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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Artem on Today at 11:14:26 PM »
Jo Kondo's early work for solo piano sounded a lot like the New York School and was also recorded by Satoko Inoue. His latests pieces for solo piano resemble Schoenberg compositions for the instrument.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Bernard Haitink (1929-2021)
« Last post by vandermolen on Today at 11:05:56 PM »
From WAYLTN thread.
The Walton (Symphony No.1 with the Philharmonia Orchestra) is most interesting - a granitic/epic performance but I'm not sure that I'd want to play it very often. I thought that the opening movement was terrific and enjoyed the alternative take (slower than usual) on the second movement (rather like Previn's EMI recording of Shostakovich's 10th Symphony) but the slow movement was very very slow and, at times, I felt that it was dragging. The conclusion of the symphony was very fine indeed. No complaints about the live VW recording so far - very idiomatic performance of Symphony No.5 (1994 recording) - haven't got round to 'Antartica' (1984 recording) yet:
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The Jazz Lounge / Re: What Jazz are you listening to now?
« Last post by Artem on Today at 11:04:24 PM »
I love how that disk starts, bristling with energy and excitement of music. Dolphy's tone is hot fire.

Evolution is a recent reissue of a 1980s recording by a mostly Japanese group done in the US. The recording was brought to Japan and released there. The compositions are very much in the modal/post bop tradition of the early 1960s Blue Note and Impulse records, which is acknowledged in the liner notes. The music is performed with confidence. Some of the originals are also very nice, but overall it lacks energy and feels somewhat reserved.


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The Jazz Lounge / Re: What Jazz are you listening to now?
« Last post by Artem on Today at 11:01:43 PM »
 :laugh:I love how that disk starts, bristling with energy and excitement of music. Dolphy's tone is hot fire.

Evolution is a recent reissue of a 1980s recording by a mostly Japanese group done in the US. The recording was brought to Japan and released there. The compositions are very much in the modal/post bop tradition of the early 1960s Blue Note and Impulse records, which is acknowledged in the liner notes. The music is performed with confidence. Some of the originals are also very nice, but overall it lacks energy and feels somewhat reserved.

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Vaughan Williams: Symphony No5
LPO, Haitink
New arrival - live recording - most enjoyable:

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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 10:22:00 PM »
Gubaidulina: Offertorium (Arabella Steinbacher / Christoph von Dohnányi / NDR Sinfonieorchester, live recording 5 April 2009) - My first time hearing this live recording (as well as the violinist), and am impressed. Steinbacher is marvelous, and Dohnányi and the orchestra are on fire. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob6hHDbLxo8

--Bruce

It sounds great,thanks for posting.
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The Diner / Re: Personality Types
« Last post by greg on Today at 10:00:43 PM »
(J types achieve things, P types do not. The J in me wants to achieve stuff while the P keeps me from achieving. I think my internal conflicts with myself comes from J and P fighting each other. As for the INT* part is concerned, my mind has peace.)
I think it's a conflict between novelty-seeking and consistency.

I'm around the middle, too, I can draw up a plan to be consistent with something every day, but some days just don't feel like doing something, so I don't. Because on the path to achievement lies a lot of repetitive work that you might not feel inspired to do every day, so you sit around watching youtube or learning the basics of some random language like Thai or something- but then after that, your brain can recharge and feel ready to get back into what you were doing before.

Then again, I remember your explanation of it and it seemed to be a different reason.

Also, I'm probably around the middle in regards to Thinking vs. Feeling- and I think the way they describe feeling types is WAY wrong on sites like the official MBTI test, more likely I lean toward more of a feeler type but don't relate to the description and don't get that result in the test. So yeah, just having INxx as a type isn't very informative, so other systems have been much more insightful for me.
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The Diner / Re: USA Politics (redux)
« Last post by greg on Today at 09:47:40 PM »
I saved my money and went to India when I was 26. I had never been outside the U.S. I remember clearly the taxi ride from the airport to the hotel. I was in such shock. It took me three days to get over the shock. I almost turned around and went back that very day.
Anyone interested needs to check out bald and bankrupt's channel, many great India videos like what the slums look like in India (in this one):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLJy5njInoc

Though mostly he is known for his awesome eastern Europe/ex-Soviet tourism, videos which are quite unlike anything I've seen before.



I was traumatized by a taxi ride in Naples.  ??? Italians have an interesting attitude when it comes to traffic rules.
Lol I used to work with someone that said exactly the same thing, never will he take a taxi in Italy again.




Those are some of the reasons, but not all of them. Cost of education is one reason. Low minimum wages are another. Medical bills are one danger.
True.


Stupid kids are everywhere in the World, but in some countries the society at least tries to help them to manage in life.
It should be the parents that help the most, but we also have a problem with many kids growing up without a dad. So not exactly a great start emotionally, mentally, or financially for them. When that fails, society can help- you need some sort of safety net for everyone. But that's also a financial burden on society as a whole...



The goal is to prison people for as short time as possible and instead try to help them to rehabilitate and become productive members of society.
This may work for many, and is a good overall approach... but it would have some limitations. There's people out there who are hopeless... with psychopathy they have an irregular brain that will never change, if they can get away with something, they'll always try because they completely lack fear and at the same time are too enticed by rewards. IMO a good system would be able to distinguish the screwups that end up in prison because they just need some guidance vs. the evil people, and treat them differently.


Here is a link to a Youtube video about prisons in Finland: https://youtu.be/l554kV12Wuo
That was interesting, didn't seem so bad at all.
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The Diner / Re: USA Politics (redux)
« Last post by 71 dB on Today at 09:25:26 PM »
I saved my money and went to India when I was 26. I had never been outside the U.S. I remember clearly the taxi ride from the airport to the hotel. I was in such shock. It took me three days to get over the shock. I almost turned around and went back that very day.

I was traumatized by a taxi ride in Naples.  ??? Italians have an interesting attitude when it comes to traffic rules.
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The Diner / Re: USA Politics (redux)
« Last post by 71 dB on Today at 09:17:33 PM »
Poju, have you ever been to a Third World country? Third World countries have widespread systemic poverty in which great masses of their population are immured.  Poverty in the US is not like that. There are poor people but not as great a percentage of the population, and for even the poorest of them it's not as desperate as it is in the Third World.  There are not great slums in the US in which everyone has mud floors, sporadic electricity, and no idea of where tomorrow's meals will come from. To put US poverty in the same category as Third World poverty is an insult to the suffering of the Third World's poor.

No, I haven't.

The US as a third World country is a special case and people tend to mistake it as a First World country for this reason, even I did up until recently after having seen how "hopeless" country we are talking about. The US is TOTALLY different third World country than say Ethiopia. The latter is a very poor country while the US is the richest country in the World, but intellectually bankrupt as a society. What happened on January 6th doesn't happen in first World countries. In Alabama many don't have proper sewage systems and due to that have worms (luckily there is ivermectin for that  ;D ). People don't have worms in first World countries. In first World countries the quality of tap water is strictly regulated. This is not the case in many places in the US, but to be fair, Mexico has even worse tap water quality as far as I know. Last winter Texas suffered massive power shortages, because of the lack of regulation. That's not maybe as bad as electrity in Ethiopia, but is certainly isn't first World level either. The US is a third World country because it operates under corporate rule. There is two kinds of poverty: Absolute poverty and relative poverty. The US has a huge relative poverty problem.
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