GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: pjme on December 16, 2007, 02:06:14 PM

Title: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on December 16, 2007, 02:06:14 PM
Etcetera and Klara ( Flemish national radio) are slowly (very slowly) working on a series of portraits of Belgian composers.

This is brandnew : August De Boeck (1865 - 1937)

(http://www.cebedem.be/images/composers/de_boeck_august.jpg)

(http://www.klara.be/html/images/klara_cds/KTC4024-150.jpg)

http://www.ningkam.com/

Several orchestral pieces :
The Dahomeyan rhapsody : a short, brillant romp à la Rimsky,I guess - it uses a Dahomeyan tune ( Dahomey is part of Benin) de Boeck heard in Brussels, as played by a group of touring musicians  and the much later Nocturne (1931 - which shows timidly  Impressionistic influences) . I've never heard the violinconcerto ( 1932) . This is music that should appeal to lovers of Glazunov, Massenet, Borodin,Rimsky Korsakov ...

Ning Kam is the soloist, the VRO ( Vlaams Radio Orkest , soon to be re-named as Brussels' Philharmonic) plays under Marc Soustrot.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dundonnell on December 20, 2007, 05:55:16 PM
Sorry not to have replied sooner! I have got de Boeck's Violin Concerto and Dahomeyan Rhapsody on an old Marco Polo CD coupled with his Symphony in G-Guido De Neve(violin) and the Royal Flanders Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Frederic Devreese. Marco Polo had a relatively short-lived Anthology of Flemish Music and I recall picking up some interesting CDs in that series, including the impressive 2nd, 3rd and 7th symphonies by Arthur Meulemans(1884-1966). Meulemans is a composer of substantial merit whose works deserve revival.

Glad to know that some interest is being shown in this largely ignored field!
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on December 23, 2007, 12:16:57 PM
Thanks anyway for the reply Dundonnell ! Belgian composers are not well represented in any catalogue....Often only César Franck seems to be the name everybody knows.

I agree with you about Arthur Meulemans. He was an amazingly prolific composers ( cfr. Darius Milhaud and Bohuslav Martinu) ( 15 symphonies, 3 operas, many cantatas and oratorios, symphonic poems, works for brass, simple folksongs, complex choral pieces on French texts, pianoworks,several "mass plays" (open air productions with actors, choruses,singers and orchestra)...
One can easily imagine that not all is of the same quality, but I'm sure some of it should be resurected. I have fond memories of two concerti for orchestra, "Concerti grossi" for sax quartet or clarinet quartet and ch.o.. There's a lovely trumpetconcerto ,two concerti for horn, 3 for piano, 2 cello, 2 organ, 2 violin ...those for harp, harpsichord, timpani ..have never been played again since their premiere.
For a traditional composer, using the tonal system, he lived in difficult times : the emergence of serialism & atonality made him quickly an oldfashioned artist... He tried to compensate by writing shorter, less lyrical works...In some of the late works ( concerto for two pianos, Evasions for orchestra etc) one longs for more "breath"...

Anyway, let's hope that Etcetera/Klara continues this series. Godfried De Vreese (Frederic's father), Raymond Chevreuille, Karel Albert, Karel Candael, Albert Huybrechts, Marcel Poot, Lodewijk De Vocht ...deserve some attention!
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on October 31, 2008, 01:38:29 PM
Just noticed this thread. I greatly admire Godfried Devreese's Gothic Symphony and In Memoriam (a great work) and Pliny's Fountain by Meulemans. Any other fans of these works?
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dundonnell on October 31, 2008, 03:00:31 PM
Just noticed this thread. I greatly admire Godfried Devreese's Gothic Symphony and In Memoriam (a great work) and Pliny's Fountain by Meulemans. Any other fans of these works?

What do you think? ;D ;D ;D

I talked about Meulemans above but I shall go back to the Devreese and remind myself :)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Sydney Grew on October 31, 2008, 03:47:53 PM
Godfried De Vreese (Frederic's father), Raymond Chevreuille, Karel Albert, Karel Candael, Albert Huybrechts, Marcel Poot, Lodewijk De Vocht ...deserve some attention!

We don't know quite what "Romantic" means in a musical context, but another composer who should not be forgotten here is Henri Pousseur, who "ran the Belgian branch of the avant-garde" (to quote the admirable Norman Lebrecht).
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dundonnell on October 31, 2008, 04:59:26 PM
We don't know quite what "Romantic" means in a musical context, but another composer who should not be forgotten here is Henri Pousseur, who "ran the Belgian branch of the avant-garde" (to quote the admirable Norman Lebrecht).


However else Henri Pousseur's music can be described, "late Romantic" it most certainly is not!
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Sydney Grew on October 31, 2008, 08:43:54 PM
However else Henri Pousseur's music can be described, "late Romantic" it most certainly is not!

We wonder whether the member has ever heard Pousseur's Stone Garland . . . But if by "Romantic" one intends "programme music" well then of course . . .

In general the quality of modern Belgian music is incomparably better than that of modern British music - this is probably because in Belgium a) there is not nearly as much "jazz-worship" and b) the valuable Symbolist movement left much deeper roots.

Here in addition to those mentioned above are a few more names of worthwhile Belgians: Peter Benoït (nineteenth century), Willy (sic) Carron, René Defossez, Paul Gilson, Joseph Jongen (he of the mighty organ concerto), André Laporte, Guillaume Lekeu (no brilliant romps for him poor young chap!), Michel Lysight, Armand Marsick, Desiré Pâque, Flor Peeters of course, Jean Rogister, Frederick van Rossum (a bit of a bore that one), Joseph Ryelandt, André-Jean Smit, Frank van der Stucken, Edgar Tinel, Renaat Veremans, and last but not least for now the renowned Eugène Ysaÿe. And we are so glad that the labours of Marcel Poot appear to be gaining wider circulation.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on November 02, 2008, 01:30:07 AM
What do you think? ;D ;D ;D

I talked about Meulemans above but I shall go back to the Devreese and remind myself :)

I listened to Pliny's Fountain yesterday and the Devreese CD (+all three recordings of Bliss's Morning Heroes...sad isn't it  :o)

Anyway, back to the topic..the Meuleman's is a beautiful, poetic work with echoes of Debussy and Respighi. Devreese's Gothic is one of my favourite Marco Polo discoveries (and there are many!) The Symphony (from 1940 I think) is a very powerful, melodic and inspiriting score, the Poeme Heroique is waltonian in a way but best of all is the 7 minute In Memoriam, a deeply moving work, which reminds me in spirit a bit of Sainton's Nadir although it doesn't really sound like it (I don't think that that makes any sense..but never mind).
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dundonnell on February 04, 2009, 11:23:48 AM
I am listening to a cd (kindly given to me by Christo in Amsterdam on Saturday) of music by the Belgian composer, Frederik van Rossum(1939-).

Anyone know of him? Peter?

The cd consists of a short but rather gloomy Violin Concerto(No.1), an equally dark but slightly more advanced Symphony(No.3)-which I must confess to rather liking-and a much more advanced/expressionist work for Brass and Percussion called 'Requisitoire" which apparently won first prize in a UNESCO International Forum of Composers competition in 1980.

On the basis of this scanty knowledge van Rossum seems a rather grim and angry composer ;D
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on February 05, 2009, 09:20:56 AM
(http://www.cebedem.be/images/composers/van_rossum_frederik.jpg) Van Rossum turned 70 this year, so this photoisn't exactly up to date...

Lately I've heard very little about Van Rossum. I'm afraid he's a bit forgotten. But then he's one of those wildly eclectic pianist/composers who are not in favour ...Belgium has quite a few of them : one day they write a litlle tonal & fun piece for piano, next they give birth to a mammoth atonal symphony or opera with politico/religious ambitions...Hmmm...? To be honest, I know too little of him to give good information. I'll stick to : eclectic, neo romantic, coloristic use of all kinds of techniques .

He wrote a Symphonia concertante for horn, piano and orchestra and a pianoconcerto "Slovienska duca" which is an extravagant mix of Prokofiev, Katsjaturian, Bartok, Chostakovitch & Penderecki..( the last movement is to played "con demenza").


From Cebedem:
Born (Ixelles) (Brussels), December 5, 1939.
Music studies at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels
In 1965 he won the first Grand Prix de Rome.
He has persued a successful career as pedagogue and composer.
He was on the staff of the Royal Conservatories of Brussels and Liège where he taught piano, musical analysis and counterpoint. He was also director of the Music Academy Watermael-Boitsfort. Since several years he is a free-lance composer.
Numerous awards including the Koopal Prize in 1972, the Fuerison Prize in 1977 and the Grand Prix Musical Paul Gilson in Quebec (Canada) in 1973.
His Violin Concerto was the compulsory work of the “International Music Competition Queen Elisabeth of Belgium 1980”. His style is
fundamentally traditional but he makes good use of some expressionistic elements which characterize the avant-garde movement.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dundonnell on February 05, 2009, 10:06:14 AM
Thanks for that, Peter :)

Yes..."wildly eclectic" seems to perfectly sum up the music I was listening to ;D
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: stevenski on August 05, 2009, 03:09:29 PM
Just noticed this thread. I greatly admire Godfried Devreese's Gothic Symphony and In Memoriam (a great work) and Pliny's Fountain by Meulemans. Any other fans of these works?
vandermolen, have u heard G. Devreese's Violin Concerto?; full of the most beautiful,memorable melodies; one of those unknown works which really stick in the mind. Wil have to replay the Gothic, but remember liking it.
Re Meulemans; very individual; the only impressionistic style music I have ever really liked, but with a late Romantic tinge(the melodies are fragmented, a sort of pointilliste style). Makes me think of barren, eerie Suffolk landscapes(UK), as explored in the (literary) works of Sebald(if you admire Sebald please pm me!)

I also recommend Mortelmans: more straightforwardly late Romantic: the closest equivalent i can think of is SIEGFRIED Wagner:his music, like SW's, is full of passion and yearning: the most striking is "The Myth of Spring". Any other G. Devreese, Mortelmans and Meulemans afficiandos?

Steve

PS The Devreese(Senior) Violin Concerto is on one of those old Marco Polo cds.


Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on August 11, 2009, 02:09:57 AM
(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571177663.png) October release

Flemish music has a rather unusual position in the history of nineteenth-century music, in that orchestral and symphonic music were almost completely subordinated to vocal music. There was little expertise in instrumental music, and this concentration on vocal works (which was seen as part of an inherited French culture) got in the way of the development of an orchestral tradition. However, occasionally a figure would appear who broke the mould. Lodewijk Mortelmans (1868–1952) was one of those responsible for the Flemish orchestral renaissance, and who looked with curiosity beyond the Belgian borders. He won the Prix de Rome in 1893, and used the prize money to travel to Germany and Italy to broaden his cultural experience. As a music correspondent he wrote about performances in Bayreuth and kept his finger on the pulse of European musical life. He wished to create an autonomous, ‘Flemish’ symphonic culture, while also appealing beyond its boundaries by choosing ‘extramusical’ subjects with a more universal agenda than Flemish nationalist topics.

One cannot accuse Mortelmans of being musically avant-garde or adventurous: he was aware that European classical music was following a new, atonal and even serial path, but right up to his death he was unwilling to abandon his romantic signature. But he perfected his traditional approach and his music is deeply attractive, showing the influence of both Sibelius and Wagner. A selection of his greatest works for orchestra are recorded here. Hyperion regular Martyn Brabbins conducts the Royal Flemish Philharmonic in their first recording for Hyperion.

read more at hyperion

  Homerische symfonie 
1  Movement 1: Van de helden : 'Of the heroes'  [11'00] 
2  Movement 2: Herinneringen aan Patroklos' dood / 'Memories of Patroklos's death'  [11'47] 
3  Movement 3: Sirenengespeel en gezang / 'Sirens playing and singing'  [11'41] 
4  Movement 4: De genius van Hellas/ 'The genius of Hellas'  [8'44] 
5  Morgenstemming 'Morning Mood'  [12'42] 
6  Mythe der lente 'Myth of Spring'  [10'47] 

Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: stevenski on August 11, 2009, 03:04:51 PM
Thanks for that, pjme; very enlightening.

Lovely music. There is a little Mortelmans piece for orchestra, "Exultation", paired down and beautiful melody. Wish I could afford the Homeric Symphony!

Steve

Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Lethevich on October 27, 2011, 06:13:29 AM
Belgian question:

Can anyone direct me towards which of Wim Mertens' compositions are of a more classical bent? I've tried to sample his music to answer my initial question "Is this classical?", but am not finding any answers. Wikipedia assures me that he at least has some, despite his Einaudi-style albums, but he composed so much that it's a bit of a hassle working out exactly what is going on in his output.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wim_Mertens
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on October 27, 2011, 11:40:55 AM
Sorry Lethe, but I cannot help you.  Mertens'music leaves cold, so I never investigated.

Peter

ps: A new Hyperion Cd will soon be out ( November) with music by Meulemans ( two concerti for orchestra) and several works by Jef Maes.  Antwerp PhO/ Brabbins.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Darwin on April 15, 2012, 11:43:32 PM
Lekeu has been mentioned already in this thread. His "Adagio pour Quatuor d'Orchestra" is a gripping, moving piece which I am sure will appeal to anybody who likes Schoenberg's Verklarte Nacht, and makes one regret very much his untimely demise. Surely the composer of such a riveting piece as this had great things in him. It was completed in 1891, when Lekeu was 22. Verklarte Nacht was not written until 1899...

The work is scored for string orchestra with a solo trio of violin/viola/cello - the title has never made sense to me, until now. I have just realised that the orchestra is the fourth member of the "quartet".

Decent recordings are a bit thin on the ground; mine is on an Erato LP (NUM 75052), played by the Monte Carlo PO under Armin Jordan, and is perfectly serviceable. Once again Youtube comes to the rescue with this slow but rather fine, impassioned performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AujdNOPZ6FU) - well, it is an Adagio. The video is split into two parts, for reasons which are unclear to me.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: calyptorhynchus on September 03, 2012, 06:24:05 PM
Just been listening to downloads kindly provided at Unsung Composers of Jongens, Violin Concerto and String Trio. The Trio reminded me of Vaughan Williams, the Concerto (a beautiful work) of Bruch.

What is his Symphonie Concertante for organ and orchestra like? I have to say I don't normally like Romantic organ music.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on October 31, 2014, 02:13:32 AM
Once again greatly enjoying this CD:
Think he is a genuinely undeservedly neglected composer. The Symphony (1944) is moving and memorable as is 'In Memoriam '. Looking forward to lots of replies  8)

Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on October 31, 2014, 07:12:57 AM
Hi, afaik, no recent recordings of music by Devreese were made... there's plenty to choose from however. A.o. a 50 min. Goethe symphony with chorus , concerti for piano, violin and cello, orchestral suites, works for brass and percussion etc.

In Hyperion's Violonconcert series however: Joseph Jongen and Sylvio Lazzari. out in january 2015.

The Romantic Violin Concerto

Joseph Jongen (1873-1953)
Violin Concerto; Lazzari: Rapsodie
Philippe Graffin (violin), Royal Flemish Philharmonic, Martyn Brabbins (conductor)
Show download options 5 January 2015 Release   This album is not yet available for download LISTEN TO ALL EXTRACTS 
1  Fantasia in E major Op 12  [6'18]  English Français Deutsch


 
2  Rapsodie in E minor  [16'52]  Sylvio Lazzari (1857-1944)  English Français Deutsch


 
3  Adagio symphonique in B major Op 20  [11'53]  English Français Deutsch


 
  Violin Concerto in B minor Op 17  English Français Deutsch


 
4  Allegro poco maestoso  [11'55] 
5  Adagio, molto espressivo  [9'15] 
6  Animé  [9'32] 
The Romantic Violin Concerto series reaches Belgium and the music of Joseph Jongen, a composer more celebrated for his organ music now, but who was equally admired in his day for his orchestral and chamber works. Jongen studied at the Liège Conservatoire where he heard the great violinist Eugène Ysaÿe and composer-conductors Vincent d’Indy and Richard Strauss.

In this new album Philippe Graffin (a welcome and familiar presence in this series) collaborates with the Royal Flemish Philharmonic and Martyn Brabbins in Jongen’s Violin Concerto, one of the composer’s first substantial works. It was described by his contemporary Florent Schmitt as ‘one of the finest violin concertos’; and he admired the ‘outpouring of warm lyricism’ and ‘lush profusion of themes and rhythms’.

Also included are other works for violin and orchestra, and a Rapsodie for the same forces by Italian Romantic Sylvio Lazzari (1857–1944) who was influenced—as was Jongen—by the music of César Franck.
 

 
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch 
In a biographical pamphlet published by J & W Chester in 1922, Lord Berners described Joseph Jongen as a composer whose music had ‘remarkable lyric charm and dramatic power’. That acute summary of his musical language makes his neglect all the more puzzling. If Jongen is known at all, it is largely through his finely crafted organ music, rather than his substantial output for orchestra or his chamber music (including three fine string quartets). Born in Liège on 14 December 1873, his father was a cabinet-maker and wood-carver who specialized in church furnishings. But he was also a keen amateur musician (he had studied the trombone in his youth), who had encountered the best music Paris had to offer when he spent six months there in 1867. Jongen began to study the piano when he was seven years old, and his teacher (who was organist of Saint-Jacques in Liège) soon encouraged him to take up the organ as well. Jongen continued his studies at the Conservatoire in Liège while still singing in the choirs of several churches. His time at the Liège Conservatoire was formative, with his first chance to hear Eugène Ysaÿe, and visits to the city by composer–conductors such as Vincent d’Indy and Richard Strauss.

Jongen was a brilliant student and had already started to demonstrate his gifts as a composer in his early teens. In 1897 he won the Belgian Prix de Rome, which gave him the chance to study in Italy and to travel. He made the most of this opportunity, setting out first for Berlin in 1898, where the concerts conducted by Arthur Nikisch and Felix Weingartner made a lasting impression, as did performances of Strauss’s Heldenleben (conducted by the composer) and Jongen’s first hearing of Brahms’s Violin Concerto, played by Joseph Joachim. One of his grandest works from this period was a symphony, written under the influence of Strauss’s tone poems. He took it to Strauss and was delighted to be welcomed warmly and taken seriously, recalling later that Strauss’s comments were ‘like beams of light, as if a thick curtain had been lifted from my eyes’.

After a visit to Bayreuth in the summer of 1899, Jongen settled for a few months in Munich. It was here that he wrote the Violin Concerto in B minor, Op 17, for the violinist Émile Chaumont (1878–1942), a lifelong friend from Liège. The following year Jongen was in Paris, where he met Dukas, Vierne and Fauré. Back in Rome at the end of 1901, he met Florent Schmitt (who had just won the Prix de Rome in Paris). The pair of them struck up a friendship during their time as fellow prize-winners at the Villa Medici. While Jongen’s next work—the Cello Concerto, Op 18, from 1900—enjoyed a good deal of success, the Violin Concerto was largely overlooked even in his lifetime. It was published by Durand in 1914—with a dedication not to Chaumont, but to the great Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. Ysaÿe admired Jongen greatly, and was an enthusiastic advocate of his music, but not, it seems, of the Violin Concerto. It had one performance in Paris at the time of publication but the critic in Le Mercure musical (May 1914) noted only that it was ‘excellently interpreted by M. Ch[arles] Herman’. Herman was a Belgian violinist who was leader of the Concerts Lamoureux in Paris for some years, later taking up a teaching post at the Conservatoire in Brussels. Another performance was given in Ostend in 1930, but it was not until October 1938 that it attracted critical attention when it was again heard in Paris. On that occasion it was played by Henry Merckel, a violinist whose impressive solo career (particularly as an advocate of new music) went in parallel with his work as one of the city’s most prominent orchestral leaders, including a thirty-year stint with the orchestra of the Paris Opéra. Merckel’s performance was part of a gala evening celebrating Franco-Belgian friendship. Aptly enough, it was reviewed for Le Temps by Florent Schmitt, Jongen’s old friend from his student years in Rome. Some four decades after its composition, Schmitt’s reaction is as fascinating as it is warm-hearted. He begins by discussing the first two movements:

This concerto, which, they say, dates from the 1900s, wears its age lightly, and if the initial part seems to delight in a slightly stiff dignity, it is the hesitant shyness of a personality that is still looking, however, towards the Andante—more matured, blended with delicious melancholy, an outpouring of warm lyricism.
Schmitt’s comments on the first movement are fair enough: though there is plenty of florid solo writing, the mood is dominated by the rather stern opening figure, descending, then rising on a dotted rhythm, that suggests something of Jongen’s debt to César Franck (he was still in his mid-twenties when he composed this concerto). A contrasting theme in E major shows another Franck characteristic—returning repeatedly to one or two notes around which the whole melody seems to revolve. As Schmitt suggests, it is in the slow movement (not in fact an ‘Andante’ but marked Adagio, molto espressivo) that Jongen appears to be set free with song-like lines for the soloist often seeming to spiral upwards, and orchestration that is delicately coloured for the most part, blossoming into a big tutti just once, near the end.

Schmitt reserves his highest praise for the finale—a movement about which Jongen himself seemed to have had some doubts before publication: the score suggests an optional cut of some ten pages near the beginning, removing the whole of the orchestral introduction except the first two bars (the work is played complete on this recording). But Schmitt evidently had no such worries:

The finale, so penetrating at the start in its rising sixths in the strings, and so bright at the end, when it explodes in a lush profusion of themes and rhythms that verges on extravagance …
Again, the benevolent influence of Franck can be heard in the propulsive rising and falling theme heard in the lower strings at the start, taken up by violins and violas over low pedal notes, and used to drive the music forward before being coloured by spiky woodwind chords. The first solo entry is a dashing counterpoint to the opening theme which continues to rumble away beneath. A second theme is a more tranquil contrast, supported by harmonies that seem effortlessly mobile. As the opening theme is used to urge the music towards an exciting climax, the key changes from B minor to B major and a thrilling coda ensues—presumably the ‘lush profusion’ of Schmitt’s review—ending with a brief flourish of woodwind and brass fanfares to underline the transformation of the theme into the major key. Schmitt was completely won over—although as well as praising Jongen profusely, he couldn’t resist taking a swipe at a rather unlikely target:

This concerto, which I believe was previously unknown in France, may be among the finest violin concertos, advantageously replacing, if necessary, the interesting but hackneyed Mendelssohn, and even more so that of Beethoven which is completely devoid of any actual musical interest.
The Violin Concerto was one of Jongen’s first substantial works. During his stay in Paris in he composed the Adagio symphonique in B major, Op 20, completing it in April 1901 (the manuscript is dated) and dedicating it to his friend Joseph Debroux (1866–1929), with whom he produced some editions of little-known eighteenth-century music. Beginning with a haunting horn figure that comes to dominate much of the work, the violin soloist plays high-lying lyrical lines over quite a rich orchestral texture. Towards the end, the soloist engages in a brief but lovely dialogue with solo oboe and flute before the music turns to harp-drenched chords of B major, with hints of the opening theme beneath.

The Fantasia in E major, Op 12, is the earliest work on this recording, completed in October 1898, just before Jongen began his European travels. A short piece, it begins slowly before becoming more animated. The most memorable moment comes near the end, where the soloist plays a version of the main theme notable for its uncomplicated lyricism, Jongen’s confident handling of the orchestra, and his gift for telling harmonies.

Sylvio Lazzari (1857–1944) was born in Italy. A pupil of Gounod at the Paris Conservatoire, he was encouraged by Franck and Chausson and his music owes a considerable debt to them, as well as to Wagner. He is probably best known for the opera La tour de feu (The lighthouse), given its premiere at the Paris Opéra in 1928. It was one of the first operas to make use of cinema effects (the final scene was performed in front of a projected film of a stormy sea). The Rapsodie in E minor for violin and orchestra was composed six years earlier (the manuscript is dated ‘Suresnes, 16 April 1922, Easter Sunday’). The fluid harmonies and lyrical lines of this work reveal a composer of great skill, while the solemn chromatic brass chords that introduce the closing section suggest a flair for moments of post-Wagnerian nobility. Cast in a single movement, the Rapsodie has an appropriately free structure—and one that is marked throughout by music of singular beauty and poise, deftly orchestrated.

Nigel Simeone © 2015

 
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on October 31, 2014, 10:12:32 AM
Many thanks for the interesting response.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on March 09, 2016, 03:15:59 AM
Am greatly enjoying Arthur Meulemans's (1884-1966) Symphony 3 (1933). It has a rather magical opening and is a very poetic and imaginative work of under 20 minutes. The same Marco Polo CD features 'Pliny's Fountain' which is Meulemans's best known or least unknown score. It a haunting and poetic score which gives much pleasure:


Here is some info.on the composer:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2002/Oct02/Meulemans_Culot.htm
I've just noticed the CD available for under 3$ at the Amazon US site.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on July 16, 2019, 11:38:44 PM
I hadn't realised how good Jef Maes's Second Symphony is. Quite Baxian in a way and definitely for admirers of late-Romantic music but with a distinctive, engaging musical personality. It has a wonderfully dark but paradoxically uplifting conclusion.
No doubt I'll reply to myself in three year's time.  8)
(http://)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 17, 2019, 02:54:03 PM
I have heard nothing by that composer so far. Your description makes the music appear appealing. It will go to my list of recommendations.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on July 17, 2019, 10:51:10 PM
I have heard nothing by that composer so far. Your description makes the music appear appealing. It will go to my list of recommendations.
Thanks for responding Cesar.  :)
In places it also reminded me of Korngold's Symphony. My surmise is that you would enjoy it. I enjoyed the whole CD and not just the Symphony No.2.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 18, 2019, 03:43:48 PM
Thanks for responding Cesar.  :)
In places it also reminded me of Korngold's Symphony. My surmise is that you would enjoy it. I enjoyed the whole CD and not just the Symphony No.2.

Much better, Jeffrey! Thanks!
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: kyjo on July 19, 2019, 05:24:54 AM
Thanks for responding Cesar.  :)
In places it also reminded me of Korngold's Symphony. My surmise is that you would enjoy it. I enjoyed the whole CD and not just the Symphony No.2.

I must hear anything that is reminiscent of the great Korngold Symphony! Thanks for the recommendation, Jeffrey.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: vandermolen on July 19, 2019, 06:20:42 AM
I must hear anything that is reminiscent of the great Korngold Symphony! Thanks for the recommendation, Jeffrey.
It was only a momentary impression Kyle but I suspect that it would be of interest to you.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on July 19, 2019, 09:02:42 AM
The website of the Queen Elisabeth Competition offers some unusual recordings - live - most of them in good sound.
https://queenelisabethcompetition.be/en/competitions/
https://queenelisabethcompetition.be/en/watch-listen/

A list of all concerto's written for the competition can be consulted  here:
http://perso.unamur.be/~jmlamber/re/re_imposes.php

Peter
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Symphonic Addict on January 29, 2020, 10:49:19 AM
(https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a0390903459_10.jpg)

These days I came across this fantastic CD. I already knew Boeck's Symphony in G major, considering it quite good and memorable. Now, the works on the CD are other real finds. The Piano Concerto is such a sparkling, witty and fresh work. It has a bit of the elegance and fluency of Saint-Saëns's works in the genre. Overture to Théroigne de Méricourt is five minutes of sheer sophistication and beauty, a splendid miniature. Perhaps the most impressive work is the Suite from the opera Francesca. This is incandescent stuff, unabashedly full-blooded, something to wallow in. Really wonderful in my view. A winning CD in all regards.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 12, 2021, 07:42:46 AM
Enjoying the works of Paul Gilson and Godfried Devreese. Picturesque and somehow three-dimensional music.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 12, 2021, 08:18:47 AM
That Devreese cd has some strange words...:
the ballet is titled Tombelène, not Tomblene ( after a Celtic legend / a small island/rock, close to the Mont Saint Michel is named Tombelaine).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombelaine
The cellist is Viviane Spanoghe (not Vivaiane), Guido de Neve is soloist in the violinconcerto. Frederic Devreese conducts.
 I hope that sooner or later we can hear the original and unusual orchestration by Godfried Devreese: 15 winds, celeste, harp, six five-string double basses and variously tuned side drums. Frederik Devreese re-orchestrated the concertino in 1992, for a more practical, small orchestra, without percussion.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 19, 2021, 05:44:23 AM
Enjoying the orchestral works of Flor Alpaerts. I don’t know anything about him, but the music is unique and elegant, with innovative and lush orchestration.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 19, 2021, 05:49:56 AM
The SVM ( Study Center for Flemish Music) in Antwerp has a biography:

https://www.svm.be/content/alpaerts-flor?display=biography&language=en

(https://www.svm.be/sites/default/files/imagecache/composer-medium/composer_1_4.jpg)

Some years ago I solisti del vento recorded Alpaerts' Avondmuziek - Evening music for winds

(https://media.s-bol.com/mBWJYANWO4O/550x495.jpg)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 19, 2021, 07:03:32 AM
This disc of music by the pianist composer Arthur De Greef is very well done. It is one of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s earliest recordings, from 2005. I never fail to find it utterly fetching even if it’s not exactly pathbreaking stuff.

(https://img.discogs.com/_nLEHHrJpl3T8-qZ0M7W_usjjFQ=/fit-in/500x494/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10356857-1495912510-1453.jpeg.jpg)


https://www.allmusic.com/album/arthur-de-greef-orchestral-works-mw0001393629 (https://www.allmusic.com/album/arthur-de-greef-orchestral-works-mw0001393629)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 19, 2021, 08:14:07 AM
(https://www.svm.be/sites/default/files/imagecache/composer-medium/composer_28_1.jpg)

https://www.svm.be/content/de-greef-arthur?display=biography&language=en

That is indeed a lovely disc...to be savoured in small doses.

His Suite for orchestra is another well written, melodious romp ''Ín the olden style'.

https://youtu.be/I7zZvr6bgYU

Musicians of the LSO gave De Greef a nickname in 1915, when touring northern Britain (Elgar conducting) : the dancing flamingo. Apparently De Greef had a curious way of moving his whole body to the rythm of the music and throwing up his hands at the end of a phrase.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 19, 2021, 09:04:25 AM
Thanks, Peter.

I yet have to unseal the Fuga Libera box of music by André Laporte (b. 1931, Flemish despite his French-sounding name). I fell under the spell of his music based on this disc:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51BQ0DXi57L.jpg)

Have you heard his music ?
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 20, 2021, 02:11:11 AM
For a couple of years Laporte was 'big name'. He worked for the BRT/BRTN/VRT and was able to influence artistic choices.
Today he is almost forgotten and his Darmstadt/Boulez/Berio/Stockhausen education makes him very difficult 'to sell'....

I clearly remember several works and the premiere of his oratorio La vita non e sogno and the opera Das Schloss. Brillant events , now forgotten.

Still, I think that he is a very accomplished artist and I definitely would buy tickets to hear  and see his music.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Laporte
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 21, 2021, 05:50:51 PM
The SVM ( Study Center for Flemish Music) in Antwerp has a biography:

https://www.svm.be/content/alpaerts-flor?display=biography&language=en

(https://www.svm.be/sites/default/files/imagecache/composer-medium/composer_1_4.jpg)

Some years ago I solisti del vento recorded Alpaerts' Avondmuziek - Evening music for winds

(https://media.s-bol.com/mBWJYANWO4O/550x495.jpg)

Thanks a lot. Very informative site! Also I like the disc you suggested, including the work of Strauss.
I am enjoying the colorful music of August de Boeck today. Wonderful disc.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 22, 2021, 05:10:14 AM
Thanks a lot. Very informative site! Also I like the disc you suggested, including the work of Strauss.
I am enjoying the colorful music of August de Boeck today. Wonderful disc.

A nice disc. Love the symphony.

Frederic Devreese, the conductor on this disc, is also a talented composer. I have a couple of discs of his music.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 22, 2021, 06:32:39 AM
A nice disc. Love the symphony.

Frederic Devreese, the conductor on this disc, is also a talented composer. I have a couple of discs of his music.

I will look for his discs! Thank you.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 22, 2021, 07:25:12 AM
A nice disc. Love the symphony.

Frederic Devreese, the conductor on this disc, is also a talented composer. I have a couple of discs of his music.

If interested, I can send both you and Dry Brett a recording of '"Evocations' a quite early symphonic suite that Frederic Devreese distilled from a radio play 'Willem van Saeftinghe'". But not before early april.....I'll give more details later.
Peter
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 22, 2021, 03:06:54 PM
Thanks, Peter. I would very much appreciate. I have long had a special interest in belgian composers  0:).
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 23, 2021, 06:29:28 AM
If interested, I can send both you and Dry Brett a recording of '"Evocations' a quite early symphonic suite that Frederic Devreese distilled from a radio play 'Willem van Saeftinghe'". But not before early april.....I'll give more details later.
Peter

Wonderful! Thank you very much, Peter.
Thanks to Stürmisch Bewegt‘s recommendation, now listening to the disc of Alpaerts / Meulemans / D'hoedt. All the works sound great. It seems to me that D'hoedt is under-recorded. His work in the disc is brilliant.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Florestan on March 23, 2021, 11:20:59 AM
Some fine music in these two discs:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51IbiwU2V3L.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91k0NX2kcZL._SX450_.jpg)

although whoever came up with the idea of orienting the covers the way they did should be hanged upside down.  ;D

The back covers at least are properly oriented.

(https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3O6QIil9a3k/XAn6HV8oahI/AAAAAAAAPv4/BdzdFT2tbv4n3yC4Ae9TasX-JBFBIGkowCEwYBhgL/s1600/back.jpg)(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Vjf4Sh6DL._SX466_.jpg)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 26, 2021, 04:29:14 PM
Flemish Horn Concerti.
Just accidentally found the disc on Amazon and ordered it. While I don’t know anything about the composers and performer, the music is vivid, picturesque and diverse. Wonderful surprise.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 26, 2021, 05:22:21 PM
Thanks for bringing this out. I have some Meulemans and De Jong, but the other names are totally unknown to me. I’ll explore further.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 26, 2021, 05:35:32 PM
Thanks for bringing this out. I have some Meulemans and De Jong, but the other names are totally unknown to me. I’ll explore further.

Great! Please let me know what you think and what is going on in the recording.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on March 27, 2021, 04:00:09 AM
Robert Herberigs concerto/symphonic poem with horn solo was played and recorded by its dedicatee.

https://www.youtube.com/v/jaNzoida8iI

Herberigs writes very colorfull, brillantly/heavily orchestrated music, using Strauss, Ravel and Debussy et.al.as masters.

The same applies for the other composrers, I'd say, but as their music is hardly ever edited or played and or recorded it is difficult to judge from a few works.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on March 27, 2021, 05:33:44 AM
Great! Please let me know what you think and what is going on in the recording.

My exploration led me to find that it is rare and overpriced  :o.

This label often gets heavily discounted on the market place, so I’ll keep an eye on it.  :)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 02, 2021, 06:12:13 AM
I have been listening to these nice discs this week. Colorful music.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 05, 2021, 04:45:07 AM
If interested, I can send both you and Dry Brett a recording of '"Evocations' a quite early symphonic suite that Frederic Devreese distilled from a radio play 'Willem van Saeftinghe'". But not before early april.....I'll give more details later.
Peter


Peter,
I am glad you sent me the recording. I enjoyed the wonderful, artistic music. While his music is significantly different from that of his father’s generation, the composition is refined and innovative with less folk elements.  The music is energetic and atmospheric. The movements and orchestration are well-structured and highly sophisticated as well. Thanks a lot for sending the music to me. I will routinely listen to this recording.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Roy Bland on April 05, 2021, 05:09:49 AM
Mr.Van Rijen told me that there was cd recorded with his music.I found never.
https://musicalics.com/it/node/485628
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on April 05, 2021, 05:45:48 AM
Hello Roy,

I found this Flemish pdf document :
https://www.arhus.be/uploads/media/16_Ostijn__Willy__folder__2005_01.pdf

It mentions only two cds that were commercially available:

Toccata voor orgel  / orgel Eric Hallein // In : Eric Hallein speelt
symfonische orgelmuziek uit Vlaanderen [ cd ]. – [S.l.] : [s.n.], 1992. – 1 cd. –
CDSE 92124
And, as part of a book, I think:

(https://www.deslegte.com/images/cached/resample/jpg/data/uploads/300/424/cms_visual_1303363.jpg_1577366268000_300x424.jpg)
Drie Vlaamse dansen voor orkest, 1942 [ track ] / Filharmonisch Orkest van de BRT ; dirigent Erik Baeck // In : Lexicon van de muziek in West-Vlaanderen, vol.01 [ cd ] /
Herman Roelstraete, Jules Bouquet, Vic Legley, Elias Gistelinck, Louis De Meester, Willy Ostijn en Jan Decadt. – Kortrijk : Radio 2, [2003?]. – 1 cd. –
LMO1
It will be difficult to track these older issues down.....
Only second hand:
https://untje.com/nl/lexicon-van-de-muziek-in-west-vlaanderen-24319.html

All the other recordings mentioned,  stem from the historical BRT/VRT archives and are not readily available. Some of these are on YT however.
https://youtu.be/14nKl11f0gM
Personally I have nothing by Ostyn. Sometimes his name is written as Ostijn.

Peter
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Roy Bland on April 05, 2021, 03:48:01 PM
Hello Roy,

I found this Flemish pdf document :
https://www.arhus.be/uploads/media/16_Ostijn__Willy__folder__2005_01.pdf

It mentions only two cds that were commercially available:

Toccata voor orgel  / orgel Eric Hallein // In : Eric Hallein speelt
symfonische orgelmuziek uit Vlaanderen [ cd ]. – [S.l.] : [s.n.], 1992. – 1 cd. –
CDSE 92124
And, as part of a book, I think:

(https://www.deslegte.com/images/cached/resample/jpg/data/uploads/300/424/cms_visual_1303363.jpg_1577366268000_300x424.jpg)
Drie Vlaamse dansen voor orkest, 1942 [ track ] / Filharmonisch Orkest van de BRT ; dirigent Erik Baeck // In : Lexicon van de muziek in West-Vlaanderen, vol.01 [ cd ] /
Herman Roelstraete, Jules Bouquet, Vic Legley, Elias Gistelinck, Louis De Meester, Willy Ostijn en Jan Decadt. – Kortrijk : Radio 2, [2003?]. – 1 cd. –
LMO1
It will be difficult to track these older issues down.....
Only second hand:
https://untje.com/nl/lexicon-van-de-muziek-in-west-vlaanderen-24319.html

All the other recordings mentioned,  stem from the historical BRT/VRT archives and are not readily available. Some of these are on YT however.
https://youtu.be/14nKl11f0gM
Personally I have nothing by Ostyn. Sometimes his name is written as Ostijn.

Peter
Thanks! Another belgian composer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhIGHrZrtzI
https://musicalics.com/nl/node/80608
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on April 07, 2021, 05:07:47 AM
Roelstraete is yet another forgotten artist. During his lifetime he had certainly some notoriety in Flanders.
As so many composers of his generation he was too modern for an older generation of listeners and definitely too old fashioned/romantic/tonal for the Pousseur, Goeyvaerts, Boesmans...school.

https://www.svm.be/content/roelstraete-herman?display=biography&language=en
https://matrix-new-music.be/en/publications/flemish-composers-database/roelstraete-herman/
https://ctb.kantl.be/publicaties/herman-roelstraete-thematische-catalogus-van-het-werk (flemish only)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 14, 2021, 05:11:36 AM
Solid performance of August De Boeck and Paul Gilson. Nice coupling and lovely disc.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 14, 2021, 05:15:04 AM
Thank you for the insightful review on the Horn Concerti, Andre.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51E5S7Mx4xL.jpg)

Rather specialized repertoire to be sure but since it exists, why not record it ?  ;D. Horn player André van Driessche was principal in the Belgian Radio Philharmonic, then the Flemish Radio Orchestra and the Brussels Philharmonic. Taught horn playing at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels. He displays a superb technique, producing golden liquid tones or rustic ones at will. Furthermore I think it’s safe to say he knows the works like the back of his hand. All of the composers were fellow Conservatory teachers or conductors in one of the orchestras he played in.

The composers are Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Arthur Meulemans and Marinus de Jong. I only know and have music of, the last two named. Never heard of Herberigs (1886-1974) or van Eechaute (1904-1964) before. Be that as it may, all the music here is really worth listening to. There’s plenty to please and a few surprises. How about an english horn solo to introduce the french horn in the slow movement of the Meulemans concerto? The effect is like watching water mixing with oil. A rather daring coloristic effect. Herberig’s Cyrano de Bergerac is a suite for horn and orchestra, and very entertaining it is !

A fine disc I’m discovering through the good offices of Dry Brett Kavanaugh. Thank you, kind sir !
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: pjme on April 14, 2021, 05:31:32 AM
Cross posted from "what are you listening to":
Rather specialized repertoire to be sure but since it exists, why not record it ?"
Over several decades, the Belgian Ministries of Culture tried to promote some (19th -20th century) composers: LPs (Decca, Cultura) and Cds (BRT/VRT / VAR...) were made, were sent to embassies, were occasionally broadcast and then largely forgotten. Furthermore Belgium is squeezed between two giants, Germany and France, it is divided by a lingual barrier (lots of politico/financial/cultural incidents & struggles) and, over the last decades, the general interest has shifted from (late)romantic music to early / baroque music and all kinds of more contemporary expressions.  Paul Van Nevel, la petite Bande, Collegium Vocale, Philippe Herreweghe, Graindelavoix, Zefiro Torna....Ictus Ensemble, Eric Schleichim,....Etc.

https://classics.flandersartsinstitute.be/who%E2%80%99s-who-classical-music-flanders

The Belgian Radio Philharmonic, then the Flemish Radio Orchestra and the Brussels Philharmonic.
"The Brussels Philharmonic was founded in 1935 by the Belgian public broadcaster (National Broadcasting Institute (NIR/INR - later BRT/BRTN/VRT).
In 1991 the Orchestre Symphonique de la RTBF (the French sister ensemble) was definitively dismantled.
In 1998 the VRT orchestra is detached from the broadcasting organisation and restarts –in 2008 - as Brussels Philharmonic. Michel Tabachnik is followed by Stéphane Denève.
https://www.brusselsphilharmonic.be/en/orchestra

Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Arthur Meulemans and Marinus de Jong.

Of these 4, van Eechaute is the least well known (imho). And forgotten...
https://www.svm.be/content/van-eechaute-prosper?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/MOwRzXiJlsA

Meulemans isn't totally unknown on GMG. Huge oeuvre (cfr Milhaud and Martinu), he wrote in almost every genre, from simple folksy/nationalistic/religious songs, to huge symphonies (15!) operas, oratoria, chamber music, concerti.... As with most his direct contemporaries: too "modern" for his late Romantic teachers, far too romantic & tonal for the 1950-1960 generation. The fact that he kept on working during WWII (out of need to feed his family...), tainted his reputation.
https://www.svm.be/content/meulemans-arthur?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/xPyvE7-qh1c

I rather like Robert Herberigs. A "burgundian, Brueghelian" type, also a writer and a painter... with an apricot plantation in the south of France. What I know of him is big, bold, often very dramatic, very colorfull. The late symphonic poems are all "heavily" orchestrated. He loved Ravel and Richard Strauss. In 1948-1949 he wrote a very monumental score for Het Lam Gods spel - an open air evocation of Van Eyck's Ghent altar piece.
https://www.svm.be/content/herberigs-robert?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/ymkTef8z6BY
Marinus de Jong is my least favorite composer of these 4. He had a profound knowledge of all the technical wizardries of composing... remains quite dull to my ears.
https://www.svm.be/content/de-jong-marinus?display=biography&language=en

https://youtu.be/NqynrD9yMUE
https://youtu.be/32fl7uEl06w
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on April 14, 2021, 07:41:09 AM
Solid performance of August De Boeck and Paul Gilson. Nice coupling and lovely disc.
(https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4977.0;attach=72846;image)

+ 1. I also have De Zee (The Sea) in another version, but I think this one is better.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 15, 2021, 09:56:47 AM

Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Arthur Meulemans and Marinus de Jong.

Of these 4, van Eechaute is the least well known (imho). And forgotten...
https://www.svm.be/content/van-eechaute-prosper?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/MOwRzXiJlsA

Meulemans isn't totally unknown on GMG. Huge oeuvre (cfr Milhaud and Martinu), he wrote in almost every genre, from simple folksy/nationalistic/religious songs, to huge symphonies (15!) operas, oratoria, chamber music, concerti.... As with most his direct contemporaries: too "modern" for his late Romantic teachers, far too romantic & tonal for the 1950-1960 generation. The fact that he kept on working during WWII (out of need to feed his family...), tainted his reputation.
https://www.svm.be/content/meulemans-arthur?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/xPyvE7-qh1c

I rather like Robert Herberigs. A "burgundian, Brueghelian" type, also a writer and a painter... with an apricot plantation in the south of France. What I know of him is big, bold, often very dramatic, very colorfull. The late symphonic poems are all "heavily" orchestrated. He loved Ravel and Richard Strauss. In 1948-1949 he wrote a very monumental score for Het Lam Gods spel - an open air evocation of Van Eyck's Ghent altar piece.
https://www.svm.be/content/herberigs-robert?display=biography&language=en
https://youtu.be/ymkTef8z6BY
Marinus de Jong is my least favorite composer of these 4. He had a profound knowledge of all the technical wizardries of composing... remains quite dull to my ears.
https://www.svm.be/content/de-jong-marinus?display=biography&language=en

https://youtu.be/NqynrD9yMUE
https://youtu.be/32fl7uEl06w


While I liked all the works, I especially enjoyed the works by Herberigs, Meulemans and de Jong. Possibly, the composition by Meulemans could be the strongest. van Eechaute was fine, but the music was broad and abstract. I need to listen to it a few more times.
Now listening to Pages Intimes/ Joseph Jongen. Likable disc.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on April 15, 2021, 11:24:24 AM
Very fine indeed. That label’s discs of Ysaÿe works are excellent, too.
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Florestan on April 15, 2021, 11:30:18 AM
Very fine indeed. That label’s discs of Ysaÿe works are excellent, too.

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4977.msg1356655.html#msg1356655 (https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4977.msg1356655.html#msg1356655)
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: André on April 15, 2021, 11:44:42 AM
These two, plus his opera Piére li houyeû (Pierre the Coal Miner). Beautiful albums in deluxe presentation, too !
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Florestan on April 15, 2021, 11:47:44 AM
Beautiful albums in deluxe presentation, too !

Yep, but the covers are a torture for my Romanian eyes and neck.  :D
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 15, 2021, 12:41:46 PM
Thanks a lot, gents. I don't know the music of Ysaÿe. I will look for the recordings!
Title: Re: Late Romantic music from Belgium / Ning Kam violin
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on May 23, 2021, 06:54:02 PM
I was listening to this recording of A. Meulemans this weekend. Such an exciting and fun music. Glad I bought the disc.