GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 05:55:13 AM

Title: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 05:55:13 AM
There is a thread for Jewish American Composers - but the composer I wished to spotlight today is not American, and I thought there should be a general thread for Jewish composers since there are many from other countries besides the US.

Such as ...

Ödön Pártos : Israeli composer, string player and teacher of Hungarian origin (//http://%C3%96d%C3%B6n%20P%C3%A1rtos%20:%20Israeli%20composer,%20string%20player%20and%20teacher%20of%20Hungarian%20origin)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/oedoen-partos.jpg?w=200&h=300)

Partos arrived in Palestine steeped in contemporary European traditions, particularly those of Bartók and Kodály. From them he had come to see folk music as a source of inspiration and to develop his personal style by enlarging Western tonality through a mixture of modal, oriental and chromatic elements; the best example of his work under their influence is the Concertino for strings (1932).

In 1960 there came a change with Partos's turning towards 12-note technique; this is best exemplified in Tehillim ('Psalms') for string quartet or chamber orchestra and Dmuyot ('Images') for orchestra, both of which date from that year. It is important to stress, however, that his use of 12-note principles was never strict: fragments of three to six notes from the series were often cast as motifs or melodic cells and certain notes were also duplicated at the octave, thus implying a tonal hierarchy.

The complete text and audio examples can be found here (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/01/odon-partos-israeli-composer-string-player-and-teacher-of-hungarian-origin/).
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Jay F on October 01, 2015, 07:48:13 AM
Does Gustav count? I think of him as Jewish, even though he converted.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 08:24:36 AM
Quote from: Jay F on October 01, 2015, 07:48:13 AM
Does Gustav count? I think of him as Jewish, even though he converted.

Of course.

:)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mandryka on October 01, 2015, 09:28:06 AM
Schoenberg of course. And Feldman and Reich and Ligeti and Kurtag. 
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 09:37:49 AM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 01, 2015, 09:28:06 AM
Schoenberg of course. And Feldman and Reich and Ligeti and Kurtag.

Yes.  There are a number of 20th century composers whose Jewish identity may not be widely known.  For example:

Alfred Schnittke
György Ligeti
György Kurtág
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 01, 2015, 11:48:42 AM
I like this CD very much:
[asin]B005H8APRI[/asin]
I also like much of the music by Bloch and Finzi, also the Symphony by Arthur Benjamin. Others include Rudolf Simonsen a Danish/Jewish composer whose 'Zion' and 'Hellas' symphonies I enjoy very much. Weinberg also, especially Symphony 5 and the Piano Quintet.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 12:10:45 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 01, 2015, 11:48:42 AM
I like this CD very much:
[asin]B005H8APRI[/asin]
I also like much of the music by Bloch and Finzi, also the Symphony by Arthur Benjamin. Others include Rudolf Simonsen a Danish/Jewish composer whose 'Zion' and 'Hellas' symphonies I enjoy very much. Weinberg also, especially Symphony 5 and the Piano Quintet.

Thanks.  I only just discovered that Finzi was Jewish and recently posted something (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/gerald-finzi-british-composer/) about him on the anniversary of his death, 9/27.

I will listen to some music by Rudolf Simonsen since his name is new to me.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 01, 2015, 01:27:08 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 01, 2015, 12:10:45 PM
Thanks.  I only just discovered that Finzi was Jewish and recently posted something (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/gerald-finzi-british-composer/) about him on the anniversary of his death, 9/27.

I will listen to some music by Rudolf Simonsen since his name is new to me.
This is a great CD which you are likely to enjoy.
[asin]B001RX3KPG[/asin]
Years ago there was a book and a film called 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' about an Italian Jewish family caught up in the Fascist era in Italy. I think that Finzi was related to that family. His Judaism is a surprise to many listeners I think.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wanderer on October 01, 2015, 02:02:09 PM
Also, Alkan, Korngold, Zemlinsky and Schreker.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2015, 02:42:47 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 01, 2015, 01:27:08 PM
This is a great CD which you are likely to enjoy.
[asin]B001RX3KPG[/asin]
Years ago there was a book and a film called 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' about an Italian Jewish family caught up in the Fascist era in Italy. I think that Finzi was related to that family. His Judaism is a surprise to many listeners I think.

I remember the film.  Thanks for the recommendation.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Scion7 on October 01, 2015, 06:55:58 PM
Religious conversion does not end one being a Jew, only "Jewish."  There are many Christian Jews. And atheist Jews, for that matter.  Now, Jews who follow orthodox Judaism consider a converted Jew to no longer be one, but that's a doctrine, not the scientific definition of ethnicity/nationality.

So Mahler, Mendelssohn, etc., are still Jews.

The contribution of Jewish composers has been pretty amazing to the genre.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wieland on October 01, 2015, 10:57:26 PM
Ernest Bloch is one of my favourite jewish composers, he still is not recognized as much as he should. His five string quartets are a major achievement and are still awaiting a top-notch recording in modern sound. I hope the Swiss Galatea Q will do it, since their recording of some other quartet music is wonderful.
And his symphony c-sharp minor is one of my dearest "genial first attempt" of a young composer. If you don't know it you have to check it out, especially if you are drawn to Mahler, Rott etc.

[asin]B00E3ISHMI[/asin][asin]B005D4Y450[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mandryka on October 02, 2015, 12:38:45 AM
Was Peter Sculthorpe a jew? The reason I ask is that I vaguely remember noticing that he died in a Jewish hospital.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mandryka on October 02, 2015, 12:39:54 AM
Quote from: Scion7 on October 01, 2015, 06:55:58 PM
Religious conversion does not end one being a Jew, only "Jewish."  There are many Christian Jews. And atheist Jews, for that matter.  Now, Jews who follow orthodox Judaism consider a converted Jew to no longer be one, but that's a doctrine, not the scientific definition of ethnicity/nationality.

So Mahler, Mendelssohn, etc., are still Jews.

The contribution of Jewish composers has been pretty amazing to the genre.

How can you stop being a jew? It's not a DNA thing is it?
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Daverz on October 02, 2015, 12:44:16 AM
Karl Goldmark, son of a cantor, who wrote the Rustic Wedding Symphony and a Violin Concerto that Milstein made famous.

Osvaldo Golijov, an Argentinian composer.  I don't know his music; I'll have to remedy that.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wieland on October 02, 2015, 02:27:25 AM
We should not forget those Jewish Composers who vanished in the Nazi death camps:

Hans Krasa
Erwin Schulhoff
Pavel Haas
Viktor Ullmann
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: North Star on October 02, 2015, 02:35:27 AM
Quote from: Wieland on October 02, 2015, 02:27:25 AM
We should not forget those Jewish Composers who vanished in the Nazi death camps:

Hans Krasa
Erwin Schulhoff
Pavel Haas
Viktor Ullmann
And Gideon Klein!!

Władysław Szpilman (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Władysław_Szpilman#Compositions), famous from the movie The Pianist, was also a composer.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2015, 02:59:38 AM
Quote from: Wieland on October 02, 2015, 02:27:25 AM
We should not forget those Jewish Composers who vanished in the Nazi death camps:

Hans Krasa
Erwin Schulhoff
Pavel Haas
Viktor Ullmann

Agreed.  There is this site (http://orelfoundation.org/index.php/site/) which is devoted to remembering composers who either perished or were persecuted during the Holocaust. 
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 02, 2015, 03:40:26 AM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 02, 2015, 12:38:45 AM
Was Peter Sculthorpe a jew? The reason I ask is that I vaguely remember noticing that he died in a Jewish hospital.

If was it would be news to me. Maybe he converted to Judaism? I seriously doubt it --- Sculthorpe wasn't a religious man.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 06:17:41 AM
Quote from: Wieland on October 01, 2015, 10:57:26 PM
Ernest Bloch is one of my favourite jewish composers, he still is not recognized as much as he should. His five string quartets are a major achievement and are still awaiting a top-notch recording in modern sound. I hope the Swiss Galatea Q will do it, since their recording of some other quartet music is wonderful.
And his symphony c-sharp minor is one of my dearest "genial first attempt" of a young composer. If you don't know it you have to check it out, especially if you are drawn to Mahler, Rott etc.

[asin]B00E3ISHMI[/asin][asin]B005D4Y450[/asin]
Me too with Bloch.  :) that early Symphony in C sharp minor has a wonderfully redemptive or doom-laden ending, depending on how you want to look at it. I think that the BIS CD is best but the Naxos and Marco Polo (not the same versions) are excellent too. Schulhoff's 5th Symphony is a terrific score and terribly poignant in view of the circumstances of its creation. If you like Bloch you'll probably enjoy the two Ben-Haim symphonies.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2015, 08:21:53 AM
Jacob Gotlib : experimental chamber and electronic music (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/02/jacob-gotlib-experimental-chamber-and-electronic-music/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/cropped-mk2.png)

Jacob Gotlib was born and raised in Louisville, KY, and has written music for instruments, electronics, dance, and multimedia.

Bio and audio clips here. (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/02/jacob-gotlib-experimental-chamber-and-electronic-music/)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: kishnevi on October 02, 2015, 11:04:22 AM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 02, 2015, 12:39:54 AM
How can you stop being a jew? It's not a DNA thing is it?

By Jewish religious law,  a person who is born to a Jewish mother or who converts according to the standards of religious law* is a Jew unto death.  One may abandon the religion, of course, but that's an individual thing...and one can always repent of the abandonment.   Schonberg is a famous case.   But essentially, once a Jew, always a Jew.  Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn were, according to religious law, fully Jewish, although they were baptized and lived as Christians. (A conversion may be annulled on the grounds the convert turned out not to be sincere, of course.)  The child of a Jewish father and a Gentile mother would need to convert.  So religious standing and ethnicity are not quite the same thing.  Lenny Kravitz has a Jewish father and Gentile mother, and as far as I know never converted.  So while we Jews have a reason to claim him as "one of us", he is not a Jew in the religious sense.  But Israeli law would admit him under the law of return as a Jew, since it goes on an ethnic definition, used in response to the Holocaust.  (Basically, if you were a Jew under the standards of the Nuremberg laws, with at least one Jewish grandparent, you can be accepted as a Jewish immigrant to Israel.)

Sculthorpe's Wikipedia biography gives no hint of being Jewish, beyond his father's name being Joshua, a rather thin reed to lean on.  He want as a child to the local Anglican church grammar school.  If he had a Jewish background, it was thoroughly secularized by the time he was born. 

I don't know what the situation is in the UK, but I imagine Australia is like the US...a hospital is "Jewish" only in the sense that it was started by Jewish doctors or had a significant number of Jewish benefactors who contributed it.  But, especially in a well established hospital,  patients and staff are from all sections of the community, not just Jews.  Catholic affiliated hospitals often have crucifixes in the rooms and a chapel to celebrate Mass on the premises.  Jewish hospitals have none of that.

*what exactly are the standards and who gets to decide if a convert meets them is often the subject of great debate in the US and Israel, since the current Chief Rabbinate of Israel tries to impose very strict standards.  In theory, the child of a woman whose mother or maternal grandmother were Jewish but abandoned the religion would not need to convert because their mother was Jewish by religious law.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Ken B on October 02, 2015, 12:07:19 PM
Quote from: Jay F on October 01, 2015, 07:48:13 AM
Does Gustav count? I think of him as Jewish, even though he converted.

sanantonio
QuoteOf course.

Of course not. Why should I accept David's opinion over Mahler's own on this point?

QuoteBy Jewish religious law,  a person who is born to a Jewish mother or who converts according to the standards of religious law* is a Jew unto death.

If one rejects Judaism one presumably rejects Jewish religious law.

Religions are ideas, not taints. You can be cured.

Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: amw on October 02, 2015, 12:26:16 PM
Judaism is a religion, Jews are an ethnicity. The topic seems to have focused on composers who are ethnically Jewish rather than on composers who practice Judaism (as is fairly clear with the mention of e.g. Mendelssohn, a devout Christian, and other similar examples)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2015, 12:27:43 PM
I created this thread as a place to discuss and post about the music written by Jewish composers; and our favorite recordings of same.  Although the issue of "who is a Jew" might be related I consider it a question outside the parameters of the thread.  Would it be too much to ask that we agree that any composer with Jewish ancestry qualifies for inclusion whether or not he converted?

Thanks,

:)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Todd on October 02, 2015, 01:24:48 PM
Quote from: Jeffrey Smith on October 02, 2015, 11:04:22 AMLenny Kravitz has a Jewish father and Gentile mother, and as far as I know never converted.  So while we Jews have a reason to claim him as "one of us", he is not a Jew in the religious sense.



This calls to mind the great Dave Chappelle skit Racial Draft.



Quote from: amw on October 02, 2015, 12:26:16 PM(as is fairly clear with the mention of e.g. Mendelssohn, a devout Christian, and other similar examples)


Even the definitive online resource for determining celebrity Jewishness is not completely clear on this one. (http://www.jewornotjew.com/profile.jsp?ID=729)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Todd on October 02, 2015, 01:26:10 PM
To the point of the thread, I don't believe Milhaud or Dukas have been mentioned yet.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 01:58:21 PM
Here is some more music I like by Jewish composers:
[asin]B00QSMV30A[/asin]
[asin]B0000045QW[/asin]

Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 02:03:15 PM
And this. Bloch's 'Sacred Service' reminds me a bit of a cross between Vaughan Williams's choral music and Hollywood Epic film scores - but it is one of my favourites:
[asin]B0007KIGGS[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Ken B on October 02, 2015, 02:08:08 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 02, 2015, 12:27:43 PM
I created this thread as a place to discuss and post about the music written by Jewish composers; and our favorite recordings of same.  Although the issue of "who is a Jew" might be related I consider it a question outside the parameters of the thread.  Would it be too much to ask that we agree that any composer with Jewish ancestry qualifies for inclusion whether or not he converted?

Thanks,

:)

Bach is my favourite living composer.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Artem on October 02, 2015, 06:19:45 PM
This book may be fitting for this topic:

(http://yalebooks.co.uk/localjackets/l/9780300154306.jpg)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 10:18:01 PM
Quote from: Artem on October 02, 2015, 06:19:45 PM
This book may be fitting for this topic:

(http://yalebooks.co.uk/localjackets/l/9780300154306.jpg)
Looks very interesting. I also like Korngold's music, especially the Symphony and the short Cello Concerto adapted from the film 'Deception'.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wanderer on October 02, 2015, 11:28:44 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 10:18:01 PM
...and the short Cello Concerto adapted from the film 'Deception'.

I love this concerto, too, and it's a shame it's not performed more often (or at all). My perennial recommendation for it is an extraordinarily alert and passionate rendition by Quirine Viersen (on Arthaus DVD (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Erich-Wolfgang-Korngold-Composers-Time/dp/B00008V60R/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1443856403&sr=8-4&keywords=korngold+dvd)), so far unsurpassed.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mandryka on October 03, 2015, 02:18:31 AM
Quote from: amw on October 02, 2015, 12:26:16 PM
Judaism is a religion, Jews are an ethnicity. The topic seems to have focused on composers who are ethnically Jewish rather than on composers who practice Judaism (as is fairly clear with the mention of e.g. Mendelssohn, a devout Christian, and other similar examples)

The question of what a jew is IMO  unanswerable. The religion offers one answer, but unless you're part of the religion it looks like a completely random answer, silly. There is no gene for jewishness as far as I know. And to say that someone's ethnically jewish would at least require some sort of shared jewish culture/identity, which isn't always the case.

All of this would be harmless timewasting, like making a list of fat composers or something. until someone starts to say things like

Quote from: Scion7 on October 01, 2015, 06:55:58 PM

The contribution of Jewish composers has been pretty amazing to the genre.

There's probably some truth in what Scion7 says -- but to understand it, to move from just noting something vague to explaining a real cultural phenomenon, requires a tighter hold on what Jewishness is.

Imagine "The contribution of fat composers has been pretty amazing to the genre."
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Scion7 on October 03, 2015, 07:27:21 AM
LOL! Of course there's "some truth" in it - if nobody else, Mendelssohn and Mahler and Schoenberg are iconic figures in the genre.  All one has to say is that they are ethnically Jews - which is the topic of the thread.

And there are many others who contributed, if now quite on their level.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 03, 2015, 08:52:13 AM
Quote from: Wanderer on October 02, 2015, 11:28:44 PM
I love this concerto, too, and it's a shame it's not performed more often (or at all). My perennial recommendation for it is an extraordinarily alert and passionate rendition by Quirine Viersen (on Arthaus DVD (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Erich-Wolfgang-Korngold-Composers-Time/dp/B00008V60R/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1443856403&sr=8-4&keywords=korngold+dvd)), so far unsurpassed.
Thanks for the recommendation. I don't know that version at all. I have a recording on Chandos and also one on that fine old RCA film composers series with Charles Gerhardt conducting.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mandryka on October 03, 2015, 09:04:45 AM
Quote from: Scion7 on October 03, 2015, 07:27:21 AM
LOL! Of course there's "some truth" in it - if nobody else, Mendelssohn and Mahler and Schoenberg are iconic figures in the genre.  All one has to say is that they are ethnically Jews - which is the topic of the thread.

And there are many others who contributed, if now quite on their level.

What does "ethnically" mean? I don't mean that to sound agressive but I really don't know.

If someone with a jewish mum denies the faith and lives, always has lived, a gentile lifestyle, is he ethnically a jew? If someone with a goy mum likes eating chopped liver and calling people meshuggah, are they ethnically a jew?
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: chadfeldheimer on October 03, 2015, 09:06:35 AM
Quote from: Scion7 on October 03, 2015, 07:27:21 AM
LOL! Of course there's "some truth" in it - if nobody else, Mendelssohn and Mahler and Schoenberg are iconic figures in the genre.  All one has to say is that they are ethnically Jews - which is the topic of the thread.

And there are many others who contributed, if now quite on their level.
In my opinion Ligeti would fall into the same heavy weight category as Mendelssohn, Mahler, Schoenberg.

Yes the contrubution of Jewish composers to the canon are quite remarkable. Thereby I find the correct definition of jewishness less interesting than the social circumstances that yielded to this. One point may be that in general jews tend to be above average wealthy and edjucated people. But I think this can only be a partial explanation. Maybe back in the time when antisemitism was still prevalent their acceptance in classical music world, was larger than in many other milieus, so that many jews directed there activity to this field. 
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Ken B on October 03, 2015, 11:45:41 AM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 03, 2015, 09:04:45 AM
What does "ethnically" mean? I don't mean that to sound agressive but I really don't know.

If someone with a jewish mum denies the faith and lives, always has lived, a gentile lifestyle, is he ethnically a jew? If someone with a goy mum likes eating chopped liver and calling people meshuggah, are they ethnically a jew?

Indeed. Most posters here are confused on the topic and treat jewishness as a taint that cannot be eradicated, unto the seventh generation. My great great great great grandmother was a catholic so I am a catholic is the implication of most comments here. Asked about catholics anyone can see how foolish the claim is. Simpler and better to be precise about what you are asking. I think sanantonio meant to ask about a cultural tradition and those raised in it.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: amw on October 03, 2015, 02:45:07 PM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 03, 2015, 09:04:45 AM
What does "ethnically" mean? I don't mean that to sound agressive but I really don't know.
Basically that your distant ancestors are likely to have come from the Levant, and you share common genetic features with other Jews (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_studies_of_Jewish_origins). I have no idea why people felt it necessary to do several hundred genetic studies in order to determine whether Jews are ethnically distinct from other groups (basic summary of the results: they are, kinda, though there's been admixture), I mean they probably could have spent some of that time on curing cancer or w/e, but you know.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: kishnevi on October 03, 2015, 06:14:20 PM
Quote from: amw on October 03, 2015, 02:45:07 PM
Basically that your distant ancestors are likely to have come from the Levant, and you share common genetic features with other Jews (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_studies_of_Jewish_origins). I have no idea why people felt it necessary to do several hundred genetic studies in order to determine whether Jews are ethnically distinct from other groups (basic summary of the results: they are, kinda, though there's been admixture), I mean they probably could have spent some of that time on curing cancer or w/e, but you know.
Political reasons, to refute the people who say we are descended from the Khazars and not the biblical Israelites.
Also, to go looking for "lost tribes" in odd places.  There is an African tribe in Uganda (I think) which has a large number of men who carry a genetic marker found in the Jewish priestly case, the Kohenim...meaning they are apparently direct descendants though the male line of Aaron the first High Priest.

Thread duty
Ignaz Brull
Saloman Jadassohn
Salomone Rossi

First two19th century Germany
Rossi c. 1600 Italy
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2015, 06:44:56 PM
Quote from: Jeffrey Smith on October 03, 2015, 06:14:20 PM
Ignaz Brull
Saloman Jadassohn
Salomone Rossi

First two19th century Germany
Rossi c. 1600 Italy

Excellent.  I was trying to remember the 16th century composer, Rossi.  Thanks for posting his name.   Other early Jewish music is from the Sephardic culture.  Jordi Savall has released this recording:

[asin]B00004RBWV[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: kishnevi on October 03, 2015, 07:02:30 PM
I actually started a thread for Rossi
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,19634.0.html

Searching for the thread brought up another name for this thread....Lukas Foss.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2015, 07:17:34 PM
I can't believe that Morton Feldman has not been mentioned yet.  Although he was not observant, his Jewishness figured large in his thinking and inspiration.

Some others:
Stefan Wolpe
Kurt Weill
Karl Weigl

Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: kishnevi on October 03, 2015, 07:29:07 PM
Mandryka mentioned Feldman early on, in reply #4.
But no one seems to have mentioned two very obvious ones:  Copland and Bernstein.

And for a whole subcategory, at least two of them mentioned already in this thread
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israeli_composers
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 03, 2015, 07:30:35 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 03, 2015, 07:17:34 PM
I can't believe that Morton Feldman has not been mentioned yet.  Although he was not observant, his Jewishness figured large in his thinking and inspiration.

Some others:
Stefan Wolpe
Kurt Weill
Karl Weigl

But wouldn't these composers qualify as Jewish American composers? I know Feldman definitely does.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Ken B on October 03, 2015, 07:43:51 PM
Quote from: Mirror Image on October 03, 2015, 07:30:35 PM
But wouldn't these composers qualify as Jewish American composers? I know Feldman definitely does.


Not unless his great great great great great grandmother was American.  He's what she was apparently.  ::)



Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: listener on October 03, 2015, 09:03:08 PM
Charles-Valentin ALKAN - did a few song settings in Hebrew but I think the favourite work generally is Le Festin d'Esope, a delightful set of variations for piano.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Scion7 on October 04, 2015, 12:27:33 AM
Quote from: Jeffrey Smith on October 03, 2015, 06:14:20 PM
Political reasons, to refute the people who say we are descended from the Khazars

Khazars are Turkic people.  Just because one of the many rulers of the Khazar nation (and therefore, those tribes under his authority) adopted Judaism (the religion) centuries ago didn't make them Jews.  And that was pretty much eradicated a long time ago by the adoption of most of them of Islam.

ANYWAY, to get back to the tunes . . .

Alban Berg
Anton Rubenstein
Aaron Copland
Salomon Jadassohn
Karl Ignaz Weigl

. . . and the list goes on!
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: The new erato on October 04, 2015, 01:28:17 AM
George Gershwin
Irving Berlin
Jerome Kern (Showboat being one of the greatest glories of US music)
Kurt Weill
Carol King (born Klein)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 03:21:00 AM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 02, 2015, 06:17:41 AM
Me too with Bloch.  :) that early Symphony in C sharp minor has a wonderfully redemptive or doom-laden ending, depending on how you want to look at it. I think that the BIS CD is best but the Naxos and Marco Polo (not the same versions) are excellent too. Schulhoff's 5th Symphony is a terrific score and terribly poignant in view of the circumstances of its creation. If you like Bloch you'll probably enjoy the two Ben-Haim symphonies.

I recently enjoyed two of Ben-Haim's chamber music works, his early string quintet and the later string quartet No. 1.
I have an old CD with his second symphony Kenneth Alwyn conducting that I however haven't heard in many years. The new cpo recording of symphony 1 is on the list.

[asin]B00HFEBXEG[/asin] [asin]B0002G8QFI[/asin]


Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 03:41:29 AM
Quote from: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 03:21:00 AM
I recently enjoyed two of Ben-Haim's chamber music works, his early string quintet and the later string quartet No. 1.
I have an old CD with his second symphony Kenneth Alwyn conducting that I however haven't heard in many years. The new cpo recording of symphony 1 is on the list.

[asin]B00HFEBXEG[/asin] [asin]B0002G8QFI[/asin]
I have the Chandos CD of Ben Haim's chamber music which I like very much, especially 'Two Landscapes'. The CD you posted looks worth exploring. I like both of his symphonies and also have the Kenneth Alwyn recording and a later Botstein download, including dramatic coughing episode. I also like Steinberg's Second Symphony, an interesting and surprising DGG release. He was the teacher of Shostakovich and the 2nd Symphony has a great redemptive ending. I wish there were recordings of his later symphonies. He married the daughter of Rimsky Korsakov.
[asin]B00005LASB[/asin]
[asin]B00CLFYWF6[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 07:26:56 AM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 03:41:29 AM
I have the Chandos CD of Ben Haim's chamber music which I like very much, especially 'Two Landscapes'. The CD you posted looks worth exploring. I like both of his symphonies and also have the Kenneth Alwyn recording and a later Botstein download, including dramatic coughing episode. I also like Steinberg's Second Symphony, an interesting and surprising DGG release. He was the teacher of Shostakovich and the 2nd Symphony has a great redemptive ending. I wish there were recordings of his later symphonies. He married the daughter of Rimsky Korsakov.
[asin]B00005LASB[/asin]
[asin]B00CLFYWF6[/asin]
Maximilian Steinberg is new to me. However, I just listened to his symphony 4 "Turksib" on youtube which I liked a lot. I have to further explore this composer. Thanks for the suggestion.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 04, 2015, 08:44:11 AM
Quote from: Scion7 on October 04, 2015, 12:27:33 AM
Alban Berg
Anton Rubenstein
Aaron Copland
Salomon Jadassohn
Karl Ignaz Weigl

. . . and the list goes on!

Although Alban Berg was not Jewish, he was persecuted by the Nazis since his music was classified as "degenerate art".
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Scion7 on October 04, 2015, 09:01:45 AM
Ah, right you are.  My memory failed me.   :(
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 10:25:35 AM
Quote from: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 07:26:56 AM
Maximilian Steinberg is new to me. However, I just listened to his symphony 4 "Turksib" on youtube which I liked a lot. I have to further explore this composer. Thanks for the suggestion.
And thanks for letting me know that his Symphony 4 is on YouTube.  :)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 11:32:51 AM
Another CD I enjoy very much:
[asin]B0000C16SJ[/asin]
If you click on the link there are some Amazon reviews.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 04, 2015, 12:07:01 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 11:32:51 AM
Another CD I enjoy very much:
[asin]B0000C16SJ[/asin]
If you click on the link there are some Amazon reviews.

Agreed.  I have the entire collection of the Wellesz symphonies and would wish to also have all of the string quartets.  The Artis Quartett Wien has recorded 3, 4 and 6

[asin]B0018J903U[/asin]

But not the rest. 
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 12:18:36 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 04, 2015, 12:07:01 PM
Agreed.  I have the entire collection of the Wellesz symphonies and would wish to also have all of the string quartets.  The Artis Quartett Wien has recorded 3, 4 and 6

[asin]B0018J903U[/asin]

But not the rest.
How interesting. Which are the best symphonies? I like No.2 'The English' although it does not sound very English at all! It was, I think, a touching tribute to his adopted homeland - a sanctuary away from Nazi persecution. But it is in a more approachable idiom I gather than the later symphonies.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 04, 2015, 12:31:45 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 12:18:36 PM
How interesting. Which are the best symphonies? I like No.2 'The English' although it does not sound very English at all! It was, I think, a touching tribute to his adopted homeland - a sanctuary away from Nazi persecution. But it is in a more approachable idiom I gather than the later symphonies.

It is fairly well accepted that his symphonies can be divided into two groups: 1-4 and 5-9 with the second half of his output exhibiting a different style.  If you like the 2nd, then I would suggest that 3 and 4 would also be enjoyable for you.  However, his later works might be somewhat less to your taste.  I happen to prefer the later works, but enjoy them all.

The disc with 4, 6 and 7 might be a good place for you to try next since it bridges the two stylistic periods.

[asin]B00007J4VB[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 12:38:04 PM
There is a brand-new CD by the Emerson String Quartet with Renee Fleming containing a Wellesz piece  for Soprano and string quartet: Sonnets By Elizabeth Barrett-Browning

[asin]B00UY80FVM[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2015, 12:41:45 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 04, 2015, 12:31:45 PM
It is fairly well accepted that his symphonies can be divided into two groups: 1-4 and 5-9 with the second half of his output exhibiting a different style.  If you like the 2nd, then I would suggest that 3 and 4 would also be enjoyable for you.  However, his later works might be somewhat less to your taste.  I happen to prefer the later works, but enjoy them all.

The disc with 4, 6 and 7 might be a good place for you to try next since it bridges the two stylistic periods.

[asin]B00007J4VB[/asin]
Many thanks.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 04, 2015, 12:44:38 PM
Quote from: Wieland on October 04, 2015, 12:38:04 PM
There is a brand-new CD by the Emerson String Quartet with Renee Fleming containing a Wellesz piece  for Soprano and string quartet: Sonnets By Elizabeth Barrett-Browning

[asin]B00UY80FVM[/asin]

I was listening to it earlier to day.  Very good.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 09, 2015, 07:17:36 AM
Some sources suggest that Saint-Saens was of Jewish origin but he was baptised.
[asin]B00PMSITF8[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 09, 2015, 08:19:25 AM
I do not know if she identifies as Jewish, however her mother is Jewish, and she does use Jewish texts and Hebrew in her compositions.

Roxanna Panufnik : using music to bridge religious differences

Panufnik is the daughter of a Jewish mother and a Polish Catholic father, the composer Sir Andrzej Panufnik; the co-existence of religions and cultures is an essential part of her identity.

QuoteShe says, "there's so much common ground between the monotheistic faiths. Obviously there are some fundamental differences in the way we practice. But I think that too much time and energy is spent on the differences and not enough on the things that we all share. That's what I want to do musically - to highlight those universal elements."

Read more and hear audio samples here. (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/09/roxanna-panufnik-using-music-to-bridge-religious-differences/)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 09, 2015, 09:08:57 AM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 09, 2015, 08:19:25 AM
I do not know if she identifies as Jewish, however her mother is Jewish, and she does use Jewish texts and Hebrew in her compositions.

Roxanna Panufnik : using music to bridge religious differences

Panufnik is the daughter of a Jewish mother and a Polish Catholic father, the composer Sir Andrzej Panufnik; the co-existence of religions and cultures is an essential part of her identity.

Read more and hear audio samples here. (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/09/roxanna-panufnik-using-music-to-bridge-religious-differences/)
I totally agree with her quote.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 12, 2015, 08:30:05 AM
At last, Lukas Foss : Complete Symphonies

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/foss1.jpg?w=339&h=339) (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/12/at-last-lukas-foss-complete-symphonies/)

Released last month by the  Boston Modern Orchestra Project, this 2 disc recording collects all of the symphonies by Lukas Foss.  Even if these were not good performances - they  are - this would be a valuable recording since Foss's symphonies have been unjustly neglected.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Scion7 on October 12, 2015, 07:20:38 PM
That is a very nice cover - would have been great on an LP.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: ComposerOfAvantGarde on October 12, 2015, 09:23:16 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 01, 2015, 09:37:49 AM
Yes.  There are a number of 20th century composers whose Jewish identity may not be widely known.  For example:

Alfred Schnittke
György Ligeti
György Kurtág

Wow! Al and the two Györgys! Big fan here, but I didn't even know this!
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 12, 2015, 11:28:06 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 12, 2015, 08:30:05 AM
At last, Lukas Foss : Complete Symphonies

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/foss1.jpg?w=339&h=339) (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/12/at-last-lukas-foss-complete-symphonies/)

Released last month by the  Boston Modern Orchestra Project, this 2 disc recording collects all of the symphonies by Lukas Foss.  Even if these were not good performances - they  are - this would be a valuable recording since Foss's symphonies have been unjustly neglected.
Oh no! More temptation.  >:D
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 14, 2015, 07:17:10 AM
Alexander von Zemlinsky : combining the divergent tendencies of Brahms and Wagner.

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/zem01.jpg?w=313&h=454) (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/alexander-von-zemlinsky-combining-the-divergent-tendencies-of-brahms-and-wagner/)

Alexander Zemlinsky (October 14, 1871 – March 15, 1942) was one of the most powerful musical voices of his time.  A remarkably influential musician, he had connections with both the more traditional and the Second Viennese School.  Although his work was nearly forgotten after the war, he has recently been recognized as one of the 20th century's significant compositional voices.

https://www.youtube.com/v/JxjBNCnxcqE
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 15, 2015, 07:22:39 AM
Elam Rotem : Early Music performer, scholar and composer

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/rotem1.jpg?w=293&h=314) (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/15/elam-rotem-early-music-performer-scholar-and-composer/)

Since about the mid-19th century, classical music has been governed by a narrative of historical progress. Composers have been taken seriously only if they write in a modern, new-sounding style; composers who continued to write in traditional styles were considered less "important," and when they wrote in frankly historical styles - as when Mendelssohn wrote fugues in the style of Bach - the results were considered exercises or trifles. But with today's expansion of cultural pluralism, that narrative of musical progress is being questioned. A composer can, without losing respect, draw on virtually any style from any era to create something new.

Meet Elam Rotem, a veritable Renaissance man: Rotem is a notable performer of the early Italian Baroque and also a distinguished scholar of the era. That combination is not unusual among early-music specialists, but Rotem adds a third endeavor that is quite rare among his colleagues: he composes ambitious new works.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 21, 2015, 07:50:08 AM
Paul Dessau : Agitprop? No; Abstract music? Yes. (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/paul-dessau-agitprop-no-abstract-music-yes/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/dessau-paul-08.jpg?w=277&h=368)

His politically inspired works have not fared well, today sounding dated, which is true for most political art which generally has a short half life.  However, his purely instrumental (abstract) music is worthwhile.  He wrote seven string quartets which are in an  expressionistic style and well worth hearing.  The complete set has been recorded by the Neues Leipziger Streichquartett  on CPO.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/973/MI0000973983.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Daverz on October 21, 2015, 01:07:47 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 12, 2015, 08:30:05 AM
At last, Lukas Foss : Complete Symphonies
(https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/12/at-last-lukas-foss-complete-symphonies/)

Other than the wonderful Time Cycle, I only recall a Clarinet Concerto and the children's opera Griffelkin.  Looking forward to hearing these symphonies.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 21, 2015, 05:02:16 PM
Quote from: Daverz on October 21, 2015, 01:07:47 PMLooking forward to hearing these symphonies.

+1 I'm looking at my new acquired set right now. 8)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on October 23, 2015, 04:54:07 AM
Miriam Gideon : Composer (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/23/miriam-gideon-composer/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/miriam-gideon.jpg?w=252&h=300)

"As far as I am concerned," she said, "I must see whether what I am writing comes from a musical impulse, and whether I am responding to it. What I write has to mean something to me.... It has to seem new. I have to be surprised by it, and it must register as feeling." "I didn't know I was a woman composer until 'the movement' in the 1960s," she reminisced in the mid-1980s. "I knew I was a young composer, and then, suddenly, an older composer. But never a woman composer."
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Cato on October 23, 2015, 05:32:46 AM
Quote from: sanantonio on October 14, 2015, 07:17:10 AM
Alexander von Zemlinsky : combining the divergent tendencies of Brahms and Wagner.

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/zem01.jpg?w=313&h=454) (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/alexander-von-zemlinsky-combining-the-divergent-tendencies-of-brahms-and-wagner/)

Alexander Zemlinsky (October 14, 1871 – March 15, 1942) was one of the most powerful musical voices of his time.  A remarkably influential musician, he had connections with both the more traditional and the Second Viennese School.  Although his work was nearly forgotten after the war, he has recently been recognized as one of the 20th century's significant compositional voices.

https://www.youtube.com/v/JxjBNCnxcqE

James Conlon has championed Zemlinsky's music, and his recordings are an all-around fave! 

e.g. still available used

[asin]B00000630B[/asin]

[asin]B00000I3V4[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on November 02, 2015, 10:41:58 AM
Yehuda Yannay : composer,conductor, filmmaker and performance artist (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/11/02/yehuda-yannay-composerconductor-filmmaker-and-performance-artist/)

(http://yehudayannay.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/yehuda-yannay.jpeg)

Yannay moved from Romania to Israel in 1951, where he studied with Alexander Uriya Boskovitch, who influenced him greatly. After completing his studies at the Rubin Academy of Music in Tel-Aviv, he pursued postgraduate studies in America, enabled by a Fulbright Fellowship. At Brandeis University (MFA 1966), he studied with Arthur Berger and Ernst Krenek, and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (DMA 1974) he studied with Salvatore Martirano, among others. In 1968 he settled permanently in the USA.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on November 11, 2015, 07:31:02 AM
Aaron Avshalomov : A Jew in China (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/11/11/aaron-avshalomov-a-jew-in-china/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/aaron-avshalomov1.jpg?w=170&h=300)

As early as 1924 Avshalomoff began to study ancient Chinese classical music, folk and temple music and street cries. His own melodies were based on the various pentatonic modes and on the whole-tone scale. Around 1940 he also began to experiment with Indian modes. His Chinese-style melodies were combined with secondary melodic lines, using simple duple or triple metres. At the same time he made full use of the range of Chinese percussion instruments and ornamentation, supporting his pentatonic melodies with interesting chordal harmonies. In orchestration he followed the example of Rimsky-Korsakov and in structure the traditional forms of Western music, although experimenting with remoter modulations in order to add interest to pentatonic melodies, thus creating a highly personal musical language.

Marco Polo Records has released three recordings of his orchestral music. 

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/aaron-avshalomov2.jpg?w=300&h=249)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on November 18, 2015, 12:59:13 PM
I impulse bought this in a shop last week and was delighted to discover it. Maurice Jacobson (1896-1976) is largely unknown but on the strength of this deserves to be heard. I liked all the piano pieces (performed by his son) but the highlights were the moving 'Lament' from 1941 and, above all the 'Theme and Variations' (1943-47) which was originally for orchestra and I'd love to hear the orchestral version too. This, at twenty minutes is by far the longest work on the CD and the most impressive. I have already listened to it three times with increasing enjoyment. The 'Lament' has a rather Bloch-like quality to it but elsewhere the music has echoes of the English pastoral tradition and admirers of Vaughan Williams and John Ireland might well enjoy it. Certainly worth exploring:
[asin]B00JWUX1G4[/asin]
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on November 18, 2015, 01:42:43 PM
Quote from: sanantonio on November 11, 2015, 07:31:02 AM
Aaron Avshalomov : A Jew in China (https://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2015/11/11/aaron-avshalomov-a-jew-in-china/)

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/aaron-avshalomov1.jpg?w=170&h=300)

As early as 1924 Avshalomoff began to study ancient Chinese classical music, folk and temple music and street cries. His own melodies were based on the various pentatonic modes and on the whole-tone scale. Around 1940 he also began to experiment with Indian modes. His Chinese-style melodies were combined with secondary melodic lines, using simple duple or triple metres. At the same time he made full use of the range of Chinese percussion instruments and ornamentation, supporting his pentatonic melodies with interesting chordal harmonies. In orchestration he followed the example of Rimsky-Korsakov and in structure the traditional forms of Western music, although experimenting with remoter modulations in order to add interest to pentatonic melodies, thus creating a highly personal musical language.

Marco Polo Records has released three recordings of his orchestral music. 

(https://musicakaleidoscope.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/aaron-avshalomov2.jpg?w=300&h=249)
I like his 'Chinese-like' First Symphony.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Spineur on May 07, 2016, 01:26:33 PM
Salamone Rossi was an italian jewish composer contempory of Claudio Monteverdi
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamone_Rossi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamone_Rossi)
As Ernest Bloch, he composed some Hebraic music (performed in Synagogue).
Here is his Kaddish
https://www.youtube.com/v/aBBXYsdt8Jk
The style is close to the music composed in his time.
This  Alphabetum Hebraicum composed in the south of France in 1539 is closer to the traditional Sephardic music of Spain.  Simple but moving music.
https://www.youtube.com/v/E3OXV2rviSg

Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 08, 2016, 03:40:49 AM
Quote from: Spineur on May 07, 2016, 01:26:33 PM
Salamone Rossi was an italian jewish composer contempory of Claudio Monteverdi
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamone_Rossi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamone_Rossi)
As Ernest Bloch, he composed some Hebraic music (performed in Synagogue).
Here is his Kaddish
https://www.youtube.com/v/aBBXYsdt8Jk
The style is close to the music composed in his time.
This  Alphabetum Hebraicum composed in the south of France in 1539 is closer to the traditional Sephardic music of Spain.  Simple but moving music.
https://www.youtube.com/v/E3OXV2rviSg
Beautiful music. Thanks for posting. Is the Alphabetum Hebraicum on CD?
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Heck148 on May 08, 2016, 04:16:20 AM
Marc Lavry (December 22, 1903, Riga – March 24, 1967, Haifa) would fit in here as well -

Born in Latvia, emigrated to Palestine in 1936 to escape anti-semitism...
the only work of his that I know is "Emek"....like Bartok and Kodaly, Lavry combined folk and classical styles in his compositions, certainly evident in the tone poem "Emek"
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Cato on May 08, 2016, 04:57:57 AM
Concerning Aaron Avshalomov: Four Biblical Tableaux:


https://www.youtube.com/v/h7buPw68Njo


https://www.youtube.com/v/kxkbusKzi74


https://www.youtube.com/v/SgE460Ulcec

And #4:


https://www.youtube.com/v/Jgewq4xIODQ

Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Cato on May 08, 2016, 05:00:51 AM
Here: #4:

https://www.youtube.com/v/mgjxzjptNqk
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: kishnevi on May 08, 2016, 06:00:16 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on May 08, 2016, 03:40:49 AM
Beautiful music. Thanks for posting. Is the Alphabetum Hebraicum on CD?

"Alphabetum Hebraicum" is really an elementary Hebrew grammar for Christians: you can see it via Google Books. 

The Youtube is apparently a recording of one of the traditional cantillations used to read the Decalogue in synagogue---although of course no form of Jehovah is used,  only Ad-on-ai (the LORD)

And Rossi has his own small thread...
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,19634.0.html
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: snyprrr on May 09, 2016, 06:42:16 AM
hands off the keyboard, snips

oy oy
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 09, 2016, 09:42:21 PM
Quote from: Heck148 on May 08, 2016, 04:16:20 AM
Marc Lavry (December 22, 1903, Riga – March 24, 1967, Haifa) would fit in here as well -

Born in Latvia, emigrated to Palestine in 1936 to escape anti-semitism...
the only work of his that I know is "Emek"....like Bartok and Kodaly, Lavry combined folk and classical styles in his compositions, certainly evident in the tone poem "Emek"
He did well to get out of Latvia when he did. Emek is a very enjoyable work. I'd like to hear more of this composer's music. Here is Emek:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CdDaPtA_3pI
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on May 15, 2022, 06:51:19 AM
A contribution
https://www.academia.edu/26166885/Israelism_Nationalism_Orientalism_and_the_Israeli_Five?email_work_card=title
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Biffo on May 16, 2022, 02:08:29 AM
Quote from: vandermolen on May 09, 2016, 09:42:21 PM
He did well to get out of Latvia when he did. Emek is a very enjoyable work. I'd like to hear more of this composer's music. Here is Emek:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CdDaPtA_3pI

Emek and a few other works are available on Spotify. I briefly previewed Emek and saved it to my library; I will have to come back to it when I have more time.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 16, 2022, 02:43:53 AM
Castelnuovo Tedesco is another Jewish composer whose music I like as is Maximilian Steinberg, especially symphonies 2 and 4. He is best known as the teacher of Shostakovich but I find him to be a very rewarding composer in his own right.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on May 16, 2022, 04:27:49 AM
Quote from: vandermolen on May 16, 2022, 02:43:53 AM
Castelnuovo Tedesco is another Jewish composer whose music I like as is Maximilian Steinberg, especially symphonies 2 and 4. He is best known as the teacher of Shostakovich but I find him to be a very rewarding composer in his own right.
Dear Vandermolen another jew composer persecuted by fascism and sadly neglected was Vittorio Rieti
https://anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2010/6/40-43_CASSARA.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uJ7brc1q-s
Contribution of jewish composers in creation of soviet asiatic music is highly valuable Ashrafi,Gliere.Yudakov.Brussilovsky etcccc......
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 16, 2022, 06:18:02 AM
Quote from: Roy Bland on May 16, 2022, 04:27:49 AM
Dear Vandermolen another jew composer persecuted by fascism and sadly neglected was Vittorio Rieti
https://anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2010/6/40-43_CASSARA.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uJ7brc1q-s
Contribution of jewish composers in creation of soviet asiatic music is highly valuable Ashrafi,Gliere.Yudakov.Brussilovsky etcccc......
Thank you. Unfortunately I can't read Italian  :(
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on May 16, 2022, 05:07:46 PM
Quote from: vandermolen on May 16, 2022, 06:18:02 AM
Thank you. Unfortunately I can't read Italian  :(
He was friend of Sauguet
http://www.bruceduffie.com/rieti.html
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 16, 2022, 10:32:38 PM
Quote from: Roy Bland on May 16, 2022, 05:07:46 PM
He was friend of Sauguet
http://www.bruceduffie.com/rieti.html
Thank you!
Most interesting about the Sauguet connection.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: vandermolen on May 17, 2022, 03:12:21 AM
Another composer whose music I admire:
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Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on May 17, 2022, 05:30:28 AM
This is a fantastic collection of Jewish composers.

Milken Archive of American Jewish Music (https://www.naxos.com/series/milken_archive_of_american_jewish_music.htm)

The Milken Archive comprises the largest collection of American Jewish music ever assembled, featuring such leading artists as the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and Sir Neville Marriner, Yoel Levi, Gerald Schwarz, the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. The Archive's primary goals are to reconstruct and preserve for current and future generations major musical manifestations of the American Jewish experience, and to reveal the intersection of Jewish composers and Jewish subject matter with some of the major genres in Western classical music. The collection has reached a major milestone with the release of the 50th CD in its pioneering recording series for Naxos American Classics.

Title   Catalogue No.
ACHRON: Violin Concerto No. 1 / Golem / 2 Tableaux from Belshazzar   8.559408
ADLER: Symphony No. 5 / Nuptial Scene / The Binding   8.559415
ADOLPHE: Ladino Songs of Love and Suffering / Mikhoels the Wise (excerpt)   8.559413
AMRAM: Songs of the Soul / Shir L'erev Shabbat / The Final Ingredient   8.559420
AVSHALOMOV / SILVER / MEYEROWITZ: Jewish Tone Poems   8.559426
BEN-AMOTS: Celestial Dialogues / Hashkivenu / Shtetl Songs   8.559421
BERLINSKI: Avodat Shabbat (Friday Evening Service)   8.559430
BERLINSKI: From the World of My Father / Shofar Service / Symphonic Visions for Orchestra   8.559446
BERNSTEIN: Jewish Legacy (A)   8.559407
BERNSTEIN: Symphony No. 3, 'Kaddish' / Chichester Psalms   8.559456
BEVERIDGE: Yizkor Requiem   8.559453
BRUBECK: Gates of Justice (The)   8.559414
CASTELNUOVO-TEDESCO: Naomi and Ruth / Sacred Service for the Sabbath Eve   8.559404
DAVIDSON: Singing of Angels (A) / And David Danced Before the Lord   8.559436
DIAMOND: Ahava / Music for Prayer   8.559412
FIRST S'LIHOT (THE): The Entire Midnight Service According to Orthodox and Traditional Ritual   8.559428-29
FOSS: Elegy for Anne Frank / Song of Anguish / BEASER: The Heavenly Feast   8.559438
GENESIS SUITE (1945)   8.559442
GOTTLIEB: Love Songs for Sabbath / Three Candle Blessings / Psalmistry   8.559433
GREAT SONGS OF THE YIDDISH STAGE, VOL. 1   8.559405
GREAT SONGS OF THE YIDDISH STAGE, VOL. 2   8.559432
GREAT SONGS OF THE YIDDISH STAGE, VOL. 3   8.559455
HANUKKA CELEBRATION (A)   8.559410
HELFMAN: Di Naye Hagode   8.559440
IN CELEBRATION OF ISRAEL   8.559461
INTRODUCING THE WORLD OF AMERICAN JEWISH MUSIC   8.559406
JACOBI, F.: Cello Concerto / Hagiographa / Sabbath Evening Service   8.559434
JEWISH MUSIC OF THE DANCE   8.559439
JEWISH OPERAS, VOL. 1   8.559424
JEWISH OPERAS, Vol. 2   8.559450
JEWISH STRING QUARTETS   8.559451
JEWISH VOICES IN THE NEW WORLD   8.559411
KINGSLEY: Voices from the Shadow / Jazz Psalms / Shabbat for Today   8.559435
KLEZMER CONCERTOS AND ENCORES   8.559403
LEVY, M.D.: Masada / Canto de los Marranos (BBC Singers, Barcelona Symphony and Catalonia National Orchestra, Kiesler, Y. Levi)   8.559427
MILHAUD: Service Sacre   8.559409
MILKEN ARCHIVE BOX SET   NMIL51
MILLER, Benzion: Cantor Benzion Miller Sings Cantorial Concert Masterpieces   8.559416
PSALMS OF JOY AND SORROW   8.559445
SACRED SERVICES FROM ISRAEL   8.559452
SCHOENFIELD: Viola Concerto / Four Motets / The Merchant and the Pauper   8.559418
SPIRO, Simon: Traditional Cantorial and Concert Favorites   8.559460
STOCK: Little Miracle (A) / Yizkor / Tekiah / Y'rusha   8.559422
TOCH: Cantata of the Bitter Herbs / Jephta   8.559417
VIENNA BOYS CHOIR: A Jewish Celebration in Song   8.559419
WEILL, K.: Eternal Road (The) (highlights) (T. Christopher, I. DeNolfo, K. Dent, C. Hauman, Ernst Senff Choir, Berlin Radio Symphony, G. Schwarz)   8.559402
WEINBERG: Piano Concerto No. 2 / String Quartet Op. 55 / Shabbat Ba'aretz   8.559457
WEINER: Art of Yiddish Song (The)   8.559443
WEISGALL: T'kiatot / Psalm of the Distant Dove / A Garden Eastward   8.559425
WYNER: Mirror (The) / Passover Offering / Tants un Maysele   8.559423
ZAIMONT: Sacred Service for the Sabbath Evening (excerpts) / A Tale of Abram and Isaac   8.559444
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on May 17, 2022, 05:59:48 AM
I just wanted to remind everyone of the Jewish American thread I started many years ago:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,18101.msg495212.html#msg495212 (https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,18101.msg495212.html#msg495212)
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Florestan on May 18, 2022, 11:36:18 AM
Interestingly enough, the names of the most famous 19C Jewish composers all started with M: Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, Moszkowski, Mahler.  :)

In this respect, Moritz Moskowski (double M!) produced an excellent bon mot. To Hans von Buelow's statement "Bach, Beethoven, Brahms! Tous les autres sont des cretins!" he retorted "Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, Moszkowski! Tous les autres sont des Chretiens!"  :laugh:
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: San Antone on May 18, 2022, 12:18:20 PM
Quote from: Florestan on May 18, 2022, 11:36:18 AM
Interestingly enough, the names of the most famous 19C Jewish composers all started with M: Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, Moszkowski, Mahler.  :)

In this respect, Moritz Moskowski (double M!) produced an excellent bon mot. To Hans von Buelow's statement "Bach, Beethoven, Brahms! Tous les autres sont des cretins!" he retorted "Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, Moszkowski! Tous les autres sont des Chretiens!"  :laugh:

The other day I watched a documentary about Jewish composers and Broadway.  It was demonstrated that almost all of the composers of musical theater in New York were Jewish, with one notable exception of Cole Porter.  However, before Porter was ultimately successful he discovered that what his songs were missing was the "Jewish tinge" and if you analyze his most famous songs you can hear similarities between his melodies and traditional Jewish songs.

Jerome Kern
Irving Berlin
The Gershwins
Harold Arlen
Rodgers & Hart/Hammerstein
Alan Lerner and Frederick Loewe
Jerry Herman
Leonard Bernstein
Stephen Sondheim

The list is very long.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on June 10, 2022, 08:02:09 AM
https://www.academia.edu/8425010/Jewish_Musicians_in_the_Lands_of_Islam_An_Overview?email_work_card=title
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: calyptorhynchus on June 11, 2022, 10:14:32 PM
Quote from: Mandryka on October 02, 2015, 12:38:45 AM
Was Peter Sculthorpe a jew? The reason I ask is that I vaguely remember noticing that he died in a Jewish hospital.

Answering this many moons later.... no he wasn't, it's just his local hospital was originally a Jewish hospital, now non-denominational.
Title: Re: Jewish Composers
Post by: calyptorhynchus on June 11, 2022, 10:21:20 PM
Minna Keal had an interesting life and returned to composition at an advanced age. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minna_Keal (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minna_Keal)

I like her Symphony and her Cello Concerto.