven't bought yet.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on March 19, 2008, 07:53:48 PM
CPO label has released many CDs of Stölzel (vocal music). I am interested but haven't bought yet.

Buy buy buy!  Especially those conducted by Ludger Remy.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: bassio on March 20, 2008, 04:01:42 PM
Buy buy buy!  Especially those conducted by Ludger Remy.

From what I heard on the radio, I should go with fl.traverso and tell you go ahead ... it should appear a very interesting listening, disregarding differences between vocal and instrumental. (I was particularly impressed with some of the compositions I heard that day.)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 20, 2008, 11:18:45 PM
Buy buy buy!  Especially those conducted by Ludger Remy.
From what I heard on the radio, I should go with fl.traverso and tell you go ahead ... it should appear a very interesting listening, disregarding differences between vocal and instrumental. (I was particularly impressed with some of the compositions I heard that day.)

Well, not this year as I am having a break from buying classical music. Next year then...  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on March 20, 2008, 11:44:30 PM
Well, not this year as I am having a break from buying classical music. Next year then...  :)

If only someone called Harry would trade budgets with you....
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 21, 2008, 01:02:00 AM
If only someone called Harry would trade budgets with you....

No need. For now, I am happy buying Tangerine Dream, Autechre, Colin MacIntyre, Lowgold etc.  ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on March 23, 2008, 10:59:22 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51D08KvyjYL.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/5528200?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist)
Click picture for samples

Review on Musicweb (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2004/Nov04/Gluck_innocenza.htm)

Newly acquired. One of the last of Gluck's "early" operatic work. (He was already 40, but had still over 30 years and many grand operas ahead of him :)). A small scale court opera - also called "serenata" or "festa teatrale" - in two acts. How to characterise it? Charming, with interesting and characterful music that easily keeps attention during the near 1,5 hours of duration. The performance is a delight - absolutely everything is right. Starring Maria Bayo who, as always, firmly projects the charcater of the role she sings. I am impressed by Argentinian soprano Veronica Cangemi, the other singers are very fine as well. Very idiomatic accompaniment by the Cappella Coloniensis under Christopher Mould - in the vein of Tafelmusik under Weil or Freiburger Barokorchester under Von der Goltz.

Of course, this is not a major work in the genre but still a very nice piece - much strengthened by a top notch performance. I think lovers of the baroque opera, or serenatas/oratorios alike, will find this (at bargain price) quite enjoyable.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on March 24, 2008, 01:47:43 AM
No need. For now, I am happy buying Tangerine Dream, Autechre, Colin MacIntyre, Lowgold etc.  ;)

Why with his budget you could buy your own Tangerine Dream garden.  ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on April 17, 2008, 09:57:04 AM
Just bought this stunning record:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/ZZT060502.jpg)

Some of the best German concertoes this side of Bach, superb playing and great sonics. Written for Hannover by a (assumedly) Bruxellois.

Zig-Zag is fast becoming one of my favorite labels, and certainly THE favorite for unfamiliar baroque music.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on April 17, 2008, 09:27:46 PM
Just bought this stunning record:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/ZZT060502.jpg)

Some of the best German concertoes this side of Bach, superb playing and great sonics. Written for Hannover by a (assumedly) Bruxellois.

Thanks for posting and bumping the thread again. :)
Looks very interesting, I see that it's with David Plantier - a great performer.
I was very curious how it sounded like - link to sample HERE (http://www.zigzag-territoires.com/article.php3?id_article=393&lang=en).

It sounds indeed like a mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles, and it has a slight Händelean flavour as well, don't you think?

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on April 18, 2008, 07:11:20 AM
It sounds indeed like a mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles, and it has a slight Händelean flavour as well, don't you think?

Q
Too many winds for Handel, I'd rather think a slightly less quirky Zelenka.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on April 30, 2008, 09:32:02 AM
Could I have some of your Heinrich Schütz favourites - works & recordings - please? :)

A composer who inexplicably escaped my attention till now!  :o


Any comments on these?

Recordings by Wilhelm Ehmann on the (tiny) German label Cantate (http://www.cantate.de/) - word has it that these are good...

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4012476576114.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4012476576039.jpg)
                                                                (plus vols. 2-4)

And what about the Weser-Renaissance under Cordes?

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203940523.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203954629.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203967520.jpg)


These seem also serious contenders:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0794881785124.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0794881834921.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4015023300781.jpg)


Just some random observations - please enlighten me! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on April 30, 2008, 08:59:47 PM


These seem also serious contenders:


I don't understand what you meant by the word "contenders" -- the recordings you quoted
are of different works by the great Schutz....

IMO the most recorded work by him must be the Musikalisches Exequien.  Do you have a
good recording of it already?  My favourite remains that sung by the Dresdener Kreuzchor
conducted by Rudolf Mauersberger (Berlin Classics).  Peter Schreier was a superb Evangelist
and tenor soloist.  An early effort at HIP by DDR forces but like David Hill's rendition of the
Victoria Requiem, it offers a totally convincing account of the work at hand, so much so
it would lead one to believe that their interpretation totally embodies the music's 'spirit.'
In the case of Mauersburger Schutz, it sends shivers down my spine just to recall Schreier's
eloquent delivery of some of the composer's most fervently austere music....

I also tried Junghanel's Symphoniae sacre and Psalmen Davids and found both a bit cold (my
response!).  Hilliard Ensemble's recording of the Opus ultimum (Virgin), on the other hand,
turned out to be much superior than I expected. 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on April 30, 2008, 09:35:31 PM
I don't understand what you meant by the word "contenders" -- the recordings you quoted
are of different works by the great Schutz....
"Candidates" then, FL, candidates - and referring to the recordings of course, not to the works. 8)

Quote
IMO the most recorded work by him must be the Musikalisches Exequien.  Do you have a
good recording of it already? 

My favourite remains that sung by the Dresdener Kreuzchor
conducted by Rudolf Mauersberger (Berlin Classics).  Peter Schreier was a superb Evangelist
and tenor soloist.  An early effort at HIP by DDR forces but like David Hill's rendition of the
Victoria Requiem, it offers a totally convincing account of the work at hand, so much so
it would lead one to believe that their interpretation totally embodies the music's 'spirit.'
In the case of Mauersburger Schutz, it sends shivers down my spine just to recall Schreier's
eloquent delivery of some of the composer's most fervently austere music....

No I'm a total Schütz virgin!  ;D I remember Val mentioning the Mauersberger as well, but I assumed those recordings to be a bit outdated. But on account of your comments I'll investigate - though a rather complicating factor will be that I do not like Peter Schreier. ::)


Quote
I also tried Junghanel's Symphoniae sacre and Psalmen Davids and found both a bit cold (my
response!).  Hilliard Ensemble's recording of the Opus ultimum (Virgin), on the other hand,
turned out to be much superior than I expected. 

Junghänel a bit cold, not entirely surprising.
Thanks for all your comments. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on April 30, 2008, 09:52:05 PM

though a rather complicating factor will be that I do not like Peter Schreier. ::)


Schreier's nasal tone is rather under control in this recording if that is what you found
objectionable in his usual way of singing.

Yes I think Junghanel's take on Schutz is too reserved, even though Schutz is in general
a VERY introvert composer whose style became more and more austere until he was
writing a cappella works at the end of his career... :o




Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 01, 2008, 02:22:34 AM
This is my favorite recording of anything by Schutz:

(http://www.musicafiata.com/diskographie/weihnachtshistoria/pic)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on May 01, 2008, 02:47:51 AM
Could I have some of your Heinrich Schütz favourites - works & recordings - please? :)

A composer who inexplicably escaped my attention till now!  :o


Any comments on these?


And what about the Weser-Renaissance under Cordes?

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203940523.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203954629.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203967520.jpg)




Just some random observations - please enlighten me! :)

Q


Well Que, I can vouch for the CPO recordings, and the one from Accent. I have them, and think WR a fine group of singers.
I have certainly a lot of vocal music from Schutz, to much to post here all, but I would also stress the Brilliant releases as being on top of my list.
I hope you find enough pleaure in them. :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on May 01, 2008, 10:39:36 AM
This is my favorite recording of anything by Schutz:

(http://www.musicafiata.com/diskographie/weihnachtshistoria/pic)

Ah, can't miss - almost anything by Bernius is bound to be exceptional!
But of course, it being on Sony Vivarte it will be 100% OOP and difficult to find.. :-\ But I've got around that before - so off goes the hunt, and thanks for the rec. :)

Well Que, I can vouch for the CPO recordings, and the one from Accent. I have them, and think WR a fine group of singers.
I have certainly a lot of vocal music from Schutz, to much to post here all, but I would also stress the Brilliant releases as being on top of my list.
I hope you find enough pleasure in them. :)

Thanks, Harry. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on May 01, 2008, 10:48:41 PM
This is my favorite recording of anything by Schutz:

(http://www.musicafiata.com/diskographie/weihnachtshistoria/pic)

Ah, can't miss - almost anything by Bernius is bound to be exceptional!
But of course, it being on Sony Vivarte it will be 100% OOP and difficult to find.. :-\ But I've got around that before - so off goes the hunt, and thanks for the rec. :)

And guess what!  :o
The German branch of Sony/BMG have reissued it in their budget "Esprit" series! :)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0886972687223.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 01, 2008, 11:16:10 PM
What wonderful news (ugly cover though).

Do you know if the rest of the Vivarte series will surface here, and if the reissus will be available outside Germany?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on May 02, 2008, 12:16:49 AM
What wonderful news (ugly cover though).

Do you know if the rest of the Vivarte series will surface here, and if the reissus will be available outside Germany?

Covers of the series are gastly...
Went through the whole series (http://www.sonybmgclassical.de/serien.php?katsuche=1&searchserien=ESPRIT&tab=Esprit), and I guess this (very recent) issue is the only - and hopefully first - from the Vivarte series. Never saw these issues other than on jpc or in Germany.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 02, 2008, 01:13:15 AM
Covers of the series are gastly...
Went through the whole series (http://www.sonybmgclassical.de/serien.php?katsuche=1&searchserien=ESPRIT&tab=Esprit), and I guess this (very recent) issue is the only - and hopefully first - from the Vivarte series. Never saw these issues other than on jpc or in Germany.

Q
When they have reissued the complete Vivarte series, I have a giant order for jpc.de awaiting. I'd better have my sunglasses ready when I open the package though.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on May 02, 2008, 01:25:12 AM
Covers of the series are gastly...
Went through the whole series (http://www.sonybmgclassical.de/serien.php?katsuche=1&searchserien=ESPRIT&tab=Esprit), and I guess this (very recent) issue is the only - and hopefully first - from the Vivarte series. Never saw these issues other than on jpc or in Germany.

Q

Of course one never gets the full text notes (often written by known musicologists in addition to performers themselves) with reissues.  If one can find the original versions at ebay, amazon shops, garage sales, used
CD stores or wherever  ;),  I'd think it advisable to get them there.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: bassio on May 02, 2008, 10:47:10 AM
Now a word is needed on his instrumental music .. which I failed to find on record on the internet.  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 02, 2008, 12:07:57 PM
Now a word is needed on his instrumental music .. which I failed to find on record on the internet.  :)
Schutz? In that case you'll have a long wait ahead of you.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on May 02, 2008, 08:24:13 PM
Schutz? In that case you'll have a long wait ahead of you.

Schutz wrote no instrumental music in our sense of the term.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 03, 2008, 12:32:13 AM
Schutz wrote no instrumental music in our sense of the term.
Which is why he'll have to wait a long time...Come on!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on May 03, 2008, 12:37:48 AM
Which is why he'll have to wait a long time...Come on!

The wait you suggested is like waiting for Godot or for the Second Coming... I prefer to tell the plain truth.  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 03, 2008, 12:39:46 AM
The wait you suggested is like waiting for Godot or for the Second Coming... I prefer to tell the plain truth.  :)
I would prefer him to sit waiting for Schutz rather than hang around on street corners and get himself into trouble.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on May 03, 2008, 12:48:50 AM
I would prefer him to sit waiting for Schutz rather than hang around on street corners and get himself into trouble.


Or he could listen to Scheidt, who wrote plenty of instrumental? 
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61DXFY2GR9L._SS500_.jpg)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on May 03, 2008, 01:25:42 AM
Or he could listen to Scheidt, who wrote plenty of instrumental? 
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61DXFY2GR9L._SS500_.jpg)



That is a fine disc by the way, remember that well.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: bassio on May 04, 2008, 09:02:53 AM
 ;D

Apologies, I meant to refer to Stolzel. Nice to find out there is Schutz too.

Oh and a Schietz too  :D

What is it with the Germans and the 'S'?  ;D

Thanks for the recommendations.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 04, 2008, 09:56:15 PM
;D

Apologies, I meant to refer to Stolzel. Nice to find out there is Schutz too.

Oh and a Schietz too  :D

What is it with the Germans and the 'S'?  ;D

Thanks for the recommendations.
And Scheidemann, Schein and Scheidt as well.....
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on May 04, 2008, 10:17:25 PM
These ones you mean that I just bought?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on May 04, 2008, 10:30:04 PM
These ones you mean that I just bought?

Nice Harry! :) How are those?

And now we are on the subject - did you by any chance already got this issue with cantatas by Erlebach with Ludger Rémy as conductor? Erlebach is a composer who interests me on account of the issue on Alpha I got a while ago. This issue received a very positive review (in German) HERE (http://www.klassik-heute.de/kh/3cds/20080418_18710.shtml).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61qZegY1jjL._SS400_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on May 04, 2008, 10:37:34 PM
Nice Harry! :) How are those?

And now we are on the subject - did you by any chance already got this issue with cantatas by Erlebach with Ludger Rémy as conductor? Erlebach is a composer who interests me on account of the issue on Alpha I got a while ago. This issue received a very positive review (in German) HERE (http://www.klassik-heute.de/kh/3cds/20080418_18710.shtml).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61qZegY1jjL._SS400_.jpg)

Q

When I started with the this cd, I was so overpowered by the beauty of his compositions, and the genial writing for voices, that I afterwards ordered the Cantatas. I think they are well recorded, and truly German in their conception, lucid, and straightforward with a honest outlook.
And I have the Erlebach, but have not listen to it yet!


Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: rubio on July 27, 2008, 09:57:31 PM
I see in the last Gramophone magazine that Norrington appear to cherish the St Mattheus Passion of Schütz. What do you think of this work, and which are great recordings on the market (probably not so many...)? What about these two - Kurz/Chor der Staatsoper Stuttgart on BellaMusica or Flämig/Dresdner Kreuzchor on Berlin Classics?

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4014513019936.jpg)  (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0782124901028.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 03, 2008, 10:49:29 PM
Another request:

Anyone familiar with this recording, that has been reissued? :)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/3463736.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on August 04, 2008, 12:07:01 AM
Another request:

Anyone familiar with this recording, that has been reissued? :)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/3463736.jpg)

Q


I have the original release of this. Essential!  0:)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Harry on August 04, 2008, 12:08:34 AM
Another request:

Anyone familiar with this recording, that has been reissued? :)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/3463736.jpg)

Q


IMO this is really a essential recording Que.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 07, 2008, 10:52:37 AM
Recently I bought my first Heinichen CD, this one:

(http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/3848/6157pjt5cwlss500jn0.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

I have to say Johann David Heinichen (1683-1729) is very interesting composer and his music seems to be of high quality. I enjoy this CD very much and I will definitely collect more Heinichen.

 :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bunny on November 07, 2008, 12:55:35 PM
Another request:

Anyone familiar with this recording, that has been reissued? :)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/3463736.jpg)

Q


I'm not familiar with that cd, but I have Junghänel's recording of the Membra Jesu Nostri which is staggeringly beautiful!  I'll bet the Geistliche Cantaten is a winner too.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/514eClsmphL._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bunny on November 07, 2008, 01:00:15 PM
Recently I bought my first Heinichen CD, this one:

(http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/3848/6157pjt5cwlss500jn0.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

I have to say Johann David Heinichen (1683-1729) is very interesting composer and his music seems to be of high quality. I enjoy this CD very much and I will definitely collect more Heinichen.

 :)

If those interest you, then you should consider the Musica Antiqua Köln and Reinhard Goebel's recording of the Dresden Concerti.  I understand that's been re-issued by DG, so that copies will be reasonably priced.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SMBO3hslL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Josquin des Prez on November 07, 2008, 04:20:29 PM
The cantatas of Buxtehude are truly special. Now if only somebody else besides Tom Koopman would decide to record them. Fat chance i guess.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 08, 2008, 02:17:21 AM
If those interest you, then you should consider the Musica Antiqua Köln and Reinhard Goebel's recording of the Dresden Concerti.  I understand that's been re-issued by DG, so that copies will be reasonably priced.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SMBO3hslL._SS500_.jpg)

I have been considering that for a long time.  ;) It's all about priorities. Heinichen isn't the only composer I want to explore. There is another cpo disc I'm interested about too. I don't have anything from Zelenka yet so perhaps I should correct that first? I haven't even heard Zelenka's music but I have read so much good about it I am really interested.

The cantatas of Buxtehude are truly special.

Yep, you got it right.  ;)

Now if only somebody else besides Tom Koopman would decide to record them. Fat chance i guess.

Buxtehude's cantatas are sadly underrecorded. Complete set of Bruhns' cantatas would be nice too as the Ricercar release is OOP with big "O".  :P

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on April 01, 2009, 02:13:02 AM
That is mightily interesting Que.
What do you think of this recording?

Hight time to bump this thread again, and thanks to Harry for reminding me! :)
Just a reminder: Bohemian composers are included in this thread - earlier posts on Jan Dismas Zelenka are to be found HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52087.html#msg52087), HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52555.html#msg52555) , HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg53232.html#msg53232), HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg111362.html#msg111362), HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg114048.html#msg114048), and HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg116070.html#msg116070).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Gx2mZXA7L._SS500_.jpg)

This is a wonderful performance of the Missa votiva ZWV 18 (The only work on the disc since it is over an hour long), by the Czech ensemble Collegium Vocale 1704 which previously recorded for Supraphon.
Luxurious is the best way to describe it. The very natural recording, the subtlety and richness of the playing and the singing in a monumental work with an abundance of diversity. Warmly recommended! :)


Samples and reviews at Amazon
(http://www.amazon.com/Zelenka-Missa-Votiva-ZWV-18/dp/B001AS6A9G)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 01, 2009, 07:28:36 PM
Here's a Telemann's CD I have enjoyed very much for years ...



Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 01, 2009, 07:32:04 PM
Here is another lovely piece, superbly performed by the Cologne Chamber Orchestra ...


Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 03, 2009, 08:52:14 PM
Pachelbel ...  I like his organ works.  Unfortunately, the CD's are not easy to collect.  I have a few volumes under the Centaur label and it is almost impossible to find certain volumes.  Here is a new CD that arrived from MDT a few weeks ago I have yet to listen to ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41hcyLdclUL._SS400_.jpg)



Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Frumaster on April 03, 2009, 08:58:49 PM
This one was a recent eye-opener for non-J.S. Bach Baroque.  Sounds excellent.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31y7%2BdKUIjL._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 06, 2009, 05:50:46 PM
Johann Melchior Molter


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41N1VSW0V1L._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Spitz on April 23, 2009, 04:37:54 PM
What about Johann Heinrich Schmeltzer, especially his HIP violin sonatas by Romanesca. With a name lilke Schmeltzer, you know it has to be good!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 23, 2009, 04:43:58 PM
Johann Ludwig Krebs, student of JS Bach.  I have this pretty nice CD.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61XME7XH1FL._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on April 23, 2009, 05:20:20 PM
Pachelbel ...  I like his organ works.  Unfortunately, the CD's are not easy to collect.  I have a few volumes under the Centaur label and it is almost impossible to find certain volumes. 

Easier than you might think.  All 11 volumes can be had directly from the Centaur website. 

The Dorian label also released the complete organ works, and those discs are also ready for purchase.  For my money, I favor Payne over Bouchard.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 23, 2009, 05:39:18 PM
Easier than you might think.  All 11 volumes can be had directly from the Centaur website. 

The Dorian label also released the complete organ works, and those discs are also ready for purchase.  For my money, I favor Payne over Bouchard.

I stopped trying a few years ago.  I have never bought direct from any record companies.  I think this is a more recent development that record companies start to sell directly to retail customers.  I have been getting promo offers from Universal for the past two years ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on April 24, 2009, 07:07:01 AM
I stopped trying a few years ago.  I have never bought direct from any record companies.  I think this is a more recent development that record companies start to sell directly to retail customers. 

In my experiences, record companies are the most reliable sources for successful transactions performed quickly.  Also, many of them have been selling directly to customers for quite a few years.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 24, 2009, 04:39:27 PM
In my experiences, record companies are the most reliable sources for successful transactions performed quickly.  Also, many of them have been selling directly to customers for quite a few years.

But it was not always this way since record companies did not want to compete with their retailers, just as people do not buy their cars directly from the automakers.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 25, 2009, 08:22:59 PM
Heinrich Schütz
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 25, 2009, 08:28:29 PM
Johann Jakob Froberger.  I have the following CD ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31TP5VYPATL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on April 25, 2009, 09:22:18 PM
These are three of the best Baroque recordings on Naxos.  :)

Even at full price would be a great value:

Buxtehude - Fasolis:
http://www.amazon.com/Buxtehude-Membra-Jesu-Nostri/dp/B000QQUORM/ref=pd_ybh_2?pf_rd_p=280800601&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_t=1501&pf_rd_i=ybh&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1R3MQQW97T1M2QBC5GH5

Schenck - Les Voix Humaines:
http://www.amazon.com/Schenck-Nymphs-Sonatas-Violas-Humaines/dp/B000053W48/ref=pd_ybh_3?pf_rd_p=280800601&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_t=1501&pf_rd_i=ybh&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1R3MQQW97T1M2QBC5GH5

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on April 25, 2009, 09:32:34 PM
But it was not always this way since record companies did not want to compete with their retailers, just as people do not buy their cars directly from the automakers.

Forget the past - the Internet has changed the relationships.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on April 26, 2009, 12:16:19 AM
These are three of the best Baroque recordings on Naxos.  :)

Even at full price would be a great value:

(http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2044.0;attach=17474;image)

Buxtehude - Fasolis:
http://www.amazon.com/Buxtehude-Membra-Jesu-Nostri/dp/B000QQUORM/ref=pd_ybh_2?pf_rd_p=280800601&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_t=1501&pf_rd_i=ybh&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1R3MQQW97T1M2QBC5GH5

Schenck - Les Voix Humaines:
http://www.amazon.com/Schenck-Nymphs-Sonatas-Violas-Humaines/dp/B000053W48/ref=pd_ybh_3?pf_rd_p=280800601&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_t=1501&pf_rd_i=ybh&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1R3MQQW97T1M2QBC5GH5

Yes, The Buxtehude disc is extremely good. Everyone should own it. I have the Schenck vol. 2 which I find good. Naxos has not released too much (lesser known) German Baroque but I enjoy their Fasch recording (Passio Jesu Christi/Térey-Smith)

(http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/648/51hxlipcglsl500aa280.jpg) (http://img139.imageshack.us/my.php?image=51hxlipcglsl500aa280.jpg)

 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on April 26, 2009, 04:39:25 AM
(http://www.snijders-hifi.com/images/telamannplais.jpg)

Plenty of Telemann on flutes, oboes, bassoons and recorders. Plus Quantz, Vivaldi, Graun concertos with woodwinds.  All tastefully prepared and performed by researching (Ricercar) musicians.  ;)   A banquet!  :D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on April 26, 2009, 04:50:50 AM
(http://www.snijders-hifi.com/images/telamannplais.jpg)

Plenty of Telemann on flutes, oboes, bassoons and recorders. Plus Quantz, Vivaldi, Graun concertos with woodwinds.  All tastefully prepared and performed by researching (Ricercar) musicians.  ;)   A banquet!  :D

Over the years, I found Telemann's works somewhat bland compared with those by his contemporaries Bach and Handel.  Perhaps that explains why Telemann is not as popular today.  He surely was more popular than Bach during his lifetime from what I have read, if that is judged by financial well-being.  Among the major composers, Handel was the most financially well off at his death.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on April 26, 2009, 09:06:10 AM
Over the years, I found Telemann's works somewhat bland compared with those by his contemporaries Bach and Handel.  Perhaps that explains why Telemann is not as popular today.  He surely was more popular than Bach during his lifetime from what I have read, if that is judged by financial well-being.  Among the major composers, Handel was the most financially well off at his death.

From the point of view of a flute player, though, I've found Telemann to be the stylistically more fluent composer (than Bach) - he definitely played the instrument himself or knew its playing styles very intimately.  Telemann's popularity in his own time may not have been all that hype.  Telemann died in the position of music director of the five largest churches in Hamburg.  In the German system of musical professions, it was hard to go higher than that.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on April 26, 2009, 03:06:22 PM
Naxos has not released too much (lesser known) German Baroque 

That's my impression too, excepting the organ works by Buxtehude and some discs of that composer previously released on Dacapo (all excellent).

I agree with you about Fasolis, his Membra Jesu Nostri is a must-have; although during the last months I have been considering this one:
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on May 30, 2009, 11:41:06 PM
This 2CD-set looks particularly enticing!
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)

(http://multimedia.fnac.com/multimedia/images_produits/ZoomPE/8/4/0/8424562218048.jpg)

An interview with Meierson on this issue on the Glossa site HERE (http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/context.aspx?Id=41).
A "babeled" review on KlassikHeute HERE (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&hl=nl&js=n&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.klassik-heute.de%2Fkh%2F3cds%2F20090521_19240.shtml&sl=de&tl=en&history_state0=).

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on May 31, 2009, 12:08:14 AM
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)

Unfortunately I don't know any music by Gottlieb Theophil Muffat (1690  – 1770).
I only have a Naxos disc of Concerti Grossi by his father Georg Muffat (1653-1704).

Georg studied under Lully while Gottlieb was Fux's student.
It seems Georg was more skilled composer than his son. I don't rate Georg Muffat very high.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on May 31, 2009, 02:02:45 AM
I only have a Naxos disc of Concerti Grossi by his father Georg Muffat (1653-1704).
I don't rate Georg Muffat very high.

So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?
Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.

At his time Georg Muffat was regarded a master of counterpoint. Along with Pachelbel he was the most important South German composer of organ music of the pre-Bach (J S Bach) generation.

Gottlieb Muffat is (judged from the few works I have heard, - he does not appeal that much to me) lighter in style, more Rococo.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bunny on May 31, 2009, 01:39:53 PM
This 2CD-set looks particularly enticing!
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)

(http://multimedia.fnac.com/multimedia/images_produits/ZoomPE/8/4/0/8424562218048.jpg)

An interview with Meierson on this issue on the Glossa site HERE (http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/context.aspx?Id=41).
A "babeled" review on KlassikHeute HERE (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&hl=nl&js=n&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.klassik-heute.de%2Fkh%2F3cds%2F20090521_19240.shtml&sl=de&tl=en&history_state0=).

Q

I think I need a translator for the Babel translation!  It makes no sense at all in English, which is sad when you consider that Meyerson is American.                                                         

While I'm unfamiliar with this composer's music, I do have a recording by Mitzi Meyerson of Couperin, and she is a formidable harpsichordist. 

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ECDR01ZML._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on June 01, 2009, 10:53:59 AM
So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?

No I don't.

Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.

Seems like it's time to make my Naxos shopping list longer...  ;D

At his time Georg Muffat was regarded a master of counterpoint. Along with Pachelbel he was the most important South German composer of organ music of the pre-Bach (J S Bach) generation.

I am more into North Germany stuff but Pachelbel/Muffat are okay, I guess.  0:)

Gottlieb Muffat is (judged from the few works I have heard, - he does not appeal that much to me) lighter in style, more Rococo.

Naturally he must have been a composer of galant style.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on June 01, 2009, 11:55:12 AM
So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?
Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.


I've had those two Naxos organ discs for many years and always enjoy the occasional listen.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on June 06, 2009, 06:23:38 AM
Yesterday, I bought this excellent recording in a local store:

SCHÜTZ, H.: Lukas-Passion, SWV 480
Linderoth (tenor), Evangelist; Jespersen (bass baritone, Jesus)
Ars Nova Copenhagen
Paul Hillier (direction)
Dacapo

Today, I found this interesting podcast with Paul Hillier being interviewed by Raymond Bisha:

http://blog.naxos.com/2009/05/12/podcast-schutzs-passion-an-interview-with-paul-hillier/

Here a fair review of the recording:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/June09/Schutz_8226019.htm


Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 06, 2009, 04:36:05 PM
Thought that I was already a poster in this thread - not so!  :-\

So, now joining - by the way, just ordered the Muffat CD shown below:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61BC22PMYSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on June 06, 2009, 04:39:42 PM
I have this CD, which is on the French Harmonia Mundi and is OOP ...

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/41/bd/e108c060ada08d26144d8110.L._AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on June 07, 2009, 10:57:22 AM
Yesterday, I bought this excellent recording in a local store:

SCHÜTZ, H.: Lukas-Passion, SWV 480
Linderoth (tenor), Evangelist; Jespersen (bass baritone, Jesus)
Ars Nova Copenhagen
Paul Hillier (direction)
Dacapo

Today, I found this interesting podcast with Paul Hillier being interviewed by Raymond Bisha:

http://blog.naxos.com/2009/05/12/podcast-schutzs-passion-an-interview-with-paul-hillier/

Here a fair review of the recording:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/June09/Schutz_8226019.htm




Today, after another listening, I did read the informative liner notes of the disc.

All the information is about the differences between this composition and Bach’s Passions. A kind of request/warning: Let’s listen to this setting in its own way! 

Recorded in St. Pauls Church, Copenhagen 10-11 April 2007, the sound is incredibly warm; beautifully sung and recited.

However, it is clear that this recording is only for people fully interested in pre-Bach composers (there is not instrumental accompaniment at all). But at least they will deserve the encouraging blessing of the “Conclusion”:  :)

“He who honours God’s suffering and often ponders His bitter death, will be well protected by His mercy here on earth, and there in eternal life”. 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on June 07, 2009, 11:24:32 AM
I have this CD, which is on the French Harmonia Mundi and is OOP ...

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/41/bd/e108c060ada08d26144d8110.L._AA240_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410ZW88W60L._SS400_.jpg)

This currently budget re-release is by the group Ars Antiqua Austria, led by the violinist Gunar Letzbor.  (Label: Symphonia)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on June 07, 2009, 11:40:22 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410ZW88W60L._SS400_.jpg)

This currently budget re-release is by the group Ars Antiqua Austria, led by the violinist Gunar Letzbor.  (Label: Symphonia)


It does not look like there are many versions of this work out there ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on June 07, 2009, 12:07:13 PM
It does not look like there are many versions of this work out there ...

It is, however, among the more famous works by this composer...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 07, 2009, 12:58:52 PM
It is, however, among the more famous works by this composer...

I'd have to agree w/ the above statement - the only other Muffat disc I owned before the order mentioned above: Parley of Instruments, a group that I've enjoyed in the past & a delightful recording -  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51wRNU8HM%2BL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on June 20, 2009, 04:29:47 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51s7ymmSMyL._SS400_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31TP5VYPATL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Q - will be curious about your thoughts on these performances - the only Froberger that I own currently is w/ Remy (inserted above) - a 2-CD set from the Strasbourg Manuscript; I'm assuming that w/ the volume numbers on the Bob van Asperen disc shown that he 'covers' what is in my set?  Dave

Hi Dave, see earlier comments on Van Asperen's Froberger here: volume I (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg93269.html#msg93269) & volume II (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg132471.html#msg132471). :)
I have the set by Rémy as well, but I frankly hardly ever listen to it anymore. It is nice but I have a clear preference for Van Asperen, who delves much deeper into the music IMO: more structured and articulated.
On the works. The Froberger edition on Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/region/index/ae_en/?URL=All-Discs/Editions/Froberger-edition) presents all surviving keyboards, so it does contain all the works presented on the CPO issue of a particular manuscript with a collection of works, which are found spread over several issues of the Aeolus edition. The CPO follows the specific numbered used in that "Strasburg manuscript", so some dectective work is needed to figure out what corresponds to what! 8)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 20, 2009, 05:01:02 AM
Hi Dave, see earlier comments on Van Asperen's Froberger here: volume I (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg93269.html#msg93269) & volume II (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg132471.html#msg132471). :)
I have the set by Rémy as well, but I frankly hardly ever listen to it anymore. It is nice but I have a clear preference for Van Asperen, who delves much deeper into the music IMO: more structured and articulated.
On the works. The Froberger edition on Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/region/index/ae_en/?URL=All-Discs/Editions/Froberger-edition) presents all surviving keyboards, so it does contain all the works presented on the CPO issue of a particular manuscript with a collection of works, which are found spread over several issues of the Aeolus edition. The CPO follows the specific numbered used in that "Strasburg manuscript", so some dectective work is needed to figure out what corresponds to what! 8)

Hello Q - thanks for the comments & links - quite a project by Aeolus - will certainly put Van Asperen on my consideration list!  :)  Dave
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 17, 2009, 06:11:00 AM
.



Reaffirming my recommendation for this Froberger series by Bob van Asperen after listening to the 3rd installment. Performances are beyond reproach IMO: clarity and equilibrity, combined with sufficient impetus and playfulness - wonderful!  :) Van Asperen plays a lush and transparent sounding anonymous French harpsichord from c.1700.

In the three volumes that I've acquired so far, this series goes from strength to strength - more information in the posts above. And my favourable impression of Froberger's music - continues to be strengthened as well. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on August 18, 2009, 05:24:36 AM
Thought that I was already a poster in this thread - not so!  :-\

So, now joining - by the way, just ordered the Muffat CD shown below:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61BC22PMYSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Got this recently. Unfortunately only a very small part of Georg Muffat´s harpsichord music has survived, but this is rather substantial music and it is a must for anyone interested in the evolution of the baroque German Claviersuite (Froberger, Pachelbel, Weckmann, Böhm, Buxtehude, and Bach of course).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on August 18, 2009, 04:04:52 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51s7ymmSMyL._SS400_.jpg)

Reaffirming my recommendation for this Froberger series by Bob van Asperen after listening to the 3rd installment. Performances are beyond reproach IMO: clarity and equilibrity, combined with sufficient impetus and playfulness - wonderful!  :) Van Asperen plays a lush and transparent sounding anonymous French harpsichord from c.1700.

In the three volumes that I've acquired so far, this series goes from strength to strength - more information in the posts above. And my favourable impression of Froberger's music - continues to be strengthened as well. :)

Q

I should give these Froberger volumes by van Asperen some serious consideration.  I just ordered his WTC at MDT and look forward to receiving it along with a few other works ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on August 30, 2009, 11:43:40 AM
Georg Böhm (1661-1733) - Werke für Lautenwerk
Geoffrey Thomas, lute-harpsichord (Keith Hill)
New Classical Adventure – NCA, 2002

This disc was in my wishlist during a long time. One month ago, I ordered it from JPC (EU 4.99). I just can say it’s an excellent recording, very well played by Geoffrey Thomas and superbly recorded. I was pleased to see the name of the multi-instrumentalist Gergély Särközy in the digital editing.

I liked the whole package, including the interesting liner notes by the performer himself. Here some extracts of those notes:

“The suites of Georg Böhm contain a manylayered aural landscape with a constant variety of textures and timbres. They extract a rich variety of sonorities from the instruments and constantly delight the listener”.

“In his earlier works J.S. Bach belongs to the musical world of Böhm and the 17th century German masters. The fifteen years old J.S. Bach came to Lüneburg as a chorister when Böhm 14 years his senior, had recently assumed the organist post at the Johanniskirche. We do not know if Bach studied with Böhm, but it is tempting to imagine that the ambitious young musician would have sought out the city’s leading composer. The music which the young Bach encountered was fluid, irregular and rhapsodic. This is not to suggest, however, that the structure or architecture is lacking. The music has a firm two-part structure with the bass in constant dialogue with the soprano. Inner voices entre and exit like supporting roles in a theatrical work”
. [you can hear this feature in the CD]

“Styles of performing in the 18th century were infinitely more varied than today. We could compare them to the wide variations in German dialects or to the many varieties of Cabernet Sauvignon from locations as diverse as California, Chile and Hungary”. [it’s a more long idea, but I am quoting just because he mentions my own country  ;D]  

It’s possible to listen to an entire track here:

http://bgthomas.com/music/

 :)



Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on August 30, 2009, 12:52:19 PM
Generally Böhm´s Claviesuiten have been neglected on CD, but there are a few excellent recordings all worth a consideration (do not know Wolley BTW).

Other than Geoffrey Thomas on NCA there are

Gustav Leonhardt on Telefunken OOP ?

Gustav Leonhardt on Sony:
http://www.amazon.fr/George-B%C3%B6hm-Keyboard-Georg-Bohm/dp/B0000028U7/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1251668804&sr=1-1

Mitzi Meyerson on Glossa (complete edition):
http://www.amazon.fr/B%C3%B6hm-Suites-clavier-Mitzi-Meyerson/dp/B0000C8WY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1251668885&sr=1-1

Rinaldo Alessandrini on Astreé : http://www.amazon.fr/Suites-Partitas-Georg-Boehm/dp/B000025UA2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1251668296&sr=1-2

Robert Wolley on Meridian:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Dclassical&field-keywords=b%F6hm+wolley&x=11&y=19
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on August 30, 2009, 03:25:18 PM

Other than Geoffrey Thomas on NCA...

Gustav Leonhardt on Sony:
http://www.amazon.fr/George-B%C3%B6hm-Keyboard-Georg-Bohm/dp/B0000028U7/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1251668804&sr=1-1

Fortunately this recording is available again in the Leonhardt's Jubilee Edition box set (Sony), so highly praised few days ago on the board.

Mitzi Meyerson on Glossa (complete edition):
http://www.amazon.fr/B%C3%B6hm-Suites-clavier-Mitzi-Meyerson/dp/B0000C8WY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1251668885&sr=1-1

I have considered this recording; it seems excellent on the basis of a few samples (and it's included in a MDT offer). But I must fight with some rejection against Meyerson. Some years ago, I bought a highly recommended disc dedicated to Gaspard Le Roux, but I hated that disc.

 :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 09, 2009, 06:45:09 AM
Georg Böhm (1661-1733) - Werke für Lautenwerk
Geoffrey Thomas, lute-harpsichord (Keith Hill)
New Classical Adventure – NCA, 2002

This disc was in my wishlist during a long time. One month ago, I ordered it from JPC (EU 4.99). I just can say it’s an excellent recording, very well played by Geoffrey Thomas and superbly recorded. I was pleased to see the name of the multi-instrumentalist Gergély Särközy in the digital editing.


Thanks for the comments - interesting read.  :)
Just to compare notes I've dug up my own comments:


Got this cheap at jpc. The music by Georg Böhm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Böhm) reminds me most of early keyboard works by Bach. Nice, but not as original as, say Froberger. An important attraction here is the sound of the lute-harpsichord (Lautenwerck), which is wonderful and full of character. Geoffrey Thomas is a sensible and competent player, but misses that extra imaginative approach that could have given this music just an extra edge.
Nevertheless - a very nice bargain for lovers of the lute-harpsichord! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on September 11, 2009, 05:43:58 PM
Thanks for the comments - interesting read.  :)
Just to compare notes I've dug up my own comments:


We agree almost totally, Que.

Anyway, I appreciate the mainly “textual” approach of Geoffrey Thomas and his effort to show objectively the different voices in these pieces.

BTW, what a wonderful piece is that Präludium, Fugue and Postludium in g-Moll! Besides, that name recalls the Bach's Toccata, Adagio & Fugue BWV 564 (not included for our contributors among the greatest Bach's organ pieces!).

Here the aforementioned Böhm’s piece played on organ:  

http://www.youtube.com/v/WLS3x-OFAFI
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on September 20, 2009, 08:59:40 AM
Johann Jacob Prinner, Musicalischer Schlissl (1677):

“If you want to play the violin properly you must hold the instrument so firmly with your chin that there’s no reason to hold it with the left hand, otherwise it would be impossible to play quick passages which go high and then low… Nevertheless, I have known virtuosi of repute who irrespective of this put the violin only against the chest, thinking it looks nice and decorative, because they have taken it from a painting where an angel is playing to St. Francis and found it more picturesque: but they should have known that the painter was perhaps more artful with his paintbrush than he would have been with the violin bow”.

(Biber, Violin Sonatas, Romanesca, 2 CDs, HM USA)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: snyprrr on September 20, 2009, 05:38:18 PM
Here is a thread to discuss works by other composers of the German baroque than Bach.

Recommendations - queries - discussions.

Btw, "German" in the title of this thread means that I'm refering to all baroque composers from the Germanic Empire (or Holy Roman Empire) and/including Bohemia.
Oh, and yes, and I assume someone will give Georg Friedrich Händel his own thread! 8)

Several composers come to mind:
  • Carl Friedrich Abel
  • Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber (http://www.bluntinstrument.org.uk/biber/)
  • Nicolaus Bruhns
  • Dietrich Buxtehude
  • Johann Friedrich Fasch
  • Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Caspar_Ferdinand_Fischer)
  • Johann Joseph Fux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Joseph_Fux)
  • Cristoph Graupner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Graupner)
  • Johann David Heinichen
  • Johann Kuhnau (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Kuhnau-Johann.htm)
  • Johann Jakob Froberger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Jakob_Froberger)
  • Sebastian Knüpfer (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Knupfer-Sebastian.htm)
  • Johann Georg Pisendel
  • Johann Joachim Quantz (http://www.quantz.info/e/index.phtml)
  • Heinrich Schütz
  • Georg Philipp Telemann (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Philipp_Telemann)
  • Johann Gottfried Walther (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Gottfried_Walther)
  • Silvius Leopold Weiss
  • Jan Dismas Zelenka (http://www.jdzelenka.net/)

Composers linked to a site specially dedicated to them, are indicated in bold.
BTW I'll continously update the list of composers, and will add links to websites on them - if anyone knows interesting sites, please PM them to me!

Thanks! :)

Bach: check
Haendel: check
Zelenka: check
Telemann: check

Abel: one SQ
Richter: four SQs

ok, so Biber, Westhoff, and Pisendel for violin? Telemann, also has some solo violin, no? The more strings, the better.

Froberger for cool harpsichord music? And Buxtehude for organ???

Telemann seems to have cornered the market on "trios" and "quartets". I had a bout of Telemann chamber buying in the early days, and what survived was a very nice Nueva Era disc with some really nice minor key "quartets". Not so hot on the "Paris" Quartets, as I remember, but Telemann has a few minor key chamber works that rival the best; however, the Zelenka trio sonatas are da bomb!

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 04, 2009, 01:03:20 AM
.



She has recorded seven volumes so far. Is the music substantial enough to be considered in that quantity?

I acquired the first two volumes.  The music is rewarding but not compelling, so I decided to stop at 2.

Well, my bank manager warned me: "think of the financial consequences", he said. :o Naturally, I went through with it anyway. ;D But I was sceptical: Graupner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Graupner)? Would he be interesting?  I mean, can there be anything worthwile besides the giant Bach and the illustrious Froberger? ::)

Well, yes, on the basis of this one disc I think there might be.  :) Though the real proof in these matters is hearing more music and living with it for a while - as is definitely my intention here. Maybe I end up aborting this project as Don has, or maybe not - I have a hunch that the character of Graupner's music might play a decisive role in how one will ultimately respond to it. The esteemed Scott Morrison clearly loves it (http://www.amazon.com/Graupner-Partitas-Harpsichord-Vol-2/product-reviews/B0000942GH/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1) (more (http://www.amazon.com/Graupner-Music-Harpsichord-Vol-5/product-reviews/B000CGYOCW/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1)), for example. But... so does the infamous Hurwitzer (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=8562)! ;D ("Graupner rocks!"  :o)

Okay, a bit more down to earth now. Graupner was a contemporary of big J.S. but the style (and character) in which Graupner wrote his harpsichord music is quite different. Like Froberger, Christoph Graupner was clearly influenced by the French harpsichord School. Though I wouldn't say as Scott did that he sounds French through and through - this music is more linear with more forward thrust and stylistic characteristics oft the German style are also clearly noticeable. Graupner's music is playful, elegant and virtuosic, but also bold at times, always in a very bright, uplifted and "witty" mood - much less of the seriousness à la Bach or Buxtehude. It is very expressive music: plenty of variety in in expression of rhythm, musical motives and dramatic gestures. When comparing with other composers Louis Couperin, Jean-François Dandrieu and Pancrase Royer come to mind, with a hint of Froberger. I like it, it is good stuff. But then again: I am a harpsichord nut... 8)

But the taste of the pudding is in the eating - do try the samples at the Analekta site - linked above.

A word about the performance. Hadn't heard Geneviève Soly before. She does quite an excellent job - doing full justice to the virtuosic and playfull nature of the music, playing swift and very articulated. Naturally she studied with old master Gustav!  8) (Also with Kenneth Gilbert.) She plays a double manual harpsichord by Hubbard & Broekmann, based on designs by H.A. Hass in Hamburgian style, with a buff stop (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/83590/buff-stop) (or lute stop) - which is used to beautiful effect on several occasions here.

Yes, sorry, for now: recommended! 8)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on October 04, 2009, 04:38:17 AM
Well, my bank manager warned me: "think of the financial consequences", he said. :o Naturally, I went through with it anyway. ;D But I was sceptical: Graupner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Graupner)? Would he be interesting?  I mean, can there be anything worthwile besides the giant Bach and the illustrious Froberger? ::)


Have I missed something here?  I have noticed only 7 volumes of Graupner's harpsichord works and these CD's are available on Amazon for about $14 on average.  How is it going to break anyone's bank? 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on October 04, 2009, 05:23:16 AM
How is it going to break anyone's bank? 
Many banks are already broken.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on October 04, 2009, 06:37:57 AM
Never underestimate Fasch and Graupner. These two are mighty composers. Fortunately their music has got more attention/recognition recently.

Naxos has released one dics of Graupner's Partitas for Harpsichord (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Graupner-Partitas-Harpsichord-Christoph/dp/B001BLR7DU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1254665688&sr=1-1).

The reviews seem flattering: "What an excellent performer she is and i hope Naxos will enable her to make further cd's. In direct comparison with Genevive Soly on Analekta who is an authority on Graupner she easily holds her own and in the great A major chaconne i actually prefer her to Soly." says one reviewer. Sounds good. I will buy that Naxos disc sooner or later.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on October 04, 2009, 10:02:20 AM
Many banks are already broken.

Like most big American and British banks ...    ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 04, 2009, 10:30:22 AM
Have I missed something here?  I have noticed only 7 volumes of Graupner's harpsichord works and these CD's are available on Amazon for about $14 on average.  How is it going to break anyone's bank? 

As far as I can see, the complete edition will take about 20 CDs, making the total cost $280.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 31, 2009, 07:30:28 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61FTEH1VCJL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

BTW another Staier/Schornsheim project is this CD I also ordered, a snapshot sampling of the great keyboard composers works from Hamburg 1734...........this is very interesting concept that I hope they continue and progress in time intervals and regions  :)

A great disc with some exceptional and interesting compositions for the harpsichord by Händel, Telemann, Buxtehude, Mattheson, Böhm, Wekcmann, and Scheidemann. And the particular instrument used - by Anthony Sidey after an harpsichord made in Hamburg 1734, by Hieronymus Albrecht Hass - is more than worthy. :)

(http://www.cdguide.nm.ru/images/haas_harpsichord.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: KevinP on December 31, 2009, 04:05:26 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4110KKM34PL.jpg)

One of the best discs in my entire collection.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on December 31, 2009, 05:16:02 PM
Have I missed something here?  I have noticed only 7 volumes of Graupner's harpsichord works and these CD's are available on Amazon for about $14 on average.  How is it going to break anyone's bank?

I don't think it's an issue of breaking the bank, just value for the funds expended.  To me, Graupner isn't worth $98 plus shipping costs.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on January 01, 2010, 03:20:00 AM
I don't think it's an issue of breaking the bank, just value for the funds expended.  To me, Graupner isn't worth $98 plus shipping costs.
I guess that just shows how different we are. Me, I would rather have a Graupner disc than the umpteenth version of at Bach work I love and which is already thoroughly well represented on my shelf. No offense meant!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 01, 2010, 03:46:32 AM
I guess that just shows how different we are. Me, I would rather have a Graupner disc than the umpteenth version of at Bach work I love and which is already thoroughly well represented on my shelf. No offense meant!

FWIW I liked that Graupner disc and intend to explore further. His harpsichord music seems more interesting than for instance Buxtehude's (or Böhm's), just to give an impression of how I qualify it - not to turn Buxtehude down. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 01, 2010, 08:18:06 AM
As far as I can see, the complete edition will take about 20 CDs, making the total cost $280.

Even $280 is not exactly bank account busting unless the account has only $500 in balance.    ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 01, 2010, 08:29:22 AM
FWIW I liked that Graupner disc and intend to explore further. His harpsichord music seems more interesting than for instance Buxtehude's (or Böhm's), just to give an impression of how I qualify it - not to turn Buxtehude down. :)

Q

Q, Erato;  Happy New Year. 

Same view here, I do not need to own EVERY version of Goldberg Variations or WTC out there and clearly do not believe every version out there for these works is worth collecting.  I am happy with already owning about at least 15 versions of each performed on either piano or harpsichord.  I strive to have as comprehensive a collection as it can be and may be able to source all the Graupner CD's at prices much better than they are now available on Amazon.  Most slow selling CD's eventually make their way to BRO, though it is not clear what postage to Europe may set you back if and when the Graupner CD's become available on BRO - Lets hope ...   ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on January 01, 2010, 08:48:18 AM
I guess that just shows how different we are. Me, I would rather have a Graupner disc than the umpteenth version of at Bach work I love and which is already thoroughly well represented on my shelf. No offense meant!

None taken, and I already have two Graupner discs.  But I feel no interest in a third.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2010, 09:05:58 AM
(http://www.analekta.com/media/analekta/album/t1600/PAL329.jpg)

A generous amount of samples  HERE (http://www.analekta.com/en/album/Graupner-Partien-Gwv-103-150-Februarius-Gwv-110-Partitas-For-Harpsichord-Vol-3.329.html).


I have listened to these samples twice. Most beautiful instrument and Soly´s playing certainly engaged and stylish. But even if the music has got a certain inventiveness, I do not find it substantial enough for more than a few listenings. If I had got the time for this now, I would acquire the scores and play the music myself, but this will have to wait until my retirement.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 28, 2010, 02:24:50 AM
FINALLY!
Ricercar is re-releasing their OOP set of cantatas by Bruhns (http://www.outhere-music.com/store-RIC_291) 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 28, 2010, 02:32:52 AM
FINALLY!
Ricercar is re-releasing their OOP set of cantatas by Bruhns (http://www.outhere-music.com/store-RIC_291)
Yes, but don't buy it at 189 Euros. £ 11.75 at mdt. I hope the rest of the 10 disc set of German Baroque cantatas follows.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 28, 2010, 03:00:28 AM
Yes, but don't buy it at 189 Euros.
Are you serious? Who asks 189 € for the re-release?

£ 11.75 at mdt.
That's reasonable.

I hope the rest of the 10 disc set of German Baroque cantatas follows.
Yes, there is no such thing as too much German Baroque cantatas.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 28, 2010, 03:05:02 AM
Are you serious? Who asks 189 € for the re-release?

A misprint. The shop you linked to quoted it at 19 Euros. The price is at the top of the page you linked to.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 28, 2010, 07:12:29 AM
None taken, and I already have two Graupner discs.  But I feel no interest in a third.

Well, so as not to search completely through this long thread and to bring up to date recommendations on Graupner (of which I own nothing at the moment), what is worth considering for you fans of him?

I've looked at Amazon and there is quite a bit of varied offerings from orchestral works, harpsichord partitas, etc. - suggestions or recommendations for a couple of discs?  Thanks all -  :D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 28, 2010, 07:53:13 AM
A misprint. The shop you linked to quoted it at 19 Euros. The price is at the top of the page you linked to.
Okay. MDT seems to offer the best deal for this product.

Well, so as not to search completely through this long thread and to bring up to date recommendations on Graupner (of which I own nothing at the moment), what is worth considering for you fans of him?

I've looked at Amazon and there is quite a bit of varied offerings from orchestral works, harpsichord partitas, etc. - suggestions or recommendations for a couple of discs?  Thanks all -  :D
This is nice. (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Graupner-Overtures-Cantata-Kleine-Konzert/dp/B00000IXJ6/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267372141&sr=1-15)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on March 03, 2010, 10:53:13 AM
Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688-1758) - a somewhat forgotten contemporary of JS Bach & Telemann; there are about 300 extant works, but much was lost in Dresden during WWII, perhaps twice that number!  The statement is made in the liner notes of the disc pictured below that 'Fasch ranked second after only Telemann among German composers of instrumental music represented in the huge holdings of the Dresden court chapel archive.'

I just acquire my fifth disc of the music of Fasch - Orchestral Works performed by a period instrument group Tempesta di Mare (http://www.tempestadimare.org/About.html) (Philadelphia Baroque Orchestra), which is new to me.  These are just wonderful performances using a variety of Baroque instruments (many w/ pics in the liner notes).  My other discs include Oboe Sonatas, other Overtures & Sinfonias, and Trios & Sonatas -  :D

A short Wiki Bio HERE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Fasch) which includes a listing of his numerous works - much sacred music (including numerous cantatas, and plenty probably lost forever!), overtures, sinfonias, concertos, and chamber works.  Fasch was indeed a major musical personality and composer in his time - hopefully a renewed interest in his compositions will emerged since the present recording dates to the 250th anniversary of his death -  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/FaschOvertureConcertos/798912943_wiTno-O.jpg)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on March 27, 2010, 01:23:57 AM
(http://discplus.ch/login/1547894/shop/upload/33413.jpg)

None taken, and I already have two Graupner discs.  But I feel no interest in a third.

I have listened to these samples twice. Most beautiful instrument and Soly´s playing certainly engaged and stylish. But even if the music has got a certain inventiveness, I do not find it substantial enough for more than a few listenings. If I had got the time for this now, I would acquire the scores and play the music myself, but this will have to wait until my retirement.

After getting a second Graupner disc and several listenings, it's definite: I'm declaring my undying love for this music! ;D More seriously: I find the music attractive enough to go for the complete series. I like the brightness, gaiety and charm. Maybe the galant Rococo style is overly sophisticated for some tastes (and perceived as superficial ) but I've found no lack of inventiveness, it is rather virtuosic and it can be quite gutsy as well. Graupner, a contemporary of Bach, was clearly orientated on the French harpsichord tradition like Froberger.
Geneviève Soly employs a free, expressive style that shows this music at his best. She plays again the harpsichord made by Hubbard & Broekman after Hass: suitable big, bright and transparent sound, beautiful lute stop! :)

Anyway, à chacun son goût, but Graupner is mine. 8) The fact that the Hurwitzer likes Soly's Graupner is slightly unsettling... :o But luckily I'm also in the good company of Scott Morrison who wrote some nice reviews on Amazon.com! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 27, 2010, 01:36:26 AM
I just acquire my fifth disc of the music of Fasch
I have 8 discs of Fasch!  ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on March 27, 2010, 02:12:39 AM
I have 8 discs of Fasch!  ;D
How faschinating!

 :P
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on March 27, 2010, 05:10:17 AM
I have 8 discs of Fasch!  ;D

Is there a big box for Fasch works out there?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 27, 2010, 05:33:11 AM
Is there a big box for Fasch works out there?
No as far as I know. These unjustly neglected composers don't have those. My Fasch "collection" is build of individual discs:

1 x Naxos
1 x Berlin Classics
1 x Harmonia Mundi
1 x Archiv Produktion
1 x MDG
3 x CPO
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on March 27, 2010, 06:15:26 AM
No as far as I know. These unjustly neglected composers don't have those. My Fasch "collection" is build of individual discs:

1 x Naxos
1 x Berlin Classics
1 x Harmonia Mundi
1 x Archiv Produktion
1 x MDG
3 x CPO
Then you really need this:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/FUG502.jpg)

One of my favorite discs of baroque orchestral music.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on March 27, 2010, 12:19:11 PM
No as far as I know. These unjustly neglected composers don't have those. My Fasch "collection" is build of individual discs:

1 x Naxos
1 x Berlin Classics
1 x Harmonia Mundi
1 x Archiv Produktion
1 x MDG
3 x CPO

I have 2 single CD's on CPO ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: listener on March 27, 2010, 12:22:46 PM
GRAUPNER Concertos for chalumeau  (single-reed ancestor of the clarinet) are worth hearing and the Pierre Verany disc uses three: soprano, tenor and bass
FASCH collection on Capriccio also has a chalumeau concerto* in addition to a variety of other forms including a Missa Brevis, Cantata, trumpet concerto, and concerto grosso/suites.

*played on the clarinet here.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on March 28, 2010, 03:03:42 AM
Then you really need this:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/FUG502.jpg)

One of my favorite discs of baroque orchestral music.

Thanks for the recommendation! I wonder when I will have money to buy more Fasch.  :D

GRAUPNER Concertos for chalumeau  (single-reed ancestor of the clarinet) are worth hearing and the Pierre Verany disc uses three: soprano, tenor and bass
FASCH collection on Capriccio also has a chalumeau concerto* in addition to a variety of other forms including a Missa Brevis, Cantata, trumpet concerto, and concerto grosso/suites.


The sound of chalumeau seems to work superbly with this kind of late baroque/galant music. I especially like Fasch's Concerto in B flat major FWV L:B1 that I have on two CDs, (The English Concert/Trevor Pinnock/Archiv Produktion and Accademia Daniel/Shalev Ad-El/CPO). Pinnock is my favorite of these two.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on March 28, 2010, 04:14:43 PM
None taken, and I already have two Graupner discs.  But I feel no interest in a third.

I hadn't thought of it before, but the Naxos Music Library has all the Graupner/Analekta recordings as well as the new one on Naxos.  I suppose I could say I'm well stocked for Graupner although it isn't a big deal.  When I recently noticed that Roger Woodward's WTC was on NML - that was a very big deal.  8)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on March 28, 2010, 04:46:03 PM
I hadn't thought of it before, but the Naxos Music Library has all the Graupner/Analekta recordings as well as the new one on Naxos.  I suppose I could say I'm well stocked for Graupner although it isn't a big deal.  When I recently noticed that Roger Woodward's WTC was on NML - that was a very big deal.  8)

Hello Don - I've ordered the Woodward WTC from MDT for about $40, but because of this thread I've been looking at the Graupner offerings w/ Soly on the label mentioned above; she seems to be 'specializing' in this composer and has recorded 'mucho' volumes - probably NOT a 'box offering' in the near future?

But, my question is about the Naxos Musical Library - I've not joined - can you briefly enlighten us as to cost and options, i.e. is this just streaming audio or can CDs/tracks be downloaded, and if so in what formats?  Any information would be appreciated - thanks.  Dave  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 03, 2010, 03:50:41 PM
Interesting that I left the last post in this thread back in late March!  :D

Well, my FIRST Graupner discs arrived today - just left a post in the 'listening thread' (quoted below) - also found a fabulous site devoted to this extremely prolific but 'forgotten' Baroque composer - check out the link which includes a listing of his own catalog, i.e. GWV numbers!  My GOD, the guy wrote over 1400 'sacred cantatas' alone - have none!  Of course, the Soly recordings of the harpsichord works are another 'in depth' exploration of this composer - will there be a 'box set'?

But back to my first recordings below - both are w/ 'period' instruments and am enjoying these recordings tremendously - look forward to further recommendations & acquisitions!   :)

A number of new arrivals in the mail today, including a composer NEW to me:

Graupner, Christoph (1683-1760) - a Bach contemporary - actually offered the Leipzig job before JS Bach accepted; CDs below include a 'small' sampling of his prolific output - wind concertos, symphonies, and overtures; according to the liner notes of the first disc shown, he composed 115 symphonies, 80 overtures, 50 concertos, and over 1400 'sacred cantatas'!  And that's not ALL - if interested, checkout THIS SITE (http://graupner2010.yolasite.com/), and go to his GWV search to see 'how much' be did write - pretty amazing - he's likely up there w/ Bach & Telemann regarding 'prolificality' (may have just invented that word?) -  ;D

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/GraupnerConcsAntichi/855957892_NWDWS-O.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/GraupnerSymphRampe/855957920_E5CJq-O.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on June 28, 2010, 08:26:42 AM
I just put this on my wish list.  It comes out at the end of July:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YNOqJwfXL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Virtuoso-Recorder-Concertos-German-Baroque/dp/B003MPHA1M/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1277744598&sr=8-11

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on June 30, 2010, 05:23:28 PM
I just put this on my wish list.  It comes out at the end of July:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YNOqJwfXL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Virtuoso-Recorder-Concertos-German-Baroque/dp/B003MPHA1M/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1277744598&sr=8-11

Bill,  This looks like an interesting CD ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on June 30, 2010, 07:35:00 PM
I have been VERY happy with all the CPO cds I have purchased so far for baroque.  Add to this heavy wind element, and I would be shocked if this boy was not a winner, Stuart.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on July 18, 2010, 05:04:15 PM
First listen:

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0030F1N9Y.01_SL75_.jpg)

Johann Jakob Froberger - Suites 1649 & 1656
Christophe Rousset, harpsichord
Instrument: Harpsichord Johannes Couchet 1652, Antwerp, extended in 1701 to include a four-foot stop. Collection Musée de la Musique, Paris
Recorded in February 2007 at the Musée de la Musique, Cité de la Musique, Paris
Ambroisie

How is that?  :) He did a Froberger disc for L'Oiseau Lyre in his early days.
I'm amazed by Rousset's productivity - but now I want that WTC! :o :D
...

Q

Hi, Q. In the past my relationship with Rousset has not been easy, especially when he comes to Bach. However, after listening to this disc three times, I can say that it has seemed to me an exceptional recording. I have loved all of it so far: the interpretation, that wonderful Flemish/French harpsichord, the recorded sound, the artwork and those excellent notes written by Rousset himself.

About the performance: I especially liked  that he doesn't try to push the music forward; the music flows rather naturally in that introspective, melancholic way that I feel totally suitable for Froberger.  :)

Read, I suppose, in 2006 and forgotten for a long time:

“Previously unknown Froberger manuscript up for auction.

“A major 17th-century manuscript by Johann Jacob Froberger, the foremost German keyboard composer of his day, is to be auctioned at Sotheby’s in London on November 30. The estimated price is £300,000-£500,000.

“The previously unrecorded autograph manuscript contains 35 pieces of keyboard music by Froberger (1616-67), none of which is known to exist in autograph anywhere else. Eighteen were previously entirely unknown, and of the other 17 there are differences between the autograph versions and the previously known copies.

“According to Dr Simon Maguire, Sotheby’s music manuscript specialist: “We have no record of an autograph manuscript by an earlier major composer appearing at auction and the discovery of this extraordinary volume will open up all sorts of new questions about Froberger, as well as resolving points about the music already known. The 18 new pieces, which amount to over 180 pages of new music and increase the composer’s canon of known works by about a fifth, are examples of his hitherto unknown ‘final period’ and will occupy musical scholarship for years to come. Its discovery will change the history of 17th-century music.”

“Born in Stuttgart, Froberger moved to Vienna in the mid-1630s, becoming a court organist. An influence on JS Bach, his music was also known to Mozart.

“Autograph music by 17th-century composers is rare – there is, for instance, no autograph music by Monteverdi. Sotheby’s believes that “no comparable 17th-century autograph music manuscript has appeared for sale at auction in living memory” with the single exception of the 22-page autograph of keyboard music by Henry Purcell, which it sold in 1994 for £276,500.

The manuscipt will be on view in New York until November 17, and in London from November 27 to 29”.



Read last night in the liner notes written by Rousset for his last disc dedicated to Froberger’s music:

“He (Froberger) left only keyboard pieces, with the exception of a few fairly conventional motets which are not very representative of his eminently personal style. There are only a few extant autograph manuscripts, preserved in Vienna and dedicated to his first patron; another autograph that was recently auctioned immediately disappeared into a private collection, thus depriving us of a significant source and of new pieces of fundamental importance for our knowledge of this rare genius”.


The subtle irony of the history:

“Shortly before his death, Froberger insisted that his protectress Sybilla of Württemberg should destroy his manuscripts, claiming that no one else would be capable of playing his compositions”.

 :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on July 18, 2010, 08:22:28 PM
“Shortly before his death, Froberger insisted that his protectress Sybilla of Württemberg should destroy his manuscripts, claiming that no one else would be capable of playing his compositions”.

 :)

Oh, what a weirdo.

Thanks for sharing those snippets, Antoine. :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on July 19, 2010, 03:45:42 AM
Thanks for sharing those snippets, Antoine. :)

You're welcome, Navneeth. Apparently, Froberger's manuscript was sold for £310,400 (about $606,832).  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 06, 2010, 11:28:36 PM
(http://img2.douban.com/lpic/s3628323.jpg)

For me this set means a total revindication of Georg Böhm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_B%C3%B6hm), who was Bach's senior by 24 years and is know for his development of the chorale partita. After my first acquaintance (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg113256.html#msg113256) with Georg Böhm's music through Jeffrey Thomas' recording my response to the composer was lukewarm. The saving grace of that recording is that it is played on a lute-harpsichord.
But this is something else. Böhm is showcased as a versatile composer who appears in various guises: sometimes a French influence is prevalent, but one can also clearly hear the influence of Froberger, the more formal style of Buxtehude on other instances, and some fair measures of the Stylus Phantasticus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stylus_fantasticus) to top things of. In the opening piece this latter style is prominent, the Prelude, Fugue & Postlude with a single repeating bass note under changing harmony. Böhm's music has a dreamy and elusive character with an eccentric quality about it - very, very interesting and enjoyable!
Mitzi Meyerson (http://www.mitzi-meyerson.de/index.php) has a direct but very eloquent hands-on approach - swift and quite rhythmically orientated, ornamented style. I'm curious what her lineage in terms of teachers is, her playing reminds me of her Canadian colleague Geneviève Soly. She plays and appropriately bright and well defined and deep sounding harpsichord by Keith Hill, after Taskin. Strongly recommend to all the resident harpsichord lovers! :)

Review at Classical Net (http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/g/gls21801a.php)

http://www.youtube.com/v/ovTuFhZdwP4 http://www.youtube.com/v/uzzFwqMI7g0

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on August 08, 2010, 07:06:42 AM
(http://img2.douban.com/lpic/s3628323.jpg)

For me this set means a total revindication of Georg Böhm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_B%C3%B6hm), who was Bach's senior by 24 years and is know for his development of the chorale partita. After my first acquaintance (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg113256.html#msg113256) with Georg Böhm's music through Jeffrey Thomas' recording my response to the composer was lukewarm. The saving grace of that recording is that it is played on a lute-harpsichord.
But this is something else. Böhm is showcased as a versatile composer who appears in various guises: sometimes a French influence is prevalent, but one can also clearly hear the influence of Froberger, the more formal style of Buxtehude on other instances, and some fair measures of the Stylus Phantasticus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stylus_fantasticus) to top things of. In the opening piece this latter style is prominent, the Prelude, Fugue & Postlude with a single repeating bass note under changing harmony. Böhm's music has a dreamy and elusive character with an eccentric quality about it - very, very interesting and enjoyable!
Mitzi Meyerson (http://www.mitzi-meyerson.de/index.php) has a direct but very eloquent hands-on approach - swift and quite rhythmically orientated, ornamented style. I'm curious what her lineage in terms of teachers is, her playing reminds me of her Canadian colleague Geneviève Soly. She plays and appropriately bright and well defined and deep sounding harpsichord by Keith Hill, after Taskin. Strongly recommend to all the resident harpsichord lovers! :)


Q

This set arrived from MDT late last week.  I may have a chance to start listening to it later today ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 08, 2010, 01:41:47 PM
(http://img2.douban.com/lpic/s3628323.jpg)

For me this set means a total revindication of Georg Böhm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_B%C3%B6hm), who was Bach's senior by 24 years and is know for his development of the chorale partita. After my first acquaintance (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg113256.html#msg113256) with Georg Böhm's music through Jeffrey Thomas' recording my response to the composer was lukewarm. The saving grace of that recording is that it is played on a lute-harpsichord.
But this is something else. Böhm is showcased as a versatile composer who appears in various guises: sometimes a French influence is prevalent, but one can also clearly hear the influence of Froberger, the more formal style of Buxtehude on other instances, and some fair measures of the Stylus Phantasticus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stylus_fantasticus) to top things of. In the opening piece this latter style is prominent, the Prelude, Fugue & Postlude with a single repeating bass note under changing harmony. Böhm's music has a dreamy and elusive character with an eccentric quality about it - very, very interesting and enjoyable!
Mitzi Meyerson (http://www.mitzi-meyerson.de/index.php) has a direct but very eloquent hands-on approach - swift and quite rhythmically orientated, ornamented style. I'm curious what her lineage in terms of teachers is, her playing reminds me of her Canadian colleague Geneviève Soly. She plays and appropriately bright and well defined and deep sounding harpsichord by Keith Hill, after Taskin. Strongly recommend to all the resident harpsichord lovers!..................


Q - recently received this 2-CD set w/ DOUBLE liner notes!  Just have gone through one GOOD listening and am thoroughly enjoying - cannot add to your original elegant comments in the previous post; the harpsichord sound is just excellent - Dave
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 24, 2011, 11:29:23 PM
A new issue:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4015023242449.jpg)

Samples at jpc
(http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/SESSIONID/fa060fd40a07a7500897d2006b8c1051/classic/detail/-/art/Jan-Dismas-Zelenka-Requiem-in-D-ZWF-46/hnum/4301513)

After listening to the first track, I was sold! :) Went on the wish list. ;D

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: RJR on January 25, 2011, 01:11:22 PM
"Maybe the galant Rococo style is overly sophisticated for some tastes (and perceived as superficial ) but I've found no lack of inventiveness, it is rather virtuosic and it can be quite gutsy as well."
Love Rococo.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on January 26, 2011, 01:01:16 AM
Very early Haydn is German baroque music, no?  ;)

Concerto in C major for organ and orchestra (w/ 2 oboes), Hob. XVIII/1 (1755)


1. Moderato (= tempo ordinario?)
http://www.youtube.com/v/wN5Qbn1WxSE


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51W6nHHq5mL.jpg)




Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 26, 2011, 07:14:48 PM
A new issue:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4015023242449.jpg)

Samples at jpc
(http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/SESSIONID/fa060fd40a07a7500897d2006b8c1051/classic/detail/-/art/Jan-Dismas-Zelenka-Requiem-in-D-ZWF-46/hnum/4301513)

After listening to the first track, I was sold! :) Went on the wish list. ;D

Q

An interesting CD ...

I have to put a moratorium on all CD orders from Europe until my last 6 orders arrived.  Most of my orders were placed over a month or close to a month ago and they ordinarily arrived in about 10 days max.  Those %&#$ idiots at the US homeland security ...    >:(
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Lethevich on January 29, 2011, 04:26:31 PM
Can anyone suggest some pieces similar to Biber's Rosary Sonatas and Bach's Sonatas & Partitas (especially solo, but also accompanied)?

Edit: Sorry, I forgot to elaborate - what I find in these two pieces is that they are used by the composers as a springboard into a very particular, rather "cosmic" style of composition, which produces music of such esoteric and emotional complexity that sounds timeless. I have heard a lot of violin sonatas by especially Italian and French composers, and none really come close to their "weird" aesthetic that Biber and Bach are able to create. Simultaneously archaic but also ultra modern.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 29, 2011, 04:42:31 PM
Can anyone suggest some pieces similar to Biber's Rosary Sonatas and Bach's Sonatas & Partitas (especially solo, but also accompanied)?

Edit: Sorry, I forgot to elaborate - what I find in these two pieces is that they are used by the composers as a springboard into a very particular, rather "cosmic" style of composition, which produces music of such esoteric and emotional complexity that sounds timeless. I have heard a lot of violin sonatas by especially Italian and French composers, and none really come close to their "weird" aesthetic that Biber and Bach are able to create. Simultaneously archaic but also ultra modern.

Hello Sara - well I'm not sure 'what' you are looking for in this request, but today I left a post in the 'listening thread' of a new acquisition of the woks of Johann Westhoff quoted below - I've not acquired the 'solo' works of this composer but these were likely the 'first' of this genre, and likely influenced JS Bach in his own solo violin works - later in that thread, Premont responded - some links are provided - so take a look and will be interested in your comments if you acquire any of Westhoff's works - Dave  :)

Quote
Westhoff, Johann (1656-1705) - Violin Sonatas w/ BC w/ David Plantier & Les plaisirs du Parnasse - new arrival and highly recommended in Fanfare Jan-Feb 2011 (review attached) - apparently these works and his solo Violin Partitas were the only compositions published in his lifetime (and apparently all that exists currently!); so, I'm curious about the latter solo works, which can be found on the disc below (right) - interested if anyone might be familiar w/ this CD?  Review from MusicWeb HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2004/jun04/westhoff.htm); Westhoff & Bach knew each other from their Weimar days and Bach's own solo violin sonatas/partitas were likely influenced by the older composer's compositions?  :)


(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/WesthoffPlantier/1168915805_m2Rp5-O.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vxW402pfL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on January 29, 2011, 04:44:10 PM
Can anyone suggest some pieces similar to Biber's Rosary Sonatas and Bach's Sonatas & Partitas (especially solo, but also accompanied)?

Edit: Sorry, I forgot to elaborate - what I find in these two pieces is that they are used by the composers as a springboard into a very particular, rather "cosmic" style of composition, which produces music of such esoteric and emotional complexity that sounds timeless. I have heard a lot of violin sonatas by especially Italian and French composers, and none really come close to their "weird" aesthetic that Biber and Bach are able to create. Simultaneously archaic but also ultra modern.

This is a beautiful 2-CD set to explore the stylus fantasticus, some names and the features you mention:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0093046736224.jpg)

http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Andrew-Manze-Fantastic-Style-Violinmusik-des-17-Jh/hnum/3930793

:)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Lethevich on January 29, 2011, 04:59:54 PM
@SonicMan: that (first) Westhoff disc must be the most recommended on this forum - I can no longer ignore it, so I'll pick that one up.

@Antoine: woah, this is what I was hoping for but didn't think possible - that there was a wider school these works were associated with, rather than simply being anomolies. Looks like I have some shopping to do ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 29, 2011, 05:58:00 PM
This is a beautiful 2-CD set to explore the stylus fantasticus, some names and the features you mention:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0093046736224.jpg)

Antoine - I've owned that 2-disc set for a while but have not listened to it in a long time - must refresh my aural memory - Dave  :D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 30, 2011, 01:31:51 AM
Can anyone suggest some pieces similar to Biber's Rosary Sonatas and Bach's Sonatas & Partitas (especially solo, but also accompanied)?

Edit: Sorry, I forgot to elaborate - what I find in these two pieces is that they are used by the composers as a springboard into a very particular, rather "cosmic" style of composition, which produces music of such esoteric and emotional complexity that sounds timeless. I have heard a lot of violin sonatas by especially Italian and French composers, and none really come close to their "weird" aesthetic that Biber and Bach are able to create. Simultaneously archaic but also ultra modern.

Stylus Phantasticus!  I find your description of it as a "cosmic style" very well put BTW.  :)

Hope you didn't miss Manze's recording of Biber's 1681 Salzburg sonatas? And beyond that there is Steck's recording of additional sonatas ascribed/attributed to Biber. (see post HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg138104.html#msg138104))

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410VSA9ZKTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/598414.jpg)

And than many moons ago erato introduced the Westhoff here, and with it came the recommendation of Johann Jakob Walther:

(http://discplus.ch/login/1547894/shop/upload/34475.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Lethevich on January 30, 2011, 04:50:38 AM
Hope you didn't miss Manze's recording of Biber's 1681 Salzburg sonatas?

I did :-[
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on January 30, 2011, 05:29:43 AM
Stylus Phantasticus!  I find your description of it as a "cosmic style" very well put BTW.  :)

Me too. I would add this music has an evident esoteric character and a sort of inscrutability.

BTW, ECM released some years ago three "fantastic" discs, not usually mentioned:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947208426.jpg)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947243229.jpg)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028946506622.jpg)

Those discs are some of the best recordings of the stylus fantasticus that I have listened to. John Holloway, Aloysia Assenbaum and Lars Ulrik Mortensen are unbeatable in this music. Unfortunately the experience will be irrepetible because of the early death of Holloway's wife Aloysia Assenbaum.

After Assenbaum's death, Holloway and Mortensen joined to Jaap ter Linden and recorded this also excellent disc:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947670551.jpg)

Samples here:

http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/home/search?fastsearch=ecm%20holloway&pd_orderby=score

 :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on January 30, 2011, 06:35:47 AM
Those discs are some of the best recordings of the stylus fantasticus that I have listened to. John Holloway, Aloysia Assenbaum and Lars Ulrik Mortensen are unbeatable in this music. Unfortunately the experience will be irrepetible because of the early death of Holloway's wife Aloysia Assenbaum.

After Assenbaum's death, Holloway and Mortensen joined to Jaap ter Linden and recorded this also excellent disc:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947670551.jpg)

Having been introduced to Veracini through Biondi, I found the Holloway samples lacking energy (in the first sonata), but perhaps he is the Yin to Biondi's Yang (or whatever is your preferred dichotomy). I have the complete Op. 1 on Brilliant, and similarly Biondi had coloured my views of the first sonata. I think ought to give those discs a spin, not having done that in quite a while. Like you said in the listening thread, one post leads to another and we end up listening to stuff. :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on January 30, 2011, 07:08:41 AM
Having been introduced to Veracini through Biondi, I found the Holloway samples lacking energy (in the first sonata), but perhaps he is the Yin to Biondi's Yang (or whatever is your preferred dichotomy). I have the complete Op. 1 on Brilliant, and similarly Biondi had coloured my views of the first sonata. I think ought to give those discs a spin, not having done that in quite a while. Like you said in the listening thread, one post leads to another and we end up listening to stuff. :)

I agree with you, Opus. Holloways's style is rather more introspective and reflective than Biondi's, but it is also highly recommendable (although slightly less than his other three discs on ECM pointed out by me). I also have that Biondi (Italian Violin Sonatas, Virgin Classics) and, IMO, it's a disc completely successful, to listen to many times; the same for Casazza on Brilliant (I think licensed from Tactus).

A beautiful complementary disc (more Holloway than Biondi anyway) is this one, with the beloved Elizabeth Wallfisch:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51LqBkz9%2BeL._SS400_.jpg)

These Sonatae Accademiche are Veracini's Opus 2.  :)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 30, 2011, 07:18:51 AM
Stylus Phantasticus!  I find your description of it as a "cosmic style" very well put BTW.  :)

Hope you didn't miss Manze's recording of Biber's 1681 Salzburg sonatas? And beyond that there is Steck's recording of additional sonatas ascribed/attributed to Biber. (see post HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg138104.html#msg138104))

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410VSA9ZKTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/598414.jpg)

And than many moons ago erato introduced the Westhoff here, and with it came the recommendation of Johann Jakob Walther:

(http://discplus.ch/login/1547894/shop/upload/34475.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/BiberFidiciniumPlantier/1172005834_zEeER-O.jpg)


Biber's instrumental violin works are often confusing because of the names attached; e.g. I just received a small order from BRO which included the disc added above (bottom right), i.e. Fidicinium Sacro Profanum w/ Plantier & Les plaisirs du Parnasse; now I probably own about a dozen Biber discs, including the Manze sonatas among others - but, the Wiki Site HERE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Ignaz_Franz_Biber) has a selected listing of his compositions which may be useful to those just acquiring his works.

The ones that I now own, many w/ the funky names, are:

Harmonia artificioso-ariosa: diversi mode accordata - 7 Partitas (C. 62-68) (Musica Antiqua Koln)

Fidicinium sacroprofanum - 12 Sonatas (C. 78-89) - 'new' disc w/ Plantier

Rosary Sonatas - 15 Sonatas + 1 Passacaglia (C. 90-105) (Lautenbacher)

Sonatae tam aris quam aulis servientes - 12 Sonatas (C. 114-126) (Goodman & Parley of Instruments)

Sonatae violino solo - 8 Sonatas 1681 (C. 138-145) (Manze & Romanesca)

Also own the John Holloway disc Unam Ceylum - need help on that one?  Six works are included, 2 are 'unpublished', and 4 are listed to be from 1681, so not sure how those may relate to the Manze recordings?   :D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on January 30, 2011, 07:19:28 AM
I also have that Biondi (Italian Violin Sonatas, Virgin Classics) and, IMO, it's a disc completely successful, to listen to many times; the same for Casazza on Brilliant (I think licensed from Tactus).

I also like the fact that Biondi often includes the lute and the therobo which, to me, makes the sounds much more attractive.

Quote
A beautiful complementary disc (more Holloway than Biondi anyway) is this one, with the beloved Elizabeth Wallfisch:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51LqBkz9%2BeL._SS400_.jpg)

These Sonata Accademiche are Veracini's Opus 2.  :)

Thanks; and before we get rapped on the knuckles for travelling to Mediterranean coast ;D, let me add that I need to get some Biber.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 30, 2011, 07:19:36 AM
Stylus Phantasticus!  I find your description of it as a "cosmic style" very well put BTW.  :)

Hope you didn't miss Manze's recording of Biber's 1681 Salzburg sonatas? And beyond that there is Steck's recording of additional sonatas ascribed/attributed to Biber. (see post HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg138104.html#msg138104))

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410VSA9ZKTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/14/598414.jpg)

And than many moons ago erato introduced the Westhoff here, and with it came the recommendation of Johann Jakob Walther:

(http://discplus.ch/login/1547894/shop/upload/34475.jpg)

Q

Q,  I need to put that Johann Jakob Walther CD on my shopping list but have owned the other 2 CD's for quite some time.  Those homeland security idiots are holding up many trans-Atlantic packages and I am waiting for 6 CD shipments to arrive, some was ordered a week before Christmas ...    >:(
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 30, 2011, 07:21:25 AM
Having been introduced to Veracini through Biondi, I found the Holloway samples lacking energy (in the first sonata), but perhaps he is the Yin to Biondi's Yang (or whatever is your preferred dichotomy). I have the complete Op. 1 on Brilliant, and similarly Biondi had coloured my views of the first sonata. I think ought to give those discs a spin, not having done that in quite a while. Like you said in the listening thread, one post leads to another and we end up listening to stuff. :)

But Veracini was Italian?  No? 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on January 30, 2011, 07:23:58 AM
Dave, for reasons unknown, I'm never able to view a lot of images (I'm not sure if its the case with all the images) you post. In your latest post, I only see the three posted by Que. :-\
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on January 30, 2011, 07:26:28 AM
But Veracini was Italian?  No? 

He was. Check my previous post. I noticed my location and am already travelling up north. :D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 30, 2011, 07:50:02 AM
Dave, for reasons unknown, I'm never able to view a lot of images (I'm not sure if its the case with all the images) you post. In your latest post, I only see the three posted by Que. :-\

Hello Navneeth - that's curious?  I often just add an image into a previous quote, mainly to save a little space and shorten the length of the post - all 4 images are showing up for me (and I've never had an issue w/ this way of posting but would be interested if others have the same problem?) - below is the added image:

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/BiberFidiciniumPlantier/1172005834_zEeER-O.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on January 30, 2011, 07:54:32 AM
Hello Navneeth - that's curious?  I often just add an image into a previous quote, mainly to save a little space and shorten the length of the post - all 4 images are showing up for me (and I've never had an issue w/ this way of posting but would be interested if others have the same problem?) - below is the added image:

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/BiberFidiciniumPlantier/1172005834_zEeER-O.jpg)

I've been noticing this only during the past week or so. Even in quote above, I cannot see it. However, I can see it by accessing it directly.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 30, 2011, 07:57:49 AM

The ones that I now own, many w/ the funky names, are:

Harmonia artificioso-ariosa: diversi mode accordata - 7 Partitas (C. 62-68)

Sonatae tam aris quam aulis servientes - 12 Sonatas (C. 114-126)

I hope this recording by the Rare Fruits Council will become available again, because I would consider it mandatory:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31N5K4VWHML.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on January 30, 2011, 08:14:12 AM
I hope this recording by the Rare Fruits Council will become available again, because I would consider it mandatory:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31N5K4VWHML.jpg)

With or without the weird sofas?  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 12, 2011, 01:23:08 AM
I tried this disc again, but it really is hopeless... And I had such high hopes. Those early recordings by the Collegium Aureum are generally much to my liking. And I have no quarrel with some inperfections or boys choirs.  But the performance here is really atrocious: serious intonations problems with the boys choir, choirs and orchestra out of sink - it is one gigantic mess.... :P

Any alternative recommendations for the Missa Salisburgensis? :)



Sofar, I have my eye on this one! :)



Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on February 12, 2011, 05:29:58 AM
I have this recording:

(http://cover7.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/97/1235197.jpg)

I think I have not listened to this disc (SACD version) in three years or something so. Anyway, I recall my conclusion: the problem is not the messenger, but the message itself. I think Biber is not at his best here. 





Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 12, 2011, 05:42:12 AM
This is the one to get I guess (I have it but haven't heard other versions):

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/4576112.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on February 12, 2011, 06:14:13 AM
This is the one to get I guess (I have it but haven't heard other versions):

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/4576112.jpg)

Unfortunately, the sound engineering is atrocious.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 12, 2011, 06:26:52 AM
Engineering not atrocious; double keyboard continuo very nice.  ;)

http://www.youtube.com/v/NvRKfiksKTI




Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on February 12, 2011, 06:36:24 AM
Engineering not atrocious; double keyboard continuo very nice.  ;)



It's an excellent disc, indeed. That fat continuo works out very well.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 12, 2011, 06:39:12 AM
It's an excellent disc, indeed. That fat continuo works out very well.

Alas the organ lady died; the fat continuo team has since disbanded.  It's unfortunate for what could have turned out to be a long brilliant series of recordings.  :'(
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 12, 2011, 07:03:05 AM
The Youtube snips do not quite do the actual recorded sound justice, but the visuals are nice; performance itself sure sounds lovely.

(Annunciation)
http://www.youtube.com/v/_ci6ltVhF5o

(Guardian Angel: Passacaglia)
http://www.youtube.com/v/aLjqm5t69qw







Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 26, 2011, 04:37:09 AM
(http://www.outhere-music.com/data/cds/2166/BIG.JPG)

I have just listened to this disc three times, but I consider it highly recommendable.

The music itself is a fine demonstration of the development of keyboard music based on some stylized dances, where Mattheson was both respectful and aware of tradition and also an innovator. He principally recalls me the Bach of the Partitas, even more than the English or the French Suites.

I would say the general pathos of Mattheson’s music is a firm feeling of self confidence and confidence in the world as a secure place, with no too much room for sadness or unexplainable melancholy. But even so his music is full of poetry (what a beautiful allemandes, for instance!) and some traces specifically German, like his use of counterpoint.

Cristiano Holtz is beyond any reproach and I would really love if he could record some Bach, especially the aforementioned partitas and suites. Anyway, now I need to get his Inventions & Sinfonias played on clavichord.

The harpsichord is an excellent copy by Bruce Kennedy after Michael Mietke (1702-1704) and its sound is perfectly suitable to this music. The recorded sound is close, but pretty clear and pleasant.

The disc includes seven suites, but just three of them are complete and the remaining are extracts, including from one to four movements.

The liner notes and presentation are excellent, as usual with Ramée.

Do I need to use the adjective “mandatory”?  :)

Noted, thanks for the review! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 27, 2011, 08:56:45 AM
Interesting that I left the last post in this thread back in late March!  :D

Well, my FIRST Graupner discs arrived today - just left a post in the 'listening thread' (quoted below) - also found a fabulous site devoted to this extremely prolific but 'forgotten' Baroque composer - check out the link which includes a listing of his own catalog, i.e. GWV numbers!  My GOD, the guy wrote over 1400 'sacred cantatas' alone - have none!  Of course, the Soly recordings of the harpsichord works are another 'in depth' exploration of this composer - will there be a 'box set'?

But back to my first recordings below - both are w/ 'period' instruments and am enjoying these recordings tremendously - look forward to further recommendations & acquisitions!   :)

Graupner, Christoph (1639-1760) - Christmas Oratorio w/ Florian Heyerick and many - not really an integrated oratorio but a compilation of 9 cantatas written for Lent & Christmas over a wide span of Graupner's career.

Some facts about the composer above in my previous post - have now accumulated about a half dozen instrumental CDs, so this is my first to explore his vocal works; he was one of the most well known Baroque composers at that time, and was second in line (after Telemann) for the position JS Bach finally obtained (i.e. third choice).  His output was phenomenal (and most still exists!) and nearly the equal of Telemann according to the liner notes in this release - non-vocal catalog HERE (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_%C5%93uvres_pour_clavecin_de_Christoph_Graupner) - a review of this 2-CD vocal package attached from the Jul-Aug issue of Fanfare - :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-9xjdwmr/0/O/GraupnerChristmas.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on September 04, 2011, 12:12:45 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51125EEW6EL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I am very impressed and fascinated by this set of sonatas from Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722). I am currently listening to the Biblical sonatas and find them profoundly moving! The sound of this disk is a plus  8)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 05, 2011, 10:26:33 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51125EEW6EL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I am very impressed and fascinated by this set of sonatas from Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722). I am currently listening to the Biblical sonatas and find them profoundly moving! The sound of this disk is a plus  8)
Leo, John Butt is not always my favorite harpsichordist, but I agree that's a very fine disc. I've found Kuhnau's keyboard music consistently engaging. Another recording I've really enjoyed is Gabriele Micheli playing Vol. 1 of the Neuer Clavier-Ubung (1689).
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vEqwQTCoL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 09, 2011, 12:45:07 PM
Having enjoyed the Opus 1 sonatas of Georg Muffat (armonico tributo, 1682),  I'm interested in exploring more of the chamber and orchestral music. The next most widely recorded work is his twelve Concerti Grossi (1701). I understand some of the latter are reworkings of the Opus 1 sonatas.

Does anyone happen to know the details of the corresponding portions of these works? If I choose a selection from the concerti grossi (rather than a complete cycle), I would prefer to have less duplication between the two works.

On a separate note, I have just placed an order for Siegbert Rampe's recording of the same composers complete harpsichord works.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on September 09, 2011, 01:21:04 PM

On a separate note, I have just placed an order for Siegbert Rampe's recording of the same composers complete harpsichord works.

I suppose, that you know his organ works already, maybe the most interesting of his surviving works.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 09, 2011, 01:42:19 PM
I suppose, that you know his organ works already, maybe the most interesting of his surviving works.
To be honest, I don't know his organ works. I'll have to add them to my list of things to explore. Thanks for the tip.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 09, 2011, 01:56:55 PM
Actually, premont, what do you think of Kelemen's Orgelmeister series on Oehms Classics? I've been eyeing the Pachelbel volume, and I see he's recorded a double CD of Muffat as well. (But it's far from the only option…)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on September 09, 2011, 03:19:44 PM
Actually, premont, what do you think of Kelemen's Orgelmeister series on Oehms Classics? I've been eyeing the Pachelbel volume, and I see he's recorded a double CD of Muffat as well. (But it's far from the only option…)

I have the Pachelbel volume in SACD, though I have listened to it only once months ago and thereby cannot quite render a fair opinion yet.  I am only 1 volume away from completing my Pachelbel Organ Works Collection on the Centaur label ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 09, 2011, 03:37:52 PM
Coopmv, thanks for your input (and do post again if you revisit Kelemen's Pachelbel and find you have more to say about it). I've been tempted by Payne's series — and there is Bouchard's and I guess Matthew Owens has begun one on Delphian as well. But I shouldn't spend the money (and I wouldn't really spend enough listening time to make it worthwhile). So I've decided to go for Selected rather than Collected.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on September 09, 2011, 04:20:36 PM
Coopmv, thanks for your input (and do post again if you revisit Kelemen's Pachelbel and find you have more to say about it). I've been tempted by Payne's series — and there is Bouchard's and I guess Matthew Owens has begun one on Delphian as well. But I shouldn't spend the money (and I wouldn't really spend enough listening time to make it worthwhile). So I've decided to go for Selected rather than Collected.

I also have the Complete Organ Works by Johann Ludwig Krebs by John Kitchen on the Priory label.  Krebs was supposed to be one of JS Bach's favorite students.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: eyeresist on September 09, 2011, 11:27:26 PM
I was listening last night to a disc of guitar concertos by Vivaldi, Fasch and Krebs (both for guitar and strings in D). I think in this case Vivaldi overshadowed the Germans, but the Krebs did catch my ear delightfully several times.
 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on September 10, 2011, 06:01:39 AM
Having enjoyed the Opus 1 sonatas of Georg Muffat (armonico tributo, 1682),  I'm interested in exploring more of the chamber and orchestral music. The next most widely recorded work is his twelve Concerti Grossi (1701). I understand some of the latter are reworkings of the Opus 1 sonatas.

Does anyone happen to know the details of the corresponding portions of these works? If I choose a selection from the concerti grossi (rather than a complete cycle), I would prefer to have less duplication between the two works.

On a separate note, I have just placed an order for Siegbert Rampe's recording of the same composers complete harpsichord works.

Hi Paul - I own just 2 CDs of Muffat's works, including the ones you discuss above.  In Roy Goodman's liner notes from the sonatas, he states "since most of the movements appear, albeit newly arranged, in his twelve concerti grossi (Sonata 1 in CG V, Sonata II in CG IV, Sonata III in CG II, Sonata IV in CG XI, and Sonata V in both CG X & XII)."

Hope that is the information you wanted?  May have to look into his Concerti Grossi now myself! - :)  Dave

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TCOn7Y4PL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61O7qsJnWSL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 10, 2011, 07:54:37 AM
Hi Paul - I own just 2 CDs of Muffat's works, including the ones you discuss above.  In Roy Goodman's liner notes from the sonatas, he states "since most of the movements appear, albeit newly arranged, in his twelve concerti grossi (Sonata 1 in CG V, Sonata II in CG IV, Sonata III in CG II, Sonata IV in CG XI, and Sonata V in both CG X & XII)."

Hope that is the information you wanted?  May have to look into his Concerti Grossi now myself! - :)  Dave

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TCOn7Y4PL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61O7qsJnWSL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Dave, thank you! That was exactly the information I'm looking for. Ironically, I own the very same recording of Armonico Tributo, but I have it as a download, sans liner notes. Fortunately for both of us, Goodman's recording is made using small forces. Muffat permits a range of ensemble sizes, and any movements that reappear in the concerti grossi offer a chance to hear the music played by a larger and more diverse group.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on September 10, 2011, 01:48:36 PM
Actually, premont, what do you think of Kelemen's Orgelmeister series on Oehms Classics? I've been eyeing the Pachelbel volume, and I see he's recorded a double CD of Muffat as well. (But it's far from the only option…)

I own all of them. Interesting organs well recorded, scholary playing sometimes a bit magistral but always worthwile. None of his CDs  constitute my ultimately preferred interpretation of the works in question. However as I am a completist as to large parts of this repertoire,  his recordings are mandatory (for me).

Concerning Pachelbel I would like to know if Payne´s and Bouchard´s recordings are interesting (they are hard to get hold of in my country). My earlier experiences with Payne and Bouchard (in Bach) are not that stimulating. I own a number of Pachelbel recordings but only the one by Wolfgang Rübsam (Naxos) seems to add that exiting stylus phantasticus quality to the music which is stimulating and prevents the music from sounding in the usual nice and harmless way.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 25, 2011, 08:58:20 PM
.



First run of this disc. I knew the name of Heinrich Scheidemann (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Scheidemann) before, but he is of earlier date than I suspected. When I listened I immediately thought: Sweelinck. And it turns out that Scheidemann was a favourite pupil of Sweelinck and founder of the north German organ school. And so everything comes neatly together. :)

First impressions: excellent, very nice indeed. Pieter Dirksen, who wrote a book about Scheidemans keyboard works, plays a bright and penetrating sounding double manual harpsichord after Ruckers.

EDIT: A wonderful, superb disc that makes me all the more anxious to try his organ works.  Interesting to hear German harpsichord music with a strong influence of the English tradition, something Scheidemann got from Sweelinck. Pieter Dirksen's style is profound and probing without being (too) scholary: the music is treated in a lively and expressive way. I like the big and dry sound of the Ruckers, though In the review below it's argued that it doesn't suit the more English orientated pieces. I'm inclined to disagree: this is an Hamburgian take on English influences  via Amsterdam. A Ruckers seems perfect for the job.

Here is the review from Fanfare's Barry Brenesal:

Quote
The modern reputation of Heinrich Scheidemann (c. 1595–1663) rested for a very long time on his prestigious position as organist of Hamburg’s Catharinenkirche, as well as the recorded remarks and friendship of such colleagues as Johann Schop and Jacob Praetorius (who studied alongside him under Sweelinck). It wasn’t until Gustav Fock rediscovered his organ tablatures at Clausthal-Zellerfeld in the 1950s that attention finally began to be paid to this musician. He is now regarded as among the leading lights of the North German organ school in the early 17th century, though Werner Breig (New Grove I) has this dour assessment of the current material: “Scheidemann’s harpsichord pieces, on the other hand, are generally insignificant, though one or two notable ones . . . have survived.”

Dutch harpsichordist and scholar Pieter Dirksen is of a different opinion, however. He states that the composer’s harpsichord music “equals his organ music in quality if not in quantity,” and forms “a lively and attractive facet of this fascinating musical personality.” It is, of course, difficult to tell just how much of Scheidemann’s harpsichord music was available to Breig when he wrote his article, but the original works included in this album are without exception graceful, and often subtle in their learning. Typical is Betrübet ist zu dieser Frist, with its three variations, employing a refined tapestry of imitative and scalar figuration. Most of Scheidemann’s praeambula are for organ; the rare examples for harpsichord included on this disc are richly chromatic and expressive. The Canzon in F (paired here with a transcription of a trumpet-like organ praeambulum, to set the stage) is a freely contrapuntal variation canzona on an elegant trilling motif in three sections.

There are also transcriptions by the composer, such as the motet intabulation in brilliant toccata manner of de Lassus’s five-part motet, Omnia quae fecisti; or another of Felice Anerio’s five-part madrigal, Mio cor, se vera sei salamandra, that succeeds by delicately suggesting rhythmic, harmonic, and contrapuntal elements rather than elaborating them. Elsewhere, much of what Dirksen has chosen to record by Scheidemann emphasizes the composer’s love for a good tune, and draws upon the repertoire of English string-players (such as William Brade) who spent much time abroad in the various German states and the Netherlands. The Englische Mascarata and Variatio in G Minor is a typical example, with elaborately contrapuntal variations that complement rather than weighing down their theme. Another, far simpler piece is the Französischer Allemand in D Minor, though to what extent the original is incorporated in this transcription isn’t clear, given the former’s loss. By contrast, the Galliarda and Variatio in D Minor, a complete recomposition of a work by John Bull, incorporates the Englishman’s angular figurations into Scheidemann’s own freely imitative and dramatic manner.

Pieter Dirksen isn’t well known to concert audiences on this side of the Atlantic, although he gives numerous solo recitals each year in his native Netherlands, as well as the occasional Fifth Brandenburg with the Combattimento Consort. We’re distinctly the losers. He has plenty of technique, but never lets it get in the way of the music. His tempos are reasonably chosen and varied, while the pieces that are more obviously based on vocal or lute origins receive a judicious degree of rhythmic freedom. I only wish that a greater number of instruments had been used, reflecting the different styles, purposes, and genres of this music. The brightly resonant two-manual 1996 Nuñez (after a 1638 Ruckers) that Dirksen plays is a very fine harpsichord, but more suited, I think, to the praeambula than to the numerous English folk dances and variations, or the laconic madrigal transcription.

Excellent, close sound is provided, which catches the instrument without much of the mechanism. Dirksen supplies his own notes, and does a fine job within the space limitations he has. In short, this is largely a fine and unusual mix of North German and English Baroque harpsichord music and styles, performed to a turn by a master harpsichordist. Highly recommended.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on September 26, 2011, 01:20:46 AM



Yes, a rather interesting disc, as far as I know the first of its kind. But if you want to know Scheidemann better, you must exxplore his organ works.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 26, 2011, 08:42:51 AM
Yes, a rather interesting disc, as far as I know the first of its kind. But if you want to know Scheidemann better, you must exxplore his organ works.

I knew one of you (the triptych premont-Antonie Marchand aka toniño-PaulCS 8)) would know this disc!  ;D

Reading up on Scheideman, I realized that his organ works would be the next step - any suggestions? :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on September 26, 2011, 01:22:07 PM
I knew one of you (the triptych premont-Antonie Marchand aka toniño-PaulCS 8)) would know this disc!  ;D

Reading up on Scheideman, I realized that his organ works would be the next step - any suggestions? :)

Q

Foccroulle seems a natural recommendation:

http://www.outhere-music.com/store-RIC_225

(http://www.outhere-music.com/data/cds/53/BIG.JPG)

 :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on September 26, 2011, 01:38:49 PM
I knew one of you (the triptych premont-Antonie Marchand aka toniño-PaulCS 8)) would know this disc!  ;D

Reading up on Scheideman, I realized that his organ works would be the next step - any suggestions? :)

Q

I've got a great disc for you.  It's Volume 2 of the Naxos/Scheidemann organ series played by Karin Nelson.  It's one of the very few discs I'd pay $100 for.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 26, 2011, 08:46:09 PM
Thank you both, Antoine and Don! :)

It seems that Naxos is going to do a complete Scheidemann series, an exciting prospect. I already read positive reviews. But what about the organs? I'm a stickler on the use of historically & stylistically "correct" organs - do I need to worry? :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on September 26, 2011, 09:19:58 PM
Thank you both, Antoine and Don! :)

It seems that Naxos is going to do a complete Scheidemann series, an exciting prospect. I already read positive reviews. But what about the organs? I'm a stickler on the use of historically & stylistically "correct" organs - do I need to worry? :)

Q

Naxos has done five volumes; the most recent was a few years ago.  Personally, I'm not a big fan of the other volumes which are played by Peter van Dijk (vol. 1) and Julia Brown (vols. 3-5).

Nelson plays the Brombaugh Organ at the Haga Church, Gothenburg (built 1992 and patterned after early 17th century models of Northern Germany).  Sounds great to me, but I'm not a stickler on this matter.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 26, 2011, 09:34:14 PM
Naxos has done five volumes; the most recent was a few years ago.  Personally, I'm not a big fan of the other volumes which are played by Peter van Dijk (vol. 1) and Julia Brown (vols. 3-5).

Nelson plays the Brombaugh Organ at the Haga Church, Gothenburg (built 1992 and patterned after early 17th century models of Northern Germany).  Sounds great to me, but I'm not a stickler on this matter.

I do not mind a modern (but true) reconstruction, I'll defintely check it out - thanks. :)

Kind of a downer to hear that the other volumes aren't quite up to snuff.  :-\

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on September 27, 2011, 12:17:05 AM
Thank you both, Antoine and Don! :)

It seems that Naxos is going to do a complete Scheidemann series, an exciting prospect. I already read positive reviews. But what about the organs? I'm a stickler on the use of historically & stylistically "correct" organs - do I need to worry? :)

Q

Bernard Foccroulle plays the famous 1624 Scherer organ of St. Stephan Church, Tangermünde, Germany.

Quote
     
This organ is one of the ten most important valuable historical organs of Europe. It is the only surviving example of the Hamburg organbuilding tradition of the first half of the 17th century, and it is also the only remaining large organ built in Germany around 1600.

It was built in 1623-4 by one of the most important organbuilder of its time, Hans Scherer, the young, from Hamburg. It had 32 stops over 3 manuals and pedal. After 1700, there were different repair attempts by church organists and organ builders Johann Georg Helbig and Elias Wernitz. Between 1712 and 1716, changes were carried out by Johann Michael Röder, from Berlin.

In 1790, the wind system and the tracking system have been rebuilt for the Hauptwerk and Oberwerk divisions by Johann Gottfried Zabel, from Tangermünde.

From 1856 to 1858, important changes were carried out by Friedrich Hermann Lütkemüller, from Wittstock: addition of many new stops, new wind system and tracking system for the Rückpositiv and pedal divisions.

 Around 1930, several minor changes were carried out in order to bring the organ uup to the taste of the day. In 1933, several experts and organists stressed the unusual value of the instrument and called for the rebuilding of the instrument in its original condition.

From 1983, the instrument becomes more and more difficult to play. A stabilization of the organ console is carried out in 1988. From 1990 to 1992, the organcase is restored and, from 1991 to 1994, the instrument is restored and rebuilt according to 1624 specifications by organbuilder Alexander Schuke, from Postdam.

The organ was reinaugurated on September 24, 1999.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/Scherer-Orgel_22-09-2007_136.jpg)

http://www.musicme.com/#/Bernard-Foccroulle/albums/Scheidemann:-Orgelwerke-5400439002258.html

 :)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 27, 2011, 05:02:30 AM
I knew one of you (the triptych premont-Antonie Marchand aka toniño-PaulCS 8)) would know this disc!  ;D

Reading up on Scheideman, I realized that his organ works would be the next step - any suggestions? :)

Q
My role in all of this is just to update my wish list; I'll definitely seek out the Dirksen and perhaps one or more of the organ discs subsequently mentioned!  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bulldog on September 27, 2011, 07:11:57 AM
My role in all of this is just to update my wish list; I'll definitely seek out the Dirksen and perhaps one or more of the organ discs subsequently mentioned!  :)

In case this is helpful - the Dirksen, the Naxos series and the Ricercar organ disc are all on Naxos Music Library.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on September 27, 2011, 07:25:37 AM
In case this is helpful - the Dirksen, the Naxos series and the Ricercar organ disc are all on Naxos Music Library.
Helpful indeed, Bulldog. I have free access to NML at work.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 27, 2011, 08:08:52 AM
Bernard Foccroulle plays the famous 1624 Scherer organ of St. Stephan Church, Tangermünde, Germany.

 :)

The credentials of the Scherer organ in Tangermünde are beyond reproach - it's a bloody marvelous organ! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on October 02, 2011, 07:37:05 PM
To end the weekend:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41KMDVGB6FL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on October 03, 2011, 06:51:06 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61mcu6wJdTL._SS400_.jpg)

One of my favorites among the last purchases. I have heard this disc at least six or seven times which is quite a lot these days of musical hyperinflation. Beautiful, really beautiful.

First, the composer; the "Beatus Vir?" of the title. Full of imagination and author of some idiosyncratic (but always musical) solutions.

Then the impeccable and passionate ensemble.

Finally, the singers and specially Raquel Andueza, plethoric of devotion and warmth.

In short, a must-have. 

:)

   
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 03, 2011, 09:51:59 PM
To end the weekend:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41KMDVGB6FL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I have that one as well, Bill! :) It's a beauty - interesting and off the beaten track.


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61mcu6wJdTL._SS400_.jpg)

One of my favorites among the last purchases. I have heard this disc at least six or seven times which is quite a lot these days of musical hyperinflation. Beautiful, really beautiful.

[..]

In short, a must-have.

Thanks, that's what I needed to hear! :D

I had my eye on that as well - I presume it is a mix of choral and intrumental (violin) pieces?

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: chasmaniac on October 14, 2011, 02:28:46 AM
Lovely:

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on October 15, 2011, 07:45:13 AM
I have that one as well, Bill! :) It's a beauty - interesting and off the beaten track.


Thanks, that's what I needed to hear! :D

I had my eye on that as well - I presume it is a mix of choral and intrumental (violin) pieces?

Q

Sorry, Q. I didn't see this post before.

Yes, it is a mix of vocal music (motets for solo voice - soprano and bass - and one duet) and instrumental music for small ensemble.

In between I purchased this Ramée disc:

(http://www.diverdi.com/files/ag/43910/RAM-1009_B.jpg)

which is done essentially on the same mix, although it only presents vocal music for alto (the countertenor Alex Potter). These discs don't have overlaps, so both of them are excellent choices, although I still prefer the Zig-Zag recording which is warmer in these ears, specially due to Raquel Andueza and Amandine Beyer. That said, the instrumental part of the ensemble Chellycus is a bit more varied because includes some beautiful period trombones (alto, tenor & bass). A hard decision, isn't it?  :)


 

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on October 15, 2011, 08:00:43 AM
A hard decision, isn't it?  :)
 
As has been noted by others, this forum isn't about choosing!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Antoine Marchand on October 15, 2011, 08:13:05 AM
As has been noted by others, this forum isn't about choosing!

Yes! We are a modern version of partying friends! A very bad influence.  ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on October 15, 2011, 11:35:27 AM
To end the weekend:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41KMDVGB6FL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

A great disk indeed!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Willoughby earl of Itacarius on December 16, 2011, 06:56:18 AM
Thought I would post this here too, so far I am into CD 1, but what I hear is pretty awesome.

(http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb79/walboi/5028421943121.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Florestan on December 16, 2011, 07:02:52 AM
Thought I would post this here too, so far I am into CD 1, but what I hear is pretty awesome.

(http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb79/walboi/5028421943121.jpg)

How many CDS are in there, Harry?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Willoughby earl of Itacarius on December 16, 2011, 07:18:16 AM
How many CDS are in there, Harry?

4 of them for 13 euros. But its on authentic instrument mind, not a pianola..... ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Florestan on December 16, 2011, 07:18:54 AM
4 of them for 13 euros. But its on authentic instrument mind, not a pianola..... ;D

I was afraid of that...  ;D
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 16, 2011, 09:28:43 AM
4 of them for 13 euros.

I bought my first Buxtehude harpsichord cd (Mortensen on Dacapo) over 10 years ago and paid at least 20 euros for it. Many years later Naxos started to re-released these discs and I have one of those. I didn't have a clue there would be one of these "4 discs of 13" euros bargains someday... ???
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 16, 2011, 10:07:46 AM
Well except for a handful of discs of Buxtehude's sacred works and trio sonatas, my main 'new' addition are the complete organ works performed by Vogel (BTW - an excellent performance & glad that I spent the extra money on this set!) - so might need to add this Brilliant box to my wishlist? :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tgTO5XixL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on January 04, 2012, 10:04:11 AM
There are lots of Froeberger recordings by Gustav Leonhardt -- including a recent one with some Weckmann, one with some organ music and one on DHM. But the first record he made, has never made it to CD. It's my favourite by far -- partly because of the instrument, which sounds lovely. And partly because the programme is very appealing to me. And partly because  . .  well . . . I just prefer the earlier Leonhardt recordings to the later ones.

Anyway, since it has never been available on CD I don't suppose there can be a problem about publishing a link to it here. If so, then no doubt someone will e mail me and I'll delete the link.

Enjoy -- it's very fine!

http://takecare-maready.blogspot.com/2011/02/gustav-leonhardt-plays-froberger-1970.html

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kqVnMOFzPtU/TUsOt92n_DI/AAAAAAAABS8/u6uTlAGqA88/s200/GL%2BFro%2Bsmall.png)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Archaic Torso of Apollo on January 04, 2012, 10:25:37 AM
There are lots of Froeberger recordings by Gustav Leonhardt -- including a recent one with some Weckmann, one with some organ music and one on DHM. But the first record he made, has never made it to CD.

You sure about that? I think I've got that one, on CD. 1962 recording, right? This is what it looks like:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Sy1xj9dsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on January 04, 2012, 10:49:09 AM
There are lots of Froeberger recordings by Gustav Leonhardt -- including a recent one with some Weckmann, one with some organ music and one on DHM. But the first record he made, has never made it to CD. It's my favourite by far -- partly because of the instrument, which sounds lovely. And partly because the programme is very appealing to me. And partly because  . .  well . . . I just prefer the earlier Leonhardt recordings to the later ones.

Anyway, since it has never been available on CD I don't suppose there can be a problem about publishing a link to it here. If so, then no doubt someone will e mail me and I'll delete the link.
This recording has been released on CD more times, I own two different incarnations as well as the original DHM LP, which I got a long time ago, and which was instrumental in awaking my interest for early baroque harpsichord music. I agree that the interpretation is outstanding, and listening to it I am always mesmerized by its great introvert concentration.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on January 04, 2012, 10:50:11 AM
You sure about that? I think I've got that one, on CD. 1962 recording, right? This is what it looks like:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Sy1xj9dsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Right, that one.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on January 04, 2012, 11:01:25 AM
Oh well it's OOP I think. I thought that was the same as this

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51F0SPR5flL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/514qYd0%2BFCL._AA300_.jpg)

but I was obviously wrong.

I'll leave the link to the blog unless someone objects.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 04, 2012, 07:18:39 PM
Well except for a handful of discs of Buxtehude's sacred works and trio sonatas, my main 'new' addition are the complete organ works performed by Vogel (BTW - an excellent performance & glad that I spent the extra money on this set!) - so might need to add this Brilliant box to my wishlist? :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tgTO5XixL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Dave,  Buxtehude was supposed to be Danish ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 05, 2012, 10:25:53 AM
Dave,  Buxtehude was supposed to be Danish ...

Hi Stuart - yes, Buxtehude was indeed born in the Denmark of his times but the geography certainly has changed in those 'neck of the woods' since his birth in 1637; his place of birth was Oldesloe, now known as 'Bad Oldesloe' which is described presently as being in northern Germany in this Wiki Article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Oldesloe) -  ;) :D

I guess the more important issue is from the age of 23 y/o he was employed in Germany, primarily in Lubeck, so I guess that most would consider his style as being 'German Baroque', hence my inclusion here; plus, do we have a Danish Baroque Music thread?  Need to check - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 05, 2012, 01:07:53 PM
Hi Stuart - yes, Buxtehude was indeed born in the Denmark of his times but the geography certainly has changed in those 'neck of the woods' since his birth in 1637; his place of birth was Oldesloe, now known as 'Bad Oldesloe' which is described presently as being in northern Germany in this Wiki Article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Oldesloe) -  ;) :D

I guess the more important issue is from the age of 23 y/o he was employed in Germany, primarily in Lubeck, so I guess that most would consider his style as being 'German Baroque', hence my inclusion here; plus, do we have a Danish Baroque Music thread?  Need to check - Dave :)

We use the term "German" rather liberal here! :D See an ancient disscussion HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52132.html#msg52132).  Buxtehude was firmly part of the Northern German Baroque (organ) tradition.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 07, 2012, 09:40:39 AM
We use the term "German" rather liberal here! :D See an ancient disscussion HERE (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2044.msg52132.html#msg52132).  Buxtehude was firmly part of the Northern German Baroque (organ) tradition.

Q

A number of my Buxtehude's recordings referred to him as the Danish early baroque composer in their booklets.  Perhaps that was the traditional thinking ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 07, 2012, 10:50:15 AM
A number of my Buxtehude's recordings referred to him as the Danish early baroque composer in their booklets.  Perhaps that was the traditional thinking ...

Absolutely, he was Danish and Denmark, unlike presentday Germany, already existed - a very old country in fact! But stylistically Baroque composers shared a common style from Denmark to Bohemia. (One of) the founder(s) of the "North German" Organ School was the Dutchman Sweelinck! :)

Apart from that Buxtehude studied with Scheidemann (who was a pupil of Sweelinck) in Hamburg, and worked and lived for the larger part of his life in Lübeck, where he also died.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on January 15, 2012, 07:25:46 AM
There are lots of Froeberger recordings by Gustav Leonhardt -- including a recent one with some Weckmann, one with some organ music and one on DHM. But the first record he made, has never made it to CD. It's my favourite by far -- partly because of the instrument, which sounds lovely. And partly because the programme is very appealing to me. And partly because  . .  well . . . I just prefer the earlier Leonhardt recordings to the later ones.

Anyway, since it has never been available on CD I don't suppose there can be a problem about publishing a link to it here. If so, then no doubt someone will e mail me and I'll delete the link.

Enjoy -- it's very fine!

http://takecare-maready.blogspot.com/2011/02/gustav-leonhardt-plays-froberger-1970.html

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kqVnMOFzPtU/TUsOt92n_DI/AAAAAAAABS8/u6uTlAGqA88/s200/GL%2BFro%2Bsmall.png)

Thank you, very very much for the heads up on this. This recording has set me off on a Froberger kick, and I grabbed Richard Egarr's early Froberger set off iTunes ofr only 7.99 each, which is a good deal considering the high prices for the actual CDs  ;D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51QaEi3kWsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51HqNrhfXJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512mo39TrVL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21P09QV6N5L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


I'm listening to the first disk now, and it's incredible music. The organ and two harpsichords sound beautiful, I've been listening to Egarr a lot lately and I'm not dissapointed in this either!


 8)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 15, 2012, 10:06:23 AM
I'm listening to the first disk now, and it's incredible music. The organ and two harpsichords sound beautiful, I've been listening to Egarr a lot lately and I'm not dissapointed in this either!

Ahhh, another Froberger fan in the making! :) I'm not much of an Egarr fan and am partial to Bob van Asperen's fabulous traversal on Aeolus - I did some posts on them on this thread in the past.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51q7eH0peIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tanGC5QOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512AjRNMUWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ciQun%2B0vL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512lEnNSbRL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61jvSCQHg1L.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DiFbMXdHL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Hugely underrated stuff. Believe it or not but if I had to name one other German Baroque composer after bach, It would indeed be Johann Jakob Froberger... :o
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on January 15, 2012, 10:17:15 AM
Ahhh, another Froberger fan in the making! :) I'm not much of an Egarr fan and am partial to Bob van Asperen's fabulous traversal on Aeolus - I did some posts on them on this thread in the past.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51q7eH0peIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tanGC5QOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512AjRNMUWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ciQun%2B0vL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512lEnNSbRL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61jvSCQHg1L.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DiFbMXdHL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Hugely underrated stuff. Believe it or not but if I had to name one other German Baroque composer after bach, It would indeed be Johann Jakob Froberger... :o

Thank you Q! I will be on the lookout for Bob van Asperen, thanks for the heads up!

Froberger's suites are incredibly dark sounding, a meditation on the world it seems...I am totally captivated.

  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: rubio on January 15, 2012, 10:25:17 PM
Ahhh, another Froberger fan in the making! :) I'm not much of an Egarr fan and am partial to Bob van Asperen's fabulous traversal on Aeolus - I did some posts on them on this thread in the past.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51q7eH0peIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tanGC5QOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512AjRNMUWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ciQun%2B0vL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512lEnNSbRL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61jvSCQHg1L.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DiFbMXdHL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Hugely underrated stuff. Believe it or not but if I had to name one other German Baroque composer after bach, It would indeed be Johann Jakob Froberger... :o

Which of these discs should I sample as a start? :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 15, 2012, 11:14:05 PM
Which of these discs should I sample as a start? :)

The first four volumes are with his harpsichord music , and 1-3 are double CD's.
But frankly any of those that you can find for a good price would be fine.

His organ works are another matter - those into Frescobaldi's organ music shouldn't hesitate.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 22, 2012, 07:46:01 AM
Ahhh, another Froberger fan in the making! :) I'm not much of an Egarr fan and am partial to Bob van Asperen's fabulous traversal on Aeolus - I did some posts on them on this thread in the past.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51q7eH0peIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tanGC5QOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512AjRNMUWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ciQun%2B0vL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512lEnNSbRL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61jvSCQHg1L.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DiFbMXdHL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Hugely underrated stuff. Believe it or not but if I had to name one other German Baroque composer after bach, It would indeed be Johann Jakob Froberger... :o

Do you like Krebs and Pachelbel?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on January 28, 2012, 06:39:24 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51B0BEI2VEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

My first foray into Buxtehude's harpsichord works, and what a set!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on January 28, 2012, 06:45:25 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51B0BEI2VEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

My first foray into Buxtehude's harpsichord works, and what a set!

Buxtehude was also an outstanding organist.  I just completed my first listen to the following set, which is my second set of complete organ works by Buxtehude.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51rjNf%2Bdb2L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on January 28, 2012, 06:53:24 AM
Buxtehude was also an outstanding organist.  I just completed my first listen to the following set, which is my second set of complete organ works by Buxtehude.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51rjNf%2Bdb2L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Coop, that is a set I was looking at before I got the Vogel, what are your first impressions? How is the organ sound?

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on February 03, 2012, 11:40:38 AM
I've been listening to a record of Johann Ludwig Krebs's 2nd Partita played by Anatoly Vedernikov. It sounds like very fine music. Can anyone suggest some versions on harpsichord of this partita?  Vedernikov is a Russian pianist.

(http://pixhost.me/avaxhome/1d/1e/00101e1d_medium.jpeg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on February 03, 2012, 12:41:40 PM
Coop, that is a set I was looking at before I got the Vogel, what are your first impressions? How is the organ sound?

We have a thread for Buxtehudes organ music. There I once wrote:

Walter Kraft´s interpretations are grandiose with an almost gothic air and also a tad romantic, but with great authority and expression and often reaching ecstatic effects. He plays the reconstructed Totentanz-organ (Karl Kemper) in Marienkirche, Lübeck. His registrations are full and sometimes a bit heavy. Recordings were made 1957 in early stereo, good for the time but sometimes with some distortion, and always with much reverberation (due to the great church). I don´t think his set is well suited for the first acquaintance with the works, and would rather recommend Vogel (see above) or Foccroulle.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Leo K. on February 03, 2012, 12:55:33 PM
We have a thread for Buxtehudes organ music. There I once wrote:

Walter Kraft´s interpretations are grandiose with an almost gothic air and also a tad romantic, but with great authority and expression and often reaching ecstatic effects. He plays the reconstructed Totentanz-organ (Karl Kemper) in Marienkirche, Lübeck. His registrations are full and sometimes a bit heavy. Recordings were made 1957 in early stereo, good for the time but sometimes with some distortion, and always with much reverberation (due to the great church). I don´t think his set is well suited for the first acquaintance with the works, and would rather recommend Vogel (see above) or Foccroulle.

Thanks for reposting that. I was able to relocate that thread. Thanks!

 8)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on February 18, 2012, 06:26:16 PM
Thanks to Dave (Sonic) I picked up my first Fasch cd.  Not sure if you have this one to go with the other yet, Dave?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61rEZg4eadL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I really am enjoying this one, as is Linda.  If you like the baroque winds like myself (very prominent on this disc) and period instrumentation, then you may want to consider this one.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 19, 2012, 10:55:23 AM
Thanks to Dave (Sonic) I picked up my first Fasch cd.  Not sure if you have this one to go with the other yet, Dave?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61rEZg4eadL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61yal3t%2BH%2BL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I really am enjoying this one, as is Linda.  If you like the baroque winds like myself (very prominent on this disc) and period instrumentation, then you may want to consider this one.

Hi Bill - yes, I have both of those discs (inserted a pic of the other one above); own just over a half dozen Fasch recordings, so there is more to choose from if he delights the both of you - good luck in your 'future' choices!  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Coopmv on February 25, 2012, 06:10:22 PM
Coop, that is a set I was looking at before I got the Vogel, what are your first impressions? How is the organ sound?

The performance was quite good and the SQ is quite decent given the age of the recordings ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 26, 2012, 03:11:06 AM
Listening to Johann Kuhnau's Sacret Music (The King's Consort/Robert King - Helios).  :)

Enjoyable stuff! It's great Hyperion re-releases these discs on Helios for low price.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 26, 2012, 03:13:25 AM
Listening to Johann Kuhnau's Sacret Music (The King's Consort/Robert King - Helios).  :)

Enjoyable stuff! It's great Hyperion re-releases these discs on Helios for low price.
In my opinion this is the best disc in their series (regrettably it ground to a halt after approximately 5 issues) of Bach's contemporaries.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 26, 2012, 03:26:50 AM
In my opinion this is the best disc in their series (regrettably it ground to a halt after approximately 5 issues) of Bach's contemporaries.

I haven't heard those other discs. The best in what sense? Music? Performance? Recorded sound?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on February 26, 2012, 03:42:46 AM
I haven't heard those other discs. The best in what sense? Music? Performance? Recorded sound?
The best music, the performances are pretty homogeneous. I've had all the discs since their initial releases.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on February 26, 2012, 04:31:22 AM
The best music.

Perhaps... ...that's why I bought this disc.  ;)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on February 26, 2012, 09:33:53 AM
Hi Bill - yes, I have both of those discs (inserted a pic of the other one above); own just over a half dozen Fasch recordings, so there is more to choose from if he delights the both of you - good luck in your 'future' choices!  Dave :)

Following up some Fasch, with this one that got buried at the bottom of my shelf that I had forgotten that I had. ;D:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YRE6BD48L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

The only repeat from my disc above is the Concerto in A Minor (FWV L:A3).  It will be fun to compare the two ensembles.

Here is a site for the ensemble for this CPO disc:

http://www.lastravaganza.de/index.htm
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on March 14, 2012, 12:36:04 AM
(http://pixhost.me/avaxhome/7e/64/0015647e_medium.jpeg) (http://www.challengerecords.com/cms2/images/product/1279880249-0.jpg)
(http://www.challengerecords.com/cms2/images/product/1295356539-0.jpg)
I've been really enjoying Buxtehude's chamber music lately. I have an affinity for this kind of instrumentation and, outside of Rameau's (much later) concerts, I haven't enjoyed other similar baroque chamber compositions quite this much. I'm stunned that there are so few period recordings of Op. 2. I only see the Mortenson/Holloway/Linden recording. I chose L'Estravagante based on samples and haven't been disappointed, although the Gamba is sometimes a bit too much in the background.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on July 20, 2012, 11:59:45 PM
One of two items that landed today from Prestoclassical



There is an acute family resemblance to Bach's solo works, rather as if Bach took Westhoff's ideas and ran with them further, farther, higher.  Six partitas consisting of four movements each (in the invariable order of Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Gigue), total of 62'51.   There are two other recordings listed on Amazon,  and I know nothing about any of the three violinists involved, including the one on this recording.  Liner notes include a short essay by Letzbor on how he became involved with the works over time, but no biographical information, although his previous recordings suggest a concentration on works from the Baroque period.  Recorded in 2009 in Verbania, Italy.  If you don't get this recording, I would suggest getting one of the other two if you don't get this one, if you have any interest in Baroque or violin music.

Niiiicccee! :)

I have this recording of the accompanied sonatas (1694). :) Very much recommended! The Leztbor is still lingering on the wish list.. :-\

It is always so interesting to hear were Bach's ideas came from - and beautiful music in itself.



I'd also recommend it's little brother:



And of course violin music by Biber and Schmelzer! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on August 08, 2012, 01:52:28 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZPybZztEL._SL500.jpg)
I'm enjoying this quite a bit. She plays an interesting instrument.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Wakefield on September 14, 2012, 11:34:06 PM
(http://images.emusic.com/music/images/album/112/111/11211179/600x600.jpg)

1st run. I was able to get it as a bargain in the original issue - with full booklet! :)

Sounds gorgeous BTW.

Q

It looks very nice, indeed.

Apparently, Rosenmüller wasn't a good person, but he was a great composer. I have failed to find a mediocre work composed by him.

This is one of my very favorite discs dedicated to him:



Andueza and Beyer are dynamite.  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 15, 2012, 12:14:32 AM
It looks very nice, indeed.

Apparently, Rosenmüller wasn't a good person, but he was a great composer. I have failed to find a mediocre work composed by him.

He had reportedly had an inclination towards choir boys...

In any case, his flight from Leipzig to Venice probably decisive in establishing his fame and quality as a composer, who wrote in mixed German & Italian style of the early Baroque. Sounds like Schütz meets Monteverdi/Gabrieli/Cavalli! :)


Quote
This is one of my very favorite discs dedicated to him:



Andueza and Beyer are dynamite.  :)

Thanks for the recommendation! :) I had already my eye on that one.

I also noticed this:



And this, also included in the budget Cantus Cöln box set:



Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 10, 2012, 11:19:58 PM
A short comment on this triptych by Epoca Barocca with chamber (trio) sonatas from Dresden and Berlin. :)

My fist comment must be that I can't believe how freaking good this ensemble is! :o
The instruments, my beloved Baroque woodwinds in particular, the fantastic interplay as an ensemble. And all in totally natural recordings. It all sounds as fresh as on the day it was first performed. If I may do a little name dropping: the bassoon player is Sergio Azzolini, who might be familair to several on this forum. But it is also oboist Alessandro Piqué who is stealing the show - what an astute and sensitive player.


As far as the music goes, I like all three and no ardent lover of Baroque chamber music should be without! :)

That being said, priority should IMO go to the disc with music by the "German Zelenka", Johan David Heinichen (http://www.allmusic.com/artist/johann-david-heinichen-mn0001206862). This is chamber ensemble music from the German Baroque of the highest order.
Of the two disc with music by the later Christoph Schaffrath (http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Christoph-Schaffrath), who wrote in the transitional "Galant" style, the disc with the Duetti ("Six Sonatas") is the more interesting one. It contains duets between two solo instruments, sometimes with obligato accompaniment in various settings: bassoon & harpsichord, 2 viola da gambas, violin & harpsichord, 2 harpsichords, oboe & harpsichord. Here Schaffrath shows off his skills in counterpoint while combining the old with the new.
But let me not dumb down the other Schaffrath disc - especially in performances of this exceptional level a very cute disc for the Baroque lover. :)

Epoca Barocca also did a disc with music by Johann Friedrich Fasch - I guess I'll have to get this as well. ;D

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2012, 07:20:25 AM
A short comment on this triptych by Epoca Barocca with chamber (trio) sonatas from Dresden and Berlin. :)

My fist comment must be that I can't believe how freaking good this ensemble is! :o .............

As far as the music goes, I like all three and no ardent lover of Baroque chamber music should be without! :).................

Epoca Barocca also did a disc with music by Johann Friedrich Fasch - I guess I'll have to get this as well. ;D

Hi Que - I love Epoca Barocca - looks like I'll be adding some more to my cart today!  Currently own one disc each of Fasch, Hasse, Platti, & Schaffrath all labeled 'Trios & Sonatas' (or vice versa) - thanks for jogging my memory of this excellent group!  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2012, 08:26:45 AM
Que - question about the Heinichen disc w/ Epoca Barocca - the works are listed as to instruments used & keys, but no catalog numbers (apparently 2 exist, one being by Seibel); I'm putting together an Amazon order of this group, but I own a 2-CD set of his Dresden Concerti w/ MAK, which is excellent; the Seibel # are: 204, 208, 211, 213-215, 217, 226, 231-235, & 240 - I'm just curious if the booklet on the EB group includes any catalog numbers; really don't need complete duplication of these works - thanks for any help - Dave :)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61J89HBKWKL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Y4YHKRZKL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 11, 2012, 09:05:55 AM
Que - question about the Heinichen disc w/ Epoca Barocca - the works are listed as to instruments used & keys, but no catalog numbers (apparently 2 exist, one being by Seibel); I'm putting together an Amazon order of this group, but I own a 2-CD set of his Dresden Concerti w/ MAK, which is excellent; the Seibel # are: 204, 208, 211, 213-215, 217, 226, 231-235, & 240 - I'm just curious if the booklet on the EB group includes any catalog numbers; really don't need complete duplication of these works - thanks for any help - Dave :)

Hi Dave  :), the CPO disc by Epoca Barocca does not list any Seibel nrs. And the works might probably not have any... ::)
The booklet describes the Goebel recording as the key recording that helped uncover Heinichen's musical quality. It seems therefore unlikely that the disc would duplicate any of the works that Goebel recorded.

Quote from the review by Brian Robins in Fanfare:
Quote
The chamber works on the present disc would seem to fall into the category of newly found pieces, since they are referred to in the notes as having only recently come to attention as the result of musicological research. That presumably accounts for them not carrying Seibel numbers (the cataloging system used for Heinichen's works). All are apparently unique sources housed in library collections of oboe sonatas by various composers in Dresden and Darmstadt.

BTW I also came across a nice review by Johan van Veen (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Feb07/Heinichen_concertos_7771152.htm) of the Heinichen disc.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2012, 10:15:26 AM
Hi Dave  :), the CPO disc by Epoca Barocca does not list any Seibel nrs. And the works might probably not have any... ::)
The booklet describes the Goebel recording as the key recording that helped uncover Heinichen's musical quality. It seems therefore unlikely that the disc would duplicate any of the works that Goebel recorded.

Quote from the review by Brian Robins in Fanfare:
BTW I also came across a nice review by Johan van Veen (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Feb07/Heinichen_concertos_7771152.htm) of the Heinichen disc.

Thanks Que for your thoughts and the link to the Fanfare review - believe that I'll add that disc to my order now!  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on October 19, 2012, 09:23:24 AM
Does anyone here know about Froberger's keyboard music?

One piece I like is the thing  labeled Suite III on Ludger Remy's CDs, the one with the lovely allemande called Wasserfall.

Well I thought I'd seek out other records of it, just out of curiosity. So I went to Richard Egarr's complete Froberger CDs, which happen to be on spotify. But what's going on? The wonderful Remy Suite III is unfindable? Egarr records something he calls suite iii, but it's not the same.

Are these Strasbourg Manuscripts that Remy plays not really Froberger? Or am I being stupid and missing them on Egarr's records?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 19, 2012, 03:21:26 PM
One piece I like is the thing  labeled Suite III on Ludger Remy's CDs, the one with the lovely allemande called Wasserfall.

Well I thought I'd seek out other records of it, just out of curiosity. So I went to Richard Egarr's complete Froberger CDs, which happen to be on spotify. But what's going on? The wonderful Remy Suite III is unfindable? Egarr records something he calls suite iii, but it's not the same.

Are these Strasbourg Manuscripts that Remy plays not really Froberger? Or am I being stupid and missing them on Egarr's records?

There is a Froberger Werkverzeichnis (FbWV) by S. Rampe, but Remy´s  numbering of the Strassbourg suites seems to stem from the sequence in this manuscript. So there is, as far as I can see, some confusion as to the numbering of the suites. Also the suites of the Strassbourg Manuscript was discovered only recently (1999). This is the reason, why Egarr didn´t record them. Only a few of the Strassbourg suites were known from other sources. The "waterfall" allemande is indeed charming, but I think that all the Strassbourg suites are on a high artistic level. I do not know the considerations concerning the contribution of the suites to Froberger, but they are written very much in his style, and as to the artistic expression they are to a large extent permeated by the special Frobergerian melancoly.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Jakob_Froberger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Jakob_Froberger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Johann_Jakob_Froberger
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on October 19, 2012, 09:16:47 PM
There is a Froberger Werkverzeichnis (FbWV) by S. Rampe, but Remy´s  numbering of the Strassbourg suites seems to stem from the sequence in this manuscript. So there is, as far as I can see, some confusion as to the numbering of the suites. Also the suites of the Strassbourg Manuscript was discovered only recently. This may be the reason, why Egarr didn´t record them. Only a few of the Strassbourg suites were known from other sources. The "waterfall" allemande is indeed charming, but I think that all the Strassbourg suites are on a high artistic level. I do not know the considerations concerning the contribution of the suites to Froberger, but they are written very much in his style, and as to the artistic expression they are to a large extent permeated by the special Frobergerian melancoly.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Jakob_Froberger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Jakob_Froberger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Johann_Jakob_Froberger

Thanks for putting the work in, premont. I'm really getting into those Remy CDs. Another suite I enjoyed a lot is XIII. It's strange that Egarr doesn't compile the music as suites, but because I'm listening to his records on spotify I don't have any notes. On spotify there's an allemande which is tagged as Suite iii, in Vol 1 of the Egarr set,  but it's not the one from the Strasbourg manuscript.

Remy is a very fine musician. There's a soft spoken, lyrical, elegant, gentle quality about his style which I very much appreciate. In some ways he reminds me of Frisch.

I wish I had more Froberger organ music. Recommendations appreciated.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 20, 2012, 12:11:20 AM
Thanks for putting the work in, premont. I'm really getting into those Remy CDs. Another suite I enjoyed a lot is XIII. It's strange that Egarr doesn't compile the music as suites, but because I'm listening to his records on spotify I don't have any notes. On spotify there's an allemande which is tagged as Suite iii, in Vol 1 of the Egarr set,  but it's not the one from the Strasbourg manuscript.

Remy is a very fine musician. There's a soft spoken, lyrical, elegant, gentle quality about his style which I very much appreciate. In some ways he reminds me of Frisch.

I wish I had more Froberger organ music. Recommendations appreciated.

Honestly I think Froberger, with his special mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles in a highly personal style, could even make a better impression in other recordings than Rémy, who I personally don't think is all that. I don't think he nailed Froberger stylistically, to me it lacks definition and structural clarity. It's neither here nor there, which might be the way Froberger sounds like himself, but appearances deceive.

I am a known advocate of Bob van Asperen's complete Froberger series on Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/All-Discs/Editions/Froberger-edition) - also recommended for the organ works! :) Completely different and with a distinct idiosyncratic touch, is Enrico Baiano's single recital disc (Symphonia).

The "Waterfall Allemande" is the 1st mvt of a suite numbered XXVII, found on volume 1 of the series:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/333/MI0003333596.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Samples HERE (http://www.allmusic.com/album/johann-froberger-le-passage-du-rhin-mw0002318223).

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 20, 2012, 04:53:49 AM
Honestly I think Froberger, with his special mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles in a highly personal style, could even make a better impression in other recordings than Rémy, who I personally don't think is all that. I don't think he nailed Froberger stylistically, to me it lacks definition and structural clarity. It's neither here nor there, which might be the way Froberger sounds like himself, but appearances deceive.

The Strassbourg manuscript is a collection of suites, and I look at it in the way, that the style of these suites is predominantly French,  that Italian stylistic traits in these suites are sparse, and German style? Well, rather than saying that Frobergers suites are influenced by German style, I think that Frobergar actually was the one who in the first hand defined the German Klaviersuite with its first and foremost French stylistic elements, and that it was later composers (Buxtehude, Pachelbel, J.K.F.Fischer and not the least J.S.Bach), who added Italian and German elements to the suite, making of it what we now call the German Klaviersuite. I think Remy captures the intimate French style of these suites well and also masters the Frobergerian melancoly, which is a more subtle and less tangible affect than e.g. the Dowlandian sadness.

The situation would be quite another one with Frobergers obviously Italian influenced toccate and ricercari et.c.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Wakefield on October 20, 2012, 05:11:43 AM
The Strassbourg manuscript is a collection of suites, and I look at it in the way, that the style of these suites is predominantly French,  that Italian stylistic traits in these suites are sparse, and German style? Well, rather than saying that Frobergers suites are influenced by German style, I think that Frobergar actually was the one who in the first hand defined the German Klaviersuite with its first and foremost French stylistic elements, and that it was later composers (Buxtehude, Pachelbel, J.K.F.Fischer and not the least J.S.Bach), who added Italian and German elements to the suite, making of it what we now call the German Klaviersuite. I think Remy captures the intimate French style of these suites well and also masters the Frobergerian melancoly, which is a more subtle and less tangible affect than e.g. the Dowlandian sadness.

The situation would be quite another one with Frobergers obviously Italian influenced toccate and ricercari et.c.

BTW, did you listen to Rémy's transcriptions of the cello suites? It would seem very well done.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 20, 2012, 08:00:45 AM
BTW, did you listen to Rémy's transcriptions of the cello suites? It would seem very well done.

Yes, but only once - when I got them several months ago. First impression very positive.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 20, 2012, 01:21:14 PM
The Strassbourg manuscript is a collection of suites, and I look at it in the way, that the style of these suites is predominantly French,  that Italian stylistic traits in these suites are sparse, and German style? Well, rather than saying that Frobergers suites are influenced by German style, I think that Frobergar actually was the one who in the first hand defined the German Klaviersuite with its first and foremost French stylistic elements, and that it was later composers (Buxtehude, Pachelbel, J.K.F.Fischer and not the least J.S.Bach), who added Italian and German elements to the suite, making of it what we now call the German Klaviersuite. I think Remy captures the intimate French style of these suites well and also masters the Frobergerian melancoly, which is a more subtle and less tangible affect than e.g. the Dowlandian sadness.

The situation would be quite another one with Frobergers obviously Italian influenced toccate and ricercari et.c.

Predominantly French, yes, but on the other hand distinctly not French..  :) The Italian influence being more present in the organ works, that's why I mentioned it.
German... well what was the "German style" in Froberger's time? I was thinking of the influence of the Sweelinck-lineage.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on October 20, 2012, 05:50:30 PM
Honestly I think Froberger, with his special mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles in a highly personal style, could even make a better impression in other recordings than Rémy, who I personally don't think is all that. I don't think he nailed Froberger stylistically, to me it lacks definition and structural clarity. It's neither here nor there, which might be the way Froberger sounds like himself, but appearances deceive.

I am a known advocate of Bob van Asperen's complete Froberger series on Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/All-Discs/Editions/Froberger-edition) - also recommended for the organ works! :) Completely different and with a distinct idiosyncratic touch, is Enrico Baiano's single recital disc (Symphonia).

The "Waterfall Allemande" is the 1st mvt of a suite numbered XXVII, found on volume 1 of the series:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/333/MI0003333596.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Samples HERE (http://www.allmusic.com/album/johann-froberger-le-passage-du-rhin-mw0002318223).

Q
I wonder what you'd think of these two recordings I downloaded (and have been enjoying) recently: 
(http://www.carpediem-records.de/media/images/popup/CD-16290_cover_web.jpg)
(http://image.musicimport.biz/sdimages/upc13/856092001148.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 21, 2012, 01:54:32 AM
Predominantly French, yes, but on the other hand distinctly not French..  :) The Italian influence being more present in the organ works, that's why I mentioned it.
German... well what was the "German style" in Froberger's time? I was thinking of the influence of the Sweelinck-lineage.

I think you confuse things a bit. Froberger actually defined the German Klaviersuite (allemande,gigue,courante,sarabande) building upon French models (such as L. Couperin) and adding a tad individual and original Froberger style (e.g. affectfiguration, and more imitation than the French did). Even his allemandes are unmistakably French, and only some of the gigues are more internatonal in style. There was no German Klaviersuite before Froberger. Sweelinck wrote no suites, and had no influence upon Frobergers suites. The Italian and German elements were added by later composers in their suites, whereby the German Klaviersuite underwent some transformation with time..

As to Frobergers Italian influenced works Frescobaldi was the towering figure, and I think Sweelinck´s influence even here was of minor importance. On the other hand Sweelinck of course exerted a great influence upon his own pupils and their successors.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 21, 2012, 01:56:30 AM
I wonder what you'd think of these two recordings I downloaded (and have been enjoying) recently: 
(http://www.carpediem-records.de/media/images/popup/CD-16290_cover_web.jpg) (http://image.musicimport.biz/sdimages/upc13/856092001148.jpg)

Are they available in the CD medium?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 21, 2012, 04:41:51 AM
I wonder what you'd think of these two recordings I downloaded (and have been enjoying) recently: 
(http://www.carpediem-records.de/media/images/popup/CD-16290_cover_web.jpg) (http://image.musicimport.biz/sdimages/upc13/856092001148.jpg)

New kids on the block, that I don't know! :) First impressions:

After heaving heard some (Youtube) excerpts, I must say I'm quite impressed by Romanian Ilana Rotaru! :) Two minor remarks: I think in the slow movements she is on the slow side, risking to lose momentum and the fragmentation of the overall structure. Also she rather puts the emphasis on the rhetorical side of the music, which might be over egging it a bit in prolonged listening. A nice review of the disc by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/Sept12/Froberger_CD16290.htm). I don't agree with the critisism in the FANFARE review (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=733488) on Ruckers harpsichord used - sounds pretty good to my ears, though admittedly it might sound a bit "bigger" than Froberger might have been used to.:)

The lady with the double Dutch name plays an Italian instrument that is perhaps more correct in terms of date, but I'm not sure about if the sound - very Italian (dry, penetrating, wiry) indeed - is despite the Italian connection of the music the most appropriate. If anything, French instruments seem the most logical choice. Van Asperen uses a Ruckers for the 1st volume and different French harpsichords for the subsequent volumes.

As far as I'm concerned, "dry" is also the right description for Ruiter-Feenstra's interpretations - academic and authoritative but lacking the free spirit necessary for this music. Rotaru demonstrates why and how.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 21, 2012, 04:42:35 AM
Are they available in the CD medium?

Yes, found them both on Amazon.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on October 21, 2012, 01:01:35 PM
Honestly I think Froberger, with his special mixture of French, German and Italian Baroque styles in a highly personal style, could even make a better impression in other recordings than Rémy, who I personally don't think is all that. I don't think he nailed Froberger stylistically, to me it lacks definition and structural clarity. It's neither here nor there, which might be the way Froberger sounds like himself, but appearances deceive.

I am a known advocate of Bob van Asperen's complete Froberger series on Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/All-Discs/Editions/Froberger-edition) - also recommended for the organ works! :) Completely different and with a distinct idiosyncratic touch, is Enrico Baiano's single recital disc (Symphonia).

The "Waterfall Allemande" is the 1st mvt of a suite numbered XXVII, found on volume 1 of the series:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/333/MI0003333596.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Samples HERE (http://www.allmusic.com/album/johann-froberger-le-passage-du-rhin-mw0002318223).

Q

First I want to say thank you for highlighting these Asperen recordings. I've been playing today all that I could find on the web -- the CD called "Pour Passer la melencolie" and the one of the Cds from the set  called "Le Passage du Rhin-Werke" It's absolutely obvious to me that this is lovely music making and lovely music. I have no doubt that I will collect the series, and I'm looking forward to getting to know Froberger's music that way.

The CD I found from "Le Passage du Rhin" happens to contain the suite with  the Allemande reprasentans monticidium Frobergeri, which is on Remy's recording, so I took the time to listen to Remy as well. I don't know about the correct style, but I do know that I find Remy very moving and that I like his understated air of confidentiality. I've always liked that sort of confidential intimate playing, in singing and in piano. Playing where it's as if the performer is confiding a secret to you, whispering gently and passionately. I'm very glad to have found it from a harpsichordist.

By the way, I was wrong to say in the post I made yesterday that there was a resemblance between Frisch and Remy - that was a false memory. I played both of them today in Suite II and Frisch is more vigorous and extrovert.  I like both of them very much -- fortunately I don't have to choose.

You also mentioned Enrico Baiano's recital. I've had it for ages but somehow I've never got into it. I'll try again soon.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on October 22, 2012, 04:59:33 AM
New kids on the block, that I don't know! :) First impressions:

After heaving heard some (Youtube) excerpts, I must say I'm quite impressed by Romanian Ilana Rotaru! :) Two minor remarks: I think in the slow movements she is on the slow side, risking to lose momentum and the fragmentation of the overall structure. Also she rather puts the emphasis on the rhetorical side of the music, which might be over egging it a bit in prolonged listening. A nice review of the disc by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/Sept12/Froberger_CD16290.htm). I don't agree with the critisism in the FANFARE review (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=733488) on Ruckers harpsichord used - sounds pretty good to my ears, though admittedly it might sound a bit "bigger" than Froberger might have been used to.:)

The lady with the double Dutch name plays an Italian instrument that is perhaps more correct in terms of date, but I'm not sure about if the sound - very Italian (dry, penetrating, wiry) indeed - is despite the Italian connection of the music the most appropriate. If anything, French instruments seem the most logical choice. Van Asperen uses a Ruckers for the 1st volume and different French harpsichords for the subsequent volumes.

As far as I'm concerned, "dry" is also the right description for Ruiter-Feenstra's interpretations - academic and authoritative but lacking the free spirit necessary for this music. Rotaru demonstrates why and how.

Q
Thanks a lot Q. I don't know if I'm right about this but the program on the Ruiter-Feenstra recording seems atypical of Froberger's output. Those partitas are rather light compared to what I'm used to from him. Another recording I picked up some time back is this one by Wladyslaw Klosiewicz. I see it has been mentioned in this forum before.
(http://i43.tower.com/images/mm106148933/pour-passer-la-melancholie-froberger-wladyslaw-klosiewicz-cd-cover-art.jpg) 
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: petrarch on November 23, 2012, 01:35:36 PM
I've had my eyes on this one since it was released:

(https://www.outhere-music.com/data/cds/2792/BIG.JPG)

https://outhere-music.com/store-RIC_323/Georg_Böhm_-_Johann_Sebastian_Bach_-_Johann_Christoph_Bach-Music_for_Weddings_and_other_Festivities-Clematis_-_Leonardo_Garcia_Alarcon.html

And I just found an excerpt on youtube, a perfect example of excellent vibrato-less singing. Divine.

https://www.youtube.com/v/S6ONV33Ifzs
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: StLukesguildOhio on November 23, 2012, 06:49:18 PM
For whatever reason... perhaps its because they were too obvious... I avoided the Italians when I first began to dig deep into the Baroque. The French and the Germans became my initial focus... and vocal music first and foremost... although that has changed with time. I see others have mentioned Westhoff:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51mlNv2a6AL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

and Walther:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51LEauQgETL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

as great examples of predecessors to J.S. Bach. Beyond the obvious (Biber, Schutz, Buxtehude, etc...) I would also suggest Johann Joseph Fux:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_250/MI0003/180/MI0003180362.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

and Thomas Baltzar:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61oxvvLyK2L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Baltzar is especially interesting for his compositions for unaccompanied violin.

Sylvius Weiss' works for lute are also a "must have" for the Baroque aficionado:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51iQWFkncWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: petrarch on November 24, 2012, 08:17:36 AM
Was listening to the previously mentioned Westhoff:



and noticed how the playing and sound was quite organic. That made me revisit Hélène Schmitt's rendition of Schmelzer's sonatas, which has a much smoother, precise playing and sound overall:



It certainly is one of my favorite CDs of music from this period. While I was on my Alpha shelf, I also grabbed this:



This is proving to be a very satisfying Saturday morning :).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on November 24, 2012, 09:42:39 AM
For whatever reason... perhaps its because they were too obvious... I avoided the Italians when I first began to dig deep into the Baroque. The French and the Germans became my initial focus... and vocal music first and foremost... although that has changed with time. I see others have mentioned Westhoff:

[...]

and Thomas Baltzar:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61oxvvLyK2L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Baltzar is especially interesting for his compositions for unaccompanied violin.


First of all a belated welcome to the forum, and thank you so much for the Baltzar recommendation! :) After sampling online, I think it is definitely a recording I want to get.

On the topic of pre-Bach violin music, I'd like to point out a recording of very worth-while music by a student of Biber:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51BSP1w6VPL._SL500_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: PaulSC on November 24, 2012, 11:02:44 AM
Baltzar and Vilsmayr are both new to me - thanks for bringing them up!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 25, 2012, 07:55:00 AM
Yesterday, I left the post quoted below in the 'listening thread', soon to disappear;  both of these are excellent Graupner recordings but the use of the chalumeaux on the one disc stimulated my interest.

The Baroque chalumeau (pic below of a 'family' of these instruments) as quoted in part in a Wiki article: "In the late seventeenth century an improved form of the chalumeau was developed. This baroque chalumeau represents the link between the recorder and the clarinet, and is essentially a cylindrical bore recorder with a mouthpiece like that of a clarinet and two additional "throat" keys controlling notes at the top of the fundamental register. The chalumeau continued to develop for several decades alongside the clarinet, and it has a large repertoire in 18th century orchestral and chamber music."

Jean-Claude Veilhan, one of three performers on these instruments in this recording, has a full page description of the history of the chalumeau, the key differences, and replacement of the single-reed version by the clarinet; he uses a soprano, alto, & tenor instrument in these performances which are copies after Denner ca. 1700 made by Andreas Schöni.  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-bj7PFFL/0/M/Chalumeaux1-M.jpg)


Quote
Graupner, Christoph (1683-1760) - new arrivals:

Overtures for Chalumeaux & Orchestra w/ Mensa Sonora & Maillet; Veilhan, Testu, & Jacquemart on the chalumeaux!

Orchestral Works, Vol.3 w/ Rampe & Nova Stravaganza - period instrument performances; own all three volumes now - excellent - :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-3q93C6B/0/O/GraupnerVeilhan.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-VbPGhHJ/0/O/GraupnerRampeV3.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on November 25, 2012, 08:45:36 AM
Yesterday, I left the post quoted below in the 'listening thread', soon to disappear;  both of these are excellent Graupner recordings but the use of the chalumeaux on the one disc stimulated my interest.

The Baroque chalumeau (pic below of a 'family' of these instruments) as quoted in part in a Wiki article: "In the late seventeenth century an improved form of the chalumeau was developed. This baroque chalumeau represents the link between the recorder and the clarinet, and is essentially a cylindrical bore recorder with a mouthpiece like that of a clarinet and two additional "throat" keys controlling notes at the top of the fundamental register. The chalumeau continued to develop for several decades alongside the clarinet, and it has a large repertoire in 18th century orchestral and chamber music."

Jean-Claude Veilhan, one of three performers on these instruments in this recording, has a full page description of the history of the chalumeau, the key differences, and replacement of the single-reed version by the clarinet; he uses a soprano, alto, & tenor instrument in these performances which are copies after Denner ca. 1700 made by Andreas Schöni.  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-bj7PFFL/0/M/Chalumeaux1-M.jpg)

I absolutely adore the instrument and I have this disc - also by Jean-Claude Veilhan, who I regard as one of the best baroque clarinetist of today.
Another favourite is Eric Hoeprich (http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/artist.aspx?id=30). Both of them play another related instrument as well: the basset horn.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61AU-ZIXyKL._SS500_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on January 17, 2013, 10:55:07 AM
Listening to Hantai's  second record of the Goldbergs today prompted me to go searching for similarly stern performances from him. I came up with nothing, but I did find this youtube of him playing Froberger -- the only time I've heard him playing Froberger in fact:

http://www.youtube.com/v/Gzl4oGzBo10

There's no Froberger from Skip Sempe neither (just imagine what that could sound like!)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on January 19, 2013, 08:29:46 PM
From the "What Are You Listening To" thread, Jeffrey responding to Harry:
[re: Brilliant Schutz Edition: Capella Augustana/M. Messori, dir.]
I agree.  Now listening to the final two CDs (18-19: Giestliche Chor-Music, Op. 11) before I go off to work.

There is some undeserved carping in the Amazon US reviews of this set.  I find it very satisfying on all accounts except one: not all of Schutz's work is included here; most important omissions being Psalmen Davids and Symphoniae Sacrae III.

Most of what I know of Schütz is limited to that Augustana/Brilliant box, the PSALMEN DAVIDS by Cantus Colln and the Prince-Valiant-bowlcut-sporting Junghänel, and Bernius' CHRISTMAS/EASTER HISTORIAS.  Since SYMPHONIAE SACRAE III isn't a piece I know at all, I'd like to know if there are some essential recordings of it.  Since I'm asking, any other Schütz recommendations would be much appreciated.  I'm going to read through this German Baroque thread tonight, but for the moment I haven't found much in way of SS3 recommendations, in my searches.  One friend who is not deeply inclined toward HIP recordings has said that Bernius is his favorite Schütz interpreter, but this seems like an opinion that is not universal.  I'm not even sure I'm going to get that ~5cd Schütz/Bernius box (Sony/Vivarte); I just don't know the field well enough.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 20, 2013, 08:15:09 AM
From the "What Are You Listening To" thread, Jeffrey responding to Harry:
Most of what I know of Schütz is limited to that Augustana/Brilliant box, the PSALMEN DAVIDS by Cantus Colln and the Prince-Valiant-bowlcut-sporting Junghänel, and Bernius' CHRISTMAS/EASTER HISTORIAS.  Since SYMPHONIAE SACRAE III isn't a piece I know at all, I'd like to know if there are some essential recordings of it.  Since I'm asking, any other Schütz recommendations would be much appreciated.  I'm going to read through this German Baroque thread tonight, but for the moment I haven't found much in way of SS3 recommendations, in my searches.  One friend who is not deeply inclined toward HIP recordings has said that Bernius is his favorite Schütz interpreter, but this seems like an opinion that is not universal.  I'm not even sure I'm going to get that ~5cd Schütz/Bernius box (Sony/Vivarte); I just don't know the field well enough.

Let me say upfront that I do not have a comprehensive overview of all the Schütz recordings out there. But let me share my own experiences. :)

I did consider the Brilliant box set by Messori, but after extensive sampling it failed to convince me enough to give it a try. Actually, Johan van Veen's review HERE (http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/BrilliantClassics_94361.html) pretty much sums up my own impressions:

Quote
Let me sum up. The initiative to record a major part of Schütz's oeuvre for a budget label is admirable. The liner-notes show that Messori has invested much time and energy in this project. The performances are sympathetic but unfortunately mostly not of a standard that brings them up to the competition. The overall quality of the singers is just not good enough, and the many changes in the line-up - sometimes for the better - lead to problems with ensemble. You can't just put together a number of singers and change them at will from one piece to the next. The best performances come from ensembles whose members have worked together on a regular basis for a long time. Moreover, in Schütz's music the text always lies at the heart and that makes unacceptable performances by those who have problems with the pronunciation of German. The earliest recordings of pieces in German are pretty painful. The generally slow tempi, the lack of dynamic accenting and the underexposure of the rhythmic pulse further undermine these performances.

Through a wonderful disc with masses by Zelenka and Heinichen, I then bumped into Hans-Christoph Rademann's brand new ongoing Schütz series on Carus. And for me that was bull's eye experience: authentic approach with limited forces, astute and idiomatic renderings, not deliberate or stodgy but still sober and intensely focused on the message of the music. And all that in state of the art recordings. I started with the Geistliche Chor-music 1648 and then went back the his earlier recording (2001) of Schwanengesang on Raumklang - fantastic performances IMO. Also got the Italian Madrigales. Notably the 1st two are strongly recommended - the Schwanengesang is probably hard to find but will probably be reissued (or re-recorded).
The series has by now progressed to 6 volumes in total - see HERE (http://www.carus-verlag.com/index.php3?BLink=Schuetz&selSprache=1).

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/042/MI0001042493.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71KAJ7tFO0L.jpg) (http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/157/MI0003157073.jpg)

Some online reviews of the Rademann/Schütz series:
http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Carus_83.232.html
http://www.allmusic.com/album/heinrich-schütz-italienische-madrigale-mw0002131504 (http://www.allmusic.com/album/heinrich-schütz-italienische-madrigale-mw0002131504)
http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Carus_83.237.html
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/June12/Schutz_Exequien_83238.htm
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=709101#review

As you can tell Johan van Veen wasn't too pleased with the use of a choir in the Madrigals issue...

I also got the Symphoniae Sacrae III by Bernius/ Musica Fiata...and frankly like your friend I found it disappointing... ::) :-\
Underpowered, blurry singing, uninspired. No, maybe that was how a Schütz performance used to sound, but not any more.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on January 20, 2013, 04:53:06 PM
Thanks a lot for that information, Que.

At the bottom of the extensive Van Veen review of the Brilliant box (cf. Que's link above), I notice that he too offers some suggestions for alternatives:
Quote
Kleine Geistliche Konzerte and Cantiones Sacrae: Weser-Renaissance/Manfred Cordes (CPO)
Symphoniae Sacrae I: Concerto Palatino (Accent); La Capella Ducale and Musica Fiata/Roland Wilson (deutsche harmonia mundi)
Symphoniae Sacrae II: La Capella Ducale and Musica Fiata/Roland Wilson (Sony); the Purcell Quartet (Chandos)
Weihnachtshistorie: Gabrieli Consort & Players/McCreesh (Archiv; especially recommendable because of the liturgical context); La Petite Bande/Sigiswald Kuijken (deutsche harmonia mundi). I also would like to mention the recording of the Weihnachtshistorie and the Auferstehungshistorie on one disc with the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius (Sony). The latter work is also available with Concerto Vocale (René Jacobs; Harmonia mundi) and Weser-Renaissance (CPO).
Geistliche Chormusik: Knabenchor Hannover/Heinz Hennig (deutsche harmonia mundi); Dresdner Kammerchor/Hans-Christoph Rademann (Carus); Weser-Renaissance (CPO).
Musicalische Exequien: Vox Luminis (Ricercar); Collegium vocale Gent/Philippe Herreweghe (Harmonia mundi)
Il primo libro de madrigali: Cantus Cölln (Harmonia mundi)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Wakefield on January 20, 2013, 05:22:55 PM
Let me say upfront that I do not have a comprehensive overview of all the Schütz recordings out there. But let me share my own experiences. :)

I did consider the Brilliant box set by Messori, but after extensive sampling it failed to convince me enough to give it a try. Actually, Johan van Veen's review HERE (http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/BrilliantClassics_94361.html) pretty much sums up my own impressions:


I usually agree with Johan van Veen, but not this time. I think Messori did a wonderful job, the voices of his ensemble are perfectly suitable to this work and his tempi (as deeply enjoying the words) are totally to my taste. I think van Veen disagree with the general philosophy of Messori, who doesn't see this music like a great and brilliant vocal spectacle, but more as an austere exercise of withdrawal in front of the Creator. Not very usual when you talk about an Italian conductor, indeed.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: kishnevi on January 20, 2013, 07:43:28 PM
I have SSIII as performed by Cantus  Colln, and frankly it underwhelmed me.  One Schutz CD I would recommend is on Naxos, with the Oxford Camerata,  under the title Psalmen Davids--a selection from the full work, together with two very late works,  including the German Magnficat.  The Vox Luminis recording of the Musicalishe Exequien is good, but nothing more.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on February 26, 2013, 06:20:55 PM
Late thanks for the feedback on Schutz, Gordon Shumway and Jeffrey.  I'd still like recommendations for the Symphoniae Sacrae III, especially in light of Jeffrey's disappointment with the Cantus Colln recording (and also that recording's more or less OOP status...it's often quite expensive), if anyone has heard a great recording.  The Carus label might have one forthcoming that will do the job. 

I'm also interested in this disc of Italian Madrigals by Cantus Colln with Junghanel:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41jec9bG8YL.jpg)

Though I see there is a volume of these from Carus, pictured in Que's post above; that one might be preferable?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 26, 2013, 11:09:25 PM
I'm also interesting in this disc of Italian Madrigals by Cantus Colln with Junghanel:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41jec9bG8YL.jpg)

Though I see there is a volume of these from Carus, pictured in Que's post above; that one might be preferable?

I have my slight doubts about Rademann....but I have no comparison. Though I found it very enjoyable, it was not on the same wow-level as the other issues so far.

Johan van Veen was not quite happy with it either, because of the decison to use a choir instead of one voice per part: http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Carus_83.237.html

So I was looking into other options myself - Van Veen 1st rec. is Concerto Vocale under Jacobs (HM), but I'll definitely check out Junghänel as well. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on February 26, 2013, 11:49:16 PM
Thanks, Que; I need to read Van Veen's site more often!  I routinely miss reviews of things I become interested in.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on February 27, 2013, 10:59:11 PM
I have my slight doubts about Rademann....but I have no comparison. Though I found it very enjoyable, it was not on the same wow-level as the other issues so far.

Johan van Veen was not quite happy with it either, because of the decison to use a choir instead of one voice per part: http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Carus_83.237.html

So I was looking into other options myself - Van Veen 1st rec. is Concerto Vocale under Jacobs (HM), but I'll definitely check out Junghänel as well. :)

Q

Of the three options Van Veen mentions, I actually seem to like this one best: (I definitely did not like the Jacobs btw)

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/008/MI0001008803.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

http://www.allmusic.com/album/heinrich-schütz-opus-1-in-venice-il-primo-libro-de-madrigali-mw0001370810

Comment of Giordano Bruno (in a review (http://www.amazon.com/Orlando-Di-Lasso-DellAmore-Thorofon/product-reviews/B0000045A1/ref=sr_cr_hist_5?ie=UTF8&filterBy=addFiveStar&showViewpoints=0) of their Lasso madrigals rec)

Quote
If you have any taste for madrigals and/or the music of Orlande de Lassus, get your ears on this recording any way you can. And while you're at it, get their recording of Heinrich Schütz's Opus 1 Venetian madrigals also, before Thorofon becomes Thoroughly unavailable.[...]

The Orlando di Lasso Ensemble sings these madrigals one on a part, with women's voices carrying the soprano lines. The voices are extraordinarily well matched in timbre and well balanced, so that no "Wallace Line" of discontinuity between the genders can be heard. Their tuning is flawless. Their phrasing is marvelously independent, and yet their cadences are as precise as an Italian chef's recipe for ragú. This gang belongs in the same exalted rank as La Venexiana, Concerto Italiano, and Il Seminario Musicale.

So now I have a new Lassus lead as well... :D

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on March 03, 2013, 06:25:47 AM
(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/non-muze2/large/733487.jpg)

On sale for $50.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=733487
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on March 24, 2013, 05:25:29 PM
Another Schütz question.  Four years ago Que asked about Ehmann's Schütz recordings on the Cantate label.  I don't think there was much response to that, or I missed it.  Does anyone know these recordings?  How do they compare to all other Schütz we have?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on May 28, 2013, 05:17:41 PM
Considering:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/611RUrAG34L._SS30_.jpg)

Comments?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on May 29, 2013, 01:10:56 AM
Considering:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/611RUrAG34L._SS30_.jpg)

Comments?
I nees stronger glasses (this is a comment).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on May 29, 2013, 02:45:01 PM
 ;D
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/835/8730835.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 29, 2013, 03:07:24 PM
;D
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81auOnZuZzL._SL1500_.jpg)

Bill - YET, a bigger image replaced above -  :D

I have nothing by this composer - the Amazon reviews are impressive (have not checked on others yet) - a little expensive, BUT I enjoy that ensemble so will add to my 'wish list' and await some other opinions - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Geo Dude on July 04, 2013, 07:58:49 AM
Well, this looks interesting...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YJuJKEhbL._SX300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Geo Dude on July 07, 2013, 07:21:52 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51jN8TzBI3L._SY300_.jpg)

What a wonderful disc.  Frankly, it leaves me tempted to take a swing at the BC complete Schutz box next month.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on July 08, 2013, 09:53:28 AM
I am looking for a decent recording of Fasch's bassoon works.  Any suggestions?
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 08, 2013, 04:02:27 PM
I am looking for a decent recording of Fasch's bassoon works.  Any suggestions?

Hey Bill - I think that you've been smitten w/ Fasch (i.e. Johann, 1688-1758) - now, I have 8 CDs of his instrumental recordings and the bassoon is featured in many as one of a number of instruments, but you question piqued my interest - his compositions are listed HERE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Fasch) in this Wiki article (but apparently is outdated); however, there seem to be few works which feature the bassoon as the major instrument (found 1 concerto & some smaller chamber works) - interestingly, there is an International Fasch Society (http://www.fasch.net), which apparently is updating his works catalog - also, there is a discography there which I've not looked @ in detail - I'm going to check on Amazon now to see what may complement my current 'small' collection - this guy was quite prolific and probably deserves much more attention!  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 08, 2013, 04:29:57 PM
Bill - just a quick follow-up - after checking Amazon, I ordered the disc below w/ Sergio Azzolini on a Baroque bassoon - love this guy and have a number of other CDs w/ him (e.g. Vivaldi) - this might be the best that you can do @ the moment - Dave :)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YRE6BD48L._SY300_.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-3DsxwWC/0/M/Screen%20Shot%202013-07-08%20at%209.13.17%20PM-M.png)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on July 08, 2013, 05:49:19 PM
Thanks, Dave.  I saw that one....more so because I have decent luck with the CPO label.  Let me know what else you dig up.  Did you see that I laneded the Quantz flute sonatas on the Hungaroton label?  Great disc!
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 09, 2013, 05:49:29 AM
Thanks, Dave.  I saw that one....more so because I have decent luck with the CPO label.  Let me know what else you dig up.  Did you see that I laneded the Quantz flute sonatas on the Hungaroton label?  Great disc!

Hi again Bill - love the CPO label (have dozens of their CDs), so w/ Azzolini on bassoon should be 'up your alley.'  Love that gal on the flute in the Quantz sonatas - I've had the CD below on my 'wish list' for over a year (maybe two!) - just checked Amazon, BRO, & MDT - just OOP @ the moment.  Dave :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61ZwTxfZRIL._SL500_SY300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on July 09, 2013, 06:14:07 AM
Thanks, Dave.  I still need to nail down the second Fasch disc on Accent with the Il Gardellino (Orchestra) and then I will be almost up to date with some baroque holes I am trying to fill (save the Bolivian baroque discs that I now enjoy).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Geo Dude on July 28, 2013, 06:31:03 PM



Any thoughts on this one?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on July 28, 2013, 09:18:51 PM



Any thoughts on this one?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
It has been well received I think. I only hacve this one (in its original version):



The reissued one is cheap, and it is superb.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on August 01, 2013, 06:57:18 AM



Any thoughts on this one?

Highly recommended! Edgy performances of first rate baroque cantatas. Yummy!  :P

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on August 10, 2013, 07:15:10 AM
Now playing, Dave!

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YRE6BD48L._SY300_.jpg)

Superior in all aspects. :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on August 10, 2013, 07:18:10 AM
;D
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/835/8730835.jpg)

A nice review of this disc here, Dave.

http://classicalcandor.blogspot.com/2012/04/schmelzer-barockes-welttheater-cd.html
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 11, 2013, 06:40:43 AM
Now playing, Dave!

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YRE6BD48L._SY300_.jpg)

Superior in all aspects. :)

Yep - thought that you might like that one!  The music, the group, & Azzolini just excellent - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on August 11, 2013, 07:23:08 AM
Indeed I do.  It has been replayed a number of times.

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on September 05, 2013, 10:20:57 PM



Funny how I - despite having seen that on Amazon several times and having read the interviews - only now realized that it's not lute music..
What do you think of the disc, Que?

I guess the term "lute-harpsichord" aka "Lautenwerck" is a bit confusing.. :) The disc is partly on harpsichord, partly on lute-harpsichord.

It is an extremely fine disc indeed - the recording of the lute-harpsichord is exemplary and the playing overall is superb.
Another beautiful recording of Weckmann's keyboard works is by Siebe Henstra, coupled with chamber music on a 2CD (Ricercar).
It is hard to choose one over the other - they are both excellent. Jan Katzschke's disc conveys, helped by the lute-harpsichord, more of an elegant, dreamy feel. Henstra is more muscular, emphasizing structure and brilliance -  a typical Dutch approach, showing Weckmann's connection - through Scheidemann - with Sweelinck.



Get both if you like Weckmann, or Katzschke in particular for a lute-harpsichord recording.

Jan Katzschke just made a brand new recording BTW - it will definitely be on my shopping list! :)



Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: North Star on September 10, 2013, 12:22:55 AM
I guess the term "lute-harpsichord" aka "Lautenwerck" is a bit confusing.. :) The disc is partly on harpsichord, partly on lute-harpsichord.

It is an extremely fine disc indeed - the recording of the lute-harpsichord is exemplary and the playing overall is superb.
Another beautiful recording of Weckmann's keyboard works is by Siebe Henstra, coupled with chamber music on a 2CD (Ricercar).
It is hard to choose one over the other - they are both excellent. Jan Katzschke's disc conveys, helped by the lute-harpsichord, more of an elegant, dreamy feel. Henstra is more muscular, emphasizing structure and brilliance -  a typical Dutch approach, showing Weckmann's connection - through Scheidemann - with Sweelinck.

[asin ]B001RIGDMS[/asin]

Get both if you like Weckmann, or Katzschke in particular for a lute-harpsichord recording.

Jan Katzschke just made a brand new recording BTW - it will definitely be on my shopping list! :)

[asin ]B00DERONQS[/asin]

Q
Thanks for the reply!
I think it was the cover art which mainly threw me. Apparently the whole disc is at Youtube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFVNDKcBPCY). I hope this kind of thing has mainly a positive effect on sales - though it is also in Spotify, along with the new Kuhnau disc.
After listening to the first 18 minutes, I can say that the instruments, playing, recording and music are all first class. This is definitely on the wish list.
(Scheidemann's name I don't even recall seeing before, and haven't heard practically any Sweelinck  :-[)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on September 10, 2013, 05:04:12 AM
(Scheidemann's name I don't even recall seeing before, and haven't heard practically any Sweelinck  :-[)

I enjoyed listening to organ works by both, this lazy afternoon, from this disc:

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: North Star on September 13, 2013, 02:28:26 PM
I enjoyed listening to organ works by both, this lazy afternoon, from this disc:
Looks nice, Nav!

There's also this recent (May) Weckmann release from Pierlot & Ricercar Consort, who, based on my limited experience are one of the very best German Baroque groups around.


http://www.youtube.com/v/-12oJ6bLNaQ
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Opus106 on September 13, 2013, 10:00:24 PM
This:



...is in my wish-list at Europadisc. Has anyone heard it? Mostly keyboard pieces, interspersed with a few vocal works.

While I'm here, I might as well enquire about this Sweelinck:

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 09, 2013, 09:20:17 PM
Pachelbel

Hexachordum Apollinis

Marga Scheurich (harpsichord)



How is that? :)

EDIT: Is this an older recording (60's/'70s of the last century)? I'm listening to it at Youtube - rather nice but soo slow! :o :)

The music itself (listening to the Chaconne in F minor) is impressive.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on October 09, 2013, 09:38:05 PM
How is that? :)

EDIT: Is this an older recording (60's/'70s of the last century)? I'm listening to it at Youtube - rather nice but soo slow! :o :)

The music itself (listening to the Chaconne in F minor) is impressive.

Q

I'd be very interested to know if you find a better record of the complete Hexachordum Apollinis. I don't think that Chaconne is part of it -- it is indeed impressive.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Sadko on October 09, 2013, 10:01:08 PM
How is that? :)

EDIT: Is this an older recording (60's/'70s of the last century)? I'm listening to it at Youtube - rather nice but soo slow! :o :)

The music itself (listening to the Chaconne in F minor) is impressive.

Q

Well, if you have it on youtube you can judge for yourself. I like it very much, and the slowness doesn't put me off at all. I'm listening to "Sebaldina" again, to me the speed feels quite natural and fitting for an aria.

No the Chaconne is not part of it, but it's nice to have it too.

PS: Yes, it is from 1970.

It is available from here: http://www.bayermusicgroup.de/en/label/dacamera/daca77032.htm (http://www.bayermusicgroup.de/en/label/dacamera/daca77032.htm) (6 Eur + postage)

PPS: Having reached the Chaconne again - I see your point now, but I still like it. The slowness gives it a more meditative or solemn character.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 10, 2013, 08:30:41 AM
Well, if you have it on youtube you can judge for yourself. I like it very much, and the slowness doesn't put me off at all. I'm listening to "Sebaldina" again, to me the speed feels quite natural and fitting for an aria.

No the Chaconne is not part of it, but it's nice to have it too.

PS: Yes, it is from 1970.

It is available from here: http://www.bayermusicgroup.de/en/label/dacamera/daca77032.htm (http://www.bayermusicgroup.de/en/label/dacamera/daca77032.htm) (6 Eur + postage)

PPS: Having reached the Chaconne again - I see your point now, but I still like it. The slowness gives it a more meditative or solemn character.

Thank you, that is a steal! :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on October 10, 2013, 08:39:21 AM
You know I'd never noticed that the F minor chaconne is the last track of that CD. I was knocked out  by Werner Jacobs playing it.

Ages ago now I uploaded this audience recording of a Leonhardt organ recital where he plays the Aria Sebaldina, it's still up and worth taking I think. It is an extremely moving performance.


http://www.mediafire.com/?5np36z898s13y

Gustav Leonhardt
Organ of Finnish St.Maria church, St.Petersburg (Martti Porthan, 2010)
Live recording, 15 September 2011

01 J.P.Sweelinck, Praeludium
02 Anonymous (Holland, ca.1625), "Windeken"
03 F.Correa de Arauxo, Tiento 54 (1626)
04 J.C.Kerll, Toccata di durezze e ligature
05 F.Couperin, Tierce en taille
06 A. van den Kerkhoven, Fantasia 131
07 A. van den Kerkhoven, Fantasia 132
08 J.A.Reinken, Toccata in g minor
09-11 J.Pachelbel, Three fugues
12 J.Pachelbel, Aria Sebaldina with variations (1699)
13 G.Boehm, "Christ lag in Todesbanden"
14 H.Purcell, "Crown the altar", ground
15 G.Muffat, Toccata 5 (1690)
16 --bis--

Unpublished recording.

What would be good now is if someone found a really exciting recording of the Magnificat fugues.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 10, 2013, 01:06:56 PM
You know I'd never noticed that the F minor chaconne is the last track of that CD. I was knocked out  by Werner Jacobs playing it.

It is generally considered an organ piece. I do not recall other harpsichord recordings of this piece than Scheurich´s. I think her slowpaced singing rather legato touch works remarcably well. Sometimes, as here, a deeply felt interpretation makes pedantic questions about historical accuracy irrelevant.

Quote from: Mandryka
Ages ago now I uploaded this audience recording of a Leonhardt organ recital where he plays the Aria Sebaldina, it's still up and worth taking I think. It is an extremely moving performance.

I deeply regret that I never have heard Leonhardt live. This performance makes one think, that his recordings aren´t but a pale reflection of his recitals.

Quote from: Mandryka
What would be good now is if someone found a really exciting recording of the Magnificat fugues.

There are 95 Magnificat fugues.A few of these are recorded by a few organists, Leonhardt among them. All the fugues are of course recorded in the two complete (about 11 CD each) Pachelbel sets (Payne/Centaur & Bouchard/Dorian). Both are horrible expensive. My experience with these two organists is unfavorable, so I have not investigated their Pachelbel sets for economic reasons. Franz Raml is embarking on a slowly progressing integrale for MDG, which includes harpsichord music and seems interesting, and the new Brilliant 5 CD volume I of the complete organ works may show to fullfill a need despite variable quality. If only Wolfgang Rübsam had completed his projected series.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Sadko on October 10, 2013, 01:46:36 PM
It is generally considered an organ piece. I do not recall other harpsichord recordings of this piece than Scheurich´s. I think her slowpaced singing rather legato touch works remarcably well. Sometimes, as here, a deeply felt interpretation makes pedantic questions about historical accuracy irrelevant.

Yes, that was what I liked about her performance, and made me prefer it over Payne's harpsichord CD.

Quote
There are 95 Magnificat fugues.A few of these are recorded by a few organists, Leonhardt among them. All the fugues are of course recorded in the two complete (about 11 CD each) Pachelbel sets (Payne/Centaur & Bouchard/Dorian). Both are horrible expensive. My experience with these two organists is unfavorable, so I have not investigated their Pachelbel sets for economic reasons. Franz Raml is embarking on a slowly progressing integrale for MDG, which includes harpsichord music and seems interesting, and the new Brilliant 5 CD volume I of the complete organ works may show to fullfill a need despite variable quality. If only Wolfgang Rübsam had completed his projected series.

I too remember not being touched in any way by Bouchard's Pachelbel.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 10, 2013, 02:17:39 PM
Payne's harpsichord CD.

Which one do you think of.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Sadko on October 10, 2013, 02:36:43 PM
Which one do you think of.

This one:

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 10, 2013, 03:15:46 PM
This one:



I consider this to be one of Payne´s finest recordings, an important contribution to the sparse Pachelbel harpsichord works (particularly suite´s) discography. played with nice conviction, and generally Payne impresses me more as a harpsichordist than as an organist.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Sadko on October 10, 2013, 03:22:32 PM
I consider this to be one of Payne´s finest recordings, an important contribution to the sparse Pachelbel harpsichord works (particularly suite´s) discography. played with nice conviction, and generally Payne impresses me more as a harpsichordist than as an organist.

I don't own that CD, so I can't listen to it again to give more specific reasons.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 10, 2013, 11:26:53 PM
It is generally considered an organ piece. I do not recall other harpsichord recordings of this piece than Scheurich´s. I think her slowpaced singing rather legato touch works remarcably well. Sometimes, as here, a deeply felt interpretation makes pedantic questions about historical accuracy irrelevant.

Probably the music will sound quite different once the new bunch of the likes of Frisch, Meyerson or Stella try their hands on it. But I agree - the Scheurich sounds very nice as it is, it's on the shopping list. :)

BTW I just hope the pejorative term "pedantic" wasn't used with me in mind, since that would be uncalled for. I didn't question in the historical accuracy of the recording. Noting that the interpretation is on the slow side is an observation of a factual nature. It is not far fetched to assume a relation with the age of the interpretation, since present day fashion is generally different. Whether that would be more or less historically accurate, is something I wouldn't know and will gladly leave up to the experts... I just have and follow my personal preferences in these matters and trust that nobody will take offense... ::)

I found one other performance on the harpsichord:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Cocs5tmRL.jpg)

AmazonFR (http://www.amazon.fr/Pachelbel-Hexacordum-Apollinis-Huguette-Grémy-Chauliac/dp/B003ELRQ5Y/ref=dm_cd_album_lnk)

Quote
There are 95 Magnificat fugues.A few of these are recorded by a few organists, Leonhardt among them. All the fugues are of course recorded in the two complete (about 11 CD each) Pachelbel sets (Payne/Centaur & Bouchard/Dorian). Both are horrible expensive. My experience with these two organists is unfavorable, so I have not investigated their Pachelbel sets for economic reasons. Franz Raml is embarking on a slowly progressing integrale for MDG, which includes harpsichord music and seems interesting, and the new Brilliant 5 CD volume I of the complete organ works may show to fullfill a need despite variable quality. If only Wolfgang Rübsam had completed his projected series.

You guys het me all excited about Pachebel's organ music! :) I did notice the Franz Raml recordings on MDG, sounds quite nice. Rübsam's series would be on Naxos, I presume? Just vol. 1 so far...

Any thoughts about this set, which did strike me as possibly interesting?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71rUciX5LiL.jpg)

AmazonUS (http://www.amazon.com/Pachelbel-Organ-Works-Johann/dp/B004CQYM3O)   jpc (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Johann-Pachelbel-1653-1706-Werke-f%FCr-OrgelCembalo-Clavichord/hnum/4561310)   samples at allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/album/andrus-madsen-plays-pachelbel-mw0002087377)

The instruments that organist Andrus Madsen chose for this recording are the Austrian 1634 Andreas Putz organ, repaired and expanded in 1708 by Johann Christoph Egedacher, and finally restored in 1989 by Reil of the Netherlands. The German 1652 Ludwig Compenius organ, altered in the 1750s and eventually rebuilt by Rühle Orgelbau in 2000. The German 1735 Gottfried Silbermann organ, restored as recently as 2007 by the Jehmlich Orgelbau and Orgelwerkstatt Wegscheider firms of Dresden. A 1990 "ravalement" style Flemish Double Harpsichord built by Robert Hicks, and a 1974 Christopher Clarke Double-Fretted Clavichord.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Octave on October 11, 2013, 12:38:03 AM
Since this thread is bumped up and Que mentioned a relevant recording in the Listening thread, I am keen to find some choice recordings of Buxtehude cantatas.  Namely curious about this recent reissue of ~1987 recordings by the Ricercar Consort:



Also interested in any other very fine recordings of these works.  I searched this thread but found little discussion aside from a brief flare of appreciation from ~2007.
There's an Immerseel disc on Channel that also sounded good, based on very brief samples. 

I don't know the works at all, aside from the masterpiece MEMBRA JESU NOSTRI.  I am impatiently awaiting my second recording of that piece/cycle/collection (Junghanel's) after falling in love with Fasolis' recording.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on October 11, 2013, 02:15:48 AM
This:



...is in my wish-list at Europadisc. Has anyone heard it? Mostly keyboard pieces, interspersed with a few vocal works.

I bought that disc some time ago. I find the performances of vocal works a bit slow for my taste. Nothing else to complain.

Since this thread is bumped up and Que mentioned a relevant recording in the Listening thread, I am keen to find some choice recordings of Buxtehude cantatas.  Namely curious about this recent reissue of ~1987 recordings by the Ricercar Consort:



Also interested in any other very fine recordings of these works.  I searched this thread but found little discussion aside from a brief flare of appreciation from ~2007.
There's an Immerseel disc on Channel that also sounded good, based on very brief samples. 

I don't know the works at all, aside from the masterpiece MEMBRA JESU NOSTRI.  I am impatiently awaiting my second recording of that piece/cycle/collection (Junghanel's) after falling in love with Fasolis' recording.

That Ricercar twofer is good.

Immerseel's disc on Channel Classics is perhaps my favorite Buxtehude cantata disc.

Fasoli's Membra Jesu Nostri on Naxos is absolutely brilliant. I haven't heard Junghanel's version.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on October 11, 2013, 02:26:03 AM
Looks nice, Nav!

There's also this recent (May) Weckmann release from Pierlot & Ricercar Consort, who, based on my limited experience are one of the very best German Baroque groups around.



At least Pierlot & Ricercar Consort's disc "De Profundis" (cantatas by Bruhns, Becker, Tunder, Buxtehude and J.C.Bach) is very very good. I think the Weckmann is a must...  :P
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 11, 2013, 08:21:06 AM

While I'm here, I might as well enquire about this Sweelinck:



Wooley is an academic and reliable musician, also in this release, and I think it is well worth to own the CD.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on October 11, 2013, 08:41:47 AM
Probably the music will sound quite different once the new bunch of the likes of Frisch, Meyerson or Stella try their hands on it. But I agree - the Scheurich sounds very nice as it is, it's on the shopping list. :)

BTW I just hope the pejorative term "pedantic" wasn't used with me in mind, since that would be uncalled for. I didn't question in the historical accuracy of the recording. Noting that the interpretation is on the slow side is an observation of a factual nature. It is not far fetched to assume a relation with the age of the interpretation, since present day fashion is generally different. Whether that would be more or less historically accurate, is something I wouldn't know and will gladly leave up to the experts... I just have and follow my personal preferences in these matters and trust that nobody will take offense... ::)

I found one other performance on the harpsichord:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Cocs5tmRL.jpg)

AmazonFR (http://www.amazon.fr/Pachelbel-Hexacordum-Apollinis-Huguette-Grémy-Chauliac/dp/B003ELRQ5Y/ref=dm_cd_album_lnk)

Any thoughts about this set, which did strike me as possibly interesting?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71rUciX5LiL.jpg)


Of course the word "pedantic" was not written with you in mind. It wasn´t but a general (rhetoric) consideration. And never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined that you might feel it intended for you.

Huguette Gremy-Chauliac is an outstanding musician, judged from her Dieupart suites and the two other recordings of hers I own (lesser known Händel suites and suites by L. Couperin). But mp3 download isn´t exactly me.

I do not know the Andrus Madsen double CD, but as late as yesterday I put it on my wishlist and shall acquire it within foreseeable time.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on October 11, 2013, 10:08:10 AM
Of course the word "pedantic" was not written with you in mind. It wasn´t but a general (rhetoric) consideration. And never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined that you might feel it intended for you.

Phewww, glad to hear that. ;)

Quote
Huguette Gremy-Chauliac is an outstanding musician, judged from her Dieupart suites and the two other recordings of hers I own (lesser known Händel suites and suites by L. Couperin). But mp3 download isn´t exactly me.

I only know her Dieupart and that is indeed outstanding, a marvelous disc which is one of my favourite harpsichord recordings.

Quote
I do not know the Andrus Madsen double CD, but as late as yesterday I put it on my wishlist and shall acquire it within foreseeable time.

Will be interested in your findings. :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Florestan on November 21, 2013, 10:49:37 AM
Any opinions on this, please?

(http://www.thespiritofgambo.nl/media/CD%20covers%20en%20algemene%20plaatjes/viola_da_gamba_Kuhnel_CD_The_Spirit_of_GAMBO.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 26, 2013, 09:04:39 AM
Posted in the listening thread and a new acquisition  only (own the 2-disc chamber set added below) - so for me an introduction to another earlier Baroque composer - the harpsichord CD is excellent - must checkout some of Weckmann's sacred works - seen a couple recordings posted here - Dave :)

Quote
Weckmann, Matthias (c. 1616-1664) - Works for Harpsichord w/ Jan Katzschke on a harpsichord based on German models around 1700 by Dietrich Hein & a lute harpsichord built by Keith Hill in the USA based on historic information (5 of the 16 tracks played on the latter instrument - love the gut strings!) - excellent review by Mr. Bruno HERE (http://www.amazon.com/Works-Harpscichord-M-Weckmann/dp/B000H4VZ6W/ref=sr_1_11?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1385482993&sr=1-11&keywords=Weckmann) - Dave :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-c28xqSq/0/O/Weckmann_Harpsichord.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-FK2LwTL/0/O/Weckmann_KB_ChamMusic.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on November 26, 2013, 03:05:01 PM
Posted in the listening thread and a new acquisition  only (own the 2-disc chamber set added below) - so for me an introduction to another earlier Baroque composer - the harpsichord CD is excellent - must checkout some of Weckmann's sacred works - seen a couple recordings posted here - Dave :)

Do not forget Siebe Henstra´s harpsichord Weckmann CD in the Ricercare twofer. It is rather good, even if it is not as imaginative as Katzschke´s.

My favorite Weckmann harpsichord CD´s are the one by Noelle Spieth on Solstice - only available as download:

http://www.amazon.com/Weckmann-L-uvre-pour-clavecin/dp/B003ELJS1E/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1385506637&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=weckmann+noelle+spieth

and the Gustav Leonhardt Sony CD with works by Weckmann and Froberger.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 26, 2013, 05:35:59 PM
Do not forget Siebe Henstra´s harpsichord Weckmann CD in the Ricercare twofer. It is rather good, even if it is not as imaginative as Katzschke´s.

My favorite Weckmann harpsichord CD´s are the one by Noelle Spieth on Solstice - only available as download:

http://www.amazon.com/Weckmann-L-uvre-pour-clavecin/dp/B003ELJS1E/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1385506637&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=weckmann+noelle+spieth

and the Gustav Leonhardt Sony CD with works by Weckmann and Froberger.

Hi Premont - the Spieth DL is of interest - did a brief comparison and seems to be just a little overlap in the works performed.  In the meantime, I wanted to obtain some of Weckmann's vocal works and ordered the CD below from Amazon - thanks for the comments - Dave :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51aQSh97R0L._SX300_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on November 27, 2013, 10:35:10 AM
Hi Premont - the Spieth DL is of interest - did a brief comparison and seems to be just a little overlap in the works performed.  In the meantime, I wanted to obtain some of Weckmann's vocal works and ordered the CD below from Amazon - thanks for the comments - Dave :)

Relative few works of Weckmann are extant to day, and all three recordings (Spieth, Katzschke and Henstra) claim to contain Weckmann´s complete harpsichord works. .
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 27, 2013, 11:22:55 AM
Relative few works of Weckmann are extant to day, and all three recordings (Spieth, Katzschke and Henstra) claim to contain Weckmann´s complete harpsichord works. .

Well, after your recommendation yesterday, I did an MP3 DL from ClassicsOnline - burned the files to a CD-R and listened this morning - I agree the performance is excellent (but I also like the other) - there was a glitch in tract 6, so I'll burn another CD-R today (and likely skip that tract - it does play on my computer - just don't want to make a lot of 'coasters'!)  -  Dave :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-8Kw55CW/0/S/Weckmann_Spieth-S.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on February 12, 2014, 10:57:37 PM
(http://galleryplus.ebayimg.com/ws/web/130489895159_1_0_1/1000x1000.jpg)


I just want to share this discovery I found on spotify, in case anyone has the time and interest to check it out. I don't know anything about the organist, I can't find any English or French informantion about Martin Neu on line. The Ahrend organ in Herzogenaurach is small scale, colourful, and I think it sounds just right. The CD contains two Boehm choral partitas, I just think the performances are wonderful - lyrical, rapt, introspective music making.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: thebestsound on February 26, 2014, 11:46:43 AM
I may be way out in left field, but I'm trying to find some German horn music I heard on a disc from my local library. The disc is long gone (some rat stole or lost it).  I think Hermann Baumann was the fellow playing the antique horns. The title might have been German Hunting Music. This might not be considered baroque music.  Anyone know something about this ? Thanks
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Bogey on February 27, 2014, 06:08:53 PM
I may be way out in left field, but I'm trying to find some German horn music I heard on a disc from my local library. The disc is long gone (some rat stole or lost it).  I think Hermann Baumann was the fellow playing the antique horns. The title might have been German Hunting Music. This might not be considered baroque music.  Anyone know something about this ? Thanks

Three pages to choose from here
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1?rh=n%3A5174%2Cn%3A85%2Ck%3Ahunting+horns&keywords=hunting+horns&ie=UTF8&qid=1393553254

and best guess:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71Exb5ON9KL.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Moonfish on May 08, 2014, 12:11:26 AM
[I figured I should post this here as well]

German Baroque. Released April 29, 2014 in the US
The Ricercar label is endlessly intriguing.... 
Any thoughts on these recordings?

Contents:
http://issuu.com/elvanden/docs/ric344_livret-web/1?e=6026233/7213391 (http://issuu.com/elvanden/docs/ric344_livret-web/1?e=6026233/7213391)

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Moonfish on May 24, 2014, 09:52:39 PM
I am considering this set. Does anybody on this eminent thread have these recordings? Thoughts?

P


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nnqzYjDCL.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Moonfish on May 24, 2014, 10:15:06 PM
[I figured I should post this here as well]

German Baroque. Released April 29, 2014 in the US
The Ricercar label is endlessly intriguing.... 
Any thoughts on these recordings?

Contents:
http://issuu.com/elvanden/docs/ric344_livret-web/1?e=6026233/7213391 (http://issuu.com/elvanden/docs/ric344_livret-web/1?e=6026233/7213391)



Needless to say I went ahead and ordered this Ricercar set. The Buxtehude recording from this set is wonderful. I have been listening to it over and over.  Hmm, this time period definitely has some beautiful music...   :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Wakefield on May 24, 2014, 10:58:55 PM
I am considering this set. Does anybody on this eminent thread have these recordings? Thoughts?

P


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nnqzYjDCL.jpg)

I don't have it, but it should be noticed they play modern instruments.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on August 23, 2014, 02:14:35 AM
I wonder if Froberger works on piano. Or if anyone has heard a performance on piano that they liked.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on August 23, 2014, 08:30:38 AM
I wonder if Froberger works on piano. Or if anyone has heard a performance on piano that they liked.

Sokolov spent about 10 years really focused exclusively on baroque music for piano, see what you think of his Froberger. I haven't given it a lot of attention to be honest. I have a recording of it with better sound than this youtube, let me know if you want it. The youtube doesn't seem to do it justice at all -- when you see Sokolov you see that the tone he makes is a major part of his art.

https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: milk on August 23, 2014, 09:00:07 AM
Sokolov spent about 10 years really focused exclusively on baroque music for piano, see what you think of his Froberger. I haven't given it a lot of attention to be honest. I have a recording of it with better sound than this youtube, let me know if you want it. The youtube doesn't seem to do it justice at all -- when you see Sokolov you see that the tone he makes is a major part of his art.

https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY
Thanks! I'll check it out.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: clavichorder on October 11, 2014, 04:33:52 PM
Georg Muffat wrote 12 very fine concerti grossi, some of the best orchestral music of that generation that includes Corelli and Alessandro Scarlatti.

His son Gottlieb Muffat wrote some of the finest harpsichord music of the high baroque, in his suites.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2014, 05:13:14 PM
Georg Muffat wrote 12 very fine concerti grossi, some of the best orchestral music of that generation that includes Corelli and Alessandro Scarlatti.

His son Gottlieb Muffat wrote some of the finest harpsichord music of the high baroque, in his suites.

OK - I have the two CDs below of Georg Muffat - nothing by his son - can you educate us further about this father-son duo - any other specific recommendations to consider?  There are plenty of Baroque composers writing in these genres that many of us enjoy - Dave :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-hfKf9DL/0/O/Muffat_Armonico.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-fm4GBhK/0/O/Muffat_Clavier.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Wakefield on October 11, 2014, 05:26:39 PM
OK - I have the two CDs below of Georg Muffat - nothing by his son - can you educate us further about this father-son duo - any other specific recommendations to consider?  There are plenty of Baroque composers writing in these genres that many of us enjoy - Dave :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-hfKf9DL/0/O/Muffat_Armonico.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-fm4GBhK/0/O/Muffat_Clavier.jpg)

Hi, Dave. I would recommend you to check out this recording of the Concerti Grossi:





PI... I have a high opinion of these disks.  :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2014, 07:46:21 PM
Hi, Dave. I would recommend you to check out this recording of the Concerti Grossi:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OK2FeDg9L.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ZYn8ArJYL.jpg)

PI... I have a high opinion of these disks.  :)

Hi Gordo - thanks for the recommendations above - let us know what you think - these Muffat men seem to be unfound & under-recorded, probably our loss?  See my next post here - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 11, 2014, 08:00:10 PM
Georg Muffat wrote 12 very fine concerti grossi, some of the best orchestral music of that generation that includes Corelli and Alessandro Scarlatti.

His son Gottlieb Muffat wrote some of the finest harpsichord music of the high baroque, in his suites.

The above piqued my interest regarding the son, i.e. Gottlieb Muffat (1690-1770) - the youngest and apparently by far the most talented son of Georg Muffat - he spent most of his adult life at the Viennese court (quote below from Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gottlieb_Muffat)) - as shown previously, I have just two CDs of the father's works and am interested in the Concerti Grossi, pending Gordo's comments.

BUT, in perusing the son's recordings, not much is available - however, he seemed to be mainly a keyboard composer (and teacher), so I just did a MP3 DL from Classicsonline (just $6) - burned to CD-R and now listening - Keyboard Works on harpsichord w/ a Japanese performer who studied in Europe, Naoko Akutagawa - always astounds me how much music has been lost to us - attached are the booklet notes that were included in the DL, implying that there may be recently discovered manuscripts?  Who knows?  Dave :)

Quote
Gottlieb Muffat, son of Georg Muffat, served as Hofscholar under Johann Fux in Vienna from 1711 and was appointed to the position of third court organist at the Hofkapelle in 1717. He acquired additional duties over time including the instruction of members of the Imperial family, among them the future Empress Maria Theresa. He was promoted to second organist in 1729 and first organist upon the accession of Maria Theresa to the throne in 1741. He retired from official duties at the court in 1763.

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-9m2MdVT/0/O/Muffat_Gottlieb.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-QhQ8Rxh/0/O/Muffat_GottliebNotes.png)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: king ubu on October 12, 2014, 06:11:35 AM
Forgive me if this has been mentioned, only checked the final four or five pages here - but this is a Muffat disc I enjoy:



Can be had cheaply on the marketplace, for instance here:
http://www.amazon.de/Orgelmusik-Wiener-Hof-Wolfgang-Kogert/dp/B002AG5TW6

Here's a review in German
http://www.organ-journal.com/en_UK/journal/showarticle,31141.html

It's about the Kogert disc as well as and another disc also including organ music from the Viennese court by Jeremy Joseph, whom I don't know - this one:



The multi-lingual booklets are available on the NCA website - samples are there as well:

Kogert:
http://www.ncamusic.com/produkte-details.php?lang=de&id=60206
Straight to the PDF: http://www.ncamusic.de/com/drucksachen/60206_booklet.pdf

Joseph:
http://www.ncamusic.com/produkte-details.php?id=60207&lang=de
Straight to the PDF: http://www.ncamusic.de/com/drucksachen/60207_booklet.pdf


Guess that Jeremy Joseph disc goes onto my shopping list ...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: king ubu on October 31, 2014, 02:57:25 PM
Second of the Ricercar German Baroque box set repackings is out ... haven't even started listening to the first yet:



One thing that bothers me with the first is the lack of recording dates (not even a year is given in most cases, where recordings from other labels were licensed, you get the (P) year, but that's it). A bit of a blunder for a label doing such a great job (their Telemann box, "Les Plaisirs de la table", is somewhat flawed too though, not providing any clear identification for the works contained).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 09, 2014, 11:17:28 AM
I noticed to my delight that cpo label is starting a project of complete recordings of Johann Kuhnau's (1660-1722) cantatas! Kuhnau of course was J. S. Bach's predecessor in Leipzig and an unjustly overlooked composer of baroque era suffering from the gigantic shadow of J. S. Bach's towering genius.

Apparently about fifty cantatas by Kuhnau have survived. Volume 1 will be released this month. I am extremely excited. I have been dreaming about projects like this. Kuhnau's complete cantatas? Wow, almost too good to be true!  ???  8)  :P
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on November 10, 2014, 08:20:00 AM
I noticed to my delight that cpo label is starting a project of complete recordings of Johann Kuhnau's (1660-1722) cantatas! Kuhnau of course was J. S. Bach's predecessor in Leipzig and an unjustly overlooked composer of baroque era suffering from the gigantic shadow of J. S. Bach's towering genius.

Apparently about fifty cantatas by Kuhnau have survived. Volume 1 will be released this month. I am extremely excited. I have been dreaming about projects like this. Kuhnau's complete cantatas? Wow, almost too good to be true!  ???  8)  :P
+ 1.I have 2 Kuhnau discs, and both are very impressive.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Florestan on April 15, 2015, 02:46:13 AM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/113/MI0001113356.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

This is a gorgeous disc, filled with superb music and splendid musicmaking in spectacular sonics. Desert island stuff.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on April 15, 2015, 02:49:38 AM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/113/MI0001113356.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

This is a gorgeous disc, filled with superb music and splendid musicmaking in spectacular sonics. Desert island stuff.
Yes it is. Highly recommended by me as well.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: San Antone on November 15, 2015, 06:15:43 PM
Johann Staden and the Nuremberg School (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/11/15/johann-staden-and-the-nuremberg-school/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/staden2.jpg?w=300&h=300)

Johann Staden (baptized 2 July 1581 – 15 November 1634) He was a distinguished and versatile composer, and one of the outstanding German musicians of his day. In his later years he was the leading musician in Nuremberg and established the so-called Nuremberg school of the 17th century.

The world premiere recording of 15 motets of Johann Staden was recently released in April, 2015. The Windsbach Boys Choir was founded in 1946 by Hans Thamm and since 1978 under the direction of Karl-Friedrich Beringer, the choir is one of the most renowned boys choirs of the world, and along with the early music specialists Capella de la Torre and Concerto Palatino this recording has been praised for the "cleanliness and lightness, balance and softness" of it's sound.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 15, 2015, 06:52:06 PM
I noticed to my delight that cpo label is starting a project of complete recordings of Johann Kuhnau's (1660-1722) cantatas! Kuhnau of course was J. S. Bach's predecessor in Leipzig and an unjustly overlooked composer of baroque era suffering from the gigantic shadow of J. S. Bach's towering genius.

Apparently about fifty cantatas by Kuhnau have survived. Volume 1 will be released this month. I am extremely excited. I have been dreaming about projects like this. Kuhnau's complete cantatas? Wow, almost too good to be true!  ???  8)  :P

Hi Poju - just checked Amazon USA and ordered the cantata CD discussed above - also have the one below on way to me from 'across the pond' - should arrive shortly - Dave :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81JyVLOAVtL._SL1059_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 15, 2015, 07:09:44 PM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/113/MI0001113356.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

This is a gorgeous disc, filled with superb music and splendid musicmaking in spectacular sonics. Desert island stuff.

Hi Andrei - thought that I already owned that CD but not in my database nor found in my collection - SO, guess another to add to my 'wish list' - believe that I own the same performers on ZigZag of another composer (or more?) - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on November 16, 2015, 05:16:11 AM
Hi Poju - just checked Amazon USA and ordered the cantata CD discussed above - also have the one below on way to me from 'across the pond' - should arrive shortly - Dave :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81JyVLOAVtL._SL1059_.jpg)

That's cool Dave.  ;) Hope you enjoy them.

I haven't bought the CPO cantata disc myself yet. I have been into post WWII stuff lately as you may have noticed...  ;D

Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 03, 2015, 07:56:15 AM
Johann Gottlieb Janitsch (1708-1763) -portion of his bio from Wiki quoted below; this composer was unknown to me until a post of one of his recordings w/ the Epoca Barocca (a favorite group of mine and own a number of their recordings) was posted in the 'listening thread'; SO, I was looking on Amazon planning to order that CD, but came across another group, Christopher Palameta w/ Notturna who had recorded 3 discs of Janitsch's works - a Fanfare review of V.3 (attached) was convincing, so went ahead and ordered all three below from the Amazon MP - just $8 (had $10 remaining on a gift card which pretty much paid the the S&H) - looking forward to hearing these performances.  Dave :)

Quote
From 1740, when Frederick ascended to the Prussian throne, Janitsch's position as Contraviolinist was transferred to the newly founded Berlin Court Orchestra, where he was awarded a salary of 350 thalers. The Friday academies continued in Berlin in his home in the form of weekly concerts open to the public. This musical association was the first in a long line of similar organisations which arose in Berlin after 1750. From 1743, Janitsch was required to compose and organise "Redutenmusik" for the annual court balls held at carnival time by Frederick. The music was performed by 24 oboists, specially selected from various regiments of the Prussian army.

Janitsch's compositional style is typical of the galant and the empfindsamer Stil of the first half of the 18th century. Although several of Janitsch's works were already published by the Breitkopf during his lifetime, most of his surviving output exists in manuscript form. The largest repository of Janitsch's surviving works is the archive of the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin, which was thought to have been destroyed during World War II until it was rediscovered in the Kiev Conservatory in 2000. There are also many other manuscripts in libraries across europe (Source (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Gottlieb_Janitsch)).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51S4L00DbbL.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71rJkC%2BXUjL._SL1200_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61wbtnCujTL._SL1000_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on December 03, 2015, 01:21:19 PM
Hi Andrei - thought that I already owned that CD but not in my database nor found in my collection - SO, guess another to add to my 'wish list' - believe that I own the same performers on ZigZag of another composer (or more?) - Dave :)
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/zigzagzzt060902.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 03, 2015, 02:48:40 PM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/zigzagzzt060902.jpg)

Hi New Erato - assume that the above is a recommendation?  I do own that one and may have confused w/ the other discussed which is now also in my collection -  :laugh:  Dave
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 05, 2015, 01:34:06 AM
Recommendations on Fasch recordings, kindly provided by Dave, here quoted for reference:

Hi Que - Johann Fasch (1688-1758) - German Baroque w/ dates similar to Handel - wrote a lot of vocal music (most lost apparently) and much instrumental music - Orchestral Suites, Concertos, Symphonies, & Chamber Works (list HERE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Fasch)) w/ a LOT of winds used.  At present, I own the 10 CDs shown below (not sure at the moment 'how much' overlap there may be?) - virtually all of these are period performances - recommendations?  I really enjoy all of these discs, but the Accent ones w/ Il Gardellino are excellent; the Overtures/Symphonies w/ Rémy are also outstanding for a 'bigger band' - Dave :)

P.S. Click for a much larger image!

(https://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-VfnJMQQ/0/O/Fasch_CDs.png)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 05, 2015, 01:43:21 AM
Forgive me if this has been mentioned, only checked the final four or five pages here - but this is a Muffat disc I enjoy:



Can be had cheaply on the marketplace, for instance here:
http://www.amazon.de/Orgelmusik-Wiener-Hof-Wolfgang-Kogert/dp/B002AG5TW6

Here's a review in German
http://www.organ-journal.com/en_UK/journal/showarticle,31141.html

It's about the Kogert disc as well as and another disc also including organ music from the Viennese court by Jeremy Joseph, whom I don't know - this one:



The multi-lingual booklets are available on the NCA website - samples are there as well:

Kogert:
http://www.ncamusic.com/produkte-details.php?lang=de&id=60206
Straight to the PDF: http://www.ncamusic.de/com/drucksachen/60206_booklet.pdf

Joseph:
http://www.ncamusic.com/produkte-details.php?id=60207&lang=de
Straight to the PDF: http://www.ncamusic.de/com/drucksachen/60207_booklet.pdf


Guess that Jeremy Joseph disc goes onto my shopping list ...

Thanks for that! :) For some reason I always get confused between the two Muffats (father Georg & son Gottlieb). Luckily they are both included in the 1st disc you recommend. :D

An awesome recording of Georg's opus magnum:



A wonderful recording with organ music by Gottlieb:



For Froberger I would suggest Van Asperen on Aeolus: volumes 5-7 of the keyboard series contain the organ repertoire.

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on December 27, 2015, 04:30:25 AM
I came across this (a 4CD set, no less! ???):


Anyone familiar with this music or composer?  :)

Q
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Jo498 on February 04, 2016, 06:16:36 AM
Does anyone know this disc:


Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 10, 2016, 10:40:33 AM
I noticed to my delight that cpo label is starting a project of complete recordings of Johann Kuhnau's (1660-1722) cantatas! Kuhnau of course was J. S. Bach's predecessor in Leipzig and an unjustly overlooked composer of baroque era suffering from the gigantic shadow of J. S. Bach's towering genius.
(http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2044.0;attach=40112)
Apparently about fifty cantatas by Kuhnau have survived. Volume 1 will be released this month. I am extremely excited. I have been dreaming about projects like this. Kuhnau's complete cantatas? Wow, almost too good to be true!  ???  8)  :P

Finally listening to this cd (arrived yesterday). The sound image is something I am not very fond of. Nothing is in the middle! Everything is on the left and right. The sound is also somehow fuzzy. The performers "are there somewhere". Very unnatural sound, everything sounds so close and reverberant it's "heavy". Thanks to crossfeed the sound is somewhat tolerable, but far from great. What a dissappointment! As if there was too much Kuhnau out there. These are world premier performances now ruined by bad sound engineering. The music is perhaps great, hard to tell...  :-\

Hopefully the following volumes are recorded better...
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: The new erato on December 10, 2016, 10:45:16 AM
Finally listening to this cd (arrived yesterday). The sound image is something I am not very fond of. Nothing is in the middle! Everything is on the left and right. The sound is also somehow fuzzy. The performers "are there somewhere". Very unnatural sound, everything sounds so close and reverberant it's "heavy". Thanks to crossfeed the sound is somewhat tolerable, but far from great. What a dissappointment! As if there was too much Kuhnau out there. These are world premier performances now ruined by bad sound engineering. The music is perhaps great, hard to tell...  :-\

Hopefully the following volumes are recorded better...
I agree, this doesn't match the wonderful Kuhnau recording from the Kings Consort on Hyperion.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on December 10, 2016, 11:16:26 AM
I agree, this doesn't match the wonderful Kuhnau recording from the Kings Consort on Hyperion.
Yes, the Hyperion cd is clearly better. It also has too wide stereo image, but at least theres stuff in the middle and the sound is natural, has some depth. Using the strongest crossfeed option (-1 dB) of my headphone adapter makes the sound quite enjoyable.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 10, 2018, 09:00:49 AM
Well, just left the post quoted below in the 'listening thread' - Schütz does not seem to have his own thread - an important early Baroque German composer w/ a couple of visits to Italy (studied w/ Gabrieli & possibly Monteverdi) - short BIO HERE (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Schutz-Heinrich.htm) - love his blending of voice and instruments - a list of his works are in the link given - I'm missing the 'Sacred Symphonies' - Carus is offering 3 2-CD sets w/ Rademann (several well reviewed in the Fanfare Archives).

SO, any Schütz fans?  Recommendations, especially regarding the Carus project - thanks.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51sDJHFvwjL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71IPqFY7XBL._SL1200_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81GT%2BBFIO7L._SL1429_.jpg)


Quote
Well, I'm reading a book on musical instruments and the composer below was discussed in the trombone chapter - only own 7 or 8 discs of his works, but 5 are in the two sets below - so decided to give them a listen today:

Schütz, Heinrich (1585-1672) - Kleine Geistliche Konzerte & Geistliche Chormusik - both well done - see reviews attached, if interested - just checked Amazon - there seems to be many multi-CD offerings, a number on the Carus label - Dave :)

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/019/MI0001019375.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/717rpEFrd5L._SL1400_.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 28, 2018, 01:35:17 PM
Well, just left the post quoted below in the 'listening thread' - Schütz does not seem to have his own thread - an important early Baroque German composer w/ a couple of visits to Italy (studied w/ Gabrieli & possibly Monteverdi) - short BIO HERE (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Schutz-Heinrich.htm) - love his blending of voice and instruments - a list of his works are in the link given - I'm missing the 'Sacred Symphonies' - Carus is offering 3 2-CD sets w/ Rademann (several well reviewed in the Fanfare Archives).

SO, any Schütz fans?  Recommendations, especially regarding the Carus project - thanks.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51sDJHFvwjL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71IPqFY7XBL._SL1200_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81GT%2BBFIO7L._SL1429_.jpg)

Well, the Schütz double-discs sets shown above are not cheap on Amazon USA - BUT, I just got some VISA credits to my account and used $50 to purchase the trio of six discs for about $30 - happy w/ the buy and plan to enjoy - attached are reviews of the three sets on MusicWeb, for those interested.  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: North Star on July 28, 2018, 01:43:03 PM
Well, the Schütz double-discs sets shown above are not cheap on Amazon USA - BUT, I just got some VISA credits to my account and used $50 to purchase the trio of six discs for about $30 - happy w/ the buy and plan to enjoy - attached are reviews of the three sets on MusicWeb, for those interested.  Dave :)
So you decided not to go for the box sets, then? The backs of the boxes also say "English texts included", so that's good.


Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 28, 2018, 01:58:52 PM
So you decided not to go for the box sets, then? The backs of the boxes also say "English texts included", so that's good.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81VwmLihRML._SY355_.jpg)  (https://www.hbdirect.com/coverm/thumbnails/4009350830424.jpg)

Hi North Star - yep, despite the great reviews (of which my 'Sacred Symphonies' are part of this project), I just would not want to listen that often to nearly 2 dozen CDs of Schütz's music, plus the ones I already own - SO, when these new arrivals are added to my collection, I'll have about 14 discs which seems enough for me.  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: North Star on July 28, 2018, 06:50:30 PM
Hi North Star - yep, despite the great reviews (of which my 'Sacred Symphonies' are part of this project), I just would not want to listen that often to nearly 2 dozen CDs of Schütz's music, plus the ones I already own - SO, when these new arrivals are added to my collection, I'll have about 14 discs which seems enough for me.  Dave :)
Fair enough, Dave, if not in the GMG spirit of obsessive completism.  :laugh:
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 29, 2018, 06:44:08 AM
Fair enough, Dave, if not in the GMG spirit of obsessive completism.  :laugh:

LOL!  ;D  Well, I've been down that road plenty of times, so know the feeling!  ::) :D  Dave
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on July 26, 2019, 09:30:16 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5103WCRF0uL.jpg)

I think this recording has been unjustly maligned, including by myself. It’s true that each sonata is preceded by a long spoken introduction, but that’s easy to skip. And it’s true that there is some voice within the sonatas too, but short and really not a problem at all for me.

In some sonatas he uses a portative organ. In other sonatas he uses a harpsichord, quite a characterful and unusual instrument (a “Lefebvre” possibly) I can’t find any details about these instruments though.

Neither do I know how much of the music is improvised, as was apparently the case with Kuhnau by contemporary performers. I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that he’s improvising while he’s speaking.  What I can say is that Leonhardt avoids any suggestion of narcissistic bravura, on the contrary, it is played with a sense of self-abandon.

 I regret having poo-pooed the recording for so long. Better late than never though.

What to say about the music? Willi Appel opined in his inimitable way concerning Kuhnau that when he’s good he’s very very good and when he’s bad he’s terrible.

Well it’s all good.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: (: premont :) on July 26, 2019, 10:53:23 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5103WCRF0uL.jpg)

I think this recording has been unjustly maligned, including by myself. It’s true that each sonata is preceded by a long spoken introduction, but that’s easy to skip. And it’s true that there is some voice within the sonatas too, but short and really not a problem at all for me.

I own the Leonhardt recording the Molardi and the Butt, but still these sonatas have never really grown on me. I think a revisit would benefit from studying the score while listening. The score can be downloaded for free at IMSLP

https://imslp.org/index.php?title=Category:Composers&from=Po
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on July 26, 2019, 11:46:20 AM
I don’t know Butt or Moladi, the music can seem static and episodic but I think in Leonhardt’s hands at least it seems to be full of life and good humour.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 16, 2020, 08:03:44 AM
Yesterday, I left the post quoted below w/ attachment in the listening thread - now buried 4-5 pages behind with no specific comments -  :laugh:

So, reposting here to see if there are Buxtehude fans who may own and/or have compared these various versions of his harpsichord music - Dave :)

Quote
Buxtehude, Dietrich (1637-1707) - Organ & Harpsichord Works w/ the performers on the cover art - concerning the Simone Stella harpsichord recordings, there seems to be some debate on the recording quality/extraneous noise - see the attached reviews that address this issue - at the moment, I've been listening to the first 2 discs w/ headphones and am not detecting what has been described (especially by one of the Amazonians - last short statement in the PDF file).

Lars Ulrik Mortensen & Ton Koopman have also been recording multiple CDs of Buxtehude's harpsichord works - Mortensen has 3 Naxos discs listed at JPC (not sure if more are available and/or planned?); Koopman seems to have recorded the most, but not boxed and expensive (unless someone knows a source not found by me) - in general, Stella's reviews have been quite good and the price is right.  Would appreciate any comments from those who own any of these discs/sets - thanks.  Dave :)

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Mar07/Buxtehude_mdg31414382.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51-taFFMTfL.jpg)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Mandryka on January 16, 2020, 08:30:46 AM
I don't know Stella.

Mortensen is reflective and lyrical and rather serious; Koopman is more articulated, and his style is vigorous and flamboyant. Koopman has a couple of excellent instruments and they're well recorded. So is Mortensen.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 16, 2020, 09:15:10 AM
The Mortensen recording were originally on the Danish label dacapo, so they are "complete" (not a complete recording, though).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: San Antone on January 16, 2020, 09:39:42 AM
Simone Stella has recorded complete keyboard works on both organ and harpsichord for Bohm, Buxtehude, Rameau, Reincken, Walther and some Bach, Handel, Froberger and others.  I listened to the Buxtehude recording Sonic Dave posted, and it is a nice sounding instrument and generally very good, IMO, but I am not very experienced with this German Baroque (beyond Bach).
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 16, 2020, 11:06:56 AM
Thanks Guys for the comments on Buxtehude's Harpsichord Music - I listened to Mortensen's V.1 on headphones using Amazon Prime and really enjoyed his playing, the harpsichord, and the quality of the recording (I'd have to agree w/ the Fanfare reviewers); yesterday, I listened to the first 2 CDs of Simone Stella's recordings and must say that I'm now not as pleased, especially w/ the sound stage, plus I did hear an occasional distortion - now Stella had 4 CDs vs. 3 discs by Mortensen, so the latter is 'incomplete' I presume.  At any rate, found all 3 of the Naxos CDs on the Amazon MP (several used from reliable sources that I've used before) - with some credit, got the trio for about $10 USD - hope that all play well upon arrival.  Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 16, 2020, 11:25:47 AM
With "complete" in scare quotes I meant that they encompass all Buxtehude that Mortensen recorded in the late 1990s for Dacapo (Note that Naxos also has a few Buxtehude chamber music discs with him, also originally on Dacapo) and it is rather unlikely that he will add more to this more than 20 years later. I am very fond of them and with the additional Naxos disc with Glen Wilson (overlaps, so not needed for repertoire) they are sufficient for my Buxtehude harpsichord needs. The big set of variations is brilliant and entertaining (and supposedly was a major influence on Bach's Goldber variations).

(Silly factoid: Buxtehude is also a town in northern Germany, close to Hamburg.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buxtehude
The name does sound rather funny and I heard/read it for the first time in a famous German children's book so for several years I was not entirely sure whether it was a made up name/town or a real one.)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on January 17, 2020, 01:14:37 AM
Thanks Guys for the comments on Buxtehude's Harpsichord Music - I listened to Mortensen's V.1 on headphones using Amazon Prime and really enjoyed his playing, the harpsichord, and the quality of the recording (I'd have to agree w/ the Fanfare reviewers); yesterday, I listened to the first 2 CDs of Simone Stella's recordings and must say that I'm now not as pleased, especially w/ the sound stage, plus I did hear an occasional distortion - now Stella had 4 CDs vs. 3 discs by Mortensen, so the latter is 'incomplete' I presume.  At any rate, found all 3 of the Naxos CDs on the Amazon MP (several used from reliable sources that I've used before) - with some credit, got the trio for about $10 USD - hope that all play well upon arrival.  Dave :)

Mortensen and Stella have quite a different approach. Now, I wasn't paying attention to extraneous noises but preferred Stella's lively approach that heightens Buxtehude's imaginative sides and Italian influences. Mortensen is beautifully phrased, solid and well considered, but not so exciting...

.



Lots of affirmations on the qualities of this set. And yes, even considering I already had Mortensen, getting this was definitely worth it. In terms of vividness, sheer freshness and expressive articulation this trumps Mortensen's much more sober, Calvinistic approach. Simone Stella plays an extremely pretty and intimate sounding copy after Johannes Ruckers.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: DavidW on February 09, 2021, 04:22:48 PM
I wanted to recommend this recording of various Trio Sonatas from 17th century Germany:

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/169/MI0001169214.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Just check out the variety of composers, all well performed:
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 07, 2021, 03:11:12 AM
Spotted this new release, which might of interest to Graupner fans as well as fans of Sergio Azzolini:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71YzURpmTaS._AC_SX522_.jpg)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Aug/Graupner-cantatas-5553532.htm
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Que on August 07, 2021, 03:26:49 AM
Another interesting issue:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71f6GHd7MFL._AC_SX522_.jpg)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Jul/Erlebach-lieder-ALPHA725.htm
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: Biffo on August 08, 2021, 02:24:53 AM
Spotted this new release, which might of interest to Graupner fans as well as fans of Sergio Azzolini:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71YzURpmTaS._AC_SX522_.jpg)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Aug/Graupner-cantatas-5553532.htm

Graupner is unknown to me as is Sergio Azzolini but I have been listening to the album on Spotify - very enjoyable.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 08, 2021, 06:41:08 AM
Spotted this new release, which might of interest to Graupner fans as well as fans of Sergio Azzolini:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71YzURpmTaS._AC_SX522_.jpg)  (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Apr11/Graupner_concs_83443.jpg)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Aug/Graupner-cantatas-5553532.htm

Hi Que - well, I'm not much of a 'cantata collector' (except for JS Bach and just small numbers of a few others), BUT I do love Azzolini - inserted above if one just wants him doing Graupner instrumental bassoon, that recording is superb (review HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Apr11/Graupner_concs_83443.htm)) - Dave :)
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on October 09, 2021, 09:03:14 AM
I'm listening to Buxtehude again trying to get into the correct "mode" of classical music listening. The one Cantatas CD Naxos has released (Aradia Ensemble / Kevin Mallow).

Very nice CD!  0:)

Graupner is unknown to me as is Sergio Azzolini but I have been listening to the album on Spotify - very enjoyable.

Graupner is one of the most important contemporaries of Bach alongside with Telemann.
Title: Re: German Baroque Music
Post by: 71 dB on October 09, 2021, 09:13:42 AM
Spotted this new release, which might of interest to Graupner fans as well as fans of Sergio Azzolini:

I checked if I have any recordings of Sergio Azzolini and I do have this one:


That's one disc to re-visit in the near future.  $:)