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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 09:12:26 PM »

Great posts, Kyle. The Veress sounds intriguing. I know his two only symphonies and they don't disappoint in my view. Very accesible, though the 2nd has more Modern touches. I listened to Weinberg's 14th following your recommendation and I have to say it is a hell of a work. I don't get the idea why it went unnoticed for me when I listened to it for the first time. Maybe I wasn't as prepared to figure out how it was going to be the music as now? Rather likely, I guess. A superb discovery. Thanks for the heads up!

I'll have to look into Veress' symphonies. Glad you enjoyed the Weinberg - a thought-provoking work to say the least!
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Antikrist certain sounds appealing, John, as I definitely prefer Langgaard's more "advanced/visionary" works as opposed to his more "conservative" ones. Which chamber works of his do you particularly recommend, btw?

One of the most incredible pieces of chamber music I think he's written is Rosengaardsspil for string quartet. Give it a listen:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/RShME_NaotE" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/RShME_NaotE</a>
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 09:05:02 PM »

Thanks for pointing the way to this one, a very interesting work that caught my attention more than any other Weinberg I've yet heard. That second movement certainly leaves a mark on the memory banks. And the last movement seems more like prologue than epilogue to me, in a most intriguing way, noodling around on the brass waiting for the chance to burst gloriously into the arena of self-realisation, but the moment never seeming to come, instead just a kind of collapse into a fog of self-doubt. Very toothsome indeed.

Glad you enjoyed it! Weinberg's 14th Symphony is undoubtedly one of his most striking works that I know.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 09:02:09 PM »
I can certainly understand your sentiments, Kyle, but I have fallen for this composer and I've actually come to regard him as a favorite. This Oramo performance seemed quite fine to me as have the other performances I've heard. I would still say that Music of the Spheres is his crowning achievement in terms of orchestral music. There's nothing quite like it compared to the other works I've heard from him. I'm still in the midst of rediscovering a lot of his music, but one last work I want to mention is his opera Antikrist. This is one hell of a work! I LOVE it. It's Straussian fireworks laced with hallucinogenics. I was quite surprised when I first heard the music, because it was almost symphonic in scope in that the music doesn't take a backseat and felt like an important as the vocals. Do check it out if you haven't already.

Antikrist certain sounds appealing, John, as I definitely prefer Langgaard's more "advanced/visionary" works as opposed to his more "conservative" ones. Which chamber works of his do you particularly recommend, btw?
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The Polling Station / Re: The Fifth: Sibelius or Nielsen?
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 08:58:34 PM »
Kullervo is mandatory for me, but I frankly could go without Luonnotar. Maybe I need an ideal recording to decide more wisely?

Not me! I think it's one of the finest creations for voice and orchestra there is! Truly an exquisite work from start to finnish...errr...finish. ;D
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You should give a try to the Skulte when you can. It's a stunner, a dramatic utterance if you have empathy with works like that.

I will! Of course I have empathy with works in the vein of Tubin and Holmboe. ;)
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The Polling Station / Re: The Fifth: Sibelius or Nielsen?
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 08:57:02 PM »
This thread reminds me I ought to revisit Kullervo... some day, perhaps not tomorrow. It's damn long, I really have to block off some time to listen to it.

And yet, you were listening to Mahler's 8th for what appeared to be several weeks with no such complaints. ;) Kullervo is astonishing piece and I don't care what the naysayers say about it. Give a listen to the Dausgaard performance if you have it. Berglund/Bournemouth on EMI and Neeme Järvi on BIS also receive firm recommendations from me.
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Had to follow up with this:



Béla Bartók: String Quartet No.3, Sz.85. Emerson String Quartet

Man, it's been a great weekend for music listening, for me. I feel like it's been hit after hit. Really enjoying everything. Doesn't always work out like this  ;D
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It’s good you mentioned the Zuiderzee symphony, Kyle. It’s a powerfully evocative work. Jan van Gilse’s no 4 is another excellent work by a Dutch composer.

The qualities of Dopper's Zuiderzee Symphony that really struck me are its sheer tunefulness, color, and even sense of humor (it quotes Handel's Harmonious Blacksmith at one point in the slow movement)! I'll have to check out the van Gilse. It seems there are many excellent Dutch composers who are all but unknown....
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by amw on Today at 08:54:12 PM »
Taking a short break here and put on a Geza Anda CD that I hadn't yet gotten around to listening to.  It's a live CD from Ermitage from 1965 and in quite decent sound.  On it:  Chopin's 12 Etudes, Schumann's Davidsbündlertänze and Schubert's Piano Sonatas in A major, D 664.  Really enjoying the Schumann!  :)
I have two reference recordings of Davidsbündlertänze I usually compare all others to. One is that one. The other is this one. There are many others I go back and forth on, and the ideal recording probably hasn't been made yet, but these are the fixtures for me personally.
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