GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Wanderer on April 30, 2007, 04:02:41 AM

Title: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 30, 2007, 04:02:41 AM
This is meant as a continuation of the old Medtner thread (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,6673.0.html) at the "retired" forum. There are many useful recommendations and insights in that topic and I hope discussion will continue here.

Firstly, let me remind everyone of this excellent and very informative site:www.medtner.org.uk (http://www.auxl52.dsl.pipex.com/medtner/index.html).

I've been listening to Hamish Milne's new album of the complete Skazki (Tales) on Hyperion (also, one should not forget the marvelous op.25 no.1 Sonata-Skazka - not included here -  in effect a tripartite collection of interrelated Skazki). Some of these miniature tone poems receive their first performances on disc. Milne is impressive throughout, managing to convey the varied moods of these pieces with astonishing clarity, sensitivity, force and insight. Highlights include the dark menace of op.8 no.2 (a favourite of Prokofiev), the grim heroics of the heavily contrapuntal allegro marciale op.14 no.2 "March of the Paladin" (one of Rachmaninov's favourites), the dark and brooding op.20 no.2 "Campanella" (as far from Liszt and Paganini as one could imagine), op.26 no.1 vividly portraying a scene of utmost tranquility, the "exalted piety" of op.34 no.4 and many others. Let's hope more pianists will tackle these works in the future. The music gives the impression of monumentality and sincerity; these were some of Medtner's more personal utterances. Milne's excellent performances and liner notes can make Hyperion proud once again.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Maciek on April 30, 2007, 04:18:23 AM
Firstly, let me remind everyone of this excellent and very informative site:www.medtner.org.uk (http://www.auxl52.dsl.pipex.com/medtner/index.html).

Thanks for the link! :D Very useful site!

Maciek
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 30, 2007, 04:31:42 AM
Thanks for the link! :D Very useful site!

One of the site's recent additions: Medtner's rarer than rare book "The Muse and the Fashion" is available as a pdf file.  :)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: 12tone. on October 07, 2007, 01:13:53 PM
I have this and wondered what else is out there that's good from Medtner.  I really like the late Romantics' thick works especially for piano and orchestral music.  Medtner's Sonata in F minor, Op 5 is big and hand-filling as it were.  I like that.  What else did he write?

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/67221.jpg)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 07, 2007, 01:43:21 PM
I saw Marc-Andre Hamelin in concert not too long ago - just fantastic & a poweful piano player; I have Geoffrey Tozer on 4-CD Chandos set in these compositions - these seem to be the two choices for these works, but would be interested to hear other comments! Also own the Violin Sonatas w/ Tozer on piano & Mordkovitch on violin (also on Chandos).

The Piano Concertos are another part of Medtner's output to explore - the Hyperion discs in their Romantic Piano Concerto series are worth a listening, esp. at a discount price - the two shown below include the Piano Concertos Nos. 1-3 & Piano Quintet - hope that others will respond w/ recommendations!  :)

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Y1W38ZR9L._AA240_.jpg)  (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EXeHDjeGL._AA240_.jpg)  (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/5d/46/8725b340dca029492fdd3010._AA240_.L.jpg)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Ten thumbs on October 13, 2007, 11:55:00 AM
The 1st Violin Sonata is one of my favourites but rather different from Op5. If you like lots of notes, try the Sonata Tragica or the Dithyramb Op10, esp No2. or the Sonata-Ballade.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Mark on October 13, 2007, 12:50:23 PM
Buy this:

(http://www.mmmusic.co.uk/grampics/bissacd1588.jpg)

... not for the Tchaikovsky, obviously. ;D

The First Piano Concerto by Medtner is stunningly brilliant, a tour-de-force and almost overwhelming. Much better than his rather long, convoluted Second Piano Concerti, IMO.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: The new erato on October 13, 2007, 11:21:19 PM
Much better than his rather long, convoluted Second Piano Concerti, IMO.
Does he have several?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Mark on October 13, 2007, 11:57:10 PM
Does he have several?

Three that I know of.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: The new erato on October 14, 2007, 12:00:57 AM
Three seconds? Then I can certainly understand why you are using Concerti about his seconds.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Mark on October 14, 2007, 12:07:51 AM
Three seconds? Then I can certainly understand why you are using Concerti about his seconds.

Tut, tut - such unnecessary pendantry. ::)

I meant he wrote three Piano Concerti. I didn't realise you'd have a problem with me writing things out in full.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: The new erato on October 14, 2007, 12:09:27 AM
Tut, tut - such unnecessary pendantry. ::)

I meant he wrote three Piano Concerti. I didn't realise you'd have a problem with me writing things out in full.
Just som gentle jesting.  ;D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Mark on October 14, 2007, 12:14:58 AM
Just som gentle jesting.  ;D

Oh, okay. I have a new baby, hence no sleep ... or sense of humour! ;D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Don on October 14, 2007, 05:11:30 AM
The 1st Violin Sonata is one of my favourites but rather different from Op5. If you like lots of notes, try the Sonata Tragica or the Dithyramb Op10, esp No2. or the Sonata-Ballade.

The Sonata Tragica is a very long work.  Doesn't it need a lot of notes?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Ten thumbs on October 14, 2007, 12:38:33 PM
The Sonata Tragica is a very long work.  Doesn't it need a lot of notes?
On the contrary, it is quite short. It is one of the 'Vergessene Weisen'.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Don on October 14, 2007, 01:15:03 PM
On the contrary, it is quite short. It is one of the 'Vergessene Weisen'.

Yes, my mistake.  I was thinking of and listening to Medtner's Violin Sonata No. 3 "Epica".
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on October 19, 2007, 08:07:26 PM
Buy this:

(http://www.mmmusic.co.uk/grampics/bissacd1588.jpg)

... not for the Tchaikovsky, obviously. ;D

I second this recommendation. A marvelous concerto in a recording and interpretation that makes it (almost) full justice. That the Tchaikovsky is a very worthwhile and thoughtful interpretation is an added bonus.

The Hyperion concerto discs mentioned above are also well worth exploring; Demidenko's interpretations especially are particularly good.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: 71 dB on December 01, 2007, 12:31:27 PM
So now I have listened to the Naxos CD with the 2nd Piano Concerto and Piano Quintet few times. I was unfamiliar with Medtner's music before this. I have to say this composer is a pleasant finding. The music is like "enhanced Rachmaninov". It has some Elgarian complexity in it, similar rich textures. Medtner is not the greatest melodist and his music is a bit messy but I do like it. Interesting how I had ignored this composer this long.  :P
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Lethevich on December 01, 2007, 12:37:01 PM
So now I have listened to the Naxos CD with the 2nd Piano Concerto and Piano Quintet few times. I was unfamiliar with Medtner's music before this. I have to say this composer is a pleasant finding. The music is like "enhanced Rachmaninov". It has some Elgarian complexity in it, similar rich textures. Medtner is not the greatest melodist and his music is a bit messy but I do like it. Interesting how I had ignored this composer this long.  :P

*cheer* A success! :D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 03, 2008, 07:27:57 AM
At the request of my friend Tasos, I will post my impressions of the piano music forthwith in this place....

Nikolai Medtner.
Complete piano works, Volume I.
Hamish Milne, Piano.
Recorded 1977, on the label CRD, by Bob Auger.

Primavera, (Spring Tale) Forgotten Melodies, Second Cycle, Opus 39, No. 2.
Meditation, Forgotten Melodies Second Cycle, opus 39, No. 2.
Fairy Tale, E flat major, opus 26, No, 2.
in F minor, (Ophelia's Song) opus 14, No.1.
in E minor, (March of the Paladin), opus 14, No. 2.
in G major, opus 9, No. 3.
in D minor.
in C sharp minor, opus 35, No. 4.
Three Hymns in Praise of Toil, opus 49.
Elegy opus 59, no. 2.
Dithyramb opus 10, No. 2.



Milne is opening my ears for Medtner. The range of emotions this composer has to offer is enormous, for what a great composer he is.
and you can find that genius in the piano works aplenty. I was slowly finding my way into Medtner, but he takes me by storm and thunder. I am listening to some of his Fairy Tales mostly in Minor keys, and amazing they are. Starting with "Primavera" (Spring Tale) forgotten Melodies, Second Cycle opus 39, No. 3, and No. 1, (Meditation) and both works are blowing me out of my chair, what beauty, and perfectly scored compositions they are. The mystery is oozing from the notes. The elegy opus 59, no. 2 is a stunning work too, as are all works. Milne is a fabulous pianist, and allthough I have no one to compare to, I would say from what I hear Milne fits the bill allright. And the recording from trustworthy Bob Auger is a always expertly done, a warm and detailed sound, in a perfect sound stage.
The start of a 7 cd box was successfull. Cannot wait to play it all. Definitively a very good start of 2008.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 03, 2008, 07:28:55 AM
Nikolai Medtner.
Complete Pianomusic, Volume II.
Hamish Milne, piano.
Licensed from CRD, and recorded in 1977, by Bob Auger.

Sonata Triad, opus 11.
Sonata in E minor, opus 25, No. 2 "The night Wind".

The second volume is every bit as good as the first one, stunning sonics, and indeed massively beautiful works. They have yet to sink in entirely, to have their full impact, but so far I think both sonatas very good. It really starts well with No. 1 in A flat major, very intimidating in its structure, and well written, followed by a even deeper one, no. 2 in D minor, "Elegy", what introverted energy bundled together in this work.
The "Night Wind", is also a awesome work of grand proportions, and I need to hear this more often.

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 03, 2008, 07:29:41 AM
Nikolai Medtner.
Complete Pianomusic, Volume III.
Hamish Milne, Piano.
Licensed from CRD, and recorded in 1989, by Bob Auger.

Sonata in G minor, opus 22.
Romantic Sketches for the Young, opus 54,
Prelude, Pastorale,
Skazka Bird's Tale,
Prelude, Hymn,
Skazka, The Beggar.

Two Skazki's opus 8, both in C minor.
Three Novelles opus 17.
Sonate in A minor opus 30.

What wonderful music this is, the third volume allready, and listening to it without strain, so easy, and utterly rewarding, its balsam for the soul. Never before after Chopin did I so enjoy piano music as from Medtner. What a find.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 03, 2008, 07:30:30 AM
Medtner.
Complete Piano Music, volume IV.
Hamish Milne, Piano.
Licensed by CRD, and recorded in 1989 by Bob Auger.

Sonata in F minor, opus 5.
Second improvisation, (in variation form) opus 47.

Marvelous follow up, and I have nothing to add to the word marvelous.
This box moves up to the top of my playing list........
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 03, 2008, 07:31:22 AM
Nikolai Medtner.
Complete Piano Music, Volume V.
Hamish Milne, Piano.
Licensed by CRD, and recorded in 1994, by Steve Portnoi.

Sonata Ballade in F sharp major, opus 27.
Four Skazki, opus 34.
Sonata Romantica in B flat minor, opus 53, No. 1.

This box is a success story so far. Well recorded and performed, this set is a constant joy to your senses. And not only the music is responsable for this extra ordinary result, but also the pianist, that makes this a journey in which to discover, in dept, what is there to take for a discerning listener. Am I that? Who knows! But I have immense pleasure going through this box. It shows. I will play all in just two days. And that is a measure with me. I simply adore the music, and the genius that is playing those gems. Well, let me see what is there to have from Medtner. Some guidance would be appreciated folks.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 10, 2008, 02:17:30 AM
Harry, thanks for posting your impressions. Keep them coming!

For another, more virtuosic view of the sonatas Hamelin's set is indispensable. Some of them like the First or the Night Wind greatly benefit from such an approach. Hamelin is not insensitive to lyrical beauty either, though he tends to downplay such elements here and there.

Severin von Eckardstein's recent Medtner album is also most highly recommended, some very potent performances (including the Sonata tragica & the Night Wind sonata) and impressive virtuosity and musicianship throughout.

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w300/front/0/0034571172217.jpg)(http://www.jpc.de/image/w300/front/0/0760623146522.jpg)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on January 10, 2008, 02:32:00 AM
Harry, thanks for posting your impressions. Keep them coming!

For another, more virtuosic view of the sonatas Hamelin's set is indispensable. Some of them like the First or the Night Wind greatly benefit from such an approach. Hamelin is not insensitive to lyrical beauty either, though he tends to downplay such elements here and there.

Severin von Eckardstein's recent Medtner album is also most highly recommended, some very potent performances (including the Sonata tragica & the Night Wind sonata) and impressive virtuosity and musicianship throughout.

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w300/front/0/0034571172217.jpg)(http://www.jpc.de/image/w300/front/0/0760623146522.jpg)

I had a eye on the MDG issue for some time now, so I will probably try that one too.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 10, 2008, 02:51:33 AM
I had a eye on the MDG issue for some time now, so I will probably try that one too.

Awaiting your impressions on that one, as well. I was very pleasantly surprised, that being my first exposure to this pianist. His Scriabin album is just as good.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: 71 dB on January 10, 2008, 02:53:31 AM
I was nice to "find" Medtner but it's not nice to realise there's more CDs to buy (as if my wishlist wasn't long enough  ::) )
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 10, 2008, 02:59:18 AM
I was nice to "find" Medtner but it's not nice to realise there's more CDs to buy (as if my wishlist wasn't long enough  ::) )

Then you definitely don't want the old forum database to come back to business...  ;)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 14, 2008, 01:12:33 PM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0747313029976.jpg)

And here comes an excellent new issue of Medtner's first and second violin sonatas. The first one is a modestly scoped (compared with the two that followed) but totally beguiling work of immense beauty, vitality and wistfulness. The second could be described as Medtner's "Spring" sonata and is full of memorable melodies, effervescence and charm. It's grand in scope and design and both its thematic material and its treatment leave one thrilled and admiring.

This version doesn't surpass the fiery and urgent account of Mordkovich/Tozer on Chandos, but is nevertheless quite expertly performed. Paul Stewart is really impressive in the piano part (never a mere accompaniment in Medtner's violin sonatas) and I was glad to be informed from the booklet that he currently records the composer's piano sonatas for Naxos.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on March 14, 2008, 03:19:15 PM
The sonatas...really, well that's good news. :)
I will start again with the 7 cd Brilliant box again next Monday.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 29, 2008, 03:51:20 AM
(http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/Apr08/medtner_sonatas_8851.jpg)

A musicweb review. (http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/Apr08/Medtner_sonatas_8851.htm)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on April 30, 2008, 05:12:24 AM
(http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/Apr08/medtner_sonatas_8851.jpg)

A musicweb review. (http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/Apr08/Medtner_sonatas_8851.htm)

I started with this box again today, and my impression is one of growing admiration. :)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: springrite on April 30, 2008, 05:28:13 AM
Do not miss Medtner's recordings. He is an excellent pianist, winner of the Gold Medal over some of the greatest pianists you know when he was graduating from the Conservatoire.

There is a recording of Medtner's own music and some Beethoven. Magic! (And it was recorded in Medtner's late years, when he has not played in public for ages and was supposedly in decline.)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Harry on April 30, 2008, 05:30:05 AM
Do not miss Medtner's recordings. He is an excellent pianist, winner of the Gold Medal over some of the greatest pianists you know when he was graduating from the Conservatoire.

There is a recording of Medtner's own music and some Beethoven. Magic! (And it was recorded in Medtner's late years, when he has not played in public for ages and was supposedly in decline.)

Yes, I was already searching a bit in that direction Paul. :)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on May 01, 2008, 05:44:40 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/516FCWRN6oL._SS500_.jpg)

A classicstoday.com review. (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=11605)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on May 01, 2008, 05:48:59 AM
Thanks for the link. I have started listening to Medtner these last few days (First Piano Concerto, Piano Quintet, Forgotten Melodies I + II), and I like what I am hearing.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on May 01, 2008, 05:52:44 AM
... and some Beethoven. Magic! (And it was recorded in Medtner's late years, when he has not played in public for ages and was supposedly in decline.)

The Appassionata, in particular. These recordings are well worth seeking out.
Beethoven's Fourth concerto was a speciality of his in concert, but, alas, no recording was ever made. His marvelous cadenzas for it still await a first recording by an adventurous pianist.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on May 01, 2008, 05:56:03 AM
Thanks for the link. I have started listening to Medtner these last few days (First Piano Concerto, Piano Quintet, Forgotten Melodies I + II), and I like what I am hearing.

I'm glad to hear that, Jezetha. Keep listening and share your impressions!  8)
Keep in mind that Medtner's music rewards repeated listening most handsomely.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: MN Dave on May 01, 2008, 05:58:31 AM
I'm glad to hear that, Jezetha. Keep listening and share your impressions!  8)
Keep in mind that Medtner's music rewards repeated listening most handsomely.

I keep meaning to try him out, but other more prominent composers always get in the way.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on May 01, 2008, 06:04:52 AM
I keep meaning to try him out, but other more prominent composers always get in the way.

You really ought to (and elbow those others out for an hour or so, Dave!) I really think you'd take to him. He is drier and more severe than Brahms, though (my first impresion)... But as Wanderer says - he rewards repeated listenings.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on May 18, 2008, 06:53:02 AM
(http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/May08/Wild_Forgotten_75003.jpg)

A musicweb review (http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2008/May08/Wild_Forgotten_75003.htm) of a very worthwhile recording, originally issued by Chesky (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/dec99/wildmed.htm). The works included are the op.47 Second Improvisation, the op.56 Sonata-Idylle and the op.39 Vergessene Weisen (second cycle of Forgotten Melodies, the last piece of the set being the Sonata tragica).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 09, 2008, 11:40:54 PM
Ginsburg's 1957 interpretation of Sonata Reminiscenza has been added to the downloads section of www.medtner.org.uk (http://www.medtner.org.uk/downloads.html) (as well as a number of songs with Dolukhanova). 8)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: DFO on August 10, 2008, 03:59:37 AM
There's an extraordinary recording of the epique
v.s.by DFO with Alexander Goldenweiser at the
piano, plus a fantastic Catoire's piano trio with
him at the piano with Kogan and Rostropovich.
The label was Dante and it's OOP
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: galltywenallt on August 20, 2008, 09:39:10 AM
There's an extraordinary recording of the epique
v.s.by DFO with Alexander Goldenweiser at the
piano, plus a fantastic Catoire's piano trio with
him at the piano with Kogan and Rostropovich.
The label was Dante and it's OOP

It can be Downloaded from here:
<http://rapidshare.com/files/122928158/Medtner_-_violin_sonata_no_3.zip>
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on August 20, 2008, 09:42:37 AM
It can be Downloaded from here:
<http://rapidshare.com/files/122928158/Medtner_-_violin_sonata_no_3.zip>

That's a nice way to start, galltywenallt! Welcome! And thank you.

(Without the brackets is better, i.e. clickable - http://rapidshare.com/files/122928158/Medtner_-_violin_sonata_no_3.zip)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: galltywenallt on August 20, 2008, 09:46:00 AM
The Appassionata, in particular. These recordings are well worth seeking out.
Beethoven's Fourth concerto was a speciality of his in concert, but, alas, no recording was ever made. His marvelous cadenzas for it still await a first recording by an adventurous pianist.

The cadenzas can be obtained on a private label (plus all the other cadenzas for Beethoven 4 that pianist Lowenthal could find).  For details go to www.medtner.org.uk/works.html and click on "Two Cadenzas for Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto" at the bottom of the page.  Lowenthal told me that the Medtner cadenzas are his favourites.    :)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 20, 2008, 11:02:08 AM
The cadenzas can be obtained on a private label (plus all the other cadenzas for Beethoven 4 that pianist Lowenthal could find).  For details go to www.medtner.org.uk/works.html and click on "Two Cadenzas for Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto" at the bottom of the page.  Lowenthal told me that the Medtner cadenzas are his favourites.    :)

Thanks for the heads-up! And welcome to the forum.  8)


Edit: Unfortunately, the e-mail address seems to be invalid...  >:(
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 20, 2008, 10:02:41 PM
Laurence Kayaleh & Paul Stewart - The Sound of Medtner (http://www.scena.org/lsm/sm13-6/medtner-en.html)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: galltywenallt on August 23, 2008, 01:44:11 AM
Thanks for the heads-up! And welcome to the forum.  8)

Edit: Unfortunately, the e-mail address seems to be invalid...  >:(

It's fine, I tried it just now and got a reply from Sophia.  mavenace{a}aol.com  replacing {a} by @
(done this way to foil spammers)   :)

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 23, 2008, 09:35:05 AM
It's fine, I tried it just now and got a reply from Sophia. 

Me too; it wouldn't get through the first time.

So, do you have the CD already or are you considering buying it?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: galltywenallt on August 23, 2008, 10:47:43 AM
Me too; it wouldn't get through the first time.

So, do you have the CD already or are you considering buying it?

I bought it a year ago.  $20 incl shipping to the UK.  I posted Sophia a dollar bill because she doesn't accept credit cards or Paypal and international bank transfers from the UK are expensive.

It's a 2-CD set containing a performance of the concerto with cadenzas by Beethoven, Clara Schumann, Anton Rubinstein, von Bulow, Brahms, Saint-Saens, Busoni, Godowsky, Dohnanyi, Medtner and Rzewski.  Good playing too; Lowenthal deserves to be better known.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on September 16, 2008, 01:37:54 AM
Good news! Sudbin's next album for BIS will be "a coupling of Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No.4 in its original version and Medtner’s Piano Concerto No.2" and it "will be released in Spring 2009". No orchestra or conductor are specified.
Since Medtner was the dedicatee of Rachmaninov's Fourth Concerto and Rachmaninov the dedicatee of Medtner's Second, the coupling makes perfect sense. The fact that Sudbin will record the original (longer) version of Rachmaninov's concerto is a further cause for rejoice.





I bought it a year ago.  $20 incl shipping to the UK.  I posted Sophia a dollar bill because she doesn't accept credit cards or Paypal and international bank transfers from the UK are expensive.

It's a 2-CD set containing a performance of the concerto with cadenzas by Beethoven, Clara Schumann, Anton Rubinstein, von Bulow, Brahms, Saint-Saens, Busoni, Godowsky, Dohnanyi, Medtner and Rzewski.  Good playing too; Lowenthal deserves to be better known.

Thanks for the info. It looks like a worthwhile issue which I'll probably investigate at some point.  :)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 07, 2008, 12:10:38 PM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/3760127220596.jpg)

This recital disc combines solo piano music (8 of the most well known Skazki/Tales, among which March of the Paladin and the sinister Campanella) and lieder (mainly settings of Tioutchev, Pushkin, Lermontov and Goethe), performed by Boris Berezovsky, V.Savenko (bass) and Y.Ivanilova (soprano).

Medtner's lieder, which constitute a significant part of his output (he wrote more than one hundred settings of both Russian and German poetry throughout his career), are multi-faceted, profound works in par with the texts that inspired them. His writing for the voice is very imaginative and colourful, it often resembles a violin and sometimes incorporates vocalise elements. The piano parts are demanding and complex, in constant dialogue with the voice, creating palpable tension and often inexorable drive and momentum.
The disc offers performances of obvious dedication and love; Berezovsky is always impressive in Medtner and both singers are in excellent form, offering the authority and conviction to make these works really sparkle. The interspersing of the skazki among the lieder is particularly inspired.
Warmly recommended.


(brief samples here (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/5904792?rk=home&rsk=hitlist))
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 01, 2008, 11:04:05 AM
Out of the depths of the listening thread, an excellent post by Lethe:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51o7447LhpL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EXeHDjeGL._SL500_AA240_.jpg) (http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/5d/46/8725b340dca029492fdd3010.L.jpg)

Medtner is just brilliant. In the genres included in these discs, he is equal to other very late Romantics such as Rachmaninoff, Scriabin and Elgar, and his style is his own. I find the music less "overheated" than some of the creations of the other mentioned composers, and due to personal preference I find this trait to be very desirable. His mastery of sonata structure and melodic invention gives his works an intellectual quality (although not academic) in how extremely well knitted together everything is - it's engaging stuff, although perhaps not immediately accessable (I didn't enjoy his concertos at first).

I must say that there are fewer "blazing" themes in evidence than in the previously mentioned composers music, but this is repaid by Medtner's excellent structural qualities, as well as the most effective way in which he uses his material. If the music is not identical to the Romantics of his time, the mood is often very similar - frequently nostalgic and longing, but also with great inner fire. My favourite concerto is #2 at the moment, mainly due to the epic first movement.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Lethevich on December 01, 2008, 11:13:01 AM
SonicMan found a nice review which describes Medtner's style far better than my stumbling attempts:

http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/h/hyp66744a.php
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 08, 2009, 09:44:41 AM
(http://www.classicstoday.com/images/coverpics/12020_coverpic.jpg)

A ClassicsToday review. (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=12020)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 12, 2009, 01:30:16 AM
(http://www.classicstoday.com/images/coverpics/12058_coverpic.jpg)

A lukewarm ClassicsToday review (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=12058) of Derzhavina's Medtner, with which I agree. These are lyrical, accomplished performances but largely undistinctive. Still, it's good to see more pianists apart from the usual suspects recording these works. Even if this issue can't be recommended as one's first (or second) acquaintance with Medtner, there are still moments of true merit to be found in these recordings.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on March 19, 2009, 02:24:27 PM
I have been listening to Tozer's recordings on Chandos (the first two volumes so far). I can't say anything original, apart from saying that I find Medtner a terrific composer. There is so much substance there, you can listen to his music many many times and discover new things at every hearing. Medtner's greatness lies in the paradoxical combination of weight and lightness, the Teutonic and Slavonic are in perfect equilibrium.

Before I started listening to Medtner in earnest a few days ago, I listened to York Bowen (Hough/Hyperion). I really love his music; it is superficially more melodically appealing than Medtner's. But I notice that Medtner gives me a sense of inexhaustibility Bowen doesn't.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 20, 2009, 06:23:18 AM
I bought this some months ago, but it never seemed to gel until recently.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51yYSKTVSDL._SS400_.jpg)

I find I need to pay attention with Medtner, and that I cannot use him as background music. I really need to listen. Perhaps with time, I'll be able to listen while doing other things - but not yet. I've grown to like some of this disc and am enjoying the process of learning his music. I recently ordered the piano concerti from Berkshire.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Lethevich on March 20, 2009, 08:38:20 AM
I find I need to pay attention with Medtner, and that I cannot use him as background music. I really need to listen. Perhaps with time, I'll be able to listen while doing other things - but not yet. I've grown to like some of this disc and am enjoying the process of learning his music. I recently ordered the piano concerti from Berkshire.

Welcome to the cult :) One way to appreciate Medtner's concerti is to listen to them expecting Beethoven rather than Rachmaninoff. I initially understood the lack of sweeping melodies to be a flaw in the music, but later realised that the composer was aiming for something different. Rather than a grand series of tunes, they are more pointalistic and architectural, these small events combining to form a satisfying whole.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: nut-job on March 20, 2009, 08:54:07 AM
Medner's Skaski I find extremely good (although I like some a lot better than others, which is expected from such collections).  A nice combination of melodic invention, rich harmony, and motific development.  However, my subsequent listening to the piano concerti was a big disappointment and the sonata-ballade struck me as a mess.  I am not impressed so far with Medner's work in large-scale forms. 
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Ten thumbs on March 30, 2009, 02:23:14 PM
Medner's Skaski I find extremely good (although I like some a lot better than others, which is expected from such collections).  A nice combination of melodic invention, rich harmony, and motific development.  However, my subsequent listening to the piano concerti was a big disappointment and the sonata-ballade struck me as a mess.  I am not impressed so far with Medner's work in large-scale forms. 

I once expressed the same opinion regarding Medtner's larger forms and was advised to think again. I now have quite the opposite opinion. In fact the Sonata-ballade since you mention it is very tautly constructed. The first piano concerto has to be considering that it is a single sonata form movement lasting over thirty minutes.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: springrite on June 01, 2009, 04:39:01 AM
TTT
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: karlhenning on June 01, 2009, 04:45:28 AM
TTT

(* Jeevesian cough *) (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,11225.msg312987.html#msg312987)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: robnewman on June 01, 2009, 04:50:08 AM
Improvisation No. 1 in B Flat Minor
Op. 31/1
(Hamelin)

http://www.mediafire.com/?gjnmdmykgzm


Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: springrite on June 01, 2009, 04:50:49 AM
Having been familiar with Medtner's piano music (that includes the concerti) and later some of the chamber works, and becoming a huge fan, I have recently listened to some of his songs (romances) and found them to be wonderful as well. I am becoming resentful of the "Rachmaninov without the tunes" description of Medtner that was so fashionable for a long time. (In fact, it was reading that line that made me curious and led to my first Medtner purchase). First of all, there are tunes. Secondly, Rachmaninov without the tunes (or even WITH the tunes) could not touch Medtner with a ten foot pole!
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Lethevich on June 01, 2009, 04:51:54 AM
Something I find remarkable is the (not expert, but very fine) orchestral writing in his piano concertos, considering that the composer produced no other mature orchestral work.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: robnewman on June 01, 2009, 04:57:22 AM

I really love this man's music. To me, having listened to much of his music (and some of his sonatas many times) his ideas are often amazing. So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like. There are a few sonatas of his which I rate as the very greatest of all.

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: springrite on June 01, 2009, 05:03:37 AM
I really love this man's music. To me, having listened to much of his music (and some of his sonatas many times) his ideas are often amazing. So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like. There are a few sonatas of his which I rate as the very greatest of all.


Very true. I am planning to name every room in my house after a pianist-composer (if you accept Bach on the piano, that is). I have settled on Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Medtner and Alkan.

I will not disclose who has the bathroom or the kitchen, but we can surely rule out Alkan for the bedroom, or the study which contain too many tall bookshelves for comfort!
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dr. Dread on June 01, 2009, 05:04:28 AM
I'm listening to his music RIGHT NOW!
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Lethevich on June 01, 2009, 05:14:07 AM
So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like.

I agree with this description, as far as it can be applied. He seems anti-Romantic in his frequent aversion to the milking of great material, not to mention this trait enhancing appreciation of the structural qualities as they show through better without long lines of surface melodies drawing all attention. The counterpoint becomes more of a focus and it's just such nourishing music.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: robnewman on June 01, 2009, 05:44:39 AM
Very true. I am planning to name every room in my house after a pianist-composer (if you accept Bach on the piano, that is). I have settled on Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Medtner and Alkan.

I will not disclose who has the bathroom or the kitchen, but we can surely rule out Alkan for the bedroom, or the study which contain too many tall bookshelves for comfort!

Alkan !!! Wow, there's a name !

As far as Bach the pianist is concerned, well, here's something I hope you find interesting. I will put it here since you plan to name a room after him ! A short radio interview with the great American Bach player Rosalyn Tureck on Bach and the piano.


Michael Oliver with
Rosalyn Tureck (Pianist and Harpsichordist)
'Bach and the Piano' (1998)


http://www.mediafire.com/?q4ytjynzznt

//

Regards


Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 06, 2009, 04:13:41 AM
The Alexeev/Demidenko recital of music for 2 pianos by Rachmaninov (Suite No.2, Russian Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances) and Medtner (Russian Round Dance op.58/1 & Knight Errant op.58/2) has been reissued by Hyperion in its budget label, Helios. Indispensable!

Samples, here. (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/al.asp?al=CDH55337)

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571153377.png)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: George on August 06, 2009, 10:43:46 AM
The Alexeev/Demidenko recital of music for 2 pianos by Rachmaninov (Suite No.2, Russian Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances) and Medtner (Russian Round Dance op.58/1 & Knight Errant op.58/2) has been reissued by Hyperion in its budget label, Helios. Indispensable!

Samples, here. (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/al.asp?al=CDH55337)

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571153377.png)

Very good news! I have no excuse to not pick it up now. Thanks for the heads up. :)
Title: RIP Geoffrey Tozer
Post by: Wanderer on August 29, 2009, 07:31:46 AM
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

Farewell to musical prodigy Geoffrey Tozer (http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25985836-16947,00.html)

Prodigy born to play all masters (http://www.theage.com.au/national/prodigy-born-to-play-all-masters-20090825-ey5h.html)
Title: Re: RIP Geoffrey Tozer
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 29, 2009, 08:20:24 AM
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

Tasos - thanks for the links in your post above - still own the same Medtner CDs as posted earlier, including the Piano Sonatas w/ Geoffrey Tozer - sad news, indeed!  :-\  Dave
Title: Re: RIP Geoffrey Tozer
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on August 30, 2009, 09:06:52 PM
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

That's too bad. And still so young. I'll be listening to that op.30 sonata later today.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 30, 2009, 12:04:23 PM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7318599917283.jpg)

Sudbin is continuing his Medtner piano concerto cycle with the extrovert (and most akin to its dedicatee, Rachmaninov) Second Concerto op.50, deservedly coupled with Rachmaninov’s Fourth (dedicated to Medtner in return). These two works were written during the same period and the two composers corresponded a lot during that time, each eventually inserting elements of its dedicatee into the fabric of their respective work; Medtner emulating the sweeping elan of Rachmaninov without for a moment forsaking his penchant for exhaustive motivic and rhythmic development and Rachmaninov incorporating whimsical rhythmic patterns and idiosyncrasies of typical Medtnerian fashion. A number of these were subsequently ironed out during his extensive revisions of the work, but they're amply demonstrated here in the concerto's original version, an impressive edifice of Rachmaninov’s disillusionment in view of  the modern world, a creation which the public of the day - obviously anticipating another Rach3 - could not and would not comprehend.

Sudbin’s rendition of Medtner’s Second is excellent, full of verve and passion and revealing a great number of personal interpretative views; however, he does not surpass Demidenko who manages to make the work sound even more urgent, ebullient and exciting. He manages to be more clear in the last movement, though, aided by the exquisite support of the orchestra, which plays magnificently throughout in both works.

Rachmaninov’s Fourth in its original version runs equally well, with ample amounts of passion and many opportunities for Sudbin to commit acts of impressive (but never vapid) virtuosity. He compares very favourably to Ghindin’s rendition of the original version of Rach4 (Michelangeli in the revised version being of course quite in another league).

Despite the general excellence of these performances, nevertheless,  I got a strange feeling that there was something missing; perhaps an additional number of rehearsals might allow soloist and orchestra to integrate and communicate more eloquently still. Mostly, I felt a general hesitation from Sudbin’s part, as if he was holding back for some reason. Despite this minor feeling of might-have-been (inspired in part by Demidenko’s stellar rendition of Medtner’s Second), this is an important release, warmly recommended.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 08, 2010, 06:40:31 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7318599917283.jpg)

A MusicWeb (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2010/Jan10/Rachmaninov_Medtner_bissacd1728.htm) review.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on January 19, 2010, 12:34:32 PM
Here's an old Ogdon performance of the Night Wind sonata op 25 no 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/jsrjxv
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 27, 2010, 02:11:11 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7318599917283.jpg)

A ClassicsTodayFrance (http://www.classicstodayfrance.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=3457) review.

Here's an old Ogdon performance of the Night Wind sonata op 25 no 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/jsrjxv

Much appreciated!  8)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: galltywenallt on November 18, 2010, 11:58:01 AM
Missed this... please could you re-upload?
Chris

Here's an old Ogdon performance of the Night Wind sonata op 25 no 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/jsrjxv
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Scarpia on November 18, 2010, 12:04:13 PM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7318599917283.jpg)

Looks like he shops in the ladies department.   ;D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: George on November 18, 2010, 12:58:19 PM
Here's an old Ogdon performance of the Night Wind sonata op 25 no 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/jsrjxv

Is that the EMI recording?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on November 18, 2010, 03:59:56 PM
Am I alone in thinking that Geoffrey Tozer's recording of the Medtner concertos is just impossible to surpass? The only blemish that seems to be on that set is that he took the shorter cadenza in the second concerto. Other than that, the playing is technically amazing, articulate, musically intelligent, and exciting. I've heard most of the other sets, including Sudbin's two recent ones (which I found disappointing, personally), and the only other set to approach Tozer is perhaps Konstantin Scherbakov. I think the worst I have heard is Demidenko's, but that was perhaps more the fault of Hyperion's shoddy job in the recording studio.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on November 19, 2010, 04:53:16 AM
Missed this... please could you re-upload?
Chris

Certainly (http://www.sendspace.com/file/0515yk).
My understanding has always been that this was a recording made for the BBC, but perhaps I'm mistaken?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: George on November 19, 2010, 05:03:03 AM
Certainly (http://www.sendspace.com/file/0515yk).
My understanding has always been that this was a recording made for the BBC, but perhaps I'm mistaken?

I asked because I was thinking of Scriabin by Ogdon. My bad.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on July 03, 2011, 08:24:56 AM
Some goodies from youtube:

The superb (and out of print) Zhukov rendition of Piano Concerto No.1:

I.
http://www.youtube.com/v/Luo3rB_9bck
II.
http://www.youtube.com/v/P5EDpnQxvbk
III.
http://www.youtube.com/v/rN6rTCfzmVA


Piano Concerto No.2 (Hamelin/Montreal SO/Dutoit) - with score

Ia.
http://www.youtube.com/v/xnnHjLLVmuw
Ib. (cadenza & coda)
http://www.youtube.com/v/AJubpTE_5hc
II.
http://www.youtube.com/v/y6ROglEF-fY
III.
http://www.youtube.com/v/Le4uNFR8pGU





Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on July 03, 2011, 08:37:19 AM
Violin Sonata No.1 (Mordkovitch/Tozer) with score

I.
http://www.youtube.com/v/CvqOHsp1qdM
II.
http://www.youtube.com/v/DOhQGh2QsCI
III.
http://www.youtube.com/v/9rLo6H7wWwo


Violin Sonata No.2 (Mordkovitch/Tozer) with score

Ia.
http://www.youtube.com/v/WuwCH74h0AU
Ib.
http://www.youtube.com/v/xs8M1dJaQiw
II.
http://www.youtube.com/v/q6iJXXmpBwk
III.
http://www.youtube.com/v/jSp7zfGJemc
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 13, 2012, 01:11:42 AM
A new Hyperion release, due for release in March:

Here be info - and samples. (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67851/2&vw=dc)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 19, 2012, 09:14:30 AM
.



A musicweb review. (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/Apr12/Medtner_piano_CDA678512.htm)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Ten thumbs on April 19, 2012, 09:57:41 AM
.





Certainly looks interesting but looks like a cover for 'This helmet I suppose'!
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Brian on August 06, 2012, 06:21:54 AM
Grand Piano, Naxos' premium piano label, will begin a complete Medtner piano sonata cycle with pianist Paul Stewart. The first volume (http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=GP617) will be released in September (click for track info).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on July 27, 2013, 07:21:53 AM
Due for a September release:



http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67963&vw=dc (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67963&vw=dc)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Parsifal on July 28, 2013, 08:24:32 AM
Was recently listening to the first set of Forgotten melodies from Tozer's set



and getting a lot of pleasure from it.  I wonder if anyone can compare that set with the alternatives (particularly these) and comment on whether there are significant new revelations to be found in them.


Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 08, 2013, 01:11:43 AM
Was recently listening to the first set of Forgotten melodies from Tozer's set



and getting a lot of pleasure from it.  I wonder if anyone can compare that set with the alternatives (particularly these) and comment on whether there are significant new revelations to be found in them.




Regarding op.38, Tozer is at the top of the game; Hamelin has a slight edge in more energetic works (e.g. in the "Night Wind" or  the F minor, op.5) without being soulless or clinical and Milne is usually able to convey the best of both worlds (virtuosity and wistfulness in measured combination). Tozer's main characteristic in Medtner is his beauty of tone and most intense poetic understanding of the soul of the works.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on August 08, 2013, 02:40:24 AM



Is that the same as this?

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 08, 2013, 02:44:24 AM
Is that the same as this?



Yes.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on August 08, 2013, 03:31:34 AM
Yes.

Thanks. BTW, your PM inbox is full.  :D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Parsifal on August 08, 2013, 04:50:44 AM
Regarding op.38, Tozer is at the top of the game; Hamelin has a slight edge in more energetic works (e.g. in the "Night Wind" or  the F minor, op.5) without being soulless or clinical and Milne is usually able to convey the best of both worlds (virtuosity and wistfulness in measured combination). Tozer's main characteristic in Medtner is his beauty of tone and most intense poetic understanding of the soul of the works.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Parsifal on September 15, 2013, 07:07:04 AM
Have continued my survey of Medner with the Sonata-Ballade Op 27 and Sonata Op 30.



The The Op 30 sonata is described in the notes of the recording as a war-time sonata, and the turbulence of the music reflects this.  The sonata is based, to some extent, on a motto theme (upward 3rd followed by descending 4th) which help the hold the structure of this sometimes rhapsodic music.  Very satisfying piece to listen to.

The Op 27 Sonata did not make as strong an impression, but I only listened twice, more careful listening may be necessary to unlock the secrets of this music.

I am generally enjoying Medner.  I seem to get more out of his short pieces than the longer ones.  His weakness may be a tendency to allow the dressing of a theme (arpeggios, running scales, other virtuosos flourishes) overwhelm the theme itself.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Parsifal on October 15, 2013, 11:17:45 AM
Returned to the Tozer release linked above, and listened to the CD 2.  This contains the  Sonatas, Op 25 No 1 and 2.  The first is subtitled "fairy tale" and the second has acquired the name "night wind."  I found both of them deeply beautiful and engaging.   They are virtuoso works, although Tozer makes them sound almost effortlessly expressive.  A very rewarding way to spend precious listening time.  This is music which (in my case) reveals its secrets only after careful and repeated listening. 
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: majesticPanda on December 24, 2013, 05:03:13 AM
Ive been looking for an extremely long time for Ogdon's recording of the Night Wind and stumbled across old links that expired in this thread, would someone be willing to reupload just that? It would be deeply appreciated.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on December 24, 2013, 10:02:54 AM
http://www.sendspace.com/file/6gnylu

is what you're looking for. Happy Xmas!

Here's Ogdon's op 25 no 1 also

http://www.sendspace.com/file/3auk8g
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: majesticPanda on December 24, 2013, 04:11:34 PM
I really appreciate it, got the m4a  to run on my android without the help of a pc too, so my drive home will be so much more meaningful now. Thank you.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on December 24, 2013, 09:03:22 PM
Glad to have been of service! Do you find his version compares well to others?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: majesticPanda on January 03, 2014, 05:05:10 PM
Its more than a service, i really cannot thank you enough. I've had years of admiring Ogdon's tempermant and beyond human capacity. His Scriabin Sonatas will always be the final word for me on a composer who is the closest to me.
Tozer's Medtner is perfect in approach and sympathy, and Hamelin gains my admiration quite often. They each have strengths and the Night Wind is a creation beyond comparison. But the way Ogdon devours is and pushes the boundaries is something i couldnt imagine until i heard it. I've played some Medtner Sonatas, but the Night Wind is still years away from me. How Ogdon deals with it and why what he does with it  is never discussed is beyond common recognition. Both Ogdon and Medtner stand apart remotely from all comparisons and are appreciated for what they are by few. That's just the nature of it all.

If you happen to have any other recordings that are rare from Ogdon i'd be interested. The SonataSkazka is never one that i have given much listening to, but eventually im sure to. Thanks again.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on June 23, 2014, 09:33:55 PM
(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571179360.png)

Due for a September release. (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67936&vw=dc)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: amw on June 26, 2014, 04:24:33 AM
Due for a September release:



http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67963&vw=dc (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67963&vw=dc)
Anyone know if they are also planning to record the 2nd Sonata?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 18, 2014, 09:49:48 AM
Anyone know if they are also planning to record the 2nd Sonata?

I don't know, but I certainly hope so. The "Epica" does seem to be the most popular choice for performers as of late, however the Second Sonata is in my view an equally if not even more impressive work, as ebullient as the "Epica" is stately, with irresistible momentum and charm. It is truly one of the great romantic violin sonatas and we need more recordings of it.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on October 25, 2014, 10:52:52 AM
.



A MusicWeb review (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Oct14/Medtner_sonata_DE3467.htm) from one of our very own.

"That sonata, Night Wind, is a behemoth, a half-hour epic in one giant movement. It’s like a massive painting of a howling nightscape, so huge your eyes can only take in part of it at a time, and the pianist plays as your vision scans across new scenes on the canvas. If this were programmed in recital with the Liszt B minor sonata, the pianist would need to drink Gatorade and receive a massage at the interval and at the end of the night everyone’s heads would be spinning."

Now that's what I'd call a great night out, no alcohol needed.

Kholodenko is more than able to withstand the hurdles, provide the torrents or virtuosity needed and he's also not insensitive to the poetry Medtner needs for this sonata to work. It should be howling and glittering on the outside, menacing underneath and able to communicate its lyric content and seemingly fantasia-like but nonetheless tight thematic argument throughout. Not an easy task, but an exhilarating journey if done right. Here, most things are done right, without being perfect. Among the worthwhile available renditions of this work, Hamelin and Eckardstein reign supreme, Berezovsky, too, in a live rendition that used to circulate the internet for a time, Tozer is sublime in the Fauréan Elysium of the ecstatic respites in the first movement and more that adequate in the rest of the work. Kholodenko is more than holding his own and that's quite a feat. His previous album of Stravinsky and Liszt (Pétrouchka and Transcendental Studies) showed great potential and more than a few things of his own to say about the music and this new album confirms he's here to stay. Hopefully, he'll record more Medtner in the process.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 23, 2014, 09:02:54 AM
At long last! Due for release: January 5, 2015.

(http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/B/I/BIS2088.jpg)

SCRIABIN Piano Concerto
MEDTNER Piano Concerto No. 3
Yevgeny Sudbin, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra / Andrew Litton
BIS SACD
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on November 23, 2014, 12:39:36 PM
Sudbin's renderings of the Medtner concertos so far has been mixed, but still a worthy companion to the old Chandos recording with the late Geoffrey Tozer, who is still can't be beat, in my opinion. I'll still check that out, especially for the Scriabin, one of my favorite concertos ever.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 11, 2014, 01:19:43 AM
After the eagerly awaited Sudbin recording of the Piano Concerto No.3, this is the second Medtner issue of 2015, also to be released on the composer's birthday, January 5. Alessandro Taverna, a multi-prizewinner in various competitions over the last years, plays three of the sonatas: the relatively popular Sonata reminiscenza, op.38/1, the more rare (exquisite and turbulent) Sonata romantica, op.53/1 (also recorded recently by Steven Osborne) and its companion, the even less frequently encountered Sonata minacciosa, op.53/2.


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/91BdGwVLsHL._SL1500_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Medtner-Sonatas-Alessandro-Taverna-SOMMCD/dp/B00Q72PT1U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418288138&sr=8-1&keywords=taverna+medtner)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 11, 2014, 01:35:49 AM
Sudbin's renderings of the Medtner concertos so far has been mixed, but still a worthy companion to the old Chandos recording with the late Geoffrey Tozer, who is still can't be beat, in my opinion. I'll still check that out, especially for the Scriabin, one of my favorite concertos ever.

Tozer is indeed excellent, but perhaps too mellow in (parts of) the Second Concerto (and generally mellow, overall - not a bad thing per se, but sometimes too much of a good thing). His is a splendidly lyrical voice, but this music also requires brimstone on occasion. Sudbin has so far given us an excellent First and a very good Second (Demidenko's fire here is still unsurpassed, although his rendition is not without problems, either). There's a youtube recording of the Third Concerto supposedly by Sudbin which sounds quite promising, so we'll see what his version of the "Ballade" will bring us. And I agree that the Scriabin Piano Concerto is a splendid coupling - and a great favourite of mine. Tozer should've recorded that, too.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on February 03, 2015, 04:22:49 AM
10 piano concertos you might not know:

Today’s top performers recommend concertos that have been undeservedly overlooked.
 (http://www.classical-music.com/article/10-piano-concertos-you-may-not-know)


Marc-André Hamelin – Medtner: Piano Concerto No. 2

Nikolai Medtner wrote three concertos, the second of which is my favourite. What is immediately striking about Medtner’s music is the way he takes a melody and develops it carefully throughout a piece. The Second Concerto is an energetic and entrancing work. The outer movements are ebullient and very rhythmic, and the slow movement is wonderfully lyrical. Medtner was a pianist himself so his music fits under the fingers. It’s enjoyable to perform because it sounds a lot more difficult than it really is! I think it is fair to say that Medtner’s music does not always make its strongest appeal at first, but once you get to know it, it is guaranteed to take hold of you.


Yevgeny Sudbin – Medtner: Piano Concerto No. 1

I’m surprised that Medtner’s Piano Concerto No. 1 is so seldomly played. It was Horowitz’s favourite Medtner piano concerto and he even contemplated recording it – had he done so, I have no doubt his works would be among the piano mainstream repertoire. And, as Rachmaninov said to Medtner: ‘You are, in my opinion, the greatest composer of our time.’ So why is it so rarely performed? The trouble is, as with all Medtner’s music, is that it hits one only after repeated listening, as the melodies are complex and the textures are dense – it takes time for the ear and mind to adjust and appreciate all the subtleties the music has to offer. From both pianistic and the listener’s points of view, the Concerto offers everything one can hope for: sweeping melodies, drama, virtuosity, introspective moments, rich orchestration and vivid interaction between soloist and orchestra. If only it wasn’t so incredibly difficult to play…
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on February 10, 2015, 05:31:19 AM
The more I delve into Medtner's output, the more I'm impressed.

Because I've been using online services, the focus for the piano music has been Tozer on Chandos and Milne on CRD (later repackaged on Brilliant). Hyperion's recordings (Milne again and Hamelin) tend not to be available online for full listening.

I'm finding I'm really not sure who I'll go for when I actually buy some discs. My natural affinity for Hyperion is also encouraged by some pretty positive reviews, particularly for the Hamelin sonatas. But then again... I've been listening to Tozer a fair bit, and for someone who is occasionally damned with fainter praise compared to the other two, I'm still enjoying the music.

Also, someone really needs to work on a proper series of discs with the songs. It looks as if many of them are only available scattered across Russian recordings.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 10, 2015, 05:51:12 AM
The more I delve into Medtner's output, the more I'm impressed.

Because I've been using online services, the focus for the piano music has been Tozer on Chandos and Milne on CRD (later repackaged on Brilliant). Hyperion's recordings (Milne again and Hamelin) tend not to be available online for full listening.

I'm finding I'm really not sure who I'll go for when I actually buy some discs. My natural affinity for Hyperion is also encouraged by some pretty positive reviews, particularly for the Hamelin sonatas. But then again... I've been listening to Tozer a fair bit, and for someone who is occasionally damned with fainter praise compared to the other two, I'm still enjoying the music.

Also, someone really needs to work on a proper series of discs with the songs. It looks as if many of them are only available scattered across Russian recordings.
Though there are not so many versions to choose from, those we do have are quite good and I think you could safely listen to any of the names you quoted. If you ever come to the US (or someone visites you), place an order at Berkshire, which often has the works you are looking for on Hyperion.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on February 10, 2015, 12:21:00 PM
The more I delve into Medtner's output, the more I'm impressed.

Glad to hear it. Apart from first impressions and beyond initial attractions, Medtner's music invariably seems to insinuate itself in your psyche the more you listen to it. What was your impression of the op.47 Second Improvisation?

Because I've been using online services, the focus for the piano music has been Tozer on Chandos and Milne on CRD (later repackaged on Brilliant). Hyperion's recordings (Milne again and Hamelin) tend not to be available online for full listening.

I'm finding I'm really not sure who I'll go for when I actually buy some discs. My natural affinity for Hyperion is also encouraged by some pretty positive reviews, particularly for the Hamelin sonatas. But then again... I've been listening to Tozer a fair bit, and for someone who is occasionally damned with fainter praise compared to the other two, I'm still enjoying the music.

You can't go wrong with either Hamelin, Tozer, or Milne (although, ideally, you want all three). My general recommendation for a first set of the sonatas is Hamelin who gives a more strong first impression, especially in the more ferocious pieces, but that doesn't mean that Tozer or Milne aren't good or insightful. I've just checked and the Hamelin set is sold for around £30 on amazon.uk (it used to be much more).

Listening to (and being impressed by) Willems' Beethoven played on a Stuart & Sons piano, I can't but wonder how Medtner's sonatas would sound on the instrument.

Also, someone really needs to work on a proper series of discs with the songs. It looks as if many of them are only available scattered across Russian recordings.

Indeed. A comprehensive series by the likes of Hyperion or Chandos is long overdue. I believe that a number of these lieder still await their first recording.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 04, 2015, 12:08:13 AM
.



Here's my take on the latest Sudbin release.

First of all, Sudbin gives an inspired, searing performance of the Scriabin concerto. Distinctive, heartfelt phrasing and excellent rapport with the orchestra make this release almost as successful as the magisterial Demidenko (quite a feat in itself) and certainly deserves to be put alongside his at the top of recent recordings of the work.

And that brings us to the Medtner Third, a difficult work, introvert with aspirations to the sublime, and with an allegorical heart (Medtner’s Ring one could say). Demidenko (and Ponti) are here major players, but the work still needs the breakthrough recording that will reveal its majesty to the world. For that, apart from a formidable pianist, it needs an orchestra and conductor as dedicated and imaginative as the pianist, with a clear vision of its architecture and tons of rehearsal time to sail through its sometimes peculiar rhythmic world and be able to present it as effortless and flowing as it should be.
Here we have Sudbin succeeding brilliantly to impart a sense of visionary intent to the proceedings and the orchestra is very good, as well. The first movement is like a huge prelude to the work (whose emotional heart is the third movement); it ebbs and flows in a series of cadenzas and false declarations like a primeval sea, until at last, after the tension has become unbearable, a theme is established (which we’ve already heard in parts and fragments during the opening pages, a typical Medtnerian device) and developed in an impassioned but strangely detached manner. The middle movement is a rhythmically unstable interludium that connects the first movement with the third, which is the true focal point, the heart of the work. The starting theme, menacing and Brahmsian, is devilishly difficult to be presented successfully by the orchestra and this is where many recordings fail. Ponti, taking it at a whirlwind speed, seems the more successful, but then the pianist needs to be able to cope (Ponti does) which is not the easiest thing. Litton is successful here, but he doesn’t nail it (although he comes close to).

This is not a battling, piano-against-the-orchestra concerto, it’s more in the Schumann tradition of collaborative forces. The piano is nary a moment silent; if it doesn’t present some theme or idea, it embellishes what the orchestra states and adds to the narrative from start to finish. As a result, apart from its enchanting pianism and atmosphere, it needs to flow seamlessly, its rhythmic peculiarities integrated into an organic whole. This is where it shows, even with a formidable pianist, if orchestras don’t well know it and conductors don’t understand its narrative arc (and whether they are able to make sense of its effective, albeit rather monochrome orchestration). Fortunately, this is a performance that succeeds in most of these points. It’s not a perfect rendition (we still await for that one), but it is very good, easily in the top three.  Sudbin is excellent and the Bergen orchestra holds its own very well under the baton of Litton; they prove sympathetic, if not always fiery, accompanists to a work that as its title "Ballade" suggests, is not a battle, but a narration of a battle, or even better-put, a spiritual battle (according to Medtner’s own description, especially pertaining to the third movement, with the beautiful paean of a theme in its middle section). It may not sound very intriguing put that way, but as Homer and others have proved, listening to a masterful narration can be as exciting as being in the battlefield.

All in all, a splendid final installment of Sudbin's Medtner piano concerto cycle, with excellent fillers (Tchaikovsky 1, Rachmaninov 4, Scriabin). Highly recommeded.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2015, 01:37:20 AM
Excellent review, Tasos! Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 15, 2015, 12:34:06 AM
Cross-posting from the like/don't like thread:

(I kind of wish Medtner had written a violin concerto, that would be something to hear)

That would've been something, indeed. He did intend to orchestrate the Violin Sonata No.3 for it to become a violin concerto, but never came around to it.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 15, 2015, 12:56:52 AM
.



This has been a January release in Europe (Janyary 5, Medtner's birthday), but will be released in April in the US.

I've been listening to it quite a bit and impressions are very positive. Taverna (he and Maltempo should open a "pianists with unfortunate names" club) gives a typical, very good rendition of the Reminiscenza (which has seen a relative surge of good recordings as of late), a very potent rendition of the Sonata Romantica (his being in a whole different league from the mainly unimaginative and, in the last movement, rhythmically stodgy and awkward recent Osborne release) and a superb rendition of the Sonata minacciosa, which is the highlight of the disc. Warmly recommended.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 18, 2015, 01:46:19 AM
.




Here's a short Guardian review (http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/feb/12/medtner-piano-sonatas-ein-idyll-alessandro-taverna-review).

"There was controversy in 2009 when Alessandro Taverna won bronze at the Leeds International Piano Competition – many people thought he should have been awarded the gold. Since then, he’s gone from strength to strength, as amply proved by this Medtner disc, which features three of the composer’s 14 sonatas – the Reminiscenza, the Romantica and the Minacciosa (effectively nos 10, 12 and 13). They’re fine interpretations, and remind us that Medtner’s restless music has its antecedents in Chopin’s poetic detail and Liszt’s expansive form, while at the same time inhabiting a disorienting harmonic territory that is uniquely its own. The Minacciosa could do with a bit more bite in the repetitions of the opening motto, but its climactic fugue is breathtaking. The Reminiscenza and Romantica, though, are both exemplary in their dynamic, emotional and architectural control. The brief, early Ein Idyll – essentially a sketch for the Reminiscenza – is the filler, and beautifully done."
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on June 28, 2015, 12:38:55 AM
Lucas Debargue gave a spell-binding rendition of Medtner's Sonata in F minor, op.5 in the second round of the still-running XV Tchaikovsky competition (followed by a superb Gaspard de la nuit). This (following a well-received Beethoven op.10/3 in the first round) as well as a superb Mozart Concerto No.24 gave him a ticket to the finals. I can't recall another time when Medtner was so prominent in a contestant's program like this. Enjoy while the link is active.

http://tch15.medici.tv/en/performance/round-round-2-piano-2015-06-21-2130000300-great-ha (http://tch15.medici.tv/en/performance/round-round-2-piano-2015-06-21-2130000300-great-ha)

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 01, 2015, 12:12:03 PM
(http://images.kultureshock.net/0001/35-acbb602430f2c992bb0510f07bf1bf69.jpg)


Medtner

1    Prologue from Stimmungsbilder, Op.1 No.1       
2    Skazka, Op.51 No.3       
3    Sonata-Reminiscenza, Op.38 No.1       
4    Skazka, Op.20 No.1       
5    Skazka, Op.26 No.1       
6    Canzona matinata, Op.39 No.4       
7    Sonata tragica, Op.39 No.5       

Rachmaninov

8-13    Six Preludes (incl. Op.23 No.5 & Op.32 No.12)


This new Sudbin SACD will be released in January (seems it's already available in Norway and from the pianist's own site). The programming is excellent: two sonatas (Sudbin even follows Medtner's instructions that the Sonata tragica should always be preceded by the Canzona matinata), three Skazki (Märchen in German, Contes in French, Tales in English) and the exquisite op.1/1 (a stunning piece of polyrhythmic magic) that started it all. The powerful op.20/1 Skazka is deservedly one of the better known ones,  the tranquil op.26/1 is a particular personal favourite (https://youtu.be/9szyuwbumdI) and the lithe op.51/3 is the only Medtner work that Horowitz (an avowed Medtner enthusiast) ever recorded.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on December 01, 2015, 01:27:37 PM
Shame that Sudbin left off Op 20 No 2 (one of my personal favorites to perform and listen to, along with the famous first). Otherwise, looks like a great program! I can't wait to hear how he does the Prologue and Sonata Tragica, two other favorites of mine. Tozer is still the benchmark for these pieces to me, but we'll see how Sudbin fares. His concerto recordings are decent.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 04, 2015, 03:01:14 AM
I really hope this is the beginning of a complete sonata cycle. If they do that and keep the same programming layout (one or two sonatas, interspersed with Skazki and/or other solo piano works, along with selected Rachmaninov - and/or Scriabin -  fillers) it's going to be a particularly inspired series (with the non-Medtner works providing juxtaposition, as well as maybe enough incentive to lure in the uninitiates).

I, too, love the Campanella. Maybe, hopefully, in vol.2? Quite a number of years ago, I remember Berezovsky played it as an encore here in Athens (damn if I remember what else he played) and it made a huge impression; everyone afterwards was asking what piece it was. Those sitting near me of course got their answer quickly.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on December 09, 2015, 03:30:23 AM
looks like a great program! I can't wait to hear how he does the Prologue and Sonata Tragica, two other favorites of mine.

It's become available on jpc.de - with samples (which sound very promising) - (https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/sudbin-spielt-medtner-und-rachmaninoff/hnum/8481097) and on various amazon sites (search for ASIN B0172MIDLQ). My copy ships today.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on December 29, 2015, 11:26:10 PM
Just got the new Sudbin Medtner/Rachmaninoff album. I must say, Sudbin sounds far less restrained than in his concerto recordings, which I found a bit too taut for my tastes. His Medtner on here is mixed in quality, with some odd decisions in the Op. 20 No. 1 especially. The Sonata Reminiscenza and Sonata Tragica receive very strong recordings, though, the latter having a bit more details brought out than I've heard while still sounding rather impassioned. The Prologue, a piece rather close to me, was very sensitively played. His playing on the whole is still something I am wary of, but this Medtner he played kept me listening.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 04, 2016, 11:46:42 PM
Just got the new Sudbin Medtner/Rachmaninoff album. I must say, Sudbin sounds far less restrained than in his concerto recordings, which I found a bit too taut for my tastes. His Medtner on here is mixed in quality, with some odd decisions in the Op. 20 No. 1 especially. The Sonata Reminiscenza and Sonata Tragica receive very strong recordings, though, the latter having a bit more details brought out than I've heard while still sounding rather impassioned. The Prologue, a piece rather close to me, was very sensitively played. His playing on the whole is still something I am wary of, but this Medtner he played kept me listening.

I returned home from Christmas/New Year's holidays and found it on my doorstep. Had a first listen in the evening and first impressions are very positive. I didn't find anything wrong with his take of the op.20/1 Skazka, in fact I thought it was impressively well done. There are personal touches in all works, which I also quite enjoyed. The difficult rhythms in Sonata tragica's coda are brought out very clearly and relentlessly. The op.1/1 Stimmungsbild (a great favourite of mine, as well) is indeed very nicely and affectionately voiced, the singing line brought out amid the polyrhythms with effortless abandon and the mood itself being appropriately lofty and impassioned.

I understand what you are saying about the concerti; these versions, while successful in general, seem to me as well a little hesitant and held-back (the First works best of all), for which I think  the orchestras and conductors are also at fault. As synergy is key in these works, I felt (especially in the rhapsodic Third) that they would've benefited from more rehearsals and/or more performances, to give the ever elusive panoptic view and attain more spontaneity and fluidity. For this, we may need orchestras of a higher calibre. Incidentally, Hamelin is performing the Second Concerto with LPO/Jurowski in Eastbourne, England this March; now, a recording of this would be most welcome.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 21, 2016, 10:55:32 AM
Re-listening to Paul Stewart's first issue of the Medtner piano sonatas on Grand Piano (a 2012 release, time for vol.2!). Beautiful tone and phrasing. The interpretations are stylish and elegant (the word patrician comes to mind); one senses more of the Milne than the Hamelin vibe. The early Sonatina from 1898 comes off particularly fine. The autumnal disposition also suits the Sonata reminiscenza and the op.5 Sonata's Largo divoto like a glove.



Pianist Paul Stewart and the Road to Medtner, by Colin Clarke (http://www.paulstewart.ca/Pianist_Paul_Stewart_and_the_Road_to_Medtner_by_Colin_Clarke/Pianist_Paul_Stewart_and_the_Road_to_Medtner_by_Colin_Clarke.html)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on January 21, 2016, 04:09:53 PM
Incidentally, Hamelin is performing the Second Concerto with LPO/Jurowski in Eastbourne, England this March; now, a recording of this would be most welcome.

I booked tickets for that today. There is a YouTube performance with Hamelin - his rhythmic feel is a bit strange at times e.g., in the opening.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on January 21, 2016, 04:19:26 PM
I love Hamelin, but I am honestly not a huge fan of how he plays that concerto. To be honest, I've still not heard a recording that thrills me (and I've heard all of the commercially available ones, plus a few more). The Tozer comes close, but there are some things in there I would personally do differently. I suppose your standards get higher when you spend so much time with a composer's music.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 28, 2016, 12:33:13 AM
Medtner Festival 2016 (https://medtnerfest.wordpress.com/)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2016, 02:36:12 AM
Medtner Festival 2016 (https://medtnerfest.wordpress.com/)

Your PM box is full, my friend! Could you save a little space for me?  :D
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on January 29, 2016, 04:22:23 AM
Your PM box is full, my friend! Could you save a little space for me?  :D

Done deal.  ;)

I booked tickets for that today.

I almost booked tickets myself, but the dates weren't convenient. Your report will be greatly appreciated.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on July 10, 2016, 06:53:29 AM
Oleg Kagan and Sviatoslav Richter performing Medtner's Violin Sonata No.1 (Moscow, 1981)


http://www.youtube.com/v/c69RkfsdguE
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: NikF on July 10, 2016, 07:57:59 AM
Oleg Kagan and Sviatoslav Richter performing Medtner's Violin Sonata No.1 (Moscow, 1981)


http://www.youtube.com/v/c69RkfsdguE

That's the first time I've heard this piece and I thought it was great. Thanks for posting it.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on September 23, 2016, 09:30:13 AM
Slow in brewing, but better late than never: an excellent review of the Parikian/Milne set of the violin sonatas.

Nikolai MEDTNER: Complete Works for Violin and Piano (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Sep/Medtner_violin_34934.htm)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on November 01, 2016, 03:29:25 AM
Anyone know where I can get Milne's Hyperion CDs of the complete Skazki at an even half-decent price?



It seems to be bafflingly rare, and those copies on offer are hideously expensive. About the cheapest I've seen was a used copy on Amazon for US$71.58.

It's possible to get downloads for a bearable price (17 pounds from Hyperion themselves), but I prefer discs.

I'm intending to buy his other Hyperion recording, of Arabesques, Dithyrambs etc. The fact that that one is still readily available makes me all the more mystified about the rarity of the Skazki. I know it was released in 2007 (compared to 2012 for the other one), but plenty of other Hyperion releases of that age seem to be around.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 01, 2016, 05:00:54 AM
The Hyperion site informs that the Milne Skazki issue is out of print; the cheapest chance for a physical medium seems to be to order an "archive" CDR from them.

http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67491/2 (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67491/2)

"This service offers a production-quality CDR with printed label, inlay (tray) card and, at the minimum, a 2pp booklet (including cover artwork and complete track listing), packaged in a normal jewel case.
In many instances we will provide complete printed booklets, but please note that this is not always the case. Pricing is £13.99 per CD, regardless of the original sale price of the disc(s).
"

Personally, I dislike CDR's of this kind and I consider downloads more suitable for sampling than as legitimate music purchases, but these do seem like the only options for now. I'll let you know if I stumble upon a decently-priced copy of the original CDs.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on November 01, 2016, 05:10:30 AM
Yes, I'm aware of the archive CDR option. I didn't count that as a better alternative than downloads. Maybe these days CDRs are good when properly made, but I'm suspicious. I'd actually trust a FLAC file more I think.

At least with Hyperion you can easily download the original booklet.

Meanwhile, I have sent enquiries to (1) Finland and (2) Chile.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Turner on November 01, 2016, 05:21:48 AM
I got the Derzhavina 2CD set which includes the 8 Stimmungsbilder op.1, 3 Pieces op.31, the Sonata Triad, and the complete Stimmungsbilder op.38-39, including their 2 sonatas.

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=phoenix156

It is a very "Russian", robust way of playing the pieces, at times quite different from the other recordings I know of some of them.
Probably not superlative performances, as stated in a review, but interesting for the variation, and the repertoire.

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-14738/
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Maestro267 on November 01, 2016, 06:45:48 AM
I'm quite interested to hear the three Piano Concertos. They look like quite substantial works.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on November 01, 2016, 07:09:34 AM
I'm quite interested to hear the three Piano Concertos. They look like quite substantial works.

Listen to the Tozer set. You won't hear a better complete set out there... yet. The only quip I have is that he does the short cadenza in the second concerto.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 01, 2016, 08:33:01 AM
I'm quite interested to hear the three Piano Concertos. They look like quite substantial works.

They are. Despite what initial impressions of what you hear might suggest, expect Beethoven rather than Rachmaninov in how the music is organized and presented and you'll be OK in delving into the Medtnerian world.

Recommendations:

First Concerto: Zhukov, Alexeev, Sudbin, Tozer
Second Concerto: Demidenko and Sudbin
Third Concerto: Demidenko, Ponti and Sudbin


For the Zhukov, look further up in the thread for some youtube links. Madge's set is also interesting, if you happen to find it cheaply. The Tozer set is recommended, but not as a first foray into the works (he plays beautifully, but his fire is generally very subdued). Don't you even come near the Scherbakov recordings on Naxos.

If you haven't already, read the thread for further suggestions and reviews.

Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on November 01, 2016, 08:41:04 AM
Listen to the Tozer set. You won't hear a better complete set out there... yet. The only quip I have is that he does the short cadenza in the second concerto.


Tozer is very lyrical but also very mellow, and these are not mellow works. His approach works best in parts of the First and Third Concertos. While he provides insights, these are mainly to those already familiar with the music. A further disadvantage: he criminally omits the superb and very substantial main cadenza in the Second Concerto in favour of the short one. I cannot recommend his set as a first and/or only option for these works.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: lescamil on November 01, 2016, 09:52:17 AM

Tozer is very lyrical but also very mellow, and these are not mellow works. His approach works best in parts of the First and Third Concertos. While he provides insights, these are mainly to those already familiar with the music. A further disadvantage: he criminally omits the superb and very substantial main cadenza in the Second Concerto in favour of the short one. I cannot recommend his set as a first and/or only option for these works.

I realize this, but as a complete set where you have all three together, which one is better? The thing with complete sets is that they are rarely completely well rounded in their quality.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Turner on November 01, 2016, 10:04:48 AM
Concerning the piano concertos, another vote for no.1 with Zhukov, no.2 with Demidenko, no.3 with Ponti (the last-mentioned very different from any other recording).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dax on November 01, 2016, 12:44:30 PM
My favourite 2nd concerto pianist is Abram Shatskes with USSR SO under Svetlanov.

Medtner himself is pretty good . . .

Anyone know either of these?
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Turner on November 01, 2016, 02:49:55 PM
My favourite 2nd concerto pianist is Abram Shatskes with USSR SO under Svetlanov.

Medtner himself is pretty good . . .

Anyone know either of these?

Yes. I must say I disagree, however :-). I have the Shatskes (includes solo piano works played by others) and some Medtner/Medtner.
Shatskes apparently knew the composer, though, and that recording does contain some unusual traits.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 25, 2017, 12:06:30 PM
What a nice surprise was to discover the Piano Quintet!! (Hyperion - Alexeev, The New Budapest Quartet)

Right now, I can't explain with enough words my impression provoked by the tremendous mastery of this astounding piece: features such as joyful, sentimental, lovely are mixed with a undisputed compositional skill that only masters can have.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on February 23, 2021, 04:05:20 AM
.(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71nWX4gFqaL._SX425_.jpg)

A Gramophone review (https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/medtner-songs-sofia-fomina?fbclid=IwAR0vdoSCcbK09BxV7CHXm6fdrKDix7j_zlJ4KEqKBd63fU7XkQyHM5zOYhE) of this new Chandos release of Medtner's songs/lieder.

"Thanks to the likes of Hamish Milne, Geoffrey Tozer and Marc-André Hamelin, Nikolay Medtner’s piano music has reached a wider audience on disc. It’s good to see other champions stepping forwards to do the same for the composer’s songs. Medtner wrote 108 of them and Iain Burnside’s excellent two-disc survey of around half of these for Delphian, featuring six singers, was warmly welcomed by Geoffrey Norris. It was joined last May by Ekaterina Levental and Frank Peters, launching the first volume of a complete edition (Brilliant Classics). And now the Russian pairing of Sofia Fomina and Alexander Karpeyev have recorded 22 of them for Chandos.

Interesting parallels are often drawn between Medtner and Rachmaninov, particularly as both were supreme pianists who went into exile. But all of Rachmaninov’s songs were composed before he left Russia, whereas Medtner, who did not leave until some years after the Russian Revolution, continued writing them. Two of the published sets here (Opp 36 and 37) were composed in the direct aftermath of the events of 1917, while the other two (Opp 45 and 46) were written in the little port of Erquy in Brittany in the summer of 1924, after a short stay in Paris. Also unlike Rachmaninov, Medtner set poets such as his beloved Goethe in the original German rather than in translation. Medtner had partial German ancestry and nearly half of his songs are set to German poetry.

A parallel with Rachmaninov that does stand is the frequently fiendish piano-writing and Medtner scholar and enthusiast Alexander Karpeyev is equal to the task, with some wonderfully tempestuous playing in works such as ‘Arion’ or the virtuoso piano part of ‘Elegy’, regarded as one of Medtner’s finest songs. ..."
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on February 23, 2021, 08:32:12 PM

Tozer is very lyrical but also very mellow, and these are not mellow works. His approach works best in parts of the First and Third Concertos. While he provides insights, these are mainly to those already familiar with the music. A further disadvantage: he criminally omits the superb and very substantial main cadenza in the Second Concerto in favour of the short one. I cannot recommend his set as a first and/or only option for these works.

As for the piano works, should I go for the recordings by Tozer and/or Hamelin?
Now I have the Marco Polo disks and Milne set.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 01, 2021, 11:28:13 PM
As for the piano works, should I go for the recordings by Tozer and/or Hamelin?
Now I have the Marco Polo disks and Milne set.

I'd suggest you go for the Hamelin set. And you can also investigate Tozer's Medtner via streaming.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: amw on March 02, 2021, 08:29:03 AM
Hamelin is the best available Medtner interpreter by some distance, though it's also worth investing in Medtner's own recordings (which are, in fact, often very similar interpretively).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: MusicTurner on March 02, 2021, 10:11:19 AM
Well, I prefer Milne to Hamelin. And many other, individual pianists have contributed with more ... individuality in the works, than Hamelin tends to, IMHO.
Medtner himself has some interesting, expressive angles, but technically, he seemed past his prime, this resulting in some sketchy or robust playing now and then.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 02, 2021, 08:31:54 PM
Well, I prefer Milne to Hamelin. And many other, individual pianists have contributed with more ... individuality in the works, than Hamelin tends to, IMHO.
Medtner himself has some interesting, expressive angles, but technically, he seemed past his prime, this resulting in some sketchy or robust playing now and then.

Yes I like the Milne recording. I will get the Hamelin discs for a comparison with others.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: springrite on March 02, 2021, 09:03:24 PM
The Milnes certainly has more sense of spontaneity to it, but I slightly prefer the Hamelin. The Tozer is too soft and lame for the material.

Two surprisingly good recordings are the two piano works (Medtner and Rachmaninov) on Hyperion and a solo recording played by the conductor Svetlanov.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on March 02, 2021, 11:13:35 PM
...the two piano works (Medtner and Rachmaninov) on Hyperion...

The Alexeev/Demidenko recital of music for 2 pianos by Rachmaninov (Suite No.2, Russian Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances) and Medtner (Russian Round Dance op.58/1 & Knight Errant op.58/2) has been reissued by Hyperion in its budget label, Helios. Indispensable!

Samples, here. (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/al.asp?al=CDH55337)

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571153377.png)

That's the one. It is indeed superb.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: kyjo on April 20, 2021, 07:08:53 PM
Recently I've been blown away by Medtner's Sonata Romantica in B-flat minor. I have no trouble declaring this as one of my favorite solo piano works ever. It's absolutely sublime. The secondary theme of the first movement, which enters just after the 1-minute mark, is one of the most achingly beautiful melodies I've ever heard. It's one of those themes that sticks with you for days on end. It's so tender, longing, nostalgic, just lovely beyond words. Medtner also knows how to write really effective energetic music too, as demonstrated by the 2nd and 4th movements which have a decidedly jazzy syncopated feel at times. I've sometimes seen Medtner called "the Russian Brahms" or "Rachmaninoff without the tunes" but let me say that is total nonsense. He was a masterful composer, and in fact I must say that I overall prefer his solo piano music to that of Rachmaninoff! Sergei is of course one of my favorite composers on the basis of his wonderful concertante and orchestral music, but some of his solo piano music is a bit elusive to me. Medtner's, on the other hand, speaks directly to me, especially the wonderful Sonata Romantica.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 21, 2021, 01:01:26 AM
Recently I've been blown away by Medtner's Sonata Romantica in B-flat minor. I have no trouble declaring this as one of my favorite solo piano works ever. It's absolutely sublime. The secondary theme of the first movement, which enters just after the 1-minute mark, is one of the most achingly beautiful melodies I've ever heard. It's one of those themes that sticks with you for days on end. It's so tender, longing, nostalgic, just lovely beyond words. Medtner also knows how to write really effective energetic music too, as demonstrated by the 2nd and 4th movements which have a decidedly jazzy syncopated feel at times. I've sometimes seen Medtner called "the Russian Brahms" or "Rachmaninoff without the tunes" but let me say that is total nonsense. He was a masterful composer, and in fact I must say that I overall prefer his solo piano music to that of Rachmaninoff! Sergei is of course one of my favorite composers on the basis of his wonderful concertante and orchestral music, but some of his solo piano music is a bit elusive to me. Medtner's, on the other hand, speaks directly to me, especially the wonderful Sonata Romantica.

I know exactly what you mean. It is a magisterial work, full of invention, gorgeous melodies, complex rhythms and breathtaking drama. His Op. 30 Sonata was known as the "War Sonata", but I think this one may also (and even more so) be deserving of the epithet; the "Romantica" designation might be selling the piece short. Paraphrasing Medtner, its "romantic" status refers to a fantastical world of shadows and light battling darkness, not romantic salons and light-hearted mirth. The theme that you noticed is indeed a sublime, achingly beautiful creation (and it is the otherwise more matter-of-fact Hamelin who manages to present it with the most apt fragrant delicateness, fragility, lilting nostalgia, grace and beauty) and what a stupendous moment it is when the movement ends in a chromatic whirlwind of shattering notes, when the dream ends and we are catapulted attacca to the second movement's carnage. The finale, too, with the ghostly flurries of notes as the work's themes re-appear one after the other in dark reverie and then it all ends in a whiff of frankincense smoke... pure genius.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on April 21, 2021, 01:10:09 AM
Love this little writeup, and I agree with you in spades. I always thought of Medtner as the Russian Grieg. I find his melodies so tight and memorable (and I have a very poor memory when it comes to melody), so light and airy, and pleasant. I always feel good after a Medtner listening session.

The Russian Grieg, I like that. The Russian Schumann might also be quite apt, if Schumann were more like Beethoven.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on April 21, 2021, 05:09:23 AM
The Russian Grieg, I like that. The Russian Schumann might also be quite apt, if Schumann were more like Beethoven.

Given the Skazki (Maerchen) and the numerous literary-inspired works, Schumann was actually the first name that came to my mind when hearing Medtner's music.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on April 22, 2021, 01:16:23 AM
I still think there's plenty in common with Rachmaninov. One can object to "Rachmaninov without the tunes" as a description without actually dispensing with the Rachmaninov part of the notion.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Florestan on April 22, 2021, 02:56:06 AM
I still think there's plenty in common with Rachmaninov. One can object to "Rachmaninov without the tunes" as a description without actually dispensing with the Rachmaninov part of the notion.

No doubt. Rachmaninoff even wrote to Medtner: I repeat what I already said to you in Russia: you are, in my opinion, the greatest composer of our time.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on August 26, 2021, 02:24:11 AM
As mentioned on the WAYLT thread, I'm listening to Milne do the op.5 piano sonata, and I'm loving it. I'm pretty sure I've tried the sonatas before, but that was some years ago. I suspect I'm paying closer attention now (and it's a heck of a lot easier with Primephonic for streaming).

I already have Milne's Hyperion albums of the shorter works, and decided I would try him rather than Tozer or someone else (Hamelin is not available for streaming). It will take me a good long while to finish this new exploration, but if I keep reacting this positively I think more Medtner albums will have to be added to my collection. If anything I think I like this sonata better than the shorter works.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: kyjo on August 26, 2021, 05:53:20 AM
As mentioned on the WAYLT thread, I'm listening to Milne do the op.5 piano sonata, and I'm loving it. I'm pretty sure I've tried the sonatas before, but that was some years ago. I suspect I'm paying closer attention now (and it's a heck of a lot easier with Primephonic for streaming).

I already have Milne's Hyperion albums of the shorter works, and decided I would try him rather than Tozer or someone else (Hamelin is not available for streaming). It will take me a good long while to finish this new exploration, but if I keep reacting this positively I think more Medtner albums will have to be added to my collection. If anything I think I like this sonata better than the shorter works.

Indeed, the op. 5 sonata is a really strong work. Don’t miss the ineffably beautiful Sonata Romantica if you don’t know it yet! ;)
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 26, 2021, 10:55:31 PM
Saving this from the black hole of the wayltn thread:

Medtner, The first set of Goethe-Lieder, op.6

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/91ymtr23bvL._SS500_.jpg)

Some delicious stuff, and also some wild piano parts.

The piano parts of Medtner’s lieder are no less elaborate than his solo piano works. Quite astonishing, indeed.

This disc also contains what I consider the pinnacle of Medtner’s writing for the voice, as well as one of his best works overall, the Sonate-Vocalise. I don’t know if you own the CD or if you’re streaming, if it’s the latter, the Sonate is in the last two tracks of the album. I mention this because Spotify has it mislabeled as part of the preceding Suite-Vocalise (although the I. and II. numbering in the tracks’ titles reveals that there’s something wrong going on). It is in two parts, the first being a setting of Goethe’s Geweihter Platz. As a standalone lied it is a setting of great beauty, poise and a sense of what could perhaps be described as ecstatic serenity - a mood that is transferred to the second part, the themes and rhythms of which are evolving from motivic and rhythmic kernels already heard in the lied. I think it is an extraordinary creation (not least for being the only vocalise work I know that makes vocalise actually work).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on August 26, 2021, 11:08:04 PM
As mentioned on the WAYLT thread, I'm listening to Milne do the op.5 piano sonata, and I'm loving it. I'm pretty sure I've tried the sonatas before, but that was some years ago. I suspect I'm paying closer attention now (and it's a heck of a lot easier with Primephonic for streaming).

I already have Milne's Hyperion albums of the shorter works, and decided I would try him rather than Tozer or someone else (Hamelin is not available for streaming). It will take me a good long while to finish this new exploration, but if I keep reacting this positively I think more Medtner albums will have to be added to my collection. If anything I think I like this sonata better than the shorter works.

If you find you’re developing a more than passing liking for the sonatas, I’m afraid that getting the Hamelin set will become unavoidable. 🤷‍♂️😉

The Op. 5 Sonata is an extraordinary work and a great favourite. I would suggest you also listen to the interpretation by Lucas Debargue.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on August 26, 2021, 11:11:31 PM
Saving this from the black hole of the wayltn thread:

The piano parts of Medtner’s lieder are no less elaborate than his solo piano works. Quite astonishing, indeed.

This disc also contains what I consider the pinnacle of Medtner’s writing for the voice, as well as one of his best works overall, the Sonate-Vocalise. I don’t know if you own the CD or if you’re streaming, if it’s the latter, the Sonate is in the last two tracks of the album. I mention this because Spotify has it mislabeled as part of the preceding Suite-Vocalise (although the I. and II. numbering in the tracks’ titles reveals that there’s something wrong going on). It is in two parts, the first being a setting of Goethe’s Geweihter Platz. As a standalone lied it is a setting of great beauty, poise and a sense of what could perhaps be described as ecstatic serenity - a mood that is transferred to the second part, the themes and rhythms of which are evolving from motivic and rhythmic kernels already heard in the lied. I think it is an extraordinary creation (not least for being the only vocalise work I know that makes vocalise actually work).

I'm streaming. Primephonic is generally slightly better at handling these metadata questions, though they do have their own misfires. But I've never really forgiven Spotify for suggesting that the most popular work by Samuel Barber was The Barber of Seville.

But in terms of finding out what versions are available, I'm relying on https://www.medtner.org.uk/  which is fabulously good at documenting recordings.
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Madiel on August 26, 2021, 11:16:36 PM
If you find you’re developing a more than passing liking for the sonatas, I’m afraid that getting the Hamelin set will become unavoidable. 🤷‍♂️😉

The Op. 5 Sonata is an extraordinary work and a great favourite. I would suggest you also listen to the interpretation by Lucas Debargue.

Unavoidable is a strong word... I certainly will sample Hamelin to the extent possible online before making any decisions, but there's enough positive views of Milne to not make a Hamelin acquisition inevitable. I know Hamelin has a reputation for spectacular playing in virtuosic works (and Medtner undoubtedly asks for virtuosity), but Milne is not exactly a slouch!

I'm thoroughly sold on the merits of op.5. Further assessment of purchasing options will wait until I've got to the end of the opuses I don't already own (I have both of Milne's Hyperion albums, one is the complete Skazki which was very difficult to find as a CD and the other is miscellaneous smaller works).
Title: Re: Nicholas Medtner
Post by: Wanderer on October 07, 2021, 10:32:15 PM
Unavoidable is a strong word...

…and utterly deserving. I don’t worry, you will get there sooner or later.


Medtner: Violin Sonata no. 3 Epica

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51c0GQ9UbyL._SY355_.jpg)

Absolutely one of my favorite violin sonatas of all time. Not only is it epic, but it is also sublimely lyrical and infectiously rhythmic - almost jazzy - in places (as in the second movement). His other two violin sonatas are also wonderful.

They are, indeed! Another version of the Third Violin Sonata I particularly cherish is this:
(https://www.amazon.co.uk/images/I/715nKzeVF3L._AC_SX679_.jpg)