GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Expresso on October 09, 2007, 05:22:44 AM

Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Expresso on October 09, 2007, 05:22:44 AM

It just came to me that i don't have anything by Mendelssohn. I listened to a vocal work (probably psalm 42) of his on the radio and it sounded good, in a Bach-like style.

Which are considered to be some of his best works?
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: 71 dB on October 09, 2007, 05:37:09 AM
Mendelssohn is an undervalued composer imo.

He was a brilliant oratorio composer (Eliah, Paulus)

His Octet Op. 20 is a chamber masterpiece (Get the stunning Naxos disc with Bruch's octet)

If you like string orchestra music with baroque-like energy his String Symphonies are very enjoyable.

Violin Concerto Op. 64 is an essential concerto.
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: dirkronk on October 09, 2007, 07:14:00 AM
His symphony #4 "Italian" is a true orchestral warhorse, filled with tunes you're sure to find familiar and quite invigorating. Many superb versions of it are out there (Stokowski, Szell, and various others come to mind), but none I've ever heard surpasses Van Beinum/Concertgebouw in a splendid mono (but hi-fi) recording from the early '50s. I've cherished my LP copies for at least two decades, but it's hard to find in CD form unless one frequents the Japanese online stores.

Much of Mendelssohn's chamber music is beautifully rewarding. Seek it out and sample whatever you find.

Enjoy the hunt.

Dirk
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: hautbois on October 09, 2007, 09:47:56 AM
(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/51BS8DCWVEL.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w300/front/0/8412964.jpg)
P.S: There seems to be another recording with Argerich and Kremer with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra that everyone raves about. Never
heard of it, but this rendition from Concerto Koln and 2 top notch soloists in the period instrument performance scene is more than necessary.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51y8GEKuzvL.jpg) (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZYQ21586L.jpg)

This is my essential Mendelssohn list, as for the symphonies, they are so well written that one can barely go wrong with any interpretation. For solo piano works, the Song without Words is probably essential along with smaller pieces like the Rondo Capriccioso in E minor Op.14. I am not familiar with those. Hope this helps.

Howard
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: BorisG on October 09, 2007, 01:52:30 PM
(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/CDUCoverArt/Music/94/7390194.jpg)
(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/270/278945.jpg)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: hornteacher on October 09, 2007, 04:05:18 PM
It just came to me that i don't have anything by Mendelssohn.

 :o :o :o :o :o  We must fix this.

A great starter kit would be:

Midsummer Night's Dream Overture
Piano Concerto 1
Symphony 4
Octet in Eb
and the VIOLIN CONCERTO performed by none other than:

Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Bogey on October 09, 2007, 04:47:50 PM
Really enjoy the below recording of his 4th.  Besides, if yo do not enjoy it, you are at least stuck with one of the best Schubert 8th's around.  ;)

(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/41G2FTBKVNL._AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: robnewman on June 03, 2009, 09:28:33 AM

Felix Mendelssohn
Octet, Op.20
Scherzo
Guarneri String Quartet and Soloists (Excerpt)

http://www.mediafire.com/?r35qoxeyjzw






Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: robnewman on June 03, 2009, 09:40:40 AM

Felix Mendelssohn
Violin Concerto in E Minor
3rd Movement
Soloist - Jascha Heifetz
Boston Symphony Orchestra/Munch

http://www.mediafire.com/?zmuqjzdguzz


Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Daverz on June 03, 2009, 10:24:56 AM
A Midsummer Night's Dream incidental music
Violin Concerto
Piano Concertos (2)
Die Erste Walpurgisnacht
Symphonies (5), particularly 3 & 4
Piano Trios (2)
Octet
String Quartets (6)
String Quintet #2
Cello Sonatas (2)
The Hebrides
Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage
The Fair Melusine

String Symphonies (12)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Gabriel on June 03, 2009, 11:27:02 AM
There are so many great works by Mendelssohn. However, I tend to agree with the voices that consider the overture to the Midsummer Night's Dream as a kind of musical miracle. I see it with "classical" eyes, and I'm impressed by it; I see it with "romantic" eyes, and it is the same. And it is astonishing that when Mendelssohn decided to compose the rest of the incidental music, he was able to keep the same level.
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Coopmv on June 03, 2009, 03:34:05 PM
I enjoy some of the more obscure Mendelssohn works such as these organ works, though I have yet to play the set after receiving it from MDT over a month ago ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41k8SVejoYL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 03, 2009, 03:37:00 PM
And it is astonishing that when Mendelssohn decided to compose the rest of the incidental music, he was able to keep the same level.

And I've read this point used as proof of his lack of development as a composer. I don't agree though  :)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Coopmv on June 03, 2009, 03:38:08 PM
Here is a wonderful set of Piano Works I have really enjoyed ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4106248NAVL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Coopmv on June 03, 2009, 03:40:14 PM
:o :o :o :o :o  We must fix this.

A great starter kit would be:

Midsummer Night's Dream Overture
Piano Concerto 1
Symphony 4
Octet in Eb
and the VIOLIN CONCERTO performed by none other than:


 

While I have a few CD's by Hilary Hahn, I am still more impressed with Julia Fischer overall ...
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: hornteacher on June 03, 2009, 04:21:35 PM
 

While I have a few CD's by Hilary Hahn, I am still more impressed with Julia Fischer overall ...

Also a great violinist.  I particularly enjoy her Tchaikovsky recording and the Vivaldi DVD, gorgeous.  I have to go to Hahn for the Mendelssohn though.   :)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Gurn Blanston on June 03, 2009, 04:25:26 PM
Here is a wonderful set of Piano Works I have really enjoyed ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4106248NAVL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I don't have that whole set, but I have 2 "Songs Without Words" disks from it and I agree, he matches up nicely to the music. I enjoy this disk for the sonatas:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51GWWT4JTVL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

8)

----------------
Listening to:
Freiburg Baroque Orchestra - K 297B Anh C14.01 Sinfonia Concertante in Eb for Flute, Oboe, Horn & Bassoon 3rd mvmt - Andantino con variazioni
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Gabriel on June 04, 2009, 02:23:35 AM
And I've read this point used as proof of his lack of development as a composer. I don't agree though  :)

Don't agree then! ;D He developed in style: his works of the 1840s are different from the ones composed in the 1820s. But the fact that he managed to match with the incidental music such a masterpiece as the overture is for me not less than a proof of Mendelssohn's splendid talent. (Or, if you prefer, "genius" ;)).
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Herman on June 04, 2009, 02:37:24 AM
(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/57/c9/21d5225b9da0565ce7163110.L.jpg)
The combined Janacek & Smetana String Quartets recorded arguably one of the very best versions of the much recorded Octet. And you get the Suk trio performing the 1st piano trio.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WGX1YCYQL.jpg)
Milstein is the violinist to go to for the concerto, and the one with Steinberg is perhaps the most felicitous recording.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/318BG1G920L.jpg)
Mendelssohn a composer who didn't develop? His string quartets cover his entire life.

For the piano works Frith on Naxos might be a very good option; I've heard from various sources he's the Mendelssohn performer now. No idea why he's on a budget label.
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: FideLeo on June 04, 2009, 05:53:09 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51OGDczhzRL._SS500_.jpg)

Includes the concerto recording recommended above by Howard.
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 04, 2009, 12:55:49 PM
But the fact that he managed to match with the incidental music such a masterpiece as the overture is for me not less than a proof of Mendelssohn's splendid talent. (Or, if you prefer, "genius" ;)).

I agree!  :)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Sorin Eushayson on June 05, 2009, 06:51:00 PM
I see a lot of these recommendations and think to myself, "No no no!"

Try this for your first Mendelssohn album:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51W55VBH93L._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Hanover-Band-Plays-Mendelssohn/dp/B0007PL8EK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1244260201&sr=1-1)
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Coopmv on June 05, 2009, 07:07:33 PM
I see a lot of these recommendations and think to myself, "No no no!"

Try this for your first Mendelssohn album:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51W55VBH93L._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Hanover-Band-Plays-Mendelssohn/dp/B0007PL8EK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1244260201&sr=1-1)

I have this set by Roy Goodman, which I think is a decent set.  I think Goodman is better known for his baroque recordings ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51F9ZXE793L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2009, 08:19:28 PM
I have this set by Roy Goodman, which I think is a decent set.  I think Goodman is better known for his baroque recordings ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51F9ZXE793L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)



For the string symphonies try to compare to the Concerto Koeln recommended above -- you might be delighted that you do.

ps. Goodman recorded a ton of Haydn symphonies but the series was cut before it was completed.
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Sorin Eushayson on June 05, 2009, 08:43:23 PM
For the string symphonies try to compare to the Concerto Koeln recommended above -- you might be delighted that you do.

I have both of them, they're both quite good.  The Hanover Band's cycle has the full orchestration of No. 8, which is quite a treat.

ps. Goodman recorded a ton of Haydn symphonies but the series was cut before it was completed.

I detect a theme with regards to Haydn symphony cycles...  :'(
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2009, 08:54:46 PM
I detect a theme with regards to Haydn symphony cycles...  :'(

Mendelssohn wouldn't mind a reference to Haydn on the side, would he?  ;) 

I still urge coopmv to try the Concerto Koeln performance, which to my ears is actually superior to the Goodman, but of course tastes differ. 
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Slezak on July 27, 2009, 11:39:49 AM
 For goodies on the obscure side, I have his Concerto in D minor, written at age 13, and the extant music from his opera "Loreley", and the Turkish Tavern Song(for male chorus).  SS
Title: Re: Mendelssohn
Post by: Dana on July 27, 2009, 11:45:17 PM
      The violin concerto really is a great place to start, but don't just stop at one recording - this is one of those classic romantic concertos where each of a dozen different recordings will show you a different, yet equally essential, facet of the work. I also enjoy the string quintets. They're yin and yang to each other, in a Brahmsian sort of way...
Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 22, 2009, 06:59:02 AM
Felix Mendelssohn (Bartholdy) (1809-1847) - I just finished 'perusing' a book entitled Mendelssohn: A Life in Music by R. Larry Todd (a Professor of Music at Duke University and considered the world's expert on this composer); now, I say 'perusing' because the book is over 700+ pages in length, is quite detailed, and has much analyzes of Mendelssohn's (and others') music (which escapes my limits of understanding).

Although 2009 is almost over, this the the 200th Anniversary of Mendelssohn's birth, so certainly a time of celebration for this unfortunately 'short-lived' composer, musician, conductor, and artist; yes indeed he was multi-talented and really did so much in the few years he had on earth.  There are plenty of excellent biographies available, including an extensive Wiki ARTICLE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Mendelssohn) and even his own Website HERE (http://www.felixmendelssohn.com/Default.htm).

Some of the many interesting facts that I learned (or became reacquainted) from the new biography mentioned included: 1) Much more 'in depth' explanation of his conversion to Protestantism and acquisition of the additional surname Bartholdy (of course, his grandfather was the famous 18th century Jewish scholar, Moses Mendelssohn); 2) Extreme precocity of his musical talents in both performing on various instruments and in composing (e.g. he wrote the wonderful Octet & Overture to a Midsummer's Night Dream as a teenager); 3) His utterly close devotion and attachment to his older sister, Fanny Mendelssohn (1805-1847): 4) His strong desire to suppress the publication of Fanny's music, an unfortunate practice toward women composers of the times; 5) His phenomenal ability to improvise on the piano - just many stories (including private audiences w/ Victoria & Albert w/ quotes from her letters); and 6) Many more details of the early deaths of Fanny & Felix w/i 6 months from each other, and both from stroke(s) (I suspect that they likely had congenital vascular brain malformations or possibly aneuryms - just postulation on my part).

But this should be a celebration of the music of Felix Mendelssohn - and I could not find a thread dedicated solely to this composer (yes plenty of posts and some threads related to specific works), so let's hope that all who enjoy this talented individual will contribute.  Although I already own a LOT of his music, a renewed interest started with discovering the musical website Musica Omnia (http://www.musicaomnia.org/index2.htm) started by Peter Watchorn; my initial attraction was to purchase his Bach WTC recordings on the pedal harpsichord (WTC II to be released soon!); there I discovered a series of discs being released in honor of Mendenssohn on this bicentennial birth year; so far, I've purchased two and have a third 3-CDs set is on order, again about to be released; these are performed by the Atlantis Trio (and Ensemble) w/ Jaap Shroder on violin & Penelope Crawford on fortepiano - just excellent.  P.S. the liner notes for these recordings are written by Todd & are superb.

So, please add additional comments, historical events related to this composer, favorite works, and recording recommendations -  :D


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EB2K5YSHL.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnTrioSextet/668544417_TWyFH-O.jpg) 

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnPTrios/687125440_D9TCs-O.jpg)  (http://www.musicaomnia.org/new_pa17.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 22, 2009, 10:42:42 AM
Mendelssohn' wrote just hundreds of compositions from his childhood to the final years of his too abbreviated life; checkout this LISTING (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Felix_MendelssohnWiki), which includes 121 Opus numbers, plus a handful of non-Opus works (e.g. his wonderful String Symphonies, written as a pre-teen!).

Below, I've gleamed some of the the better recognized compositions from this list, many of which warrant inclusion in any comprehensive Mendelssohn collection; missing are many of his solo piano pieces, vocal works (lieder in particular), and other choral compositions; so, comments & recommendations welcomed!   :D

Cello Sonata, No. 1 (Op. 45; 1838)
Cello Sonata, No. 2 (Op. 58; 1843)
Elijah (Op. 70; 1846)
Hebrides Overture (Op. 26; 1830-32)
Overture MSN Dream (Op. 21; 1826)
Piano Concerto, No. 1 (Op. 25; 1831)
Piano Concerto, No. 2 (Op. 40; 1837)
Piano Quartets, 1-3 (Op. 1-3; 1822-25)
Piano Sextet (Op. 110; 1824)
Piano Sonata, No. 1 (Op. 6); 1826)
Piano Sonata, No. 2 (Op. 105; 1821)
Piano Sonata, No. 3 (Op. 106; 1827)
Piano Trio, No. 1 (Op. 49; 1839)
Piano Trio, No. 2 (Op. 66; 1845)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.1 (Op. 19b; 1829-30)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.2 (Op. 30; 1833-34)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.3 (Op. 38; 1836-37)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.4 (Op. 53; 1839-41)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.5 (Op. 62; 1842-44)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.6 (Op. 67; 1843-45)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.7 (Op. 85; 1834-45)
Songs w/o Words, Bk.8 (Op. 102; 1842-45)
St. Paul (Oratorio) (Op. 36; 1836)
String Octet (Op. 20; 1825)
String Quintet, No. 1 (Op. 18; 1826, 1832)
String Quintet, No. 2 (Op. 87; 1845)
String Quartets, 1 & 2 (Op. 12/13; 1827/29)
String Quartets, 3 - 5 (Op. 44; 1837-38)
String Quartet, 6 (Op. 80; 1847)
String Quartet, Four Pieces (Op. 81; date NA)
String Symphonies (None; 1821-23)
Symphony No. 1 (Op. 11; 1824)
Symphony No. 2 (Op. 52; 1840)
Symphony No. 3 (Op. 56; 1841-42)
Symphony No. 4 (Op. 90; 1833)
Symphony No. 5 (Op. 107; 1830)
Violin Concerto (Op. 64; 1844)
Violin Sonata (Op. 4; 1825)
Wedding March (Op. 61 part; 1842)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: listener on November 22, 2009, 12:28:54 PM
and another bi-centenary coming up is Robert Schumann (b. June 8, 1810).  The Vancouver Symphony combined these in a three-day festival a couple weekends ago.
The "biggest hits" played on historical instruments are on Nimbus NI 5158 (Violin Conc. Piano Conc.1 and Symphony 4
The piano is an c.1840 Henschker fortepiano.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Grazioso on November 23, 2009, 02:51:25 AM
Two anniversary box sets worth investigating, the former from BMG/RCA/Sony, the latter from Brilliant:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41mmvPcyAEL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/414Faf4ApmL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on November 23, 2009, 10:30:24 PM
There is seriously no Mendelssohn thread until now??? :o Hard to believe.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 24, 2009, 10:12:10 AM
There is seriously no Mendelssohn thread until now??? :o Hard to believe.

Well, I was reading the book mentioned in my OP; then looked on Sara's Composer Thread under Germany and found no entry for Felix; so, I did some more general searching and except for specific works or genres could not find a dedicated thread - now, I may have missed one?   :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Brahmsian on November 24, 2009, 10:14:25 AM
I'm surprised there wasn't a general Mendelssohn thread?  Considering Saul holds the record number of new topics started......one would think?  :D
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: karlhenning on November 24, 2009, 10:23:25 AM
I'm surprised there wasn't a general Mendelssohn thread?  Considering Saul holds the record number of new topics started......one would think?  :D

Oh, certainly.

And that would account for lack of interest otherwise ; )
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 24, 2009, 10:25:00 AM
Two anniversary box sets worth investigating, the former from BMG/RCA/Sony, the latter from Brilliant:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41mmvPcyAEL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/414Faf4ApmL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Grazioso - thanks for the mention of the two BIG BOXES of Mendelssohn's Works - certainly a one-stop shopping approach!  :D

Actually, last night I looked at my FM collection and compared my items to the list generated in my second post; to my amazment I have nearly everything in that summary; of course, much is missing (solo piano, lieder, songs w/ piano, other vocal pieces, etc.), but my main addition in the future will likely be in 'solo piano' - I do have a wonderful collection of Songs w/o Words w/ Livia Rev (bargain Hyperion Dyad, so all books included!). and a single Naxos disc of other solo piano - recommendations in that genre would be appreciated.

Also, for those who may just be getting started in collecting Mendelssohn, works from his childhood and teenage years can impress, e.g. Octet & Overture to Midsummer's Nights Dream; also, his String Symphonies (written as a pre-teen) are amazingly good and not for just a boy; the 3-disc set w/ Ross Pople & the London Festival Orchestral is excellent!  :)

(http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/t_200/hyperioncdd22020.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/618E7XARNTL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on November 25, 2009, 10:02:14 AM
Sorry all!  :-[

I guess there was a Mendelssohn thread that I overlooked in my search; well now combined and with plenty of previous threads -  :D

Hope that the 'new' additions will stimulate some interest in Felix toward the end of this bicenntenial birth year - Dave  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Opus106 on February 03, 2010, 11:23:38 AM
Anyone celebrating his birth, today? Here it's the fourth already, and I'm about to go to sleep. Just thought I'd let those of you still in the third know about the day.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: karlhenning on February 03, 2010, 11:41:59 AM
Seeing this thread suddenly brings it home, what a non-event last year was in terms of a Mendelssohn bicentenary.

A sobering lesson in the perils of Enthusiasm and Hype overdoing a normally worthy subject.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on February 21, 2011, 06:20:48 PM

Mendelssohn Quartets Galore
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814)



Felix Mendelssohn B.
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=476

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/fmb_1822_by_w_hensel-200x300.jpg) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=476)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 14, 2011, 08:27:33 AM
Felix Mendelssohn (Bartholdy) (1809-1847) - I just finished 'perusing' a book entitled Mendelssohn: A Life in Music by R. Larry Todd (a Professor of Music at Duke University and considered the world's expert on this composer); now, I say 'perusing' because the book is over 700+ pages in length, is quite detailed, and has much analyzes of Mendelssohn's (and others') music (which escapes my limits of understanding).

Although 2009 is almost over, this the the 200th Anniversary of Mendelssohn's birth, so certainly a time of celebration for this unfortunately 'short-lived' composer, musician, conductor, and artist; yes indeed he was multi-talented and really did so much in the few years he had on earth.  There are plenty of excellent biographies available, including an extensive Wiki ARTICLE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Mendelssohn) and even his own Website HERE (http://www.felixmendelssohn.com/Default.htm).

Some of the many interesting facts that I learned (or became reacquainted) from the new biography mentioned included: 1) Much more 'in depth' explanation of his conversion to Protestantism and acquisition of the additional surname Bartholdy (of course, his grandfather was the famous 18th century Jewish scholar, Moses Mendelssohn); 2) Extreme precocity of his musical talents in both performing on various instruments and in composing (e.g. he wrote the wonderful Octet & Overture to a Midsummer's Night Dream as a teenager); 3) His utterly close devotion and attachment to his older sister, Fanny Mendelssohn (1805-1847): 4) His strong desire to suppress the publication of Fanny's music, an unfortunate practice toward women composers of the times; 5) His phenomenal ability to improvise on the piano - just many stories (including private audiences w/ Victoria & Albert w/ quotes from her letters); and 6) Many more details of the early deaths of Fanny & Felix w/i 6 months from each other, and both from stroke(s) (I suspect that they likely had congenital vascular brain malformations or possibly aneuryms - just postulation on my part).

But this should be a celebration of the music of Felix Mendelssohn - and I could not find a thread dedicated solely to this composer (yes plenty of posts and some threads related to specific works), so let's hope that all who enjoy this talented individual will contribute.  Although I already own a LOT of his music, a renewed interest started with discovering the musical website Musica Omnia (http://www.musicaomnia.org/index2.htm) started by Peter Watchorn; my initial attraction was to purchase his Bach WTC recordings on the pedal harpsichord (WTC II to be released soon!); there I discovered a series of discs being released in honor of Mendenssohn on this bicentennial birth year; so far, I've purchased two and have a third 3-CDs set is on order, again about to be released; these are performed by the Atlantis Trio (and Ensemble) w/ Jaap Shroder on violin & Penelope Crawford on fortepiano - just excellent.  P.S. the liner notes for these recordings are written by Todd & are superb.

So, please add additional comments, historical events related to this composer, favorite works, and recording recommendations -  :D


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EB2K5YSHL.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnTrioSextet/668544417_TWyFH-O.jpg) 

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnPTrios/687125440_D9TCs-O.jpg)  (http://www.musicaomnia.org/new_pa17.jpg)

What can you tell me about the Piano Trios, in general? What do you think are FM's Top3-4 Chamber Works?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: DavidW on May 14, 2011, 09:51:33 AM
What can you tell me about the Piano Trios, in general? What do you think are FM's Top3-4 Chamber Works?

His piano trios are great works, you should listen to them!  I think that his top 3 chamber works are his string quintets and his octet... well no octet is just a favorite of mine, I guess I would in his last string quartets.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Coopmv on May 14, 2011, 10:14:17 AM
I am still trying to find time to start listening to this set, which arrived from Presto Classical some 2 months ago ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51oeRAohZJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Lethevich on May 14, 2011, 10:24:25 AM
His piano trios are great works, you should listen to them!

I second these, they are super!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 15, 2011, 09:13:44 AM
I second these, they are super!

His piano trios are great works, you should listen to them!  I think that his top 3 chamber works are his string quintets and his octet... well no octet is just a favorite of mine, I guess I would in his last string quartets.

I'm on it! ;)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: The new erato on May 15, 2011, 09:20:26 AM
A new release of potential interest:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/94216.jpg)

MENDELSSOHN Incidental Music For Antigone, Oedipus, Athalia. Sabina Martin, Ann Hallenberg, Chorus Musicus Koln Das Neue Orchester / Christoph Spering, Radio Symphony Orchestra, Berlin / Stefan Soltesz. Briliant Classics 3cds
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Coopmv on May 15, 2011, 09:29:03 AM
A new release of potential interest:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/94216.jpg)

MENDELSSOHN Incidental Music For Antigone, Oedipus, Athalia. Sabina Martin, Ann Hallenberg, Chorus Musicus Koln Das Neue Orchester / Christoph Spering, Radio Symphony Orchestra, Berlin / Stefan Soltesz. Briliant Classics 3cds

Wonder if Mendelssohn was inspired by Handel Athalia in anyway.  I do have Handel Athalia in my collection ...
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 16, 2011, 09:41:09 AM
I second these, they are super!

They are quite 'fleet', compared with the other Biggies. I like the c-minor's understated quality.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 17, 2011, 04:33:20 AM
What can you tell me about the Piano Trios, in general? What do you think are FM's Top3-4 Chamber Works?

Snyprrr,

Well, coming in after others have posted but agree that the Piano Trios are wonderful works - the Musica Omnia releases (posted & quoted by you) are excellent performances w/ Penelope Crawford on fortepiano (Conrad Graf, Vienna, 1835); another favorite recording of these works is below, which I've had for a LONG time (maybe OOP?)!  But just looking briefly on Amazon, there are plenty of other releases (including the Florestan Trio).

As to his TOP chamber works - really will vary depending on one's preferences, e.g. do you only want strings, keyboard + strings, or other, like the clarinet recording that is also in my collection); for me I go love the piano works, the octet, & the string quartets - but I need to put on that clarinet disc - has been a while!  Dave  :D

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnPTriosGolub/668973326_9v35N-O.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6150SXVR59L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 17, 2011, 04:40:42 AM
Snyprrr,

Well, coming in after others have posted but agree that the Piano Trios are wonderful works - the Musica Omnia releases (posted & quoted by you) are excellent performances w/ Penelope Crawford on fortepiano (Conrad Graf, Vienna, 1835); another favorite recording of these works is below, which I've had for a LONG time (maybe OOP?)!  But just looking briefly on Amazon, there are plenty of other releases (including the Florestan Trio).

As to his TOP chamber works - really will vary depending on one's preferences, e.g. do you only want strings, keyboard + strings, or other, like the clarinet recording that is also in my collection); for me I go love the piano works, the octet, & the string quartets - but I need to put on that clarinet disc - has been a while!  Dave  :D

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/MendelssohnPTriosGolub/668973326_9v35N-O.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6150SXVR59L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I just ordered that old HM issue for the PTs ($3!!).
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: DavidW on May 17, 2011, 04:53:03 AM
I just ordered that old HM issue for the PTs ($3!!).

HM=Harmonia Mundi=Florestan Trio?  Anyway bargain buy of the PTs = nice! :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 19, 2011, 06:31:27 PM
I second these, they are super!

I got the Claret brothers on Harmonia Mundi. Why I've rejected these works in the part I can't fathom (I did see that I'd heard the Stuttgart group on Orfeo), but hearing them fresh today, I must call them winning on all levels. What's there to say about the music? It's familiar, whether you've heard it or not!

No.2 was dedicated to Spohr (!), and, I must confess I hear a similarity of 'coolness' in both Composers. It might be time to put Spohr in proper perspective.
Title: Sunday: all-Mendelssohn broadcast with Dudamel and LA
Post by: Brewski on October 04, 2011, 10:53:24 AM
This Sunday, broadcast live in movie theaters (2pm Pacific, 5pm Eastern) - tickets here (http://www.fathomevents.com/).

Janine Jansen, violin
Gustavo Dudamel, conductor and host
Los Angeles Philharmonic

Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture
Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3, “Scottish”

--Bruce
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Leo K. on February 09, 2013, 07:43:31 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51I4IQe7PUL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

A cheap download of Mendelssohn that I'm very happy with.

The orchestral works are first rate, but are generally not by the most famous names. But was impressed by the overall performance quality. Bitrates vary from 184 to 247 Kbps, with most in the 220s or 230s. Only two tracks are below 200 Kbps. I haven't come across any disappointing encoding artifacts or distortion so far -- quality seems good from a technical standpoint too. Total download size is a humongous 1.08 GB. Organ Sonatas. The parts of Mendelssohn's work that appear underrepresented are sacred and choral works, and songs. Psalm 42 is included in its entirety, and selections from "Three Psalms" and "Sechs Sprüche" for Choir. These offer a glimpse into this part of Mendelssohn's work.

But as with all these collections, it is always possible to argue about what is included and what is left out -- there is no way to satisfy everybody. The performances, as with most of the collections by X5 in its "Most Essential" series, of both Piano Concertos as well as both Concertos for Two Pianos. Only the double concerto for piano and violin is missing among the concertos. The set has a broad and satisfying selection of chamber music, including the Clarinet Sonata, the two excellent String Quintets, Piano Trio No. 1, the 1838 Violin Sonata, and two of the 12 String Symphonies he wrote as a child.

There is also a nice selection of organ music, with the Three Preludes and Fugues for Organ, and two of his six perhaps the heart of the set, with all but one of Mendelssohn's five symphonies included. Except for two symphonies performed by the Bamberg symphony Orchestra under Austrian conductor Han Swarowsky, they are by different orchestras and conductors. I really enjoyed the 1st Symphony performed by the Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra under Maxim Shostakovich (Dmitri's son). The omnipresent Violin Concerto is performed ably by soloist Jaime Laredo and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and the lesser-known Concerto for Violin and Strings is also here. There are good performances the compositions in this collection show, starting out with the first track ("The Hebrides"), that Mendelssohn really was a composer of depth with tremendous ability and a broad emotional palette -- including a good dose of melancholy, if not pathos. Check out the 5th Symphony, or the 1st. Or the concertos for one or two pianos. Or any number of chamber works, such as Piano Trio No. 1, early String Symphonies, or the sonatas. There is emotional range and depth to burn.
Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Appy34 on February 11, 2013, 01:23:42 PM
What recordings of the Piano Trios do you all recommend?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: North Star on February 11, 2013, 01:26:11 PM
What recordings of the Piano Trios do you all recommend?
Haven't listened to the recording in a while, or heard any other recordings, but the Trio Wanderer is really nice.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on February 11, 2013, 01:47:16 PM
What recordings of the Piano Trios do you all recommend?

Leibniz Trio & Swiss Piano Trio.

Wanderer, too, is very nice, but a touch mellower.


(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B007MLISNQ.01.L.jpg)
F. Mendelssohn-B.
Piano Trios
Leibniz Trio

Genuin (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B007MLISNQ/goodmusicguide-20)
German link (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/B007MLISNQ/goodmusicguide-21) - UK link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B007MLISNQ/goodmusicguide-21)

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B004DGOJJA.01.L.jpg)
F. Mendelssohn-B.
Piano Trios
Swiss Piano Trio

Audite SACD (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004DGOJJA/goodmusicguide-20)
German link (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004DGOJJA/goodmusicguide-21) - UK link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004DGOJJA/goodmusicguide-21)
Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Leo K. on February 11, 2013, 02:57:36 PM
Jens, what are your recommendations for the symphonies, or is there a link to a survey you have done?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on February 11, 2013, 03:07:24 PM
Jens, what are your recommendations for the symphonies, or is there a link to a survey you have done?

There was, on WETA, but that's no longer extant.

My very clear favorite (not the least for having the most competitive 2nd among complete sets) is Dohnanyi with the WPh (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B003Y3MYWC/goodmusicguide-20), followed by Karajan with the BPh (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001DCQI9G/goodmusicguide-20). Surprise bummer of the growing lot is Abbado / LSO, which I find inexplicably boring and dull. I'm looking forward to Chailly / Leipzig recording the whole cycle.
Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Leo K. on February 11, 2013, 04:50:34 PM
I have to agree on the Abbado, and I will seek out the others you mention, much thanks Jens!
Title: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Appy34 on February 12, 2013, 03:59:34 PM
Thanks for the recommendations. Think I'm going to check out the Leibniz disc...
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Octave on May 24, 2013, 08:21:38 PM
From the Listening thread:

This magical disc:

(http://i.marktplaats.com/00/s/NTUwWDU1MA==/$(KGrHqVHJE!FENsEzg59BRIUv+8z4w~~60_84.JPG)

plus The Hebrides' (Fingal's cave) - Overture, Op.26

Sandrine Piau, Delphine Collot, sopranos
La Chapelle Royale & Collegium Vocale Gent
Orchestre des Champs-Élysées
dir. Philippe Herreweghe

 :)

I am keen to get this disc.  I notice that it was reissued in a 5cd with Herreweghe's recordings of ELIJAH and PAULUS; I'm curious if these recordings come recommended.  (I have only heard one other recording of each of these before.  They were interesting, but I wonder if I'd enjoy the Herreweghe more.)

Also curious if this other Mendelssohn/Herreweghe is worth checking out (two different editions, same contents afaik):



Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on May 24, 2013, 11:14:19 PM

Also curious if this other Mendelssohn/Herreweghe is worth checking out (two different editions, same contents afaik):

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00009IC6M.01.L.jpg)
  F. Mendelssohn-B.
Motets & Psalms
Herreweghe
Harmonia Mundi (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00009IC6M/goodmusicguide-20)
German link (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00009IC6M/goodmusicguide-21) - UK link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00009IC6M/goodmusicguideuk-21)


If you're wondering about the works: They're are on par with Elijah and Paulus... extraordinarily gratifying cantatas. Herreweghe picks some of the pieces he likes best and alongside Bernius' work, they are favorites. Nicol Matt on Brilliant is highly competitive, too.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on October 29, 2013, 05:04:38 PM
Hoping this is still the 'official' Felix Mendelssohn thread.

Figured from now on, anything I'm listening to I will just post into the applicable composer thread, instead of in the WAYLT thread.

Listening to Mendelssohn's string quartets and octet, which I haven't for quite some time.  Gorgeous music, and wonderful performances given by the Emersons.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on October 31, 2013, 09:48:41 AM
Continuing what was a 'mini-Mendelssohn' marathon, to an all-out binge!  :)

First, the complete string quartets and Octet for strings.

Now, onto:

*Symphonies
*Piano Trios
*Violin Concertos
*Cello Sonatas

It's been quite some time since I've gone on a Mendelssohn binge.  Enjoying it very much!  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on November 20, 2013, 04:30:28 PM
And now, listening to this excellent set!

Have been listening to a lot of Mendelssohn lately, more than usual.  :)

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Fafner on December 23, 2013, 05:26:28 PM
Having listened to nothing but Mendelssohn for the past three days, I have now officially gone from 'generally indefferent' to 'rabid fan'.

I previously only knew him through the Violin Concerto, Midsummer Night's Dream, and Symphonies No. 3 & 4, but he is definitely an under-appreciated composer.  I can see myself sinking money in this. :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
Post by: OrchestralNut on January 25, 2014, 11:44:08 AM
Listening to this magnificent set.  :) 

Mendelssohn

Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 56 "Scottish"
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 11
Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 107 "Reformation"


Ashkenazy
Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

Decca

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on July 02, 2014, 11:39:04 AM
Listening to this magnificent set, specifically my three favourite Mendelssohn symphonies.  :) 

Mendelssohn

Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 56 "Scottish"
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 11
Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 107 "Reformation"


Ashkenazy
Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

Decca

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on August 03, 2014, 04:37:34 AM
Some Sunday morning Mendelssohn!

String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 13
String Quartet No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 12


Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: EigenUser on August 03, 2014, 05:06:04 AM
Some Sunday morning Mendelssohn!

String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 13
String Quartet No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 12



Have you heard their Octet? They split it into two string quartets and superimposed them. There is a bonus track with the two separate scherzos.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on August 03, 2014, 05:44:17 AM
Have you heard their Octet? They split it into two string quartets and superimposed them. There is a bonus track with the two separate scherzos.

I have heard it indeed, and I have listened to the bonus material on that disc.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Pat B on February 04, 2016, 11:59:10 AM
BUMP!

I just finished the Concerto Köln set of String Symphonies and two of the early concertos. After one listen I consider the Symphonies good for his age, but I like these concertos very much without any qualifications. Parts of the Violin and Piano Concerto remind me of Schubert's Fantasy D.934 which I heard first but was written several years later, though it seems unlikely that Schubert would have known this work.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jo498 on February 04, 2016, 12:40:29 PM
I don't know the violin/piano concerto but it's virtually impossible that Schubert could have known an unpublished piece by the teenager Mendelssohn. Apparently there is also an early violin concerto d minor (and of course two fairly early double concertos for two pianos)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Pat B on February 04, 2016, 08:24:14 PM
I don't know the violin/piano concerto but it's virtually impossible that Schubert could have known an unpublished piece by the teenager Mendelssohn. Apparently there is also an early violin concerto d minor (and of course to fairly early double concertos for two pianos)

Yes, I think it's most likely a coincidence, even with Mendelssohn being a prodigy. He was still in Berlin in 1827 (when Schubert wrote the Fantasy). But I wanted to mention it.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jaakko Keskinen on February 05, 2016, 08:16:53 AM
My favorite work from Mendelssohn has remained for years the same: Piano trio in D minor op. 49. Specifically the last movement. That melody is so penetrating. The final recall at the end of the piece sends shivers down my spine.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on March 17, 2016, 02:27:02 AM

Latest on Forbes.com:
Classical CD Of The Week: Mendelssohn String Quartets (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/03/16/classical-cd-of-the-week-mendelssohn-string-quartets/#7d462ff24664)

Felix Mendelssohn-B., String Quartets Nos.2 & 3, Escher String Quartet, BIS

...If it weren’t ultimately silly, I’d go so far and say that they are Mendelssohn’s best. Well, certainly Mendelssohn at his best and also at his darkest...

(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2016/03/Forbes_Classica-CD-of-the-Week_BIS_Mendelssohn_Escher-Quartet_StringQuartets1200-1200x469.jpg)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/03/16/classical-cd-of-the-week-mendelssohn-string-quartets/ (http://hhttp://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/03/16/classical-cd-of-the-week-mendelssohn-string-quartets/#7d462ff24664)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Scion7 on March 17, 2016, 04:30:09 PM
I like the quartets, but I wouldn't put them above his Violin Concerto in e, or the Concerto for Violin & Piano in d, just for starters.
That said, the first movement of Op.80 has always provided a high-energy Romantic rush.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on April 01, 2016, 03:08:40 PM

Ionarts-at-Large: Daniele Gatti’s Elijah in Vienna (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2016/04/ionarts-at-large-danielle-gattis-elijah.html)


(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-mCaAJT0V1Zg/Vv75gKlS0GI/AAAAAAAAJB8/nPNPRxAilcEgmSwI57N8JxoZDEgPtfwqw/s1600/MENDELSSOHN_eyes_Classic_jens-f-laurson_600.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: snyprrr on May 09, 2016, 05:43:46 AM
VC
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Scion7 on May 09, 2016, 08:34:38 AM
VC

First we have the 'is he a German or a Jew' controversy, now you say he was a Viet Cong ??

When will it end, Lord, when will it end?!!!??  :(
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on June 10, 2016, 09:50:18 AM
Latest on Forbes.com:
Classical CD Of The Week: Scarlatti Classical And En Suite (http://bit.ly/CDoftheWeek015)

As every clever Scarlatti disc or recital should, this one has had some thought put into the selection and arrangement of the sonatas, rather than just willy-nilly lumping together personal favorites. True, the pudding-proof is in the listening, not the admiration of the thought behind it. But it’s worth mentioning all the same in this case, especially since on Claire Huangci’s disc it works so particularly well: The pianist (whom I heard at the 2011 ARD International Music Competition, where she came second, then still performing as Tori Huang) arranged bundles of sonatas in the form of baroque suites (disc 1) and classical sonatas (disc 2), as laid out by her lucid, well-written, and refreshingly level-headed liner notes:...

(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2016/04/Forbes_Classica-CD-of-the-Week_BIS_Mendelssohn_Octet_DoubleConcerto_Tognetti_Leschenko_Laurson_1200-1200x469.jpg)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/06/10/classical-cd-of-the-week-thats-mendelssohn (http://bit.ly/CDoftheWeek015)

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: mjmosca on July 04, 2016, 03:07:25 AM
So glad to find this thread! In the US it seems that Mendelssohn is little played in the concert hall, but still, happily popular on the radio. And what great music!

What recording of the entire "Midsummer Night's Dream" do you recommend- I am looking for advice. Thank you!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on July 04, 2016, 06:35:34 AM
What recording of the entire "Midsummer Night's Dream" do you recommend- I am looking for advice. Thank you!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51KmBOHmXwL._AC_UL320_SR312,320_.jpg)

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/076/MI0001076069.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Mirror Image on July 04, 2016, 06:46:47 AM
So glad to find this thread! In the US it seems that Mendelssohn is little played in the concert hall, but still, happily popular on the radio. And what great music!

What recording of the entire "Midsummer Night's Dream" do you recommend- I am looking for advice. Thank you!

This is my favorite Midsummer Night's Dream. It doesn't get any better than this IMHO. Abbado's credentials in Mendelssohn are pretty well-established and there's a great performance of the 'Italian' on this recording as well:

(http://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/hires/888880831477.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Spineur on July 04, 2016, 07:08:50 AM
So glad to find this thread! In the US it seems that Mendelssohn is little played in the concert hall, but still, happily popular on the radio. And what great music!

What recording of the entire "Midsummer Night's Dream" do you recommend- I am looking for advice. Thank you!
I happen to like Felix Mendelssohn a lot as well.  He you are interested in his sacred repertoire, I can recommend the oratorio Paulus


Its in my top 10 sacred works list.
An his chamber music is really charming.  The quartet Op 13 is a beauty as is his octet Op. 20.    If you like piano music, i like among other pieces his "Variations sérieuses" Op. 54.  Here is Alfred Brendel at it
https://www.youtube.com/v/N8VCyD5I5I4
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jo498 on July 04, 2016, 08:52:07 AM
How much spoken text does the Previn include? Many famous and recommended recordings (e.g. Maag, Fricsay) have no spoken text and are also missing some of the shorter pieces or melodram sections?

I don't have any with different actors speaking the texts but the Abbado mentioned above has brief passages spoken by an actress (in German) and seems to include all or most of the short/melodram pieces.

My recommendation for a similar version with one narrator speaking the relevant passages for context would be Ozawa/Boston/DG with Judi Dench as narrator (English). No coupling and only about 55 min on a full priced disk, though
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on July 04, 2016, 09:01:43 AM
How much spoken text does the Previn include?

None at all, unfortunately.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: jlaurson on July 04, 2016, 10:43:00 AM
None at all, unfortunately.

Unfortunately??? Oh, it's such a boon, I think. Can't stand when Judi (for example) rips me out of the music.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on July 04, 2016, 10:46:26 AM
Unfortunately??? Oh, it's such a boon, I think. Can't stand when Judi (for example) rips me out of the music.

Well, after having recently heard the complete Peer Gynt, including spoken dialogues, I would not have it any other way in the future, as they are essential for the atmosphere, the mood and the development of the work. It might not be the case with AMSND, though.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jo498 on July 04, 2016, 12:33:29 PM
On the track listings at amazon the melodrams are included in Previns. But they make no sense if there is nothing spoken, e.g. Oberon's and Puck's spells. Of course a single narrator is different from the actual actors of the respective figure and the passages spoken on those recordings are fairly short, just a little bit around the music. But they provide the context without which the shorter pieces don't make sense.

The other option is to treat the music basically as a suite and skip the melodrams and short pieces.

As I got to know the music (except for Ouverture and wedding march) in the Ozawa/Dench recording, I always miss something without the words.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Mirror Image on July 04, 2016, 02:58:33 PM
Unfortunately??? Oh, it's such a boon, I think. Can't stand when Judi (for example) rips me out of the music.

I can't help but to agree here. I loathe narration in musical works.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jo498 on July 04, 2016, 10:33:08 PM
But it is not narration in a musical work in that case (which I agree is pretty weird, e.g. in Gurrelieder).

It is music for a spoken play. The short music for the spells does not make a lot of sense if the words are not spoken. One could do without the spoken words in the intro to Titania's lullaby or the finale, I guess. But overall, unless one knows MSND by heart and exactly where the music comes in, I found it more interesting with the spoken passages for context.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Scion7 on July 06, 2016, 09:26:59 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41pjrdpCPQL.jpg)

Picked it up for $2 at Nicely Out of Tune at the beach Saturday.   :)



Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on March 28, 2017, 06:42:04 AM

Review: Irish Chamber Orchestra On Tour With A Mendelssohn Revelation
(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2017/03/Irish-Chamber-Orchestra-Widmann-Forbes_Laurson_-1200x700.jpg) (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/03/28/review-irish-chamber-orchestra-on-tour-with-a-mendelssohn-revelation/#1556572718e8)
The Irish Chamber Orchestra may not be much of an established brand in the international orchestra-world,
but they are on their best way of getting there. Currently on a on-and-off tour of continental Europe, they
are spreading their excellence in places like Brussels, Freiburg, Vienna and Heidelberg. It helps that they
surround themselves with interesting and good musicians. Among them “Principal Artistic Partner” (a bit
labored, their titles) Gábor Tákacs Nagy, that old-school continental musician with semi-quavers running in
his veins, “Principal [Guest] Conductor and Artistic Partner” composer-clarinetist-conductor Jörg Widmann,
and, on this tour, Igor Levit, one of a hot new generation of musicians; a young-ish, nicely severe pianists...
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/03/28/review-irish-chamber-orchestra-on-tour-with-a-mendelssohn-revelation/ (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/03/28/review-irish-chamber-orchestra-on-tour-with-a-mendelssohn-revelation/)

I knew that the "Parsifal" bit (i.e. Dresden Amen) is in the Fifth Symphony... but that it sounds so much like Charles Ives, I'd never noticed.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on November 03, 2017, 12:04:57 PM
Review of a spectacular recording of the String Symphonies:


Classical CD Of The Week: Rocking The Mendelssohn String Symphonies
(https://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2017/11/Forbes_Classical-CD-of-the-Week_MENDELSSOHN_symphonies_L-ORFEO-Michi-Gaigg_CPO_Laurson_960.jpg?width=960)
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/11/03/classical-cd-of-the-week-rocking-the-mendelssohn-string-symphonies/#516ae1226f40 (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/11/03/classical-cd-of-the-week-rocking-the-mendelssohn-string-symphonies/#516ae1226f40)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: motoboy on November 03, 2017, 03:22:20 PM
I put on the Reformation Symphony in honor of the quintentinseniatiel. I was never a big Felix fan and vaguely remember playing stunt/double first trumpet in it a few years back. I remembered it being a bit boring.

But I was wrong. I was thrilled hearing it again. I think this might be my gateway drug back into absolute music, which I have poo-poo-ed for the last half decade or so.

Here's to rediscovery!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 19, 2018, 02:37:57 AM
What is the consensus on the Brilliant complete chamber music box?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Unfinshed symphony No. 6
Post by: gprengel on August 06, 2018, 12:29:33 PM
Quote from: gprengel;1490553
In the beginning of the year I discovered a symphony fragment of about 80 measures in full score  (till 2:25) and some sketches for the second theme, the end of the exposition and 2 sketches for the development by Mendelssohn from the year 1844 in Frankfurt which fascinated me so much that I made an attempt to complete it.

I finally made it also to complete the beautiful second movement sketch from Mendelssohn to a whole Andante movement of about 14 minutes.
The first 2:50 minutes are based on a full melody sketch with various hints to the accompaniement by Mendelssohn.After orchestrating this I continued with a new middle part with various themes with each increasing in strength and coming to a dramatic climax with an appassionate fugato.
After this various variations of Mendelssohn's beautiful Andante theme follow until a recapitulation of the beginning. The movement ends with a most tender final variation.

The recording was made with Finale and NotePerformer and is best heard with some good headphones:

I.Allegro

http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony1.mp3 (http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony1.mp3)
http://www.gerdprengel.de/Symphony_in_C_Allegro.pdf (http://www.gerdprengel.de/Symphony_in_C_Allegro.pdf)

II. Andante cantabile

http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony_Andante.mp3 (http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony_Andante.mp3)
http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony_Andante.pdf (http://www.gerdprengel.de/Mendelssohn_unfinished_symphony_Andante.pdf)

I hope you will enjoy it and tell me whether and where I should make any improvements ...

Gerd
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Unfinshed symphony No. 6
Post by: Cato on August 06, 2018, 12:47:50 PM
Greetings Gerd!

Welcome back!

I will need some time to peruse your score: many thanks for sharing it!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on August 09, 2018, 10:53:59 PM
What is the consensus on the Brilliant complete chamber music box?

I'm not aware of any consensus... but looking at the ingredients, it seems to be a very mixed bag, indeed. But Joan Berkhemer and the Trio he's in with Klara Wuertz are second rank but top-notch musicians whom I'd put some faith into giving very musical accounts. But the quartets and quintets, I wouldn't bank on top-notch stuff. But you would have those already in this MUST-MUST-MUST HAVE box (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2014/01/best-recordings-of-2013-7.html), right?!?!  [The Re-Issue]
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on August 20, 2018, 06:39:00 AM
What is the consensus on the Brilliant complete chamber music box?

The consensus is just what any other composer's Brilliant complete chamber music box is: a mixed bag but at this price a no-brainer.  :D
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: kyjo on August 20, 2018, 11:25:53 AM
Much as I enjoy a lot of Mendelssohn’s music, I will admit that it rarely plumbs great emotional depths (which isn’t a bad thing). However, one exception is the powerful slow movement of his String Quintet no. 2, which has a grave, almost Bachian stateliness with its “walking bass” cello line. It rises to a climax of great emotional intensity not often found in Mendelssohn’s output.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on August 21, 2018, 12:46:14 AM
Much as I enjoy a lot of Mendelssohn’s music, I will admit that it rarely plumbs great emotional depths (which isn’t a bad thing). However, one exception is the powerful slow movement of his String Quintet no. 2, which has a grave, almost Bachian stateliness with its “walking bass” cello line. It rises to a climax of great emotional intensity not often found in Mendelssohn’s output.

Also the string quartets, esp. the F Minor, which is a heartrending masterpiece the equal of anything ever composed for string quartet.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: kyjo on August 21, 2018, 10:37:45 AM
Also the string quartets, esp. the F Minor, which is a heartrending masterpiece the equal of anything ever composed for string quartet.

Yes, the F minor quartet is a great work as well. There’s also some poignant moments in his first two quartets.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on October 17, 2018, 04:57:58 AM
I think that St. Paul is AT LEAST as good an oratorio as Elijah - and it has the benefit of not being about an ISIS-style religious fanatic mass murderer.

Latest on ClassicsToday:

Rilling’s Budget #Mendelssohn; A Reference St. Paul Oratorio At The Center
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DpnqxLpXcAAFEDM.jpg) (https://t.co/axq4B1qA9x)
(insider)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on February 25, 2019, 05:30:11 AM
CD From Hell: Gardiner’s Bloodless Mendelssohn Symphonies
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D0QYiITX4AAfqYL.jpg) (http://a-fwd.to/5BRXhAe)


Latest on @classicstoday: CD From Hell: Gardiner’s Bloodless Mendelssohn Symphonies

https://www.classicstoday.com/review/cd-from-hell-gardiners-bloodless-mendelssohn-symphonies/ (https://www.classicstoday.com/review/cd-from-hell-gardiners-bloodless-mendelssohn-symphonies/)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on March 14, 2019, 06:44:41 AM

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D1Z0Oi7XcAIvlIt.jpg)
My latest on @ClassicsToday: Superbly Played Mendelssohn From The @sitkovetskytrio, But...

#BISrecords (https://amzn.to/2O1kKpW)

Review: https://www.classicstoday.com/review/superbly-played-mendelssohn-from-the-sitkovetsky-trio-but-somethings-missing/ … (https://www.classicstoday.com/review/superbly-played-mendelssohn-from-the-sitkovetsky-trio-but-somethings-missing/)

: https://amzn.to/2O1kKpW  (https://amzn.to/2O1kKpW)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Mookalafalas on July 11, 2019, 01:22:11 AM
Any Mendelssohn fans familiar with this?



  Just played it, and liked it a lot, but all I could think was "Is this really Mendelssohn?"
    It is so turbocharged and aggressively dynamic, from start to finish, that it doesn't fit my impression of the composer at all.  Most of my M focuses on long, beautiful lines and rich sonic color. However, it is generally pretty staid and placid.  This disk reminds me of LP days from my youth, playing a 33RPM at 45 to see how it would sound...
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Wanderer on July 11, 2019, 01:40:11 AM
I remember sampling it and not being impressed at all by what I heard.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aukhawk on July 11, 2019, 10:38:45 PM
Brenda Lucas Ogdon was John Ogdon’s wife and partner in an LP he made of duets by Debussy and Bizet,  Last year she released this recording of WTC 2, on a modern piano, ...

Seeing Brenda Lucas mentioned in a thread elsewhere reminded me of this Mendelssohn recording which was a great favourite of mine back in the day - a wonderful antidote to the heavier fare that I mostly listened to at that time.

(https://img.discogs.com/dFjOGIW58BvcTcIMj87DCB87cU8=/fit-in/600x621/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13696568-1559224991-1002.jpeg.jpg)

Both concertos are now available as disc 2 of this compilation.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81YYXtzOW7L._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on September 19, 2019, 09:49:12 PM
Latest #CDReview on
@classicstoday: Prosseda Splashes Sunshine Over Mendelssohn’s Piano Concertos

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EEVL6IuVAAEGXkn?format=jpg&name=small) (https://t.co/iUvaCYtlB1?amp=1)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: vers la flamme on March 25, 2020, 02:11:08 PM
Any love for Mendelssohn lately? His music has been in semi-regular rotation for me ever since his birthday (early February, the 3rd I believe). What I've been listening to and enjoying is the piano concertos, the piano trios, some of the string symphonies, and the Reformation symphony. There's a lot I still need to hear, especially in terms of chamber music.

As for the string symphonies, I have the box with all the Concerto Köln recordings of them alongside Kurt Masur conducting the full orchestral symphonies. But somehow I prefer the Nicholas Ward, Northern Chamber Orchestra recordings on Naxos. Could just be modern vs period instruments; I don't really know. Some of these string symphonies are really nice.

Still looking for the violin concerto recording that's just right for me. I'm considering getting the Perlman/Haitink or the Mutter/Karajan.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2020, 02:24:45 AM
Any love for Mendelssohn lately? His music has been in semi-regular rotation for me ever since his birthday (early February, the 3rd I believe). What I've been listening to and enjoying is the piano concertos, the piano trios, some of the string symphonies, and the Reformation symphony. There's a lot I still need to hear, especially in terms of chamber music.

I strongly recommend you (1) Die Erste Walpurgisnacht, a stunningly beautiful cantata featuring a scene as dark and chilling as the Wolf's Glen from Freischuetz and (2) probably his best kept secret: the Lieder and Duets, which in terms of melodic inventivity give Schubert a hard run for the money. Hyperion has issued a splendid 4 or 5 disc series.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on March 26, 2020, 02:39:02 AM
I strongly recommend you (1) Die Erste Walpurgisnacht, a stunningly beautiful cantata featuring a scene as dark and chilling as the Wolf's Glen from Freischuetz and (2) probably his best kept secret: the Lieder and Duets, which in terms of melodic inventivity give Schubert a hard run for the money. Hyperion has issued a splendid 4 or 5 disc series.

What timing. My #morninglistening:

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EUB1nAsXsAIy1sU?format=jpg&name=small)
#morninglistening to #Mendelssohn’s #DieErsteWalpurgisnacht w/ #FriederBernius, #KammerchorStuttgart &
@DKAMbremen on @CarusVerlag

: http://a-fwd.to/11M3lhn (http://a-fwd.to/11M3lhn)

(Haven't, alas, found it on Amazon yet. But the Harnoncourt is good, too.)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2020, 02:56:50 AM
What timing. My #morninglistening:

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EUB1nAsXsAIy1sU?format=jpg&name=small)
#morninglistening to #Mendelssohn’s #DieErsteWalpurgisnacht w/ #FriederBernius, #KammerchorStuttgart &
@DKAMbremen on @CarusVerlag

: http://a-fwd.to/11M3lhn (http://a-fwd.to/11M3lhn)

(Haven't, alas, found it on Amazon yet. But the Harnoncourt is good, too.)

I have this one:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81kxXcKbYSL._SS500_.jpg)

not the above incarnation, though, but actually as a part of this:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5103hjY5x%2BL._SY355_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 09, 2020, 07:25:57 AM
Mendelssohn's Piano & Violin Concerti - quoted below a list of his many concerti, primarily divided into 'early' and 'later' compositions - trying to peruse my own collection shown below - do I need to cull, add, replace, or hold steady - :)

The 4th disc in the Concerto Koln box has performances of the Piano and Strings Concerto, A minor, listed as No. 0 below (1822) performed by Andreas Staier on fortepiano & Concerto for Violin, Piano & Strings, D minor, No. 1 (1822) w/ Rainer Kussmaul on a 1724 Strad.  The Brautigam recoding has Piano Concertos, No. 0,1,2, latter Opus 25 & 40, performed on two different grand pianos.  Serkin & Stern do the 'mature' works, i.e. Opus 25 & 40 and Opus 64; finally, Chung performs Op. 64 (I've put these in italics in the list below).

Well, I don't seem to own the Capriccio, Rondo, Serenade, or the 'double' concerti - just curious about others' 'Concerti Collections' - what are your favorites and are the works that I don't have in my collection worth exploring?  Thanks - Dave

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41a2h%2BhK1oL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71wS-VSgVHL._SL1057_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61cV43ehPRL._SL1500_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41EWYFPXB6L.jpg)

Quote
Concerti [Source (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Felix_Mendelssohn#Concertante)]
  Piano Concerto (No. 0) in A minor (1822)
  Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25 (1831)
  Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 40 (1837)

  Piano Concerto No. 3 (fragment) in E minor, Op. Posth. (1844)
  Violin Concerto (No. 1) in D minor, for violin and strings (1822)
  Violin Concerto (No. 2) in E minor, Op. 64 (1844)

  Capriccio brillant for Piano and Orchestra in B major/minor, Op. 22 (1826, published 1832)
  Rondo brillant for Piano and Orchestra in E flat major, Op. 29 (1834)
  Serenade and Allegro giocoso (also "giojoso") for Piano and Orchestra in B minor, Op. 43 (1838)
  Double Concerto for Violin, Piano and String Orchestra in D minor (1823)
  Concerto for 2 Pianos and Orchestra (No. 1) in A flat major (1822/1824)
  Concerto for 2 Pianos and Orchestra (No. 2) in E major (1823)
  Cello Concerto (lost)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 09, 2020, 08:35:51 AM
Mendelssohn's Solo Piano Works - seems that Felix wrote enough for the solo piano to fill at least 4 or 5 CDs - currently, I own the first volume w/ Benjamin Frith on Naxos - he has recorded 5 discs of solo works (plus at least 2 others of concertos and violin/piano pieces); also have the 2-disc set of 'Songs w/o Words' performed by Livia Rev.

Now, there seem to be just a few more 'multiple disc' options for this music, i.e. Howard Shelley on Hyperion w/ 4 CDs and Marie-Catherine Girod (8 discs!) at an outrageous price on Amazon (of course, may be cheaper elsewhere?).  SO, how much of Mendelssohn's 'solo piano' works are worth owning - my Frith Vol. 1 disc is well performed but is Shelley a better choice?  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61DJqg2mw4L._SL1041_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41ymLgDC%2B8L.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51xp%2BM6ASYL.jpg)  (https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/91uxJ4izktL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) Artist
Post by: Cato on June 28, 2020, 11:06:49 AM
An article about certain of Mendelssohn's manuscripts being for sale mention his manuscripts as pictorial works of art:


Quote


 Felix Mendelssohn wasn’t only a great composer and a virtuoso organist; he was also a trained draftsman, a skill he put to use in his elaborate handwritten scores. “A Mendelssohn manuscript is a work of art in itself,” says his biographer R. Larry Todd, professor of music at Duke University. “The calligraphy is stunning.”

The composer’s curvaceous clef markings and arabesque lettering are on display in a newly discovered manuscript from 1842, a version of his song “Im Frühling” (“In Spring”) that will be sold next month by Sotheby’s London. It carries a presale estimate of $25,000 to $30,000 and is available for public viewing on the Sotheby’s website in advance of the online auction, which opens July 7.



Manuscripts by other composers are mentioned in the article, e.g. by Wagner, Mahler, et al.


https://www.wsj.com/articles/musical-masterpieces-written-by-hand-11593194244 (https://www.wsj.com/articles/musical-masterpieces-written-by-hand-11593194244)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Jo498 on June 28, 2020, 11:46:48 AM
The Frith disc is quite good (I only have this one from his series), the most famous of the P&F is the e minor and this one has been recorded more frequently than the rest. Besides a few of the better known "Songs without words" that tend to show up as encores or on mixed recitals, the most famous piano piece is probably the "Variations serieuses" op.54. Two mixed anthologies I like are Kirschnereit (Arte Nova) and Knauer (Berlin), both include the variations, the latter also has the nice "Rondo capriccioso" whereas the former as a fantasy/sonata f# minor that seems more interesting than the "real sonatas" (one of which is also included). For Lieder ohne Worte Barenboim seems a classic recording.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: kyjo on June 30, 2020, 02:25:51 PM
I’m surprised to see only a meager 7 pages for Mendelssohn! I especially hold his chamber music in very high esteem. What a treasure trove of delightful invention! The string quartets (esp. nos. 1-3 and 6), piano trios, Cello Sonata no. 2, String Quintet no. 2, and Octet are all firm favorites of mine, and are tremendously fun to play - I had the pleasure of sight-reading the string quartets often with my college friends before the virus struck. I was listening to the Piano Trio no. 2 the other day and was once again struck by its quality - surely it’s one of his greatest works. The first movement unflaggingly sustains its power and argument over its whole duration, and the finale is truly uplifting with its incorporation of the Doxology. Not to say the middle movements aren’t great, either!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 10, 2021, 05:15:39 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)


I have in the past, for some reason unknown to me, paid scant attention to the String Quartets of Mendelssohn. That has changed significantly after hearing this set performed by the Gewandhaus Quartet. Both the music and their performances of it are excellent in every way. This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening listening experience. The integrity of the cycle of string quartets is totally complete with exceptional performances throughout.

I will now go on to listen to Mendelssohn’s String Quintets of which I am equally ignorant. I have only attended to the Octet in the past but at least that is now, or soon will be, rectified.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 10, 2021, 07:27:42 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)


I have in the past, for some reason unknown to me, paid scant attention to the String Quartets of Mendelssohn. That has changed significantly after hearing this set performed by the Gewandhaus Quartet. Both the music and their performances of it are excellent in every way. This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening listening experience. The integrity of the cycle of string quartets is totally complete with exceptional performances throughout.

I will now go on to listen to Mendelssohn’s String Quintets of which I am equally ignorant. I have only attended to the Octet in the past but at least that is now, or soon will be, rectified.

There's not a single dud in his whole chamber music output. Beside SQs, S5s and Octet, there are the violin sonatas, the cello sonatas, the clarinet sonatas, the piano trios, the piano quartets, the piano sextet and last but not least two absolutely delicious duos for clarinet and basset horn. Felix was a genius, I have no doubts about it.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 10, 2021, 07:51:24 AM
There's not a single dud in his whole chamber music output. Beside SQs, S5s and Octet, there are the violin sonatas, the cello sonatas, the clarinet sonatas, the piano trios, the piano quartets, the piano sextet and last but not least two absolutely delicious duos for clarinet and basset horn. Felix was a genius, I have no doubts about it.

So I still have quite a long way to go yet.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 10, 2021, 07:59:15 AM
So I still have quite a long way to go yet.

Yes, but there's help available. I can let you have all you need, just PM me.  ;)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 10, 2021, 08:04:28 AM
Yes, but there's help available. I can let you have all you need, just PM me.  ;)

Thank you, Andrei.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 10, 2021, 10:02:17 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/414W9p27M2L.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UNdupVtVL.jpg)

I have in the past, for some reason unknown to me, paid scant attention to the String Quartets of Mendelssohn. That has changed significantly after hearing this set performed by the Gewandhaus Quartet. Both the music and their performances of it are excellent in every way. This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening listening experience. The integrity of the cycle of string quartets is totally complete with exceptional performances throughout.

I will now go on to listen to Mendelssohn’s String Quintets of which I am equally ignorant. I have only attended to the Octet in the past but at least that is now, or soon will be, rectified.

Well, time for me to pull out some Felix M.!  Own all the works in the Brilliant box w/ other performers, so starting w/ some of his 'other chamber pieces' (inserted above):

Cello & Piano Works w/ Simca Heled and Simone Dinnerstein & Clarinet, Basset Horn & Piano Works w/ Alan Hacker and friends on period instruments - Dave :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 10, 2021, 11:08:25 AM
There's not a single dud in his whole chamber music output. Beside SQs, S5s and Octet, there are the violin sonatas, the cello sonatas, the clarinet sonatas, the piano trios, the piano quartets, the piano sextet and last but not least two absolutely delicious duos for clarinet and basset horn. Felix was a genius, I have no doubts about it.

+1 for all that.  I think I enjoy his chamber music most of all the genres.  But that said I find the Songs Without Words to be disarmingly lovely.  And then the Organ Sonatas are really fine too!  A genius for sure....
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 10, 2021, 11:11:02 AM
I find the Songs Without Words to be disarmingly lovely. 

 8)

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 10, 2021, 11:33:09 AM
+1 for all that.  I think I enjoy his chamber music most of all the genres.  But that said I find the Songs Without Words to be disarmingly lovely.  And then the Organ Sonatas are really fine too!  A genius for sure....

8)

Songs Without Words w/ Livia Rev - now, I've owned the version below for a dozen years or more and have not explored other performances - so, just curious which are some of your favorite interpretations of these wonderful pieces?  Thanks - Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41ymLgDC%2B8L.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 10, 2021, 12:13:02 PM
Songs Without Words w/ Livia Rev - now, I've owned the version below for a dozen years or more and have not explored other performances - so, just curious which are some of your favorite interpretations of these wonderful pieces?  Thanks - Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41ymLgDC%2B8L.jpg)

I am very limited in my knowledge of many versions.  My introduction was a couple of discs on Naxos played by Peter Nagy.  I'm sure others will have greater insights but I have always enjoyed his unfussy approach allowing the simple beauty of the music to speak without over sentimentalising it.  The Op.30 No.1 that was used to such powerful effect in the film "Sophie's Choice" never fails to move me.....
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 10, 2021, 12:33:14 PM
Continuing w/ more Mendelssohn Chamber Works w/ the performers shown below - Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71EHriBec%2BL._SL1500_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Won7fibNL._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 10, 2021, 12:42:46 PM
You are full on Dave  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aukhawk on May 11, 2021, 03:08:08 AM
Well, I don't seem to own the Capriccio, Rondo, Serenade, or the 'double' concerti - just curious about others' 'Concerti Collections' - what are your favorites and are the works that I don't have in my collection worth exploring?  Thanks - Dave

After the Octet, my favourite music by Mendelssohn is the Double Piano Concerto.
It's very unusual for me to like 'happy' music but Mendelssohn overcomes my resistance  :)

(https://img.discogs.com/dFjOGIW58BvcTcIMj87DCB87cU8=/fit-in/600x621/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13696568-1559224991-1002.jpeg.jpg)
Mendelssohn, Piano Concertos - Ogdon, Lucas, ASMF cond. Marriner

These days that recording can be found buried in this twofer:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81YYXtzOW7L._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 11, 2021, 07:09:28 AM
Some more of Felix's Chamber Music, i.e. the String Quartets w/ the Pacifica Quartet - I've bought and culled/saved these works for a number of decades - my current favorite is the Pacifica Quartet (reviews attached w/ a main article from Fanfare for those interested); the other set that I've kept in my collection is w/ the Emerson Quartet, which includes a fourth disc that adds the Octet with the group overdubbed.  Regardless, there are plenty of options out there for those liking these Mendelssohn chamber works.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71lUvoFaoJL._SL1445_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51g734IXj6L.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 11, 2021, 07:20:49 AM
Some more of Felix's Chamber Music, i.e. the String Quartets w/ the Pacifica Quartet - I've bought and culled/saved these works for a number of decades - my current favorite is the Pacifica Quartet (reviews attached w/ a main article from Fanfare for those interested); the other set that I've kept in my collection is w/ the Emerson Quartet, which includes a fourth disc that adds the Octet with the group overdubbed.  Regardless, there are plenty of options out there for those liking these Mendelssohn chamber works.  Dave :)

 (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51g734IXj6L.jpg)

The Emerson Quartet is the set I own and love. Highly recommend it!  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 11, 2021, 12:03:03 PM
Some more of Felix's Chamber Music, i.e. the String Quartets w/ the Pacifica Quartet - I've bought and culled/saved these works for a number of decades - my current favorite is the Pacifica Quartet (reviews attached w/ a main article from Fanfare for those interested); the other set that I've kept in my collection is w/ the Emerson Quartet, which includes a fourth disc that adds the Octet with the group overdubbed.  Regardless, there are plenty of options out there for those liking these Mendelssohn chamber works.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71lUvoFaoJL._SL1445_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51g734IXj6L.jpg)

I have downloaded your attachment Dave and I will give it a read later. Thank you.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 12, 2021, 12:39:26 PM
Mendelssohn, Felix - String Symphonies w/ Lev Markiz & the Nieuw Sinfonietta Amsterdam - astounding works from a boy between 11 and 14 years of age!  Multiple reviews attached - over the years I've owned other performances of these works (shown below) - culled my classical music collection a year ago and kept Markiz and gave away Pople - listening now, well not a bad choice.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51DMK1VNA9L.jpg)  (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571140810.png)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71hXNc9d0lL._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 12, 2021, 12:48:26 PM
Mendelssohn, Felix - String Symphonies w/ Lev Markiz & the Nieuw Sinfonietta Amsterdam - astounding works from a boy between 11 and 14 years of age!  Multiple reviews attached - over the years I've owned other performances of these works (shown below) - culled my classical music collection a year ago and kept Markiz and gave away Pople - listening now, well not a bad choice.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51DMK1VNA9L.jpg)  (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571140810.png)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71hXNc9d0lL._SL1500_.jpg)

I have been potentially looking for a recording of the complete set of string symphonies.

Do you have a favourite Dave?

FWIW, I've only ever heard one string symphony so far, last fall, but I know I liked it. It was number 7 or 8, something like that. It was in a minor key.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 12, 2021, 01:27:03 PM
I have been potentially looking for a recording of the complete set of string symphonies.

Do you have a favourite Dave?

FWIW, I've only ever heard one string symphony so far, last fall, but I know I liked it. It was number 7 or 8, something like that. It was in a minor key.

Hi Ray - well, as stated I now have just the Markiz performances (the 4-CD set; there is a single SACD that the Amazonians bitched about likely not realizing what they were buying, so beware of that choice if you do not have the equipment - as in my case).  The Markiz reviews attached are superlative - the others I culled out but enjoyed Pople for years - guess those would be my two top choices from the ones that I've heard - but when you realize that these were composed by a young teenager, the works amaze - argumentative but Mendelssohn was certainly the 'equal' (perhaps even better?) that Wolfie at that age (now to step out of the ring -  :laugh:) - Dave  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 12:33:58 AM
Songs Without Words w/ Livia Rev - now, I've owned the version below for a dozen years or more and have not explored other performances - so, just curious which are some of your favorite interpretations of these wonderful pieces?  Thanks - Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41ymLgDC%2B8L.jpg)

I am very limited in my knowledge of many versions.  My introduction was a couple of discs on Naxos played by Peter Nagy.  I'm sure others will have greater insights but I have always enjoyed his unfussy approach allowing the simple beauty of the music to speak without over sentimentalising it.  The Op.30 No.1 that was used to such powerful effect in the film "Sophie's Choice" never fails to move me.....

You can find a very comprehensive survey here:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23753.0.html (https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23753.0.html)

(who else than Todd could have authored it?)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 13, 2021, 12:36:07 AM
Another version to consider is the one by Concerto Koln:


(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81WZ6Kr-yfL._SS500_.jpg)


This is the only version that I own and I will be revisiting it soon  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 12:45:42 AM
Imo Mendelssohn's best kept secrets are his Lieder. Neverfailing melodic invention, pianistic craftsmanship, disarming simplicity and pure beauty. Hyperion has released them all in a splendid series whose artcovers are Felix's own watercolors. Highly recommended.

(https://img.discogs.com/LhjaMp1e2rI7vjvE2Fvsh6LeTw4=/fit-in/600x599/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-5502424-1597168299-3673.jpeg.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61KNBqSvtUL._AC_.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61CGEQIzBoL._SY355_.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91iXxM2dMkL._SY355_.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61Sk7xPCA3L._AC_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 02:00:56 AM
Another version to consider is the one by Concerto Koln:


(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81WZ6Kr-yfL._SS500_.jpg)


This is the only version that I own and I will be revisiting it soon  8)

Thanks Dave and Fergus. There seems to be many iterations of the Concerto Köln sets. I'll be considering that one (Köln combined with the Kurt Masur symphonies box set, or the Lev Markiz set).

I now figured out it was number 7 that I heard before, last fall in a streaming concert. It was highly enjoyable and I found it to be unmistakably Mendelssohn.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 13, 2021, 02:19:33 AM
After the Octet, my favourite music by Mendelssohn is the Double Piano Concerto.
It's very unusual for me to like 'happy' music but Mendelssohn overcomes my resistance  :)

(https://img.discogs.com/dFjOGIW58BvcTcIMj87DCB87cU8=/fit-in/600x621/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13696568-1559224991-1002.jpeg.jpg)
Mendelssohn, Piano Concertos - Ogdon, Lucas, ASMF cond. Marriner

These days that recording can be found buried in this twofer:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/81YYXtzOW7L._SS500_.jpg)

Just been listening to this via the "double-Decca" set you show.  The Ogden/Lucas performance is a joy but I'd forgotten just how brilliant is Jorge Bolet's Rondo Capriccioso Op.13 that's a filler in this set.  I don't have a lot of Bolet's recordings but goodness me he has the technique to play this kind of piece - a delight from first to last
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 05:39:39 AM
Hi Ray - well, as stated I now have just the Markiz performances (the 4-CD set; there is a single SACD that the Amazonians bitched about likely not realizing what they were buying, so beware of that choice if you do not have the equipment - as in my case).  The Markiz reviews attached are superlative - the others I culled out but enjoyed Pople for years - guess those would be my two top choices from the ones that I've heard - but when you realize that these were composed by a young teenager, the works amaze - argumentative but Mendelssohn was certainly the 'equal' (perhaps even better?) that Wolfie at that age (now to step out of the ring -  :laugh:) - Dave  8)


Well, I guess the Markiz is out for me, as I don't have a SACD player.  I guess I know very little of these things (audio wise), but I have many SACD discs (but I guess they are combined types) that play on regular CD players??  For example, the Dacapo Alan Gilbert/NYPO Nielsen symphony set that MI got me as a gift is an SACD, but it plays fine on my "regular" CD player.

I don't know what would be the case with this Markiz set where it would not play on a regular CD, but seeing the comments, I guess I should avoid it.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 05:54:40 AM
I think I am leaning towards this one.  The reviews and price are both "right", it would seem.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Jyn42FGmL._AC_SL1425_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 13, 2021, 06:56:29 AM

Well, I guess the Markiz is out for me, as I don't have a SACD player.  I guess I know very little of these things (audio wise), but I have many SACD discs (but I guess they are combined types) that play on regular CD players??  For example, the Dacapo Alan Gilbert/NYPO Nielsen symphony set that MI got me as a gift is an SACD, but it plays fine on my "regular" CD player.

I don't know what would be the case with this Markiz set where it would not play on a regular CD, but seeing the comments, I guess I should avoid it.

Hi Ray - maybe my post was not clear, but I own the 4-disc set below left which plays on a standard CD player but might be pricey now?  BIS also came out w/ a single disc SACD (below right) of all the same works, but single layer, i.e. not a hybrid product, so will play only on a SACD machine but is cheaper.  Interestingly, I had the Concerto Köln box for a decade (and one of my favorite groups) but when I did some culling last year I decided to just keep the Markitz recordings, the performances and those reviews that I left in a previous attachment must have swayed me.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71EW8p%2BAQUL._SL1050_.jpg)  (https://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h4319/4904319-origpic-b0243f.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 07:01:47 AM
Hi Ray - maybe my post was not clear, but I own the 4-disc set below left which plays on a standard CD player but might be pricey now?  BIS also came out w/ a single disc SACD (below right) of all the same works, but single layer, i.e. not a hybrid product, so will play only on a SACD machine but is cheaper.  Interestingly, I had the Concerto Köln box for a decade (and one of my favorite groups) but when I did some culling last year I decided to just keep the Markitz recordings, the performances and those reviews that I left in a previous attachment must have swayed me.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71EW8p%2BAQUL._SL1050_.jpg)  (https://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h4319/4904319-origpic-b0243f.jpg)

No, your post was clear Dave.  :)  Yes, the 4 disc set is quite pricey, compared to the 1 disc SACD, which I could not purchase as it is not a SACD/CD hybrid, as you say.  This is the reason I am now considering the Concerto Koln set (combined with the Kurt Masur recordings of the 5 full mature symphonies)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 13, 2021, 07:11:58 AM
You can find a very comprehensive survey here:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23753.0.html (https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23753.0.html)

(who else than Todd could have authored it?)

Thanks Andrei for Todd's link on these works dating back to 2014 (I must have missed it or forgot? Checked Amazon and bought the Livia Rev recording there in 2009) - BUT, I just found the Daniel Gortler CDs as a used purchase on the MP for $8 USD (plus shipping) and placed an order - with Todd's recommendation and review and great comments from ClassicsToday, 9/9 rating attached, I should be pleased - NOW, I just saw that Brautigam has released two discs of these works on fortepiano (his McNulty) - several reviews also in the attachment - would be curious if anyone is familiar w/ these performances?  Just checked Spotify and both albums are available - made a playlist and will listen soon.  Dave :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ODQIH69bL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41ymLgDC%2B8L.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41OFwWvulSL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41DzxIr7iTL.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 07:33:58 AM
Just relistening to the only string symphony of Mendelssohn's that I have ever listened to (Number 7).  YouTube performance (Tel-Aviv Soloists)/Barak Tal.

Again, I am struck (particularly by the final movement) by just how much this is vintage sounding Mendelssohn.  If you hear it, you know it cannot be anyone other than Mendelssohn who composed it.  :)

I dare challenge anyone to tell me I am wrong.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 10:18:37 AM
I think I am leaning towards this one.  The reviews and price are both "right", it would seem.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Jyn42FGmL._AC_SL1425_.jpg)

I have that in the following combination

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81IRWkeFmOL._SY355_.jpg) (https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aUHkcRb1vys/XMJqzKSjVaI/AAAAAAAARCo/qywNoD--Z-EPVHaaF9BijCCdBWzk4uFrQCLcBGAs/s1600/front.jpg)

and I can vouchsafe you can't go wrong with the set you posted. Gewandhaus was Mendelssohn's own orchestra, they have his music in their genes and Masur is a very competent and sympathetic conductor, while Concerto Koeln feels like a fish in the water with the string symphonies. Don't hesitate, it's a no-brainer.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 10:33:24 AM
I just saw that Brautigam has released two discs of these works on fortepiano (his McNulty) - several reviews also in the attachment - would be curious if anyone is familiar w/ these performances?  J

Well, Dave, I listened to some pieces from books 1-4 just the other night and I must say I found them rather rushed and un-poetic. I was quite tired after two hectic days, though, so I might have not been in the right mood. Will re-listen very soon and post my thoughts in the WAYLT thread.

FWIW, my favorite complete SWW recordings are Rev, Kyriakou and Barenboim (I also have Brautigam, Martin Jones and Frank van de Laar). Recently I got this set

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51B%2B1HdRuZL._SY300_SX300_QL70_ML2_.jpg)

but haven't listened to it yet.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 10:39:21 AM
I have that in the following combination

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81IRWkeFmOL._SY355_.jpg) (https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aUHkcRb1vys/XMJqzKSjVaI/AAAAAAAARCo/qywNoD--Z-EPVHaaF9BijCCdBWzk4uFrQCLcBGAs/s1600/front.jpg)

and I can vouchsafe you can't go wrong with the set you posted. Gewandhaus was Mendelssohn's own orchestra, they have his music in their genes and Masur is a very competent and sympathetic conductor, while Concerto Koeln feels like a fish in the water with the string symphonies. Don't hesitate, it's a no-brainer.

Thank you, Andrei.  I wasn't looking for another set of the "5 mature symphonies", as I have always been happy with Ashkenazy there, but this combined set is at such a good price, I feel reassured to purchase it indeed.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 10:51:29 AM
When it comes to the symphonies, there are many options beside Masur which are never less than very good.

First and foremost this, which comes with the great bonus of having also the complete overtures

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81rajEvd1TL._SL1400_.jpg)

Then these two classics

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61brovTGF5L.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41S9Y4PXQFL.jpg)

The Brilliant Classics big box, namely this

(https://images.booklooker.de/x/018Qc5/Felix-1809-1847-Mendelssohn-Bartholdy+Mendelssohn-The-Masterworks-40-CD-Edition.jpg)

has them with the Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra conducted by Frans Brueggen.

And the most recent recording is this

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71aXoq69AWL._SX466_.jpg)

which I got just the other day.




Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 10:53:49 AM
Thank you, Andrei.  I wasn't looking for another set of the "5 mature symphonies", as I have always been happy with Ashkenazy there

Has Ashkenazy recorded the complete Mendelssohn symphonies?  :o

Blimey, I wasn't aware of that! I need that set and I need it now!
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 10:59:12 AM
Has Ashkenazy recorded the complete Mendelssohn symphonies?  :o

Blimey, I wasn't aware of that! I need that set and I need it now!

Yes indeed.  I find it to be a fantastic set.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41C8pfu%2BvnL._AC_.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 13, 2021, 11:00:59 AM
Yes indeed.  I find it to be a fantastic set.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41C8pfu%2BvnL._AC_.jpg)

In seek-and-capture mode it went right away, thanks for mentioning it.  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 13, 2021, 11:01:35 AM
In seek-and-capture mode it went right away, thanks for mentioning it.  8)

You're welcome.  Happy to do so.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Florestan on May 14, 2021, 09:41:33 AM
This is an excellent book on Mendelssohn. Highly recommended.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/611xrdZmvfL.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: JBS on May 14, 2021, 12:20:32 PM
Nezet-Seguin has the unrevised Reformation Symphony, which shows that composer revisions are not always the best idea
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/510EYEi3%2BkL.jpg)

Does Manacorda do the unrevised version?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on May 17, 2021, 01:21:14 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)


I have in the past, for some reason unknown to me, paid scant attention to the String Quartets of Mendelssohn. That has changed significantly after hearing this set performed by the Gewandhaus Quartet. Both the music and their performances of it are excellent in every way. This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening listening experience. The integrity of the cycle of string quartets is totally complete with exceptional performances throughout.

I will now go on to listen to Mendelssohn’s String Quintets of which I am equally ignorant. I have only attended to the Octet in the past but at least that is now, or soon will be, rectified.


I have now recently listened to the Mendelssohn String Quintets from the set above. Once again I have paid scant heed to these String Quintets of Mendelssohn in the past. Once again I have missed out on some wonderful musical listening. Once again it is wonderful music and string writing.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 27, 2021, 06:23:38 AM
Okay, after listening to the Concerto Köln for the complete Mendelssohn string symphonies, I would now like recommendations for a complete set on modern instruments, if that exists.  :)

I do think the Concerto Köln performances to be quite good, but I get a feeling that I would prefer Mendelssohn on modern instruments in more Romantic hued performances.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 27, 2021, 08:59:00 AM
Okay, after listening to the Concerto Köln for the complete Mendelssohn string symphonies, I would now like recommendations for a complete set on modern instruments, if that exists.  :)

I do think the Concerto Köln performances to be quite good, but I get a feeling that I would prefer Mendelssohn on modern instruments in more Romantic hued performances.

Hi Ray - I also own the Concerto Köln set and enjoy.  Over the years, I've had 2 or 3 other sets in my collection but now just have the one other shown below w/ Lev Markiz and the Nieuw Sinfonietta Amsterdam string orchestra - DDD recordings from 1993-96 - I've attached some reviews, all consistently excellent comments - NOW, BIS has put all of these discs on a single SACD (several of the reviews address this release) at a great price, but this release will only work on a SACD player.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51DMK1VNA9L.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61SXFRAPX1L.jpg)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: vers la flamme on June 27, 2021, 09:11:53 AM
Okay, after listening to the Concerto Köln for the complete Mendelssohn string symphonies, I would now like recommendations for a complete set on modern instruments, if that exists.  :)

I do think the Concerto Köln performances to be quite good, but I get a feeling that I would prefer Mendelssohn on modern instruments in more Romantic hued performances.

I've enjoyed the Nicholas Ward on Naxos.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 28, 2021, 04:33:55 AM
Thanks Dave and VLF!  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 28, 2021, 04:41:29 AM
Hi Ray - I also own the Concerto Köln set and enjoy.  Over the years, I've had 2 or 3 other sets in my collection but now just have the one other shown below w/ Lev Markiz and the Nieuw Sinfonietta Amsterdam string orchestra - DDD recordings from 1993-96 - I've attached some reviews, all consistently excellent comments - NOW, BIS has put all of these discs on a single SACD (several of the reviews address this release) at a great price, but this release will only work on a SACD player.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51DMK1VNA9L.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61SXFRAPX1L.jpg)

Dave, is the Markiz set performed on modern instruments?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 28, 2021, 05:56:52 AM
Dave, is the Markiz set performed on modern instruments?

Hi Ray - knowing that your wanted a MI recording I checked the Markiz booklet notes/jewel box inserts and there was absolutely nothing indicating the kind of instruments used, although I suspect 'modern', i.e. meaning strings used, tuning, and performance techniques (although the instruments per se may be of any age, as in the pic of them below of the recent group?).  Also, they perform all sorts of repertoire, including new commissioned works suggesting to me that modern instruments are used - maybe others will 'chime in' to help; also, check out YouTube - there are likely videos of their playing, possibly even the Mendelssohn String Symphonies, don't know?

Another set that I owned for years and loved was w/ Ross Pople and the London Festival Orchestra (believe a MI group) on Hyperion (PDF booklet HERE (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/notes/44081-B.pdf)) - I just needed the space and liked Markiz a little better.  Dave :)

(https://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Bio-A-BIG/Amsterdam-Sinfonietta-03.jpg)  (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571140810.png)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 28, 2021, 06:47:12 AM
Hi Ray - knowing that your wanted a MI recording I checked the Markiz booklet notes/jewel box inserts and there was absolutely nothing indicating the kind of instruments used, although I suspect 'modern', i.e. meaning strings used, tuning, and performance techniques (although the instruments per se may be of any age, as in the pic of them below of the recent group?).  Also, they perform all sorts of repertoire, including new commissioned works suggesting to me that modern instruments are used - maybe others will 'chime in' to help; also, check out YouTube - there are likely videos of their playing, possibly even the Mendelssohn String Symphonies, don't know?

Another set that I owned for years and loved was w/ Ross Pople and the London Festival Orchestra (believe a MI group) on Hyperion (PDF booklet HERE (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/notes/44081-B.pdf)) - I just needed the space and liked Markiz a little better.  Dave :)

(https://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Bio-A-BIG/Amsterdam-Sinfonietta-03.jpg)  (https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571140810.png)

Excellent, thank you Dave!  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: VonStupp on June 28, 2021, 12:22:16 PM
Okay, after listening to the Concerto Köln for the complete Mendelssohn string symphonies, I would now like recommendations for a complete set on modern instruments, if that exists.  :)

I do think the Concerto Köln performances to be quite good, but I get a feeling that I would prefer Mendelssohn on modern instruments in more Romantic hued performances.

I had Kurt Masur and the Gewandhaus on LP ages ago, and I just reinvested in their CD set of String Symphonies today.

It has been so long since I have listened, and I probably won't get to them anytime soon, but I have fond memories of their performances on Berlin Classics.

They would certainly be a more Romantic, modern instrument performance in these works. And with Mendelssohn's own orchestra too!

I'm not sure why these weren't issued with Masur's Mendelssohn box; probably licensing.

I have been without these for a long time.

(https://img.discogs.com/ouyyrzsH59ayNhRAgv-kXB8nxYk=/fit-in/600x519/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-16962240-1610833925-5879.jpeg.jpg) (https://img.discogs.com/rTYeR9_B0uGuzi5MyqfGxeaKSL0=/fit-in/560x560/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-16962963-1610836486-9829.jpeg.jpg) (https://img.discogs.com/KXdIqkFWwqysfsTdyySFCNhFfL8=/fit-in/560x560/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-16963206-1610837665-6293.jpeg.jpg) (https://img.discogs.com/kwYbuj8Z9CPa2_JV0hCw_nAVzj8=/fit-in/560x560/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-16967586-1610874859-6288.jpeg.jpg) (https://rovimusic.rovicorp.com/image.jpg?c=fqCSPDxVEuFMhQ-KNlssCRyhM-OFI8zG4l-qVpXXB1I=&f=5)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 29, 2021, 03:57:46 AM
I had Kurt Masur and the Gewandhaus on LP ages ago, and I just reinvested in their CD set of String Symphonies today.

It has been so long since I have listened, and I probably won't get to them anytime soon, but I have fond memories of their performances on Berlin Classics.

They would certainly be a more Romantic, modern instrument performance in these works. And with Mendelssohn's own orchestra too!

I'm not sure why these weren't issued with Masur's Mendelssohn box; probably licensing.

Yes, I'm confused why they didn't include the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig set of the string symphonies to go with the mature full scale symphonies? Instead, it is a hybrid of Masur in the mature symphonies with the Concerto Köln for the string symphonies. As you say, perhaps a licensing issue?
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: Maestro267 on September 27, 2021, 04:14:43 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)


I have in the past, for some reason unknown to me, paid scant attention to the String Quartets of Mendelssohn. That has changed significantly after hearing this set performed by the Gewandhaus Quartet. Both the music and their performances of it are excellent in every way. This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening listening experience. The integrity of the cycle of string quartets is totally complete with exceptional performances throughout.

I will now go on to listen to Mendelssohn’s String Quintets of which I am equally ignorant. I have only attended to the Octet in the past but at least that is now, or soon will be, rectified.

I know I'm quoting a post from May but I found this set in a local charity shop and picked it up today.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: vers la flamme on September 27, 2021, 03:11:15 PM
I know I'm quoting a post from May but I found this set in a local charity shop and picked it up today.

Nice find! I've been looking for a copy.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on October 02, 2021, 12:39:12 AM

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AaE2R%2BTHL._AC_SY355_.jpg)

I know I'm quoting a post from May but I found this set in a local charity shop and picked it up today.

Excellent. What luck! I think that you will thoroughly enjoy it.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on October 10, 2021, 02:41:19 AM
I have just embarked on another Mendelssohn odyssey with this, set with Ashkenazy at the helm:


(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/FJMAAOSw4V5gAAQs/s-l640.jpg)


A Midsummer’s Night Dream 

Notwithstanding the brisk tempi this presentation is magical, enchanting and exciting from the opening bars. The orchestra creates a wonderful atmosphere with a deftness and a lightness of touch that is assured yet still quite enchanting. One can but admire the fine portrayal of the orchestration and the harmonies here. I also find the portrayal of the woodwinds to be particularly engaging; they have a significant voice here. The brass also has a worthy voice here. The vocal element of the work was also very well delivered. The conclusion is wonderfully enchanting. I was very impressed with this version.

Octet

This is a version for String Orchestra. What a magnificent sweeping introduction to this version and this grand sweep continues throughout the movement. The slow movement is too saccharine for me. The Scherzo is suitably lively. The final movement takes the pace up another notch from the Scherzo and it is a whirlwind in places, but light and wonderfully flighty.

Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on October 10, 2021, 03:15:26 AM
I have just embarked on another Mendelssohn odyssey with this, set with Ashkenazy at the helm:


(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/FJMAAOSw4V5gAAQs/s-l640.jpg)


A Midsummer’s Night Dream 

Notwithstanding the brisk tempi this presentation is magical, enchanting and exciting from the opening bars. The orchestra creates a wonderful atmosphere with a deftness and a lightness of touch that is assured yet still quite enchanting. One can but admire the fine portrayal of the orchestration and the harmonies here. I also find the portrayal of the woodwinds to be particularly engaging; they have a significant voice here. The brass also has a worthy voice here. The vocal element of the work was also very well delivered. The conclusion is wonderfully enchanting. I was very impressed with this version.

Octet

This is a version for String Orchestra. What a magnificent sweeping introduction to this version and this grand sweep continues throughout the movement. The slow movement is too saccharine for me. The Scherzo is suitably lively. The final movement takes the pace up another notch from the Scherzo and it is a whirlwind in places, but light and wonderfully flighty.

I've had and enjoyed the Ashkenazy set of symphonies for a long time! Just the symphonies, my set doesn't include the extras like yours.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on October 10, 2021, 03:17:43 AM
I've had and enjoyed the Ashkenazy set of symphonies for a long time! Just the symphonies, my set doesn't include the extras like yours.

Good to know that the symphonies come with your recommendation, Ray.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on October 31, 2021, 08:08:39 AM
Symphonies 1-5 [Ashkenazy]:


(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/FJMAAOSw4V5gAAQs/s-l640.jpg)


I recently completed a listening survey of this Ashkenazy cycle and I was very impressed with it.


Symphony No. 1: This is a light and bright first movement presentation. It swirls like a breeze as it moves along but it is never overly forced. The scoring is well presented here with all of the groups being well balanced in a good recording. The slow movement is a wonderful contrast in tempo and mood. The woodwinds sound wonderful. The Menuetto is quick in pace with an interesting mix of moods making it atmospherically interesting. Once again the woodwinds shine. The final movement is pacy and well driven. The movement has a fine conclusion.

Symphony No. 2: Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 2 was always an odd one for me and I am still not sure that I understand it. I have always found it to be a problematic work. One of its issues for me is the multiplicity of movements in it. Perhaps this affects the work’s coherency and cogency in presenting a unified whole; is it too fragmented? Anyway, being objective, the presentation here is excellent with all parties performing superbly. The blend between the vocal and instrumental elements is very fine indeed. The final movement is particularly powerful.

Symphony No. 3: This symphony has a wonderful opening. It is enchanting music and it is well delivered here. As the music progresses in the movement the music explodes wonderfully and it is both powerful and lyrical in turns. The second movement is a spirited affair and I particularly like the scoring for the woodwinds. The slow movement is presented wonderfully lyrical and expansive here. The final
movement is an exciting affair and the work concludes with a satisfactory and definitive resolution. This is a very fine presentation of this music; it is both driven and sensitive and it achieves a fine
balance between those two elements. The scoring is also noticeably very fine and rich.

Symphony No. 4: This must have one of the most instantly recognisable openings to a symphony. The whole opening movement is well presented; it is light, crisp but not overly driven. The orchestral textures of the music is also very apparent. Although this is a serious version I really like the feeling of “lightness” here. Once again, the textures in the slow movement are wonderful. The lower register strings sound wonderful as a sort of ground bass accompaniment; prominent and effective. The third movement is quite lyrical and this is a smooth, rounded presentation of it with those wonderful orchestral textures once again being wonderfully balanced and highlighted. The tempo takes flight again wonderfully in the final movement; it is quite invigorating. Those flitting woodwinds are wonderful. This is a most delightful and engaging version of this work. The recorded sound is excellent.

Symphony No. 5: The depth of emotion portrayed in the opening movement is profound. The breadth of the orchestration is also very skillfully presented. This is wonderful music and music making. I like the unrelenting forward momentum and drive in the movement. It is sympathetically paced throughout in an excellent presentation here delivering high drama, tension and wonderful exuberance. The second movement is a buoyant, Scherzo-like movement. It is light and quirky, engaging and again well delivered here. The short slow movement is more on the solemn side in terms of tone but the
harmonies and scoring are always very engaging and appealing. The final movement is a wonderfully expansive Chorale. The scoring is wonderful and I like the graduated changes in the tempo, offering a
fine dramatic element culminating in a very fine conclusion.
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: OrchestralNut on October 31, 2021, 08:35:38 AM
Symphonies 1-5 [Ashkenazy]:


(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/FJMAAOSw4V5gAAQs/s-l640.jpg)


I recently completed a listening survey of this Ashkenazy cycle and I was very impressed with it.


Symphony No. 1: This is a light and bright first movement presentation. It swirls like a breeze as it moves along but it is never overly forced. The scoring is well presented here with all of the groups being well balanced in a good recording. The slow movement is a wonderful contrast in tempo and mood. The woodwinds sound wonderful. The Menuetto is quick in pace with an interesting mix of moods making it atmospherically interesting. Once again the woodwinds shine. The final movement is pacy and well driven. The movement has a fine conclusion.

Symphony No. 2: Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 2 was always an odd one for me and I am still not sure that I understand it. I have always found it to be a problematic work. One of its issues for me is the multiplicity of movements in it. Perhaps this affects the work’s coherency and cogency in presenting a unified whole; is it too fragmented? Anyway, being objective, the presentation here is excellent with all parties performing superbly. The blend between the vocal and instrumental elements is very fine indeed. The final movement is particularly powerful.

Symphony No. 3: This symphony has a wonderful opening. It is enchanting music and it is well delivered here. As the music progresses in the movement the music explodes wonderfully and it is both powerful and lyrical in turns. The second movement is a spirited affair and I particularly like the scoring for the woodwinds. The slow movement is presented wonderfully lyrical and expansive here. The final
movement is an exciting affair and the work concludes with a satisfactory and definitive resolution. This is a very fine presentation of this music; it is both driven and sensitive and it achieves a fine
balance between those two elements. The scoring is also noticeably very fine and rich.

Symphony No. 4: This must have one of the most instantly recognisable openings to a symphony. The whole opening movement is well presented; it is light, crisp but not overly driven. The orchestral textures of the music is also very apparent. Although this is a serious version I really like the feeling of “lightness” here. Once again, the textures in the slow movement are wonderful. The lower register strings sound wonderful as a sort of ground bass accompaniment; prominent and effective. The third movement is quite lyrical and this is a smooth, rounded presentation of it with those wonderful orchestral textures once again being wonderfully balanced and highlighted. The tempo takes flight again wonderfully in the final movement; it is quite invigorating. Those flitting woodwinds are wonderful. This is a most delightful and engaging version of this work. The recorded sound is excellent.

Symphony No. 5: The depth of emotion portrayed in the opening movement is profound. The breadth of the orchestration is also very skillfully presented. This is wonderful music and music making. I like the unrelenting forward momentum and drive in the movement. It is sympathetically paced throughout in an excellent presentation here delivering high drama, tension and wonderful exuberance. The second movement is a buoyant, Scherzo-like movement. It is light and quirky, engaging and again well delivered here. The short slow movement is more on the solemn side in terms of tone but the
harmonies and scoring are always very engaging and appealing. The final movement is a wonderfully expansive Chorale. The scoring is wonderful and I like the graduated changes in the tempo, offering a
fine dramatic element culminating in a very fine conclusion.

Glad you enjoyed this set.  :)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: aligreto on October 31, 2021, 09:10:33 AM
Glad you enjoyed this set.  :)

I sure did, Ray. You came up trumps once again with your recommendation  ;)  8)
Title: Re: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) - Bicentennial Celebration!
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 31, 2021, 04:34:36 PM
Celebrated Reformation day with Thos Fey's Fifth