GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Scriptavolant on May 31, 2007, 07:33:44 AM

Title: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on May 31, 2007, 07:33:44 AM
Gian Francesco Malipiero (1882-1973) belonged to the Generation of the 80s (1880); according to John Waterhouse he has been the most original personality within the group (others were: Casella, Alfano, Respighi, Pizzetti etc.); according to Luigi DallaPiccola he’s the most important Italian musical personality after Giuseppe Verdi. Bruno Maderna cared a lot for his music too, and directed some of his works.

The aims of the Generation of the 80s were to find new ways out of the stalemate caused by the popular veneration of the Italian melodramma; each composer of the group looked for a personal path to achieve new mediums of expression. One could simplify things considering Malipiero a post-romantic (or even anti-romantic) neo-classicist, with sturdy roots in the instrumental Italian tradition of the XVIII Century, and back to madrigalism and polyphonic tradition. His style is the antythesis of traditional development, laying on free motivic inspiration and gregorian monody. A wonderful, desperate and often mocking evocation of ghostly worlds, which may be interpreted as an homage to the loss of ancient Italy splendour (far away from shallow nationalistic issues, that's obvious).
His late works tend to adopt atonal solutions.

I had only two great musical passions so far: Wagner’s Ouvertures (a juvenile love) and Malipiero’s symphonies, which I’d recommend to anyone interested; I know less about his chamber music, but would recommend his String Quartes:

(http://music.brilliantclassics.com/ProductImages/8550.jpg)

and the “Ricercari”

(http://www.rondomagazin.de/klassik/s/strawinsky/cover/is12.jpg)

Along with his piano music as well (attached).

Here’s his naxos page with the complete symphonic cicle recorded by the Moscow Symphony Orchestra and De Almeida.
http://www.naxos.com/composerinfo/655.htm
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: springrite on May 31, 2007, 07:52:36 AM
I have just 3 CDs of his music and, frankly, I find them quite boring. After Verdi and the other opera composers, the first (non-operatic) Italian composer that really tickled my fancy was Dallapiccola.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on May 31, 2007, 07:54:27 AM
An interesting, if uneven, composer. I have most of the Marco Polos, below is my favourite; a great disc:

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.223602

I've just ordered the string quartets. Thanks for raising Malipiero, I also like the paintings by Mantovani (presumably not the band leader!) on the front of thye Marco Polo releases.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on May 31, 2007, 09:48:13 AM
An interesting, if uneven, composer. I have most of the Marco Polos, below is my favourite; a great disc:

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.223602

I've just ordered the string quartets. Thanks for raising Malipiero, I also like the paintings by Mantovani (presumably not the band leader!) on the front of thye Marco Polo releases.

Know what? I was stunned by the beauty of those paintings, especially "Nightfall" (first Cd of the Serie, my favourite). Nevertheless I couldn't find any information on this artist.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on May 31, 2007, 09:55:25 AM
Know what? I was stunned by the beauty of those paintings, especially "Nightfall" (first Cd of the Serie, my favourite). Nevertheless I couldn't find any information on this artist.

They reminded me of paintings by Georgio de Chirico and have the same haunting, poetic quality to them.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Drasko on May 31, 2007, 10:05:08 AM
Probably Alessandro Mantovani (1814-1892)

(http://www.artnet.com/picture.asp?date=20060601&catalog=101738&gallery=110995&lot=00065&filetype=2)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on May 31, 2007, 10:08:45 AM
They reminded me of paintings by Georgio de Chirico and have the same haunting, poetic quality to them.

When I did not know who the painter was, I made the same suggestion, though De Chirico is probably even more surrealistic and abstract.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on May 31, 2007, 10:16:50 PM
I'm sure from my own limited internet research (ie googled the name) that Drasko is right but I assumed that Mantovani was a more recent artist. I must try to find out more. Certainly, he seems like a forerunner of Surrealism.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on June 01, 2007, 12:41:32 PM
Mmm..I'm sceptical, and think too he's a more recent artist.

If you look at this painting:
http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.223696

You'll see that the building on the left of the praying woman is pretty obviously of modern making (I'd say 1950s-1960s). You can even see the window's blind.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Drasko on June 01, 2007, 07:41:02 PM
Could be Adelchi Riccardo Mantovani
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on June 02, 2007, 06:31:47 AM
Yes! Most probably that's the guy.

(http://www.berlin-mit-stil.de/m/Bilder/n02.jpg)

The style is pretty similar and marvelous. Thanx Drasko!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on June 07, 2007, 04:59:35 AM
Gian Francesco Malipiero (1882-1973) belonged to the Generation of the 80s (1880); according to John Waterhouse he has been the most original personality within the group (others were: Casella, Alfano, Respighi, Pizzetti etc.); according to Luigi DallaPiccola he’s the most important Italian musical personality after Giuseppe Verdi. Bruno Maderna cared a lot for his music too, and directed some of his works.

The aims of the Generation of the 80s were to find new ways out of the stalemate caused by the popular veneration of the Italian melodramma; each composer of the group looked for a personal path to achieve new mediums of expression. One could simplify things considering Malipiero a post-romantic (or even anti-romantic) neo-classicist, with sturdy roots in the instrumental Italian tradition of the XVIII Century, and back to madrigalism and polyphonic tradition. His style is the antythesis of traditional development, laying on free motivic inspiration and gregorian monody. A wonderful, desperate and often mocking evocation of ghostly worlds, which may be interpreted as an homage to the loss of ancient Italy splendour (far away from shallow nationalistic issues, that's obvious).
His late works tend to adopt atonal solutions.

I had only two great musical passions so far: Wagner’s Ouvertures (a juvenile love) and Malipiero’s symphonies, which I’d recommend to anyone interested; I know less about his chamber music, but would recommend his String Quartes:

(http://music.brilliantclassics.com/ProductImages/8550.jpg)

and the “Ricercari”

(http://www.rondomagazin.de/klassik/s/strawinsky/cover/is12.jpg)

Along with his piano music as well (attached).

Here’s his naxos page with the complete symphonic cicle recorded by the Moscow Symphony Orchestra and De Almeida.
http://www.naxos.com/composerinfo/655.htm


I just bought the sting quartets thanks to your recommendation and thought them to be absolutely excellent, my favourite being No 5 but they are all great.  I enjoyed the double CD set so much that I listened to all eight string quartets consecutively (the longest is only about 20 mins). In some ways, I think that these are finer works than some of the symphonies. A great find and well-packaged and great value on Brilliant Classics.

So thank you for the recommendation.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on June 07, 2007, 08:06:34 AM
Oh, you're welcome. I'm glad you've enjoyed his SQs, I've not been listening to them for a while, but remember my preference went to No. 2 "Stornelli e Ballate", based on popular songs. I'm still waiting for the Brilliant Box to arrive, I did already have the edition on the ASV label.
I would really like to know your impressions on the symphonies if you have any, and which one you consider less fine (I think Malipiero's atonality is not particularly inspired or maybe I'm just unable to understand it).

If you happen to be interested in his piano works (attached in the OP), I've put the files on sharing some time ago and you still can find them in peer to peer.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: karlhenning on June 07, 2007, 08:32:10 AM
Come on!  He's really from Arkansas, right? (Little Rock . . . .)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: karlhenning on June 07, 2007, 09:50:38 AM
Just kidding!

I need to get to listening to Malipiero.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scriptavolant on June 07, 2007, 10:13:26 AM
Just kidding!

(http://www.vocinelweb.it/faccine/mad/48.gif)

JUst to have some tasting you could start by listening to some sample on the naxos website.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on June 07, 2007, 11:04:15 PM
Oh, you're welcome. I'm glad you've enjoyed his SQs, I've not been listening to them for a while, but remember my preference went to No. 2 "Stornelli e Ballate", based on popular songs. I'm still waiting for the Brilliant Box to arrive, I did already have the edition on the ASV label.
I would really like to know your impressions on the symphonies if you have any, and which one you consider less fine (I think Malipiero's atonality is not particularly inspired or maybe I'm just unable to understand it).

If you happen to be interested in his piano works (attached in the OP), I've put the files on sharing some time ago and you still can find them in peer to peer.

I especially like the Marco Polo CD with Sinfonia del Mare and symphonies 3 and 4 but I have not got to grips with the others (Zodiac Symphony, for example), I have about three other Marco Polo CDs with the symphonies and have just ordered his Piano Concerto 3 on a different label. I intend to have another go at the symphonies and will report back in due course.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on August 21, 2007, 03:15:16 PM
CPO has just announced the forthcoming release of a two CD set of Malipiero's 6 Piano Concerti. That is certainly enterprising of them!
There is an old Louisville Orchestra performance from 1960 of Piano Concerto No.3 with Benjamin Owen as soloist. I remember thinking that it was a rather dry piece but I still reckon that I will have to give this new set a go!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 22, 2009, 12:14:25 PM
Woefully underfunded thread...

A) WARNING: Get the SQs 1-8 on Dynamic, not Brilliant. If you really like these SQs, the bright, tight Dynamic recording makes these SQs really really more Italian...trust me 0:)...and the Venice based quartet really has these things locked down. Very improvisatory.

B)SYMPHONIES: I heard No.3 and No.4 were the pinnacle, but I felt each was done in by a very stompy noisy finale (the slow mvmts however are heavenly). The Marco Polo w/No.7 and the Sym. de Antigonia? became my fav. No.7 has all the rustic beauty of the others, but the finale isn't quite as...I'll say bombastic. And the Antigonia Sym. is probably the best of the unnumbered syms. I also have the string sym, No.6 (on Denon w/Rota and a great piece by Morricone).

I have a rare Nuevo Era cd with Grottesco, Cello Cto, Ricercare, and Dialogo No.1? and this cd shows up Malipiero's 1920's clanky, quirky stuff to great effect. S. Palm plays the Cto. Very Milhaud-y, but a bit cranky-er. Great fun. Great cd. There is a companion disc in this series, a 2cd set of Casella by the same troupe.

C)CHAMBER: Besides the quirky SQs, I have a Dischi Recordi cd w/Sonata a tre (piano trio), Sonata a cinq (fl,hrp,str),wind qnt Dialogo, and SQ NO.8. The piano trio from @1920 IS a masterpiece IMHO. Again, all good fun here.

And Stradivarius has released all the Dialoghi (though the 2 or 3 I have suffice) and a 2-cd set of chamber music called Endecatode?. This would be the only other Malipiero disc I feel I would "neeeed" as it seems like a veritable treasure chest (and no duplications, I believe).

Malipiero's language hardened in the 50s-60s (like Chavez, Rawsthorne, Bloch, and other composers of the generation), but I really like his version of crankiness.

But the SQs really are some of the most chipper, cheerful, exhuberantly melodic and rhapsodic and quirky SQs I know. No one sounds like these SQs. It's like he keeps writing the same SQ over and over, in a good way, and they are so infectious. But please spend the $$$ and get the Dynamic recording.

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on April 24, 2009, 01:36:34 AM
Woefully underfunded thread...

A) WARNING: Get the SQs 1-8 on Dynamic, not Brilliant. If you really like these SQs, the bright, tight Dynamic recording makes these SQs really really more Italian...trust me 0:)...and the Venice based quartet really has these things locked down. Very improvisatory.

B)SYMPHONIES: I heard No.3 and No.4 were the pinnacle, but I felt each was done in by a very stompy noisy finale (the slow mvmts however are heavenly). The Marco Polo w/No.7 and the Sym. de Antigonia? became my fav. No.7 has all the rustic beauty of the others, but the finale isn't quite as...I'll say bombastic. And the Antigonia Sym. is probably the best of the unnumbered syms. I also have the string sym, No.6 (on Denon w/Rota and a great piece by Morricone).

I have a rare Nuevo Era cd with Grottesco, Cello Cto, Ricercare, and Dialogo No.1? and this cd shows up Malipiero's 1920's clanky, quirky stuff to great effect. S. Palm plays the Cto. Very Milhaud-y, but a bit cranky-er. Great fun. Great cd. There is a companion disc in this series, a 2cd set of Casella by the same troupe.

C)CHAMBER: Besides the quirky SQs, I have a Dischi Recordi cd w/Sonata a tre (piano trio), Sonata a cinq (fl,hrp,str),wind qnt Dialogo, and SQ NO.8. The piano trio from @1920 IS a masterpiece IMHO. Again, all good fun here.

And Stradivarius has released all the Dialoghi (though the 2 or 3 I have suffice) and a 2-cd set of chamber music called Endecatode?. This would be the only other Malipiero disc I feel I would "neeeed" as it seems like a veritable treasure chest (and no duplications, I believe).

Malipiero's language hardened in the 50s-60s (like Chavez, Rawsthorne, Bloch, and other composers of the generation), but I really like his version of crankiness.

But the SQs really are some of the most chipper, cheerful, exhuberantly melodic and rhapsodic and quirky SQs I know. No one sounds like these SQs. It's like he keeps writing the same SQ over and over, in a good way, and they are so infectious. But please spend the $$$ and get the Dynamic recording.



Interesting points.  Have just ordered this CD, which features Mitropolous conducting Malipiero's 7th Symphony.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on April 24, 2009, 05:58:22 AM
Many thanks, snyprrr, for the heads up about the Nuovo Era cd of the Cello Concerto and Grottesca :)

I have just managed to find a copy on Amazon for around £15(other dealers were asking £72!) and have duly ordered it ;D
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 24, 2009, 07:01:46 AM
Woefully underfunded thread...

A) WARNING: Get the SQs 1-8 on Dynamic, not Brilliant. If you really like these SQs, the bright, tight Dynamic recording makes these SQs really really more Italian...trust me 0:)...and the Venice based quartet really has these things locked down. Very improvisatory.........


Snyprrr - at the moment, I have no Malipiero recordings in my collection, but had put in an order to MDT a week or so ago for the Complete String Quartets on the Brilliant label; unfortunately (or fortunately after reading your comments above?), the 2-CD set is OUT OF STOCK!

Thus, I could easily cancel the order, and consider the one suggested by you on the Dynamic label (assume the pic, left shown below); however, the 'used' asking price on the Amazon Marketplace is $50+ - just too steep, unless 'someone' knows of a less expensive option?  Now ClassicsOnline (http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue/product.aspx?pid=532919) is offering the set as an MP3 download for $20, but no liner notes -  :-\

Your review is indeed encouraging, but I'm wondering if you have listened to the Brilliant set as a comparison?  If not, I would be curious if anyone else may have had the opportunity to compare both sets?

Now, the set (below, middle) w/ the Orpheus SQ, released in 1991 that received a superlative review on Music on the Web (http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/quartetti2/malipiero.htm); assume the same recordings that were used on the Brilliant release, so what to do?  Thanks all -  :)

(http://smallfiles.classicsonline.com/images/cds/CDS168.gif)  (http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/quartetti2/malipiero.jpg)  (http://static.rateyourmusic.com/album_images/3fbce3b91af17a6a1679dfd735d6919d/860179.jpg)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: nut-job on April 24, 2009, 07:18:01 AM
Snyprrr - at the moment, I have no Malipiero recordings in my collection, but had put in an order to MDT a week or so ago for the Complete String Quartets on the Brilliant label; unfortunately (or fortunately after reading your comments above?), the 2-CD set is OUT OF STOCK!

Thus, I could easily cancel the order, and consider the one suggested by you on the Dynamic label (assume the pic, left shown below); however, the 'used' asking price on the Amazon Marketplace is $50+ - just too steep, unless 'someone' knows of a less expensive option?  Now ClassicsOnline (http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue/product.aspx?pid=532919) is offering the set as an MP3 download for $20, but no liner notes -  :-\

Your review is indeed encouraging, but I'm wondering if you have listened to the Brilliant set as a comparison?  If not, I would be curious if anyone else may have had the opportunity to compare both sets?

Now, the set (below, right) w/ the Orpheus SQ, released in 1991 that received a superlative review on Music on the Web (http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/quartetti2/malipiero.htm); assume the same recordings that were used on the Brilliant release, so what to do?  Thanks all -  :)

(http://smallfiles.classicsonline.com/images/cds/CDS168.gif)  (http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/quartetti2/malipiero.jpg)


The Brilliant Classics set is a clone of the Orpheus set on ASV, available for nine bucks on Amazon marketplace.

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-String-Quartet-Malipiero/dp/B000WC386Y/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1240589641&sr=1-3

You can also consider the Piano Concerti.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51fo-rXYK-L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

2 hyprid SACDs, street price $18.  I found the first one very charming, the last one dismal, and the ones in between a linear extrapolation between the two.  I'm not sure if the music declined in quality of if I just got tired of it.  I should listen in reverse order next time.

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 24, 2009, 07:20:37 AM
The Brilliant Classics set is a clone of the Orpheus set on ASV, available for nine bucks on Amazon marketplace.


LOL -  ;D  Just realized that and altered my previous post for that reason; thanks - now even a more interesting comparison for me!  Dave  :)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: karlhenning on April 24, 2009, 07:22:03 AM
2 hyprid SACDs

Typo of the Month!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: nut-job on April 24, 2009, 09:02:46 AM
Typo of the Month!

As far as I know hyprid is not a word and has no widely known slang meaning, so it seems like a boring typo to me.   I even Googled it to see if anything horribly indecent came up, and nothing.  ???
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: karlhenning on April 24, 2009, 09:37:06 AM
As far as I know hyprid is not a word and has no widely known slang meaning, so it seems like a boring typo to me.   I even Googled it to see if anything horribly indecent came up, and nothing.  ???

Well, you mistake me if you think I should have exulted in a typo for any indecent suggestion!

How I read it (not that you intended it so) is:

hype + hybrid = hyprid
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: nut-job on April 24, 2009, 09:50:32 AM
Well, you mistake me if you think I should have exulted in a typo for any indecent suggestion!

How I read it (not that you intended it so) is:

hype + hybrid = hyprid

Well, I expect to see this thread cited in the OED as first usage of the term.
 8)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 24, 2009, 11:41:49 AM
I haven't heard the Orpheus, but I had just read an Amazon review by someone who had both, and they were the ones who noticed that the particular acoustics of the Dynamic set really brought a certain bright quality to the music...a quality which I truly hear in my Dynamic set...kind of like recording in a white marble room on a sunny Italian day.  Even if the Orpheus recording is "good", I do believe you will be getting something extra special with the Dynamic. I do not know of any SQ recording that has such a particular acoustic, so perfect for Malipiero's joyous, bubbly, bouncy music.

As far as performance goes, I've got to believe that the Venice quartet bring something more Italian to the table. I admit I make a few assumptions, but however, that Amazon reviewer who has both sets seems to be as bowled as I am.

I am hoping someone can second my enthusiasm. Here, here!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 24, 2009, 01:09:07 PM
I haven't heard the Orpheus, but I had just read an Amazon review by someone who had both, and they were the ones who noticed that the particular acoustics of the Dynamic set really brought a certain bright quality to the music...a quality which I truly hear in my Dynamic set...kind of like recording in a white marble room on a sunny Italian day..............

Snyprrr - thanks for the additional comments; doubt the MDT will come through w/ that OUT OF STOCK order any time soon, so can wait - when I get some time on one of my other than laptop computers, will listen to some 'snippets' from the available sites (never convinced that this is the best way to compare - the quality is just often not there); but I hope others may provide some more aural observations - Dave  :D
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: nut-job on April 24, 2009, 01:12:16 PM
I haven't heard the Orpheus, but I had just read an Amazon review by someone who had both, and they were the ones who noticed that the particular acoustics of the Dynamic set really brought a certain bright quality to the music...a quality which I truly hear in my Dynamic set...kind of like recording in a white marble room on a sunny Italian day.  Even if the Orpheus recording is "good", I do believe you will be getting something extra special with the Dynamic. I do not know of any SQ recording that has such a particular acoustic, so perfect for Malipiero's joyous, bubbly, bouncy music.

As far as performance goes, I've got to believe that the Venice quartet bring something more Italian to the table. I admit I make a few assumptions, but however, that Amazon reviewer who has both sets seems to be as bowled as I am.

I am hoping someone can second my enthusiasm. Here, here!

Not interested.  The set is listed as discontinued on Amazon, doesn't seem to be listed on UK sites, I'm not going to pay $150 for a CD out of curiosity about a second rate composer.  With the Italian musicians comes the Italian administrative incompetence of an Italian record label.  I've been trying to get a DVD from Dynamic, a new release which has been on backorder for a month at least.   In this economy, the half-wits can't even ship a new release to customers waiting in the US, what hope do we have?

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on April 24, 2009, 01:41:46 PM
The Brilliant Classics set is a clone of the Orpheus set on ASV, available for nine bucks on Amazon marketplace.

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-String-Quartet-Malipiero/dp/B000WC386Y/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1240589641&sr=1-3

You can also consider the Piano Concerti.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51fo-rXYK-L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

2 hyprid SACDs, street price $18.  I found the first one very charming, the last one dismal, and the ones in between a linear extrapolation between the two.  I'm not sure if the music declined in quality of if I just got tired of it.  I should listen in reverse order next time.



I made the mistake of listening to the Malipiero Piano Concertos one after the other. Not recommended!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: nut-job on April 24, 2009, 03:35:01 PM
I made the mistake of listening to the Malipiero Piano Concertos one after the other. Not recommended!

Yes, it's deja vu all over again!.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: karlhenning on April 24, 2009, 03:58:25 PM
I made the mistake of listening to the Malipiero Piano Concertos one after the other. Not recommended!

Yes, I should mix things up.

Listen to a little Henning in between, perhaps  8)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on April 24, 2009, 04:30:15 PM
Yes, I should mix things up.

Listen to a little Henning in between, perhaps  8)

Probably a better idea than interspersing the Malipiero concertos with those by Darius Milhaud ;D
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on November 20, 2010, 07:39:17 PM
BUMP!!! :D
 
I bought all the Naxos re-relases so far. I'm looking to exploring this composer in depth. A general question for everybody, what are your favorite works by Malipiero?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on November 21, 2010, 02:25:33 AM
BUMP!!! :D
 
I bought all the Naxos re-relases so far. I'm looking to exploring this composer in depth. A general question for everybody, what are your favorite works by Malipiero?

Symphony 3 and 4 (Naxos), Symphony 7 (Marco Polo) SQ No 5.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on November 24, 2010, 09:37:58 AM
BUMP!!! :D
 
I bought all the Naxos re-relases so far. I'm looking to exploring this composer in depth. A general question for everybody, what are your favorite works by Malipiero?

If you get the SQs, be sure to get the one on Dynamic.

Sym No.7 would be my fav there. And, I like the Symphony di Antigonia (?), on the same cd. I generally liked 3 & 4, but thought they were both let down by a rather bombastic Finale. No.7 was the smoothest I had heard.

I have a chamber disc on Ricordi, including a great Piano Trio, flute/harp/string trio Quintet, ww quintet, and SQ 8.

I haven't yet heard the 2cd "Endecatode"?? on Stradivarius, but that seems to fill out the chamber arena.

I have an interesting cd on Nuevo Era, including a Grottesco for orch, a Cello Concerto, and so forth.

Piano wise, I think he's got a lot of stuff, but I haven't heard it.



Start with the SQs,... on Dynamic, of course!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2010, 08:03:51 PM
If you get the SQs, be sure to get the one on Dynamic.

Sym No.7 would be my fav there. And, I like the Symphony di Antigonia (?), on the same cd. I generally liked 3 & 4, but thought they were both let down by a rather bombastic Finale. No.7 was the smoothest I had heard.

I have a chamber disc on Ricordi, including a great Piano Trio, flute/harp/string trio Quintet, ww quintet, and SQ 8.

I haven't yet heard the 2cd "Endecatode"?? on Stradivarius, but that seems to fill out the chamber arena.

I have an interesting cd on Nuevo Era, including a Grottesco for orch, a Cello Concerto, and so forth.

Piano wise, I think he's got a lot of stuff, but I haven't heard it.



Start with the SQs,... on Dynamic, of course!

Seeing as I'm into orchestral music, I probably won't be looking into the chamber music at all. I seldom listen to this genre, but I do have a few favorite chamber pieces, I just prefer a larger sound pallette for classical music. My own personal limitation/preference whatever you want to call it.
 
This said, the last Naxos re-release of the symphony series will be released next month.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on December 30, 2010, 08:50:34 PM
There are about three discs of GCM's Piano Music. Is anyone familiar? There are some macabre titles, very tempting. There's also a whole disc of Violin&Piano, and a Complete Cello Music plus Piano Muisc cd.

I have the Piano Trio, so, any further exploration would probably MAKE me have to buy all the cds just mentioned, which, I am NOT allowed to do. ;)

Also, that 'Endecatode' cd from Stradivarius looks kinda interesting.

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on January 03, 2011, 08:44:06 AM
There are about three discs of GCM's Piano Music. Is anyone familiar? There are some macabre titles, very tempting. There's also a whole disc of Violin&Piano, and a Complete Cello Music plus Piano Muisc cd.

I have the Piano Trio, so, any further exploration would probably MAKE me have to buy all the cds just mentioned, which, I am NOT allowed to do. ;)

Also, that 'Endecatode' cd from Stradivarius looks kinda interesting.

No one familiar with GFM piano music?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on January 04, 2011, 10:34:11 PM
No one familiar with GFM piano music?

Well, I went ahead and listened to some samples, and I like his laconic style here in the piano music. There is also a Fabio Biondi cd of violin and piano music that sounds great, but isn't going for less the $70 anywhere in the amazon world. Add in the cello music cd, and the Piano Trio (Sonata a Tre), and poof!, you've got quite a nice chamber appendix! Uselessly expensive, though.

There is also a cd of piano music recorded in 1968 that is also in the stratosphere. oh well...

Listen to those Biondi samples! ;)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on July 28, 2011, 06:50:00 AM
Moving on from a composer who wrote twenty-one symphonies after he reached the age of 80(Havergal Brian) to one who wrote a mere four in his eighties.......

Malipiero.

Very glad to see on the Naxos forthcoming cds listings that some highly regarded(at least by the composer himself :D) early Malipiero works are being released at the end of August:

Impressioni dal vero
- the three part work(1910-1922) written in Impressionistic style which reflects the composer's love of nature and

Pause del Silenzio: Malipiero's reflections on the horrors of World War One(1917).

Malipiero regarded the latter work as one of his most important creations.

The absence of all of these pieces from the catalogue has been an omission which good old Naxos is finally rectifying.

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Naxos/8572409
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: The new erato on July 28, 2011, 08:32:10 AM
Seems that Naxos really is getting their series of modern (relatively) Italian Music going, and extremely valuable (and long overdue) it seems. Cannot see myself not buyin any of these issues.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 28, 2011, 09:30:57 AM

Malipiero regarded the latter work as one of his most important creations.


Yes!

I was recently listening to the 'Latter' Symphonies (8-12), and I really enjoy his cragginess. I haven't heard much Brian, but I'm assuming that there's a link here. GFM's Late Works I find perfectly charming, in an 80-year-old grumpy kind of way. Surely I must like Brian too.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Lethevich on July 28, 2011, 09:36:05 AM
I was recently listening to the 'Latter' Symphonies (8-12), and I really enjoy his cragginess. I haven't heard much Brian, but I'm assuming that there's a link here. GFM's Late Works I find perfectly charming, in an 80-year-old grumpy kind of way. Surely I must like Brian too.

He was the only composer I could consider comparison with when I first heard Brian - the lack of lengthy melodies, the restless progression within concise movements, there are distinct similarities. I find Malipiero a more conventional figure, both in his style and also attitude towards composition, though.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum: Complete Music for Piano & Strings
Post by: snyprrr on September 07, 2011, 05:59:47 AM
I'm looking at these two cds:

"Complete Music for Violin and Piano" (Opus 111)

"Complete Music for Cello and Piano" (Tactus)


Haha,... there are three other Composers on the first album, and the second is dominated by Piano Music, meaning,.... especially in the first (where the advertised music runs to only about 20% of the cd),... there might be a bit of PR going on. ::)

The Tactus album has a Sonata, a Sonatina, and an encore that also ends up on the violin disc by way of transcription. The violin disc has four separate pieces, which are complemented by pieces by Respighi, Pizzetti, and Casella.


I have to tell you that when I saw the Fabio Biondi recital, I felt as if I'd been had. The cd itself says it's Malipiero's Complete blah blah, which it is!, but, Malipiero's output is so modest that Pizzetti ends up being the big winner on this album. Actually, I'm being unfair, because this is a great album of the evolution Romanticism. These Italians brought something of the singing line, and freedom, to the tyranny of sonata form. This is actually a very nice rainy day album, beautifully played and recorded.


I don't have the cello disc :-[ ;D, but, I would expect the Sonata to be interesting. I have his Sonata a Tre for Piano Trio, which certainly belongs in the canon (piano solo in the third movement, with two extra, silent, staves). He has no Piano Quintet (certainly it would have ever been coupled with the Martinu), which means, that, if we then include his 'Complete Piano Music' (about 3 cds worth), I think we have the picture of Malipiero's 'Complete Music for Piano & Strings'.




Then, all we need to include are the 'Dialoghis', and the very nice selection of Chamber Music proper, the ensemble pieces in which Malipiero's tickling yields the most scintillating results: the Sonata a Cinque for the hallowed flute, harp, & string trio combination, and the pieces collected on the Stradivarius cd 'Endecatode', quirky and charming. Malipiero has a deceivingly complicated Works List, and I don't know if I've seen Grove's yet on him (go to the library...), but, ultimately, I think what we have in this Post is most/all of the Chamber Music.

There are, then, a few transitional type works, which, I believe, have been recorded, that lead to his Orchestral Works, and the, I believe we're home free! Malipiero and Milhaud do have a lot in common, not least that it is fun getting to the bottom of it all,... at least, haha, for me. Perhaps neither Composer is to everyone's taste, but, I'm sure the connesoor :-* can find examples of the sublime in both.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Dundonnell on September 22, 2011, 01:31:15 PM
I have to say that the new Naxos disc of relatively early Malipiero orchestral music demonstrates to my ears a composer of supreme quality and inventiveness. I am extremely impressed by all five works on the disc(8.572409).

"Impressioni dal vero I"(1910-11) are indeed highly impressionistic, betraying the influence of Debussy and would strongly appeal, I suspect, to all lovers of Delius.
"Impressioni dal vero II"(1914-15) and "Impressioni dal vero III"(1921-22) on the other hand are vigorous. energetic pieces reminiscent of the Stravinsky of Petrushka and the Rite of Spring but combined with strong echos of the Respighi of the Fountains and Pines of Rome. Each of the three sets has three movements inspired rather than directly depicting particular birds and scenes of Italian life such as festivals or (particularly impressive) the first movement of set II-'Dialogue of Bells'.

Even better however and with claims, as made by David Gallagher in his as usual excellent booklet notes, to be Malipiero at his greatest are the two pieces known, somewhat enigmatically, as "Pause del silenzio I"(1917) and "Pause del silenzio II"(1925-26). The first advances Malipiero's compositional style more towards the Stravinsky of the 1920s but in an unmistakenly Italian context while the remarkable second shows, I think, Malipiero at the height of his powers in a work with both power and nobility.

Much as I admire Malipiero's symphonies I do not recall being so impressed by any of his orchestral compositions as much as I have been by the music on this excellent disc.

Highly recommended.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: The new erato on September 22, 2011, 10:29:18 PM
This is definitely the best of Malipiero I've heard (haven't heard extensively though).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: bumtz on May 28, 2012, 04:02:17 AM
In case somebody is looking for Malipiero's complete string quartets performed by Quartetto di Venezia, they are a part of the "Italian Quartets" 10-CD box on Dynamic that can be obtained relatively cheaply from amazon.es: http://www.amazon.es/gp/product/B000CNEFXI/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i03   
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 26, 2013, 12:29:34 PM
In case somebody is looking for Malipiero's complete string quartets performed by Quartetto di Venezia, they are a part of the "Italian Quartets" 10-CD box on Dynamic that can be obtained relatively cheaply from amazon.es: http://www.amazon.es/gp/product/B000CNEFXI/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i03

I have them (not the Box, and yes, it's relatively cheap!). Not a Post in a year!! I'm growing very fond of the Symphonies 8-11, fans of BRIAN should take note here!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 03:03:11 AM
Not too surprisingly, in pulling a pair of Dallapiccola discs for today, I grabbed one volume of the Malipiero symphonies, as well.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 28, 2013, 06:01:47 AM
Not too surprisingly, in pulling a pair of Dallapiccola discs for today, I grabbed one volume of the Malipiero symphonies, as well.

which voluuume?? report
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 11:13:50 AM
Nos. 5, 6, 8 & 11, per here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21492.msg724975.html#msg724975).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on June 28, 2013, 12:13:11 PM
My knowledge of Malipiero comes from



I started out enjoying it greatly, but every successive concerto seemed to be identical to the one that came before.  I ended up being quite turned off.

Can I expect a different experience from the symphonies?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 03:13:12 PM
I'll need to dig a bit into what I've got, in order to answer. I've got at least one other volume of the symphonies, but it's an age since I heard any of them, until today. I'll investigate, and be back to you.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on June 28, 2013, 03:31:33 PM
I'll need to dig a bit into what I've got, in order to answer. I've got at least one other volume of the symphonies, but it's an age since I heard any of them, until today. I'll investigate, and be back to you.

An impression might be as good as an investigation.  Do all the symphonies on the disc seem to be cut from the same cloth?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 29, 2013, 02:47:07 AM
An impression might be as good as an investigation.  Do all the symphonies on the disc seem to be cut from the same cloth?

I'll have a listen this evening.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 29, 2013, 02:50:07 AM
My knowledge of Malipiero comes from

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000VQQJO4.01.L.jpg)

I started out enjoying it greatly, but every successive concerto seemed to be identical to the one that came before.  I ended up being quite turned off.

I don't know the concerti, but I find myself wondering if this is not The cpo Effect, the catalogue-centred mills grinding everything to much the same consistency.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on June 29, 2013, 06:12:24 AM
I don't know the concerti, but I find myself wondering if this is not The cpo Effect, the catalogue-centred mills grinding everything to much the same consistency.

I have a lot of cpo and my own experience is that the cpo effect works the other way, making unfamiliar music come to vivid life.  (Just beginning my exploration of the Saygun series on cpo and enjoying it greatly.)

Regarding Malipiero, I enjoyed the first PC a lot and found the performance quite impressive.  I don't think the last one was any worse.   It was just that he seemed to be in the same groove. 
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 29, 2013, 06:56:55 AM
My knowledge of Malipiero comes from



I started out enjoying it greatly, but every successive concerto seemed to be identical to the one that came before.  I ended up being quite turned off.

Can I expect a different experience from the symphonies?

I think Symphony No.7 is the best 'normal' work, nothing grumpy or craggy (No.3 or 4, is an 'elegiac' work, also). It was the last before a break , that resumed with No.8.

Sure, Malipiero 'sounds' a lot the same, buuut, the early- and late- phases are very different. If you liked the earlier Piano Concerti, then maybe go for that Naxos disc with 'Silenzio'. I looove his craggy 'Late' style, so, if they all sound the same, so much better for me.

You might like the String Quartets,... maybe one either takes to GFM or not. I can listen to it all,... his manner of moving from theme to theme sounds absolutely natural to me, the opposite of Myaskovsky, who is forever developing and developing.


Nos. 5, 6, 8 & 11, per here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21492.msg724975.html#msg724975).

WHADDAYA THINK OF 8 (ack!!), but especially 11? 11 is short and craGGY... is this like Havergal??? They're all on YT now...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on June 29, 2013, 07:40:37 AM
I think Symphony No.7 is the best 'normal' work, nothing grumpy or craggy (No.3 or 4, is an 'elegiac' work, also). It was the last before a break , that resumed with No.8.

Sure, Malipiero 'sounds' a lot the same, buuut, the early- and late- phases are very different. If you liked the earlier Piano Concerti, then maybe go for that Naxos disc with 'Silenzio'. I looove his craggy 'Late' style, so, if they all sound the same, so much better for me.

You might like the String Quartets,... maybe one either takes to GFM or not. I can listen to it all,... his manner of moving from theme to theme sounds absolutely natural to me, the opposite of Myaskovsky, who is forever developing and developing.

I have one of the discs from the Naxos series of symphonies (don't recall which one, off hand) and I should listen soon.  I think my problem may have been too much Malipiero in too short a time, which caused enthusiasm to flag.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 30, 2013, 09:48:12 AM
Well, I am partly in error. I do have one other Malipiero disc, but it is orchestral works no sinfonie.  This 'un:



. . . a disc which I shall happily revisit, remembering that I liked it very well.

I suspect that I fetched in the disc of Symphonies nos. 5, 6, 8 & 11 specifically to get my feet wet with a broad sampling, pieces written from 1947 to 1969.  I find each of the symphonies has its own profile, and they all strike me as both capably written, and musically engaging.  My quick take-aways are: (a) I certainly want more of the symphonies-plus, and (b) I probably won't trouble to get all the symphonies, not just yet . . . possibly taking too close to heart a moderately negative review of the earliest symphonies.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 30, 2013, 05:57:34 PM
Well, I am partly in error. I do have one other Malipiero disc, but it is orchestral works no sinfonie.  This 'un:



. . . a disc which I shall happily revisit, remembering that I liked it very well.

I suspect that I fetched in the disc of Symphonies nos. 5, 6, 8 & 11 specifically to get my feet wet with a broad sampling, pieces written from 1947 to 1969.  I find each of the symphonies has its own profile, and they all strike me as both capably written, and musically engaging.  My quick take-aways are: (a) I certainly want more of the symphonies-plus, and (b) I probably won't trouble to get all the symphonies, not just yet . . . possibly taking too close to heart a moderately negative review of the earliest symphonies.


Listen close, y'all. Malipiero's Symphonist Achilles Heel in the early Symphonies must be the ever bombastic Finales. That's why I pick No.7, in it alone, GFM restrains himself, and all four movements equal One Whole Fairy Tale.

1 & 2 might be the weakest (GFM was very imaginative in his early phase, then, like all, reverted to a Neo-Classicism aster WWI). 3 & 4 are nice and have moments, but, check, but I think they may both be let down by a little Finale Bombast.

I remembered I have No.6, for Strings, on that great sounding Denon disc (their Italian Soloists series). I'll check that; I think it's got the same string jauntiness of the SQs,... I think 6 might also be the keeper.


But then he took a break, and wrote some of the non-numbered 'Symphonies', and then returned wit 8-11, which I like more and more as just free expressions of spontaneous feeling... Italian... Opera... Singing... wait... they're actually pretty nice and craggy, that's why I'm always asking about Havergal... no, I haven't plunged yet.



btw- that disc of Orchestral Works got 'boring' reviews, which may be understandable, but, I'm sure it's still nice Malipiero. There's also a similar disc on CPO. Malipiero's ALWAYS listenable.


I'm still recommending the 'Endecatode' cd from the Stradivarius label, and also their set of the 'Dialoghi'.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 01, 2013, 01:57:34 AM
Most interesting, thanks, snypsss.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 01, 2013, 05:25:07 AM
The works that appeal to me the most are the string quartets.

(http://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/CDS168.gif)

Quartetto d'Archi di Venezia

Again, that disc has a recorded sound like they're playing in a marble sun room. No other recording I can think of has such a nice, 'daylit' recording, so fresh one can almost here birds chirping!

I don't know about the ASV, BUT, I will ONLY recommend the Dynamic,... great cover painting that actually has something to do with Malipiero (masks and all). One should perhaps pick up their BoxSet!!

SQ 1-2: These form a pair. These two, particularly, encapsulate the Malipiero ethos of just playing theme-after-theme with no development. Probably his most well known...

SQ 3: This is quite of a recapitulation of 1-2

SQ 4: eludes me at the moment

SQ 5; THIS is the one I was talking about. Very polite GFM,... Vaughn Williams, Hindemith,...

SQ 6: This one is also 'nice'.

SQ 7-8: I know 8 is pretty thorny, 7 eludes me at the moment.


I'm trying to fend off a Malipiero buying frenzy!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on July 01, 2013, 12:45:21 PM
Consulting the shelves, the other Malipiero release I have is this one:



Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 02, 2013, 07:00:20 AM
Consulting the shelves, the other Malipiero release I have is this one:



I think you may find both Symphonies let down by a slightly bombastic Finale. I's like a to know what you think about the 'Sinfonia del Mare', an early work that should have reams of atmosphere?!?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 02, 2013, 07:03:38 AM
Most interesting, thanks, snypsss.

I listened to No.6 (for Strings) on the Denon recording. Wow!, what a sunny work (deliciously recorded). The slow bits are very nice indeed, nothing wrong with this one. Just So Sunny!! Great driving music yesterday.


I now really want to try the Piano Concerti Set. There is also a Late Flute Concerto on Stradivarius I'd like to hear.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 02, 2013, 07:44:41 AM
Yes, Degli archi is lovely.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 03, 2013, 05:51:46 AM
Yes, Degli archi is lovely.

I don't know her work. What films was she in?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on July 17, 2013, 08:02:41 AM
Yes, Degli archi is lovely.

Listened to this release



I liked it more than I expected to.  The symphony No 6 (for strings) was the highlight of the release.  Only the symphony No 8 struck me as a dreadful bore.  The style of the other two (5 and 11) was generally appealing, typified by free counterpoint with colorful orchestration, and the use of piano as a concertante instrument was appealing in 5.

The performances were rather good, I thought, but the recorded sound was not ideal.  I notice that the recordings were made in the studios of Mosfilm and the audio had sound of a movie soundtrack, pleasing but as though there were a veil between the performers and the audience.  It would be wonderful if other recordings of this music were available.  The 11th symphony, in particular, had interesting use of the horns which I would like to have heard in a move vivid recording.

The question now, where to go next.  More symphonies, or on to the string quartets.  (I have the ASV/Brilliant Classics set on the shelves).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 17, 2013, 08:32:46 AM
Glad you found the music worthwhile, Scarps!

Yes, if only we could get these works in better recordings . . . .
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 17, 2013, 10:43:54 AM
Listened to this release



I liked it more than I expected to.  The symphony No 6 (for strings) was the highlight of the release.  Only the symphony No 8 struck me as a dreadful bore.  The style of the other two (5 and 11) was generally appealing, typified by free counterpoint with colorful orchestration, and the use of piano as a concertante instrument was appealing in 5.

The performances were rather good, I thought, but the recorded sound was not ideal.  I notice that the recordings were made in the studios of Mosfilm and the audio had sound of a movie soundtrack, pleasing but as though there were a veil between the performers and the audience.  It would be wonderful if other recordings of this music were available.  The 11th symphony, in particular, had interesting use of the horns which I would like to have heard in a move vivid recording.

The question now, where to go next.  More symphonies, or on to the string quartets.  (I have the ASV/Brilliant Classics set on the shelves).

I think you'd find Symphony 7 the best overall 'pleasing' Symphony, no bombast.

If you liked No.6, you might want to look up the Denon recording, which is of course sweeet.

And again, one MUST appreciate the 'dreadful' scores, because perhaps some day you'll have heavy weather in your area and will be in need of something craggy!! But you liked 11? 8-11 are all pretty 'clunky' (which of I like), but I haven't made deep comparisons.

I also like the Sinfonia della Antigenida, probably quite dreary by your standards (gotta have humid music too y'know!!)

Were you the one with the 'Piano Concerto Set' from earlier? I'd like to try that (and I might recommend it over the Milhaud PC Set, also on CPO (stick with Helffer here)).

I really have to make the usual note the Dynamic recording of the String Quartets is one of the Greatest Chamber Music Discs of All Time, so, go ahead and play your ASV, but I can't vouch for anything there (can't be all bad). But, the Italian group has a recording venue that positively bristles with early sunlight in the atrium. However, start with SQs 1-2, then go to No.5 'Dei Capricci', then maybe 6, 3-4, and keep in mind that 7-8 are going to be a little more like Symphonies 8 & 11.


You might like his Piano Oeuvre. I think the ASV has the same performer as the PC Set. Then there are some other collections Icarus, an old '60s recording, and some obscure 2cd set of his complete piano music which I only saw on Ebay once and never on Amazon). I'm certainly interested in trying some out.

And you'll really want to try the Stradivarius disc 'Endecatode' which has a nice sampling of Chamber Works. There's also the set of 'Dialoghi' on Strad, but this might be for Converts Only (might be a bit prickly). I've also hawked the Chamber Works disc on DischiRecordi (the blue spine) which includes the very worthy Piano Trio (a happy Bridge PT??).

I've been staying away from Composer Threads because I begin to salivate, yearning to BUUUY!!! I bought all the cheap stuff so now everything on The List is expensive. :'(


Yes, Degli archi is lovely.

Did you ever listen to the Sinfonia del Mare?

btw- would you pleeeeeze Capitalize the 'm' in 'Malipiero's mausoleum', aaarrrrgggghhhhh
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 17, 2014, 06:49:42 AM
Listened to this release



I liked it more than I expected to.  The symphony No 6 (for strings) was the highlight of the release.  Only the symphony No 8 struck me as a dreadful bore.  The style of the other two (5 and 11) was generally appealing, typified by free counterpoint with colorful orchestration, and the use of piano as a concertante instrument was appealing in 5.

The performances were rather good, I thought, but the recorded sound was not ideal.  I notice that the recordings were made in the studios of Mosfilm and the audio had sound of a movie soundtrack, pleasing but as though there were a veil between the performers and the audience.  It would be wonderful if other recordings of this music were available.  The 11th symphony, in particular, had interesting use of the horns which I would like to have heard in a move vivid recording.

The question now, where to go next.  More symphonies, or on to the string quartets.  (I have the ASV/Brilliant Classics set on the shelves).

Symphonies 8-11

I enjoyed the "dreadful bore", the 8th, and also the 10th, both of which, were, a little less craggy than 9, and a bit less colourful than 11. But I liked them for that reason. 11 is the most colourful, making me want to hear Brian; and 9 eventually won me over. Malipiero just started using the orchestra in a 'fantasy' way, not unlike Martinu's Late Works, with a concertante piano not far away, tinkling with xylophone the capricious wood nymphs. Indeed, Malipiero seems to take off from Martinu's final resting place?

Now I'm off to try Malipiero's Early Works, those long, Impressionist Symphonies, and the 'Silenzio' pieces. Malipiero was one of those mid-century Composers who had at least three phases, like Hindemith or Bloch or Villa-Lobos, or DSCH, so, it's easy to find SOMETHING one will enjoy.


Again, for the Beginner: get the String Quartets on Dynamic ONLY!

Anyone have love for the CPO Complete Piano Concerti? It's calling!
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 17, 2014, 07:43:42 AM
Anyone have love for the CPO Complete Piano Concerti? It's calling!

On the Wish List.  But you knew that . . . .
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 18, 2014, 06:40:38 AM
I also checked out his Violin Concertos 1-2/ No.1 is the Gertler cd (with Casella), and though, at first, I found it a bit florid, by the cadenza I was won over by it's charming character. The 2nd is from the '60s, and though I like the Late Symphonies, this one was too scrappy for me; same goes for the Flute Concerto: Petrassi's is the way to go here.

And the 2cd 'Dialoghi'- well, there's a lot of scrappy '60s music on here too. The one for harpsichord was just a bit busy and... mm eh..., but I found the one for viola very nice and dark and mild. The pieces for two pianos were quite clunky- did not like- but the Falla piece is nice. In all, this is probably a set you can skip- the recording, too- 'live'- leaves somewhat to be desired.

Out of the first four Symphonies I found No.2, the 'Elegiac', the nicest- No.4,, 'In Memoriam' (or 'Tragic' or something), wasn't as nice sounding. No. 1 is a 'Four Seasons' which frankly was ok, but nothing special, and No.3 was the livliest of the bunch.

No.5 is a Concertante Symphony that had some interest to it.


Out of the early 'Symphonies'- the 'Silenzo & Morte' one seemed just a bit perky for the title and just wasn't what I was looking for,  but the 'Mare' was nicely Impressionistic.


Also, found the earlier Cello Sonata somewhat aggressive, but the later Sonatina much more to my liking. The Music for Violin is somewhat negligible, and the Piano Music is difficult to find on YT- there's an old '60s recital by Gino Gorini, a disc on ASV (by the guy who plays in the Concerti)m a disc on Nueva Era, and I even think there's a Complete Piano Music out there, but I only saw it on Ebay once and have no info.
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 18, 2014, 06:44:57 AM
Interesting, thanks.

Now, the quartet recording you strongly advise . . . who play 'em? TIA
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 19, 2014, 01:36:02 PM
Interesting, thanks.

Now, the quartet recording you strongly advise . . . who play 'em? TIA

The 'Venizia' group on Dynamic. Yea, it may be hard to get though- haven't heard the ASV, but the Dynamic is one of the sunniest recordings of anything- reviewers agree!, this is a very special issue.

I don't know if they're available digitally...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 24, 2014, 06:47:35 PM
Piano Music

GFM wrote quite a body of Piano Music, much of it in a quirky Impressionist style that I have rather odd. Availability rests on a  few releases, namely, Bartoli on ASV, Temerkiev(not right) on Nueva Era, and a 1968 recital by Gino Gorini that has recently been re-released on CD on a new label (it's near the top at Amazon). All three, I believe, share much material (though there is so much more in Malipiero to choose from), and YouTube appears to have the whole Nueva Era CD downloaded, and also some of the Gorini, but, the elusive Bartoli disc is getting expensive and is absent from YT.

From what I hear from Temerkie(?)v and Gorini is music which seems to go from languid and tonally murky Impressionism to quirky, and back again, with regularity. Personally, I like pieces which are either 'a', or 'b', but, here, I just find Malipiero asking too much of me. Perhaps I don't not like Janacek's Piano Music- at least, I didn't respond to his mood changes- and there seems to be a bit of that spirit here. I know I'm been a puss here- maybe it's the recordings- the sound doesn't really absorb the volleys of notes to my satisfaction. Maybe I found the same thing in Dallapiccola's Piano Music too- I'm sorry, I just want to say "clangy" to all three, aaah!! Please don't hate me (find me a Janacek piano cd I like!)!

Maybe Malipiero was "the Roaring 20s" whilst WWI was raging, I don't know, but it does seem somewhat Futurist of Malipiero the way he seems to just do what he pleases and write it down just... like... that. There is a Malipiero piece for Mechanical Piano.

Take a look at the CDs mentioned, and the works. He definitely seems to carry on from Debussy,... again, another Composer whose Piano Music I haven't found to my liking. I have to say that GFM's Piano Music seems to cry out for the Nimbus Treatment (some will instinctively know what I mean here). I just don't respond to Quirky Piano Music- something about the Piano and being "wilful".

So, if anyone has that Bartoli/ASV disc, please, do SHARE: how is it? How do you like the music? Even Malipiero at his craggiest I seem to like a lot, but most of what I've heard of his Piano Music just reminded me of others' music that I also didn't get. I feel sort of bad about it.

On the up side, I do see that Complete Piano Concerti as a completely different beast, where the craggyPpiano writing is off-set by the Orchestra. Anyone on GFM's Piano Music?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 25, 2014, 01:52:11 AM
I don't know if they're available digitally...

Yes (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002WR7ST0/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1), part of a big "Italian String Quartets" set, which I got for $17.98, but looks much pricier now . . . .
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 25, 2014, 07:10:54 AM
Yes (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002WR7ST0/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1), part of a big "Italian String Quartets" set, which I got for $17.98, but looks much pricier now . . . .

So you got the whole Box? There's some interesting stuff there, though, probably none more interesting than the GFM. Respighi No.1 has that hot-house-back-of-the-hand-against-forehead Romance. Do you like the crisp, sunny recording?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 25, 2014, 07:13:06 AM
I did the download, so, aye, it's a passel of music I've not made way all through yet.  But I've listened to perhaps half of the Malipiero SQ's, and yes, love the music, and really enjoy the sound!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 25, 2014, 08:22:27 AM
I'm revising my GFM Recommends:

Symphonies

Every seems to think that the Symphony for Strings, No.6, is the most wonderful, the one that anyone can enjoy, and it sure is a beautifully sunny work. That said, I have to recommend the Denon recording as the ONLY choice here, since, as we should all know, they tend to have a most superior sound, and here it is no different: the strings sound delicious and truly make this sound masterful!

Then, let me point you to No.7, "delle canzoni". Part of the problem I was having with Syms. 3-4 was the somewhat bombastic finales, and No.7 foregoes this vestigial tendency. No.7 is the "straightest" way of enjoying a GFM Symphony, with all the signposts intact. It's smoother, in a Hindemithian way- not really quirky but just a nice curve- it's "normal" music that holds a few things under the current.

No.5, "concertante in eco", has a nice Piano part to commend it, but Syms. 1-4 show a bit of "gearing up": there's lots of nice, Elgar-type moments, but there's bombast in the finales. I liked No.2, "in memoriam" better than No.4, "elegiac" (though I'd love to hear the Koussevitsky), No/2 being the smoothest and mildest of the whole bunch, imo.

As for 8-11, 8 and 10 and the more brooding ones, 9 is the quirkiest with outbursts and waywardness, and 11, "delle cornamuse", has a nice pseudo-horn part mimicked through. So, I'd get the disc with 5,6,8,& 11 before I'd get 9-10.

The "early" Symphonies I didn't much care for, but 'Sinfonia del Mare' has a nice Impressionism to recommend it. Out of the later, non-numbered Symphonies, I like the 'Sinfonia per Antigenida' which might be one of the craggier and greyer ones (but I like it!). The other stuff is really no great shakes, imo.

So, for the adventurous, I'd go for the 5,6,8,11 disc; for those who want beauty, go for the Denon 6th, and those who fall in between might try the one I have currently, with No.7 and 'Antigenida'. Koussevitsky in the 4th might also be a good choice. You're on your own with the rest, but surely the one with 1-2 will be the last on the list. Enjoy!

Concerti

Cello Concerto: a nice little scrappy piece from the early '30s, played by S. Palm on Nueva Era. A great little GFM CD all around.

Violin Concerto No.1: this is the Gertler (with Casella on Supraphon), and it's one of GFM's super-sunny, marvellous works, like the SQ No.1. It's fruity and sweet, and may actually be a better purchase than the Symphonies. Here we get a perfect dose of GFM along the lines of the String Symphony.

Violin Concerto No.2: this a later work (on Stradivarius) which I didn't respond to (thankfully for the pocketbook). This is the type of GFM I didn't go for.

Flute Concerto: same with this (on the same disc). If you're looking for an FC, go no further than the Petrassi, or even Ghedini. Both of those over this one.

Piano Concerti 1-6: this of course has come to us by way of a wonderful CPO release, which I am currently saving for. I won't listen first, but I'm sure it's just the ticket for me, even if there is much stylistic similarity between them. Make sure you like GFM first, before you invest: one of our readers did not like the sameness- others might. But I'd say this is at the top of the list for consideration.

"Harpsichord Quasi-Concerto": this is in the 'Dialoghi' set, and I found it much less desirable than othe HCs by similar Composers (I'd have to go with Gerhard here). I didn't really even respond to the Frank Martin, hmm.

"Viola Quasi-Concerto": same set, different animal. Perhaps the dark tones of the viola brought out a more thoughful music, but here is a Viola Concerto that's very nice for a modern piece (though the old fashioned rReviewer at Amazon liked Mozart better!). I have Ernest Wallfisch coming in the mail and am looking forward to hearing it.

Misc. Orchestral

I'm not too keen on the disc with the 'Invenzioni"- there's just too much more substantial GFM to be had. But I know this may be most people's introduction to GFM and maybe that's where the misunderstanding began? Save this, and the CPO disc, for the very last if you need. Also, the First Edition Lousiville cd has gotten some pretty bad notices concerning most issues, including quality of music. Stick with the major works here.

Chamber Music

String Quartets: I only recommend the Dynamic recording, truly a one of a kind recording, so beautifully presented. The sound is special here, haven't heard ASV.

'Dialoghi 1-7': honestly, I'd skip the Stradivarius 2cd Complete set. I like the 'de Falla' piece for Chamber Ensemble (Nueva Era), the Woodwind Quintet (Dischi Ricordi), and the 'Viola Quasi-Concerto' (Wallfisch). The pieces for 2 Pianos were just to clangy for me, and I wasn't into the vocal piece(s). Well, perhaps with a better, studio, recording, these pieces would have had a better unveiling?

'Endecatode': this Stradivarius cd, by contrast, might be a great introduction to GFM. The balance between cragginess and beauty is on display here, and the recording is very nice. This is the recording I really recommend in that it has a lot of interesting things on display.

Piano Trio/ Harp Quintet: I have the Dischi Ricordi disc which has a wonderful selection of pieces, including a very original PT. However, it is waaay OOP, and unavailable at the moment, so, give the OTHER Stradivarius disc a try. It has a better recording of the 2 Piano 'Dialoghi'm the PT, and some violin pieces, and also the lovely Cello Sonatina, which I liked much more than the busier Cello Sonata.

Complete Violin Music/ Complete Cello Music: Fabio Biondi plays the GFM Complete Violin Music, which, runs to about 12 minutes!! It's interesting but not earth shattering, but comes on a nice recital (w/ Respighi, Casella,...). The Cello Music is also under 20 minutes, and is supplemented with some Piano Music. I liked the short Cello Sonatina very much, and it is available on both the above Strad discm and also on an all-Italian cello programme by a cellist named Zappa (very expensive though). But, technically, no great shakes here.

Piano Music- see my above post (needs Hamelin, or something...)




So, the Vocal Music is beyond my reach, but, for the newbie, if you follow the layout you should find some GFM that you will enjoy. He runs the gamut, from beautiful and sunny, to craggy and unattractive. Choose carefully with this one, Luke!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 25, 2014, 08:38:39 AM
Thanks for the survey!  I need to revisit the symphonies (nor do I think I've heard the early ones which aren't quite doing it for you).  I remember really enjoying the middle and late symphonies.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 25, 2014, 11:13:26 AM
I hope this amuses you as much as it does me:

http://www.youtube.com/v/sWuJ235s1l4
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: pjme on March 25, 2014, 11:28:01 AM
Malipiero in religious mood....lovely! And the performance is excellent.


http://www.youtube.com/v/0ANCSwwe6Ps
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: torut on March 25, 2014, 06:03:47 PM
Yes (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002WR7ST0/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1), part of a big "Italian String Quartets" set, which I got for $17.98, but looks much pricier now . . . .
:o It is still $9.49 at Google play store (https://play.google.com/store/music/album/Venice_String_Quartet_Italian_String_Quartets_by_B?id=Bj6a35z5hs2v5s6okbns5fpn2oq).

I wanted to say thank you because I found it in your post (probably in "what are you listening to now?" thread) and purchased it. Although I already had Malipiero SQ set, still it was a bargain, containing a lot of interesting works. Boccherini (3CD) was a little bit boring, but Bazzini (3CD) was new finding for me and very good, besides famous composers SQs (Verdi, Puccini, Respighi).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 26, 2014, 05:23:27 AM
Very glad you are finding the set worthwhile!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on March 26, 2014, 06:59:40 AM
I'll have to revisit the Malipiero symphonies, but one of my favorite works of his is the Impressioni dal vero, which can be found on a newer Naxos recording with La Vecchia conducting the Rome Symphony Orchestra.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 09:59:57 AM
I hope this amuses you as much as it does me:

http://www.youtube.com/v/sWuJ235s1l4

Oh, you found my review. I was going to link it for you.












 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 26, 2014, 10:04:09 AM
Oh, you found my review.

I knew it!  ;)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 10:04:41 AM
I hope this amuses you as much as it does me:

http://www.youtube.com/v/sWuJ235s1l4

Dude... it's like... these violins, "quote" are wailing "unquote" and like...


 :'( :laugh: :'( :laugh: :'( :laugh: :'( :laugh: :'( :laugh:

Is it funny or is it sad, I can't tell?!?!? :o ??? :o ???


I really was going to tell you it was me! :laugh:

Dooooooooooood
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 26, 2014, 10:11:31 AM
Overall, it did make me smile, but with no scorn.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 10:14:07 AM
I'll have to revisit the Malipiero symphonies, but one of my favorite works of his is the Impressioni dal vero, which can be found on a newer Naxos recording with La Vecchia conducting the Rome Symphony Orchestra.

Yes, everyone's liking that very much. What should I get?:

1) Syms. 5/6/8/11 (MarcoPolo)

2) Violin Cto. (Gertler/Supraphon)

3) Piano Cti. 1-6 (CPO)


Seriously, someone needs to sample the 6th on Denon. If all you've heard is the MP/Naxos you will be ravished!


Overall, it did make me smile, but with no scorn.

At least he's trying. I guess... no, it's just funny!!! :laugh:
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 11:27:49 AM
My knowledge of Malipiero comes from



I started out enjoying it greatly, but every successive concerto seemed to be identical to the one that came before.  I ended up being quite turned off.

Can I expect a different experience from the symphonies?

Just ordered... Karl!?!... and, I'm going to learn from Scarpia and begin by listening to the one Aldo Ciccolini(?) recorded, the 3rd (Louisville Editions), then No.1, then the last,... and save 2 and either 4 or 5 for later. There! Problem solved. Plus, there's even an extra piece! Yippy,... aaand!, that's the CDCDCD talkin'... no DOUBT!!haha

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 26, 2014, 11:33:05 AM
After seeing your video review of the quartets, snypsss . . . you're right, I need to check out the piano concerti, and it is high time.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 11:45:27 AM
After seeing your video review of the quartets, snypsss . . . you're right, I need to check out the piano concerti, and it is high time.
Sinfonia de Antigenida (1962)

Whitehouse says this is by far GFM's most bitter work. Who am I to argue? It's the last non-numbered Symphony before resuming numbering with 8 in 1964, which itself is rather inward, gnomic, and enigmatic. Both are quite removed from the sunnier skies of 5-7 (or even the whole first cycle).

However, if we take Whitehouse at his word, and listen, what we hear indeed betrays the sentiment of a lot of Malipiero's generation, that, by the '60s, their achievements had forever been overshadowed by the Masters of High Modernism. The gist of the title is that the public no longer cares, so, he will play for himself. In that regard, the music is somewhat...mm... 'Pathetic', in the best term,... and by no means sounding anything like Petterrsson, or, frankly, anyone I can think of. Perhaps Late Hindemith recalls a bitterness akin to Malipiero's, of the Organ Concerto and the Pittsburgh Symphony? Anyways, GFM's four movement panel form is still on display, but now the music has totally changed from a human, singing voice, to, not mechanical, but, somewhat gnomic, with odd, raking repetitions of strange orchestration, making the proceedings feel like that old black-and-white movie 'Carnival of Souls'. Not in notes, just impression.

The music does sound "meaningful", in that one is aware that GFM is trying to communicate something. I'd say repeated listenings are in order, for one will surely not "get it" on the first go round. GFM's 'bitterness' is 'masked' a lot better than, say, Pettersson, so, the whole experience comes off as somewhat compelling and enigmatic at the same time. I think, Is this what Myaskovsky's 13th sounds like?, but I'm sure GFM is tamer here- he is old after all! Still, it reminds one of all the 'quirky' Composer's like Brian, with their short little enigmas, so, in that regard, this may be held up as the Perfect Odd-Duck Symphony. It is very sad musically, and by sad, I mean 'grey' sad.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 11:46:44 AM
After seeing your video review of the quartets, snypsss . . . you're right, I need to check out the piano concerti, and it is high time.

dude, is it 4:20 alreeeady????
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 11:47:37 AM
And we have passed 10,000 Views in the Thread! Woo Hoo!! $:)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2014, 11:48:21 AM
And we have passed 10,000 Views in the Thread! Woo Hoo!! $:)

And 100 Posts!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: ZauberdrachenNr.7 on March 26, 2014, 05:17:32 PM
I hope this amuses you as much as it does me:

http://www.youtube.com/v/sWuJ235s1l4

It did, thank you, but I'm left wondering what led him to purchase the SQs.  His casualness and insouciance (the tilting scenery almost caused me to fall off my chair, whether from laughter or vertigo I've yet to determine) runs counter to our culture and so in some ways was surprisingly refreshing!  He seems not to have given a moment's forethought to the filming, so you have to admire his courage!  He should be encouraged.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 26, 2014, 05:31:11 PM
Aye, agreed.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: pjme on March 27, 2014, 12:30:38 AM
Concerto per pianoforte e orchestra n. 3:

1. Allegro (00:00)
2. Lento (03:30)
3. Allegro agitato (10:05)

Aldo Ciccolini, piano
Orchestra Sinfonica di Roma della RAI
Günther Neuhold, direttore

Roma, Auditorium del Foro Italico, 12 Dicembre 1987


http://www.youtube.com/v/SSWluDg85_U
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: pjme on March 27, 2014, 12:51:57 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/vSpx3EMp9NA

Haunting!

Fabio Biondi and Luigi di Ilio.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: ZauberdrachenNr.7 on March 27, 2014, 03:03:06 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/vSpx3EMp9NA

Haunting!

Fabio Biondi and Luigi di Ilio.

Thanks, PJME, the more I hear the more I like from Malipiero. 8)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 27, 2014, 06:39:25 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/vSpx3EMp9NA

Haunting!

Fabio Biondi and Luigi di Ilio.

Yes, though he only wrote four pieces (the Biondi disc boasts: 'The Complete Music for Violin'!), that one in particular have quite a nice individualism. Still, there's only four works, and they go by quickly. However, I believe this piece is also transposed for the cello disc (with three pieces- also called 'The Complete Music for Cello'!! haha).

That used to be such a hard disc to find; didn't they re-release it recently?




Yes, I'm firmly in a CDCDCD/ Malipiero binge,... I just hope I survive... one choice left... must... hit... 'Enter'..... ahhhh.... gasp!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: pjme on March 27, 2014, 08:04:37 AM
(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/superd/full/8007/8007194104745.jpg)

Is it this one, on the Tactus label?
Works:
1. Sonata for Cello and Piano in D minor by Gian-Francesco Malipiero

2. Canto nell'infinito  (cello version)

3. Sonatina for Cello and Piano 

4. Hortus conclusus by Gian-Francesco Malipiero

5. Il tarlo

6. Bizzarrie luminose dell'alba, del meriggio, della notte 

The Naive/Biondi disc is only available as download.


Peter
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 28, 2014, 08:36:02 PM
(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/superd/full/8007/8007194104745.jpg)

Is it this one, on the Tactus label?
Works:
1. Sonata for Cello and Piano in D minor by Gian-Francesco Malipiero

2. Canto nell'infinito  (cello version)

3. Sonatina for Cello and Piano 

4. Hortus conclusus by Gian-Francesco Malipiero

5. Il tarlo

6. Bizzarrie luminose dell'alba, del meriggio, della notte 

The Naive/Biondi disc is only available as download.


Peter

yea, I believe the whole album is on YT. Frankly, I'd skip it and get the Strad disc with the Sonatina (along with the very cool Sonata a Tre). 

eh, can't one make their own album from both of these?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum: GFM's MOTTO REVEALED!
Post by: snyprrr on March 28, 2014, 08:39:27 PM
Here is the little motto that occurs throughout GFM. In the Key of C it would go like this:

A G E F G

Perhaps we have a (G)ian (F)rancesco situation going on? Anyhow, this is like GFM's "Martinu" bit.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 30, 2014, 11:54:49 AM
I went to Grove's to get the skinny on GFM:

1) Except for all the Operas, and other Vocal Music, it appears that we have most of GFM on available record, so that there really isn't much at all that hasn't been considered. Only some ChamberMusic trifles, and some various, minor looking, OrchestralWorks remain unrecorded.

Here are GFM's 'Periods':

A- juvinile, including Early Symphonies, up to 'Le Sacre', and WWI.

B- 1914-1917: the War Years produce the Imprssionist Masterpieces (Naxos) and most of the Piano Music.

C- 1917-1921-1929: Transition to the 'Panel' Method. Bright, sunny works like SQ1 become the norm. Much Experimentalism- indeed, GFM isn't totally without an Avant bone. Period worth studying...

D- 1932/8-1948/9- he begins writing the Symphonies, and gets somewhat conventional during the War Years. Chamber output vanishes in '38. Some would say this is the low point of his Inspiration- though, most of us here, myself included, greatly enjoy his brand of Neo-Classicism (in that manner that all (Mid Century Masters), from Hindemith, to Vaughn Williams to Martinu, reached a 'Perfection' of their own style during this period).

E- 1950-1971: And then, around 1949-50, he embarked on his Late Style, with all the bluff cragginess, the first major fruit of which was the 'Sinfonia in un tempo', which, certainly, is a lot more brooding than anything since the Impressionist Years. The very final phase would begin around 1962-64, which yielded many of our favourite works, including the Brianesque, quirky, Symphonies 8-11, and the wonderful Chamber Music on the 'Endecatode' cd (Stradivarius).

So, really, GFM is like most other Composers of his generation, initially bowled over by 'Le Sacre'. If I wanted to be completely wrong and simplistic, I'd simply say he was an amalgam of Hindemith, Martinu, Milhaud, and Villa-Lobos, but, of course, Italian. I mean, you get my drift? All these Composers (Bloch too) went through the same events, and likewise all ended up a little more 'brittle' in the '50s and beyond (Hindemith's Octet, Organ Symphony). Anyhow, I think it's safe to say, in this Thread at least, that GFM has that certain "something" that pricks our ears- an Individual by any account!




2) GFM was friendly with Mussolini, writing his Caesar Opera for him. He did get a scolding over another Opera..
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 01, 2014, 10:57:57 AM
After seeing your video review of the quartets, snypsss . . . you're right, I need to check out the piano concerti, and it is high time.

Piano Concerti 1-6; Variazoni senza tema (CPO)

Just enjoyed the 'Variazoni', and 6 minute piece that really comes across a bit like Janacek. Very nice stuff there. Now I'm listening to the "weakest" (Bartoli's liner notes), No.2 from 1937, which has a very nice slow movement, flute and lugubrious piano, very pale- wondering recording!

No.3 is the longest at 18 minutes and might be considered the 'Hit'. Anyhow, I'm going to try to milk the unvealing, so I'm going to play No.6 "delle macchine", from the grittier '60s, and then I'm going to have to set up a Malipiero Retrospective.

btw- this No.2 slow movement is very nice indeed. GFM eschewed "virtuosity" completely in all his works, and the piano writing is always in keeping with what's going on. Very much like Janacek and Martinu- yes, I'm going to enjoy these- they really do sound exactly like the cover art, haha!! Milhaud without all the extra stuff? The verve of Villa-Lobos? The finale of No/2 is very 'travelogue'- Honegger? The piano writing is still very un-virtuoso. Poof!, and then it stops. Very much like a Piano Concertino. Nice.

Just don't digest 2 discs in one sitting and you'll be fine.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 01, 2014, 12:08:57 PM
Piano Concerti 1-6; Variazoni senza tema (CPO)

Just enjoyed the 'Variazoni', and 6 minute piece that really comes across a bit like Janacek. Very nice stuff there. Now I'm listening to the "weakest" (Bartoli's liner notes), No.2 from 1937, which has a very nice slow movement, flute and lugubrious piano, very pale- wondering recording!

No.3 is the longest at 18 minutes and might be considered the 'Hit'. Anyhow, I'm going to try to milk the unvealing, so I'm going to play No.6 "delle macchine", from the grittier '60s, and then I'm going to have to set up a Malipiero Retrospective.

btw- this No.2 slow movement is very nice indeed. GFM eschewed "virtuosity" completely in all his works, and the piano writing is always in keeping with what's going on. Very much like Janacek and Martinu- yes, I'm going to enjoy these- they really do sound exactly like the cover art, haha!! Milhaud without all the extra stuff? The verve of Villa-Lobos? The finale of No/2 is very 'travelogue'- Honegger? The piano writing is still very un-virtuoso. Poof!, and then it stops. Very much like a Piano Concertino. Nice.

Just don't digest 2 discs in one sitting and you'll be fine.

No.1 opens reminding one of Roussel. Yes, it just a Neo-Classical delight! The slow movement almost sounds like the 'Exorcist' theme- awesome! haha

Yes, they are nothing like Prokofiev, haha! Very cinematic, very Mediterranio. So unassuming- very Martinu-esque, but totally his own sound world, a sense of Italian castles and someone by themselves looking out over the balcony whilst the party goes on inside. The flick of the lighter... very pittoreque. Honegger, Roussel, Martinu, Janacek, Milhaud...
Title: Re: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 01, 2014, 12:13:39 PM
Piano Concerti 1-6; Variazoni senza tema (CPO)

Just enjoyed the 'Variazoni', and 6 minute piece that really comes across a bit like Janacek. Very nice stuff there. Now I'm listening to the "weakest" (Bartoli's liner notes), No.2 from 1937, which has a very nice slow movement, flute and lugubrious piano, very pale- wondering recording!

No.3 is the longest at 18 minutes and might be considered the 'Hit'. Anyhow, I'm going to try to milk the unvealing, so I'm going to play No.6 "delle macchine", from the grittier '60s, and then I'm going to have to set up a Malipiero Retrospective.

btw- this No.2 slow movement is very nice indeed. GFM eschewed "virtuosity" completely in all his works, and the piano writing is always in keeping with what's going on. Very much like Janacek and Martinu- yes, I'm going to enjoy these- they really do sound exactly like the cover art, haha!! Milhaud without all the extra stuff? The verve of Villa-Lobos? The finale of No/2 is very 'travelogue'- Honegger? The piano writing is still very un-virtuoso. Poof!, and then it stops. Very much like a Piano Concertino. Nice.

Just don't digest 2 discs in one sitting and you'll be fine.

Thanks! Mine hasn't landed just yet.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 02, 2014, 10:43:54 AM
I suspect that I fetched in the disc of Symphonies nos. 5, 6, 8 & 11 specifically to get my feet wet with a broad sampling, pieces written from 1947 to 1969.  I find each of the symphonies has its own profile, and they all strike me as both capably written, and musically engaging.  My quick take-aways are: (a) I certainly want more of the symphonies-plus, and (b) I probably won't trouble to get all the symphonies, not just yet . . . possibly taking too close to heart a moderately negative review of the earliest symphonies.[/font]

Symphonies 5,6,8,11 (Naxos/Marco Polo)

I've held off on No.5 until this arrived today. I like the 2 Piano Symphony. It's somewhat different than its mates, starting out in cacophony, the pianos and orchestra engaged in a Stravinskian motor rhythm that settles into angularity. The rest of the Symphony gets progressively more 'normal' sounding; the pianos never let the proceedings get far from a twinkling travelogue. In context, this is a nice tonic- and a nice supplement to the PCs.

The rest of the album has been discussed (get the Denon for 6). I am reminded here of the woolen Marco Polo sound, which does sometimes seem a bit opaque- listen to the noisy intro of No.5 to hear (or not) detail that could be brought out in a better recording. Of course, all the Marco Polos are serviceable, and unless CPO is in love with GFM, we probably will get no more Cycles, so, at least these recordings are good enough to listen to repeatedly, Actually, the wan sound fits a lot of GFM's moody moods quite well.

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 04, 2014, 06:26:44 AM
The piano concerti have landed!  Will tuck in this weekend.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 04, 2014, 07:51:07 AM
The piano concerti have landed!  Will tuck in this weekend.

Delicious!

Please,... DO start with the last Track on Disc2, the 'Varizioni senza tema', and then go straight to PC1 or 2, and then the other one- THEN, take a rest. I just listened to the "Hit", No.3, the longest, and I liked the first two just a little better, so, save No.3 perhaps. Still, all three of the first have absolutely startlingly austere, Mozartean slow movements- just 5:30 in the morning peace and beauty that really, for me, blow similar moods from Frank Martin out of the water... Malipiero is really Neo-CLASSICAL rather than Neo-BAROQUE.

Anyhow, I still have Nos. 4 (1950) and 5 (1958) left (don't think that will last the day). No.6 (1964) example of his Late Style- if you have the 'Sinfonia delle Antigenida' (1960) or the 8th (1964), this would be the place to compare. The 6th was inspired by the ensemble piece 'Macchine' (1963), though the quoting is thankfully minimal.

I can hardly wait to hear your "totally charmed" gushing!


btw- I finally heard Symphony No.5 'Concertante in eco', with 2 Pianos, and I love how out-of-place it is in the '40s, very angular and much like his later work. However, the Marco Polo sonics very much diminish the beauty of No.6 'Degli archi'. ABSOLUTELY get the Denon whilst it is still a cheapie. The drab sound fits the later stuff to-a-T, though.

Any, it's the caffeine talkin', nevermind! :laugh:


I now have most all of the rare Malipeiro recordings that are needed for a decent study, and he's just becoming one of my favourites, always joyously melancholy. You know what?- I hear a lot of Finzi and Satie in these PCs!! Yes, they're that good!!

Woo hoo!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 04, 2014, 06:22:35 PM
Finished up PC5 (1958) earlier, and  boy!, it is by far the gruffest of the bunch. I'm calling it the 'Jaws' Concerto! I mean, it's just a'clunkin' away in a very primitive fashion, - it's somewhat jarring, and I didn't quite like it that much. I'd relate it to the 'Dialoghi', much of which I didn't really care for (though, a splendid 'Pseudo-Concerto' for Viola). No.6, though in GFM's Late Style, seems to take a step back from the outright bold rudeness of No.5. I think GFM was really pissed off here in the late '50s.

So, now, I'm listening to the last in line, No.4 (1950). I was wondering how much of his 'breaking' (with his old ways) was going to show here (meaning, was it going to be angular, or linear?), and, I think this is the 'Hit' that No.3 has the reputation for. It opens in joy, and the slow movement is my favourite from the last four. Every note is where it should be here (all the more contrast to  No.5), and it leaves me with a satisfying end to this traversal.

So, if you get this set, may I recommend this order?:

1) Variazoni senza tema
2) PC1
3) PC4
4) PC2
5) PC5
6) PC6
7) PC3
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 05, 2014, 01:14:38 PM
Recommendation noted!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on April 06, 2014, 04:51:26 PM
I need to seriously to revisit Malipiero's symphonies and PCs. I believe I will start on this after I finish Scriabin's Symphony No. 3. It's just been too long since I've heard any of his music.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on April 06, 2014, 05:17:08 PM
Finished up PC5 (1958) earlier, and  boy!, it is by far the gruffest of the bunch. I'm calling it the 'Jaws' Concerto! I mean, it's just a'clunkin' away in a very primitive fashion, - it's somewhat jarring, and I didn't quite like it that much. I'd relate it to the 'Dialoghi', much of which I didn't really care for (though, a splendid 'Pseudo-Concerto' for Viola). No.6, though in GFM's Late Style, seems to take a step back from the outright bold rudeness of No.5. I think GFM was really pissed off here in the late '50s.

So, now, I'm listening to the last in line, No.4 (1950). I was wondering how much of his 'breaking' (with his old ways) was going to show here (meaning, was it going to be angular, or linear?), and, I think this is the 'Hit' that No.3 has the reputation for. It opens in joy, and the slow movement is my favourite from the last four. Every note is where it should be here (all the more contrast to  No.5), and it leaves me with a satisfying end to this traversal.

So, if you get this set, may I recommend this order?:

1) Variazoni senza tema
2) PC1
3) PC4
4) PC2
5) PC5
6) PC6
7) PC3

I'm revisiting the PCs now and have started with Variazoni senza tema as you suggested. Quite a melodic work with some interesting harmonic ideas.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 07, 2014, 06:21:54 AM
I'm revisiting the PCs now and have started with Variazoni senza tema as you suggested. Quite a melodic work with some interesting harmonic ideas.

Yes, it really was a nice little surprise. Frankly, it's No.5 that cracks me up- it really is, somewhat, Ugly Music, and certainly is compared to the others, reminding me a bit of the gruff ugliness of Hindemith's Octet (love that Teldec recording!). It's a clunk-fest, but it's a nice tonic anfter some of the more beautiful moments.

Tell me what you think, but what do you think of the slow movements of 2 and 4 (even 1)? GFM has a spare beauty that reminds me of Satie. I think the slow part of 1 (or 4) sounds just like Finzi's 'Eclogue'. (from that beauty to the clunk of 5- GFM at least shows variety!!). I have to carp on those beautifiul slow movements- usually just piano and a wind instrument, just sooo space,... pale moonlight... ahhh,...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on April 07, 2014, 06:56:00 AM
Yes, it really was a nice little surprise. Frankly, it's No.5 that cracks me up- it really is, somewhat, Ugly Music, and certainly is compared to the others, reminding me a bit of the gruff ugliness of Hindemith's Octet (love that Teldec recording!). It's a clunk-fest, but it's a nice tonic anfter some of the more beautiful moments.

Tell me what you think, but what do you think of the slow movements of 2 and 4 (even 1)? GFM has a spare beauty that reminds me of Satie. I think the slow part of 1 (or 4) sounds just like Finzi's 'Eclogue'. (from that beauty to the clunk of 5- GFM at least shows variety!!). I have to carp on those beautifiul slow movements- usually just piano and a wind instrument, just sooo space,... pale moonlight... ahhh,...

I thought Piano Concertos 1-3 and Variazoni senza tema were very good and, yes, those slow movements beautiful. There's an elegance to these works that I like and the piano writing seems rather sparse at times. I enjoyed these four works greatly, but I need to listen to Piano Concertos 4-6 next.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 07, 2014, 05:22:16 PM
Sweet! Dude!!

Just watch out for No.5! 'Jaws' :blank:

Take a liston to the Violin Concerto No.1 on YT in between, perhaps? I'd like to know what you think of that, too., very lyrical.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on April 08, 2014, 05:47:48 AM
Sweet! Dude!!

Just watch out for No.5! 'Jaws' :blank:

Take a liston to the Violin Concerto No.1 on YT in between, perhaps? I'd like to know what you think of that, too., very lyrical.

Yeah, I'll have to check out the Jaws Concerto. ;D Do you recommend any recordings of Violin Concerto No. 1? Perhaps that Supraphon recording coupled with Casella's VC?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 08, 2014, 09:05:27 AM
Yeah, I'll have to check out the Jaws Concerto. ;D Do you recommend any recordings of Violin Concerto No. 1? Perhaps that Supraphon recording coupled with Casella's VC?

It's the only one.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 08, 2014, 11:19:19 AM
This thread is helping me gradually get some structural sense of the music across his career.

snypsss, have you heard the triple concerto (1938)?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 08, 2014, 11:21:28 AM
Vn Concerto № 1 (1932):

http://www.youtube.com/v/6zIZL1rwrCM

Vn Concerto № 2 (1963):

http://www.youtube.com/v/YtrzUArSxHM
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 08, 2014, 04:18:43 PM
This thread is helping me gradually get some structural sense of the music across his career.

snypsss, have you heard the triple concerto (1938)?

It is not in the Catalog.

It seems GFM, and Casellam and Ghedini, and who knows who else, all wrote Triple Concertos around this time.

Vn Concerto № 1 (1932):

http://www.youtube.com/v/6zIZL1rwrCM

Vn Concerto № 2 (1963):

http://www.youtube.com/v/YtrzUArSxHM

The VC 1 is gorgeous, is it not?, just pure sunny lyricism, very florid; but, then, that VC 2 is in his 'ugly' vein and I neither liked it or the Flute Concerto (both on Stradivarius), which suited me just fine (I'm allowing the pocketbook to dictate my tolerance level!- so I can easily dismiss things that don't speak to the core immediately). I mean, do you agree? I kind of like the 'ugly' Piano Concerto No.5, but the violin is such a squeaky and whiny instrument, that when GFM turns the 'grate' on, it really grates.

Much of that 'Dialoghi' set on Stradivarius is also- well, some of it maaay be the 'live' recording- but much of the 'Dialoghi' represents GFM's most unappealing music, imo, which, again, is fine by me, because that's just something I won't be obsessing over (gaaah! ::))! Here's my take on the 'Dialoghi'- and you can hear them for yourself on YT:

Sorry, this is off my head- order may be off:

No.1 'de Falla' (ensemble)- this is a nice, general GFM piece; I have it on the Nueva Era disc with 'Grottesco'. (good disc)

No.2 'Socrate'?- don't care to hear a Satie-esque 2 Piano and Vocal piece from GFM.

No.3 for 2 Pianos- this is a verrry clunky piece, aye, 2 pianos goin' at it,- I'll give it to GFM, that he could write music that exasperates! Boulders clunky!

No.4 'Quasi-Concerto'? for 2 Pianos (+ens)- again, clunky and unappealing.

No.5 for Woodwind Quintet- again, a very nice all-purpose GFM piece, almost like Janacek. I have it two separate unavailable Italian cds.

No.6 'Quasi-Concerto' for Viola- (+ens) this is the Masterwork of the bunch, I believe. The slow movement is certainly one of GFM's Top3 Beautiful Moments, maybe even surpassing the ones from the PCs that I've been raving about. Yes, listen to this slow movement on YT, but I have Ernest Wallfisch on Bayer, and he certainly plays it a little better than the player on Stradivarius. A beautiful Gregorian melody opens this very inward and grippingly beautiful music.

No.7 'Quasi-Concerto' for Harpsichord (+ens)- aye, gaaah, no!! Give me either Martinu or Gerhard,... I wasn't even that impressed with Martin's; but this one made me turn it off- maybe I'll come back, but a different recording might be in order. Craggy,... be angry and it may work?

No.8- was there a No.8? If there was, I'm not sure it wasn't just as unappealing as the - OH! Yes, another Vocal (+ens) that I skipped. Sorry, ha! I have yet to approach GFM's Vocal Work.


So, just listen to them on YT, but skip the Stradivarius (on sonics alone- not so bad, buuut...). I do recommend the Wallfisch 'In Memoriam' cd (should be fairly cheap), but I think the others are way OOP (Ricordi).


Based on Groves, there's a few Orchestral Works from the '50s that haven't been recorded (in the vein of the works on the Louisville cd) that might be no great shakes either. That Triple Concerto might be the best thing unrecorded? So, the late '50s is GFM's bitterest phase, and you'll notice a more playful feeling coming out of the very  Late Works, from 1964 on.

See, everyone, wasn't it nice to get to the bottom of Malipiero? I certainly have discovered- and heard- how events and things changed his outlook and how that came through the music. He's extremely human - like Honegger maybe? Not as dramatic, but definitely the craggiest tonal Composer (is there a Brian as craggy as GFM?).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: pjme on April 10, 2014, 10:28:00 AM
No interest in  "San Francesco d'Asissi" whatsoever? Because it is vocal or religious or both?

It lasts just under 30 minutes, is in a very supple,lyrical style - and forms a large archaic hymn that ends on a question mark....early Malipiero is ear friendly.

Peter

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 10, 2014, 10:36:30 AM
No interest in  "San Francisco d'Asissi" whatsoever? Because it is vocal or religious or both?

My dear chap, I am not at all averse to either dimension!  I simply have yet to mash that link.  I do thank you!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 10, 2014, 11:03:12 AM
definitely the craggiest tonal Composer (is there a Brian as craggy as GFM?).

Try 17 and 18 (both composed in 1961)

Sarge
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: North Star on April 10, 2014, 11:19:46 AM
No interest in  "San Francisco d'Asissi" whatsoever? Because it is vocal or religious or both?

It lasts just under 30 minutes, is in a very supple,lyrical style - and forms a large archaic hymn that ends on a question mark....early Malipiero is ear friendly.

Peter
My dear chap, I am not at all averse to either dimension!  I simply have yet to mash that link.  I do thank you!
An enticing description indeed, I'll give it a whirl now :)
https://www.youtube.com/v/0ANCSwwe6Ps
Title: Re: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 10, 2014, 11:39:43 AM
Try 17 and 18 (both composed in 1961)

Sarge

Aye, 1961 was rather a craggy year.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: North Star on April 10, 2014, 11:42:27 AM
An enticing description indeed, I'll give it a whirl now :)
https://www.youtube.com/v/0ANCSwwe6Ps
Beautiful writing for the harps and winds, and voices of course.  :)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 10, 2014, 11:54:05 AM
The more I listen to, the better I like him.  I'm trying not to snaffle up the rest of the symphonies....
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 11, 2014, 05:52:18 AM
The more I listen to, the better I like him.  I'm trying not to snaffle up the rest of the symphonies....

There IS an end to Malipiero you know! I mean, you can get 1-4 but it won't be any great shakes. The slow movements are always nice. I recommend the Violin Concerto )Suprph.) before the rest of the Symphonies. Or, even the 'Endecatode' Chamber Music (Strad.).

The only left for me is the VC (want) and the Piano Music (not so much). It seems this little spell of CDCDCD ran itself into a brick wall! Can't buy anything if there's nothing to buy. Wait? Huh/ Who said that?

I think some parts of the Piano Concertos sound a lot like a more cheerful Schoenberg Piano Concerto (somewhat Neo-Baroque?).

Also, before you get the other Syms. you should try that Sym. No.6 on Denon. The Marco Polo recording is just way too wooly for this particular piece (there's also a 6 on that other Strad. disc...).

Maybe you'd like the Piano Music? It's somewhat like Janacek's PM, I think, very wayward, going all over the place...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 11, 2014, 06:08:56 AM
I think some parts of the Piano Concertos sound a lot like a more cheerful Schoenberg Piano Concerto (somewhat Neo-Baroque?).

Yes, I have rather casually dipped into the concerti, at the top of his game.  Here and there I hear intersections with Hindemith, with Prokofiev, with Schoenberg, but his music always has its own character.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 11, 2014, 06:32:39 AM
Yes, I have rather casually dipped into the concerti, at the top of his game.  Here and there I hear intersections with Hindemith, with Prokofiev, with Schoenberg, but his music always has its own character.

... and Roussel, and Milhaud,.. and... and... yes, I really felt like I heard EVERYONE here?!?! Because GFM's style is somewhat anonymous here, he ends up including the Whole World... they're just a great snapshot of the concerns everyone was concerned with during the mid-century. Maybe they'd make an interesting compare with the Villa-Lobos five? They were written starting in the '40s, I think, but their reputation is a little more in the Hollywood sound? GFM skirts the Hollywood sound, but it's quite a fun little movie that one!

What do you think of those spare slow movements? Just a piano and a flute... I do like GFM's piano writing much more here in context rather than the solos. Here he is reined in by the orchestra, and makes the two fit together perfectly.

And how about that angular Symphony No.5, with two concertante pianos? A nice pendant to this set...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 11, 2014, 09:20:56 AM
Gorm, do I have the Fifth Symphony? . . .
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on April 12, 2014, 08:03:07 AM
Gorm, do I have the Fifth Symphony? . . .

I thought you had the 5/6/8/11 disc. Anyhow, if you didn't have ANY of the Symphonies, get the one with 7 and that one with 5/6/8/11. That leaves 1-4, which can most certainly be sampled at a later, non-essential, date.

Frankly, I've been listening a LOT to that set of PCs. The fast movements go by pretty quick, leaving this idyllic slow movement to savour. This set reminds me a bit of Chailly's Hindemith set, always dipping in to something different!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 06, 2014, 09:30:23 AM
Frankly, I've been listening a LOT to that set of PCs. The fast movements go by pretty quick, leaving this idyllic slow movement to savour. This set reminds me a bit of Chailly's Hindemith set, always dipping in to something different!

An excellent rec, thanks!  I enjoy that two-fer thoroughly.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 06, 2014, 09:39:55 AM
Dude, you called it:  each and every one of those slow movements is a gem. One is enraged that the composer of such exquisite beauty is so broadly neglected!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 06, 2014, 10:07:27 AM
I thought you had the 5/6/8/11 disc. Anyhow, if you didn't have ANY of the Symphonies, get the one with 7 and that one with 5/6/8/11. That leaves 1-4, which can most certainly be sampled at a later, non-essential, date.

Indeed, I do. Re-listening to the Fifth, now.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 06, 2014, 04:58:11 PM
Dude, you called it:  each and every one of those slow movements is a gem. One is enraged that the composer of such exquisite beauty is so broadly neglected!

limpid... wan moonlight... Mozatean...I've never heard any such spare beauty as there... I picture parties at a castle on the river at night... ahhh...

Indeed, I do. Re-listening to the Fifth, now.

It might have been nice to have that 5th on the PC set- but it's such a nice, angular work and the MarcoPolo sound gives it that gothic '60s quality. Tell me what you like out of 8 (a bit more brooding) and 11 (capricious). 11's got some fruity winds and is a perfectly craggy work- do you think Havergal fans would enjoy this?

I might be ready for a little SQ action,... they're so summery... and it IS! $:)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 18, 2014, 06:31:37 PM
Dude, you called it:  each and every one of those slow movements is a gem. One is enraged that the composer of such exquisite beauty is so broadly neglected!

I haaave to ask you about the Kabalevsky PC 1-4: do you know them? I'm kind of getting the same 'thing' as in the GFM 1-6; not as wonderful perhaps, but in their own way exuding, to me, the same atmosphere- do ya do ya?? huh huh??
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 19, 2014, 02:53:17 AM
I don't know 'em.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on November 21, 2014, 07:51:32 AM
Gorm, do I have the Fifth Symphony? . . .

Took 5/6/8/11 with me yesterday. I just love GFM's Late Symphonies, they are so craggy, blurting out fanfares, only to fold in on itself in melancolie,... I suppose Brian fans take note...

The Marco Polo (now on Naxos) recording really is pretty good, passing for at least a CPO.


Malipiero is so friendly! Even in his cantankerous way,The Joy is unmistakable. Things pop and sputter,... he almost reminds me of 'Chitty Chitty Bang Bang'...


Symphony No.5, 'In eco', features 2 Pianos, and is probably GFM's most angular Symphony, though, the contours are as in other GFM. The pianos sound a lot like glittering fountains, with both cascading over each other. It's certainly muuuch more appealing than the 'Dialoghi' Concerto for 2 Pianos, or the other one for 2 Pianos alone.- but, those are later works. No.5 comes from the '40s, and is much more pleasant.


Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 21, 2014, 07:59:05 AM
Aye, it is time for more Malipiero Mania!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on November 21, 2014, 08:26:16 AM
Aye, it is time for more Malipiero Mania!

Yes! It's been awhile since I've listened to any of his music myself. Have you or any one else bought that new recording on Naxos?

Edit: Oh well, I just did. :) I'll let you guys know how it is here.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 21, 2014, 09:07:33 AM
Thanks for the alert!  Once Santa leaves the traditional Amazon gift card in my stocking . . . .

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on November 21, 2014, 07:29:01 PM
Thanks for the alert!  Once Santa leaves the traditional Amazon gift card in my stocking . . . .



You're welcome. I listened to some of this recording via Naxos Music Library, sounded quite nice.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on November 22, 2014, 10:04:14 AM
Piano Concertos 2-3 right now... boy!, this was good stuff when we were frothing earlier, but right now it's really really really good stuff!! Just Perfect Music...  CinemaScope all the waaay!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 22, 2014, 10:20:46 AM
I think the pf cti are my favorites by Gianni Malipiero . . . .
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on November 22, 2014, 07:27:53 PM
I think the pf cti are my favorites by Gianni Malipiero . . . .

Check out the Violin Concerto on YT. It's rawer- GFM is a little different with string textures.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Klaze on November 23, 2014, 12:37:19 AM
I've got 2 discs;

A disc with chamber music: the Sonata a tre and other works on BMG Ricordi.

--> Like it a lot!

Then i had another disc with orchestral works on Naxos: Tre Commedie/Stradivarius/Cimmarosiana/Gabrieliana

--> This I thought was incredibly uninspired, to the extent that I thought it must be another composer.

Well, maybe I should investigate the Piano Concertos or Symphonies.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on November 23, 2014, 07:48:46 PM
I've got 2 discs;

A disc with chamber music: the Sonata a tre and other works on BMG Ricordi.

--> Like it a lot!

Then i had another disc with orchestral works on Naxos: Tre Commedie/Stradivarius/Cimmarosiana/Gabrieliana

--> This I thought was incredibly uninspired, to the extent that I thought it must be another composer.

Well, maybe I should investigate the Piano Concertos or Symphonies.

I also have the Ricordi, yes, all around very nice; the Naxos has only trifles, yes it's not for us.

i would definiyely suggest the PCs, or the String Quartets on Dynamic (only that one), or the Naxos with Symphony No.7. I like Symphony No.6 on Denon (maybe his sunniest work).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Moonfish on April 29, 2015, 03:10:03 PM
Malipiero: Cello Concerto          Mainardi/RCO/van Beinum        1/41  [live]
 
My first listen ever to Malipiero's music and I was quite impressed with his cello concerto. The first two movements were quite alluring and built a soundscape I was drawn to. In contrast I was not too thrilled with the third movement that had more of a 20th century chaotic flavor even though it redeemed itself as it progressed.  Is the cello concerto a "typical" soundscape for Malipiero's works or can one expect a wide variety of tonal worlds?  Regardless, the cello concerto was definitely a positive experience for me. So are the new Naxos releases by La Vecchia worthwhile exploring?

(http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/aggiuntemalipiero/immagini/gfmhome5.jpg)

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/068/MI0001068087.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81exrUxU61L._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on May 04, 2015, 06:03:33 AM
Malipiero: Cello Concerto          Mainardi/RCO/van Beinum        1/41  [live]
 
My first listen ever to Malipiero's music and I was quite impressed with his cello concerto. The first two movements were quite alluring and built a soundscape I was drawn to. In contrast I was not too thrilled with the third movement that had more of a 20th century chaotic flavor even though it redeemed itself as it progressed.  Is the cello concerto a "typical" soundscape for Malipiero's works or can one expect a wide variety of tonal worlds?  Regardless, the cello concerto was definitely a positive experience for me. So are the new Naxos releases by La Vecchia worthwhile exploring?

(http://www.rodoni.ch/malipiero/aggiuntemalipiero/immagini/gfmhome5.jpg)

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/068/MI0001068087.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81exrUxU61L._SL1500_.jpg)

Well, the CC is actually a very minor piece, but, yes, GFM has a spiky, quirky, charming quality that runs through all his developments.

BUT--- YOU MUUUUST---- you must get the set of Piano Concerti that we have been raving about on this Thread. And, try either the disc with Symphony 7 (Naxos/Marco Polo) or 3/4,... to start with.

The Violin Concerto, also, you WILL like a lot! ;)



ALSO- the String Quartets on DYNAMIC- don't get the one on ASV, MUST be Dynamic version.




THEN, you can go on to the Late Symphonies which are a craggy as can be- Havergal? I am building up a Honegger-Malipiero bridge that is quite compelling.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Moonfish on May 04, 2015, 06:25:54 AM
Well, the CC is actually a very minor piece, but, yes, GFM has a spiky, quirky, charming quality that runs through all his developments.

BUT--- YOU MUUUUST---- you must get the set of Piano Concerti that we have been raving about on this Thread. And, try either the disc with Symphony 7 (Naxos/Marco Polo) or 3/4,... to start with.

The Violin Concerto, also, you WILL like a lot! ;)



ALSO- the String Quartets on DYNAMIC- don't get the one on ASV, MUST be Dynamic version.




THEN, you can go on to the Late Symphonies which are a craggy as can be- Havergal? I am building up a Honegger-Malipiero bridge that is quite compelling.

The CPO release of the PCs???
I really did like the cello concerto quite a bit. It doesn't seem like it has been recorded for quite a while?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Moonfish on May 04, 2015, 06:34:20 AM
This is due to be released by Naxos a few days from now....    8)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/912rYqUE%2BoL._SL1500_.jpg)

"Five vividly contrasting works, four of them in world première recordings, make up this latest issue in the Naxos series of orchestral music by the Italian composer Gian Francesco Malipiero. Visions of heroism and death form the cornerstone of the release, in the Ditirambo tragico (Tragic Dithyramb) composed during the First World War, and in Malipieros two earliest surviving pieces, Dai sepolcri (From Tombs) and the Sinfonia degli eroi (Symphony of Heroes). They are heard alongside the deceptively relaxed charm of Armenia, based on traditional Armenian melodies, and the varied, pungently Stravinskian moods of the aptly titled Grottesco (Grotesque)."
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on May 04, 2015, 06:51:06 AM
Is the cello concerto a "typical" soundscape for Malipiero's works or can one expect a wide variety of tonal worlds?  Regardless, the cello concerto was definitely a positive experience for me. So are the new Naxos releases by La Vecchia worthwhile exploring?

I'm not really sure if the Cello Concerto is typical of the composer or not as I've never heard the work. The Naxos recordings of Malipiero are definitely worth seeking out, especially those La Vecchia recordings, but I wouldn't want to be without the symphonies recordings either (originally released on Marco Polo). I'm not a huge fan of this composer's music as he's quite uneven in the quality of his compositions. Some of the works I've heard are unmemorable and lack a distinctive quality, but, at his best, he's a lyrical composer.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 04, 2015, 07:22:48 AM
The CPO release of the PCs???

This beauty right here:

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on May 04, 2015, 09:59:48 AM
This beauty right here:



A very nice set indeed.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on May 06, 2015, 04:24:20 PM
The CPO release of the PCs???
I really did like the cello concerto quite a bit. It doesn't seem like it has been recorded for quite a while?

The only other recording is on Nuova Era- with Siegfried Palm on cello, no less! G. Garbarino conducting.(recording verrry dry and serviceable) Disc also has 'Grottesco' from new Naxos release.
This beauty right here:



for all that is good- please either subsume this thread into my corrected title, or Capitalize that "M" in "mausoleum"- huh? pretty please_ can there be a little good tonight???

it will haunt you if you don't!!!!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on May 07, 2015, 03:27:17 PM
really??? ::) :(
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on May 07, 2015, 07:20:10 PM
This is due to be released by Naxos a few days from now....    8)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/912rYqUE%2BoL._SL1500_.jpg)

"Five vividly contrasting works, four of them in world première recordings, make up this latest issue in the Naxos series of orchestral music by the Italian composer Gian Francesco Malipiero. Visions of heroism and death form the cornerstone of the release, in the Ditirambo tragico (Tragic Dithyramb) composed during the First World War, and in Malipieros two earliest surviving pieces, Dai sepolcri (From Tombs) and the Sinfonia degli eroi (Symphony of Heroes). They are heard alongside the deceptively relaxed charm of Armenia, based on traditional Armenian melodies, and the varied, pungently Stravinskian moods of the aptly titled Grottesco (Grotesque)."

Looks like a great release. I just added to my Amazon wishlist.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on May 08, 2015, 08:56:59 PM
Looks like a great release. I just added to my Amazon wishlist.

Me too.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on February 16, 2016, 09:12:44 AM
I just downloaded the Naxos recording of the 3rd and 4th Symphonies, and I've got to say they were a joy to hear.  There's so much life to the score and the slower movements are striking in their beauty. Some composers speak your language and Malipiero definately speaks mine. I'm looking forward to picking up some more of his music. I'm aware he went through the usual phases of composers born to the Stravinsky generation, and that late in his long life he composed more in the atonal language. I'm looking forward to hearing the progression. I've heard his wonderful third PC and will look for a good recording of that as well as his other concerti.  Which post4th Symphony would be best to go with? I've known about Malipiero all along, but I somehow forgot about him over the years :-X.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on February 16, 2016, 09:46:06 AM
I really ought to revisit Malipiero's Piano Concertos. I remember good things about them.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 16, 2016, 09:49:45 AM
I just downloaded the Naxos recording of the 3rd and 4th Symphonies, and I've got to say they were a joy to hear.  There's so much life to the score and the slower movements are striking in their beauty. Some composers speak your language and Malipiero definately speaks mine. I'm looking forward to picking up some more of his music. I'm aware he went through the usual phases of composers born to the Stravinsky generation, and that late in his long life he composed more in the atonal language. I'm looking forward to hearing the progression. I've heard his wonderful third PC and will look for a good recording of that as well as his other concerti.  Which post4th Symphony would be best to go with?

I almost want to say “any of them”—only I know how helpful that won't be  8)

OTTOMH I should suggest either № 6 (Degli archi) or № 8 (Sinfonia brevis).
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on February 16, 2016, 03:29:31 PM
I just downloaded the Naxos recording of the 3rd and 4th Symphonies, and I've got to say they were a joy to hear.  There's so much life to the score and the slower movements are striking in their beauty. Some composers speak your language and Malipiero definately speaks mine. I'm looking forward to picking up some more of his music. I'm aware he went through the usual phases of composers born to the Stravinsky generation, and that late in his long life he composed more in the atonal language. I'm looking forward to hearing the progression. I've heard his wonderful third PC and will look for a good recording of that as well as his other concerti.  Which post4th Symphony would be best to go with? I've known about Malipiero all along, but I somehow forgot about him over the years :-X.
Those are my favourites by this composer but you might also like Symphony 7 and the string quartets available dirt cheap on Brilliant.
PS having said that I just looked up the Brilliant set on Amazon UK and found it now on sale for £75.99  :o. Hardly 'dirt cheap'. I think I paid about £7 for them. They are much cheaper on ASV on the Amazon US site.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on February 16, 2016, 08:22:31 PM
I just downloaded the Naxos recording of the 3rd and 4th Symphonies, and I've got to say they were a joy to hear.  There's so much life to the score and the slower movements are striking in their beauty. Some composers speak your language and Malipiero definately speaks mine. I'm looking forward to picking up some more of his music. I'm aware he went through the usual phases of composers born to the Stravinsky generation, and that late in his long life he composed more in the atonal language. I'm looking forward to hearing the progression. I've heard his wonderful third PC and will look for a good recording of that as well as his other concerti.  Which post4th Symphony would be best to go with? I've known about Malipiero all along, but I somehow forgot about him over the years :-X.

Shhh!!!!! Don't listen to anyone but me!!! Meeeeeee!!!!!!!

Symphony No.7 is the Overall Best, as being better than No.3 only by not having such a bombastic finale (not that it's that much, but, No.7 eliminates any displeasures). Then, of course, perhaps, the actual Best in Show might just go to the Symphony No.6 for Strings, BUT, only if you get the Denon recording, in its unbelievable sound. Now, I like all the later, quirky, numbered Symphonies 8-11, but the other ones are... different: go for the Naxos/Marco Polo with No.7, which also includes the interesting Sinfonia della Antigenida.

Then, the Piano Concertos AND the String Quartets (Dynamic version ONLY PLEASE!!!) YES, it may cost you a limb, or not, but you must must must get that one.

Eventually you might want to delve further. This Thread should have some good Posts. And, that Naxos series is coming along.

BUT PLEASE, CONSULT ME BEFORE PURCHASE- DON'T make any rash malipiero purchases,- get ONLY the approved recordings.


Stay away from the "Dialoghi" set on Stradivarious.








I have spoken
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on February 28, 2016, 05:09:07 PM
Shhh!!!!! Don't listen to anyone but me!!! Meeeeeee!!!!!!!

Symphony No.7 is the Overall Best, as being better than No.3 only by not having such a bombastic finale (not that it's that much, but, No.7 eliminates any displeasures). Then, of course, perhaps, the actual Best in Show might just go to the Symphony No.6 for Strings, BUT, only if you get the Denon recording, in its unbelievable sound. Now, I like all the later, quirky, numbered Symphonies 8-11, but the other ones are... different: go for the Naxos/Marco Polo with No.7, which also includes the interesting Sinfonia della Antigenida.

Then, the Piano Concertos AND the String Quartets (Dynamic version ONLY PLEASE!!!) YES, it may cost you a limb, or not, but you must must must get that one.

Eventually you might want to delve further. This Thread should have some good Posts. And, that Naxos series is coming along.

BUT PLEASE, CONSULT ME BEFORE PURCHASE- DON'T make any rash malipiero purchases,- get ONLY the approved recordings.


Stay away from the "Dialoghi" set on Stradivarious.








I have spoken


Sorry Snyprrr, I WAS rash in my acquiring much of Malipiero's music over the past few weeks. I hadn't seen this post until today :-[. I downloaded the Naxos recordings of Symphonies 1-6,8, 11. I live in a remote area in BC and the postage on Amazon kills me...
My reflections show a preference for the 1930-early 50s works, though some of the earlier scores are also nice. 
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 28, 2016, 05:10:30 PM
No worries; our snyppps is an excitable fellow.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Scion7 on February 28, 2016, 05:43:07 PM
... and possibly under-medicated.   :P
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 29, 2016, 02:35:51 AM
And, incidentally, I am perfectly content with the Venetian String Quartet recording of the quartets.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on March 01, 2016, 07:09:48 AM
Early returns on the numbered symphonies...I like them all  :).  The 6th, for strings, is really good and it inspired me to purchase the collected String Quartets (Dynamic). It'll take awhile for them to arrive. While I haven't heard the 7th Symphony, I've been binging on the first six as well as the Piano and Violin Concerti (PC 3). I'd really like to get a hold of the complete PC collection as I have always been a fan of PC3. The 1930-50 period I prefer to his earlier work. Some of the WW1 works are nice, but overall the impressionistic works seem less original and are sometimes harmonically uninteresting. Not that there aren't a lot of works I like ( the Pause del Silencio and Impressions Dal Vero have some great music in them). But his gift for melodic phrases really shines in those numbered Symphonies and concerti.

I have to say that the fidelity on the Naxos recordings is uneven, but since they pretty much cover all his work of that period, I can't complain. I'm curious as to what his opera output sounds like, but to be frank, I don't listen to much opera these days. As his works are often on the short side, it's easy to listen to several wofks in succession...for good or bad. For now, I want those Piano Concertos and String Quartets...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 01, 2016, 07:21:44 AM
[...] The 1930-50 period I prefer to his earlier work.

Me, too, though perhaps my ear is kinder to the early work.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on March 01, 2016, 02:37:05 PM
Me, too, though perhaps my ear is kinder to the early work.

 No disrespect intended...I like lots of the early work; it's just got to wait until I've listened to the mid and late pieces that have hooked me in. The Pause Dal Silenzios are playing as I write (N.2 is great)...not that they're so early, but they are pre-1930. GFMs artistic periods gently reflect the the 20th C. development of the language. He is the first Italian composer I've listened to in a long while and I appreciate the emphasis on lyricism.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum SYMPHONY 6 ON DENON
Post by: snyprrr on March 03, 2016, 08:16:15 AM
No disrespect intended...I like lots of the early work; it's just got to wait until I've listened to the mid and late pieces that have hooked me in. The Pause Dal Silenzios are playing as I write (N.2 is great)...not that they're so early, but they are pre-1930. GFMs artistic periods gently reflect the the 20th C. development of the language. He is the first Italian composer I've listened to in a long while and I appreciate the emphasis on lyricism.

Check out Chris lee's "Castle of the Living Dead" for the kind of b+w mid-60s Italian Gothic Horror that fits in perfectly with the craggy GFM way.


I'm glad for your enjoyment. Yes, you must still get the PCs and the SQs (remember, the Dynamic version only- did you just say you're waiting? good)


Blustery spring is perfect GFM weather round here!!


ALSO, PEOPLE, PLEASE DO LOOK INTO SYMPHONY 6 ON DENON FOR THE SCRUMPTUOUS(?) SOUND!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: SymphonicAddict on March 01, 2017, 08:15:56 PM
About his symphonies (the symphony is my favorite classical form)

This is a pretty good composer. You can perceive the evolution of your imagination for composing. The first symphonies are certainly impressionistic and warm (Sinfonia degli Eroi, Sinfonia del Silenzio e de la Morte, Sinfonia del Mare, Symphony No. 1). The following are a bit more avant-garde but not very dissonant (Symphony No. 2 to Symphony No. 7 including Sinfonia in un tempo and Sinfonia dello Zodiaco). The latter are rougher, they have complex harmony, many dissonances and more seriousness (Symphony No. 8 to Symphony No. 11 including the Sinfonia per Antigenida).

He made a very good impression on me.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on March 01, 2017, 10:32:51 PM
About his symphonies (the symphony is my favorite classical form)

This is a pretty good composer. You can perceive the evolution of your imagination for composing. The first symphonies are certainly impressionistic and warm (Sinfonia degli Eroi, Sinfonia del Silenzio e de la Morte, Sinfonia del Mare, Symphony No. 1). The following are a bit more avant-garde but not very dissonant (Symphony No. 2 to Symphony No. 7 including Sinfonia in un tempo and Sinfonia dello Zodiaco). The latter are rougher, they have complex harmony, many dissonances and more seriousness (Symphony No. 8 to Symphony No. 11 including the Sinfonia per Antigenida).

He made a very good impression on me.
Interesting overview. I like symphonies 3,4 and 7 most + the string quartets.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on March 03, 2017, 07:35:21 AM
Interesting overview. I like symphonies 3,4 and 7 most + the string quartets.

Agreed. I like 1, 3, 6, 7, and 10 the most. The Quartets are uniquely his own and 3-7 are my favourites, though they're all good. I feel the need to acquire some of his vocal works as his melodic flair is  powerful. Any recs?
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on March 03, 2017, 03:22:42 PM
Agreed. I like 1, 3, 6, 7, and 10 the most. The Quartets are uniquely his own and 3-7 are my favourites, though they're all good. I feel the need to acquire some of his vocal works as his melodic flair is  powerful. Any recs?
Interesting overview. I like symphonies 3,4 and 7 most + the string quartets.

Oh come on guys, and love the ugly Symphonies 8-11. They just keep getting craggier and craggier,... I mean, you love Havergal... Malipiero's Late Symphonies are a world unto themselves of bluffs and cliffs and caves and knotty trees...


A shout out to the Piano Concertos- you will love them MORE!! ;)
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 03, 2017, 04:02:05 PM
Oh come on guys, and love the ugly Symphonies 8-11. They just keep getting craggier and craggier,... I mean, you love Havergal... Malipiero's Late Symphonies are a world unto themselves of bluffs and cliffs and caves and knotty trees...


A shout out to the Piano Concertos- you will love them MORE!! ;)

I'm Karl Henning, and I approve this message.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: SymphonicAddict on March 03, 2017, 04:36:06 PM
Interesting overview. I like symphonies 3,4 and 7 most + the string quartets.

Oh, yes! They're pretty nice. I like more Sinfonia del Mare, Sinfonia del Silenzio e de la Morte, 1, and 3 to 7, but without demeaning the other ones.
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum GREAT PIANO CONCERTI
Post by: snyprrr on June 19, 2017, 05:28:12 PM
I'm Karl Henning, and I approve this message.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Time to dip into the Piano Concerto Cycle on CPO, Karl.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 20, 2017, 04:15:27 AM
Good!
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on June 22, 2017, 06:53:05 AM
Oh come on guys, and love the ugly Symphonies 8-11. They just keep getting craggier and craggier,... I mean, you love Havergal... Malipiero's Late Symphonies are a world unto themselves of bluffs and cliffs and caves and knotty trees...


A shout out to the Piano Concertos- you will love them MORE!! ;)

I'm in agreement on the later symphonies. I used to listen to the more tonal-sounding works of 1930-45 and overlooked the later music, but that was more a tribute to the quality of those earlier works. But the less tonal works post 1950 are full of great musical adventures. I have more listening to do!
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: Parsifal on June 22, 2017, 07:51:37 AM
Oh come on guys, and love the ugly Symphonies 8-11. They just keep getting craggier and craggier,... I mean, you love Havergal... Malipiero's Late Symphonies are a world unto themselves of bluffs and cliffs and caves and knotty trees...

I don't know of any recordings aside from the Naxos series, which I find extremely lack-luster with respect to performance and audio quality. I'm waiting for an alternative.
Title: Re: Malipiero's Mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on June 22, 2017, 11:38:53 AM
I don't know of any recordings aside from the Naxos series, which I find extremely lack-luster with respect to performance and audio quality. I'm waiting for an alternative.

mmm... only CPO might venture that, MDG,... but, y'know,... you KNOW that's probably not gonna happen on THIS planet in the foreseeable... but, yea, hearing all that craggy goodness in a crisp rendition would be sweet...

BUT, I thought half the charm of those MarcoPolo/Naxos Symphonies was their "Eastern European" quality? lol- I mean,- uhh...

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 26, 2017, 05:22:48 AM
Good!

Finished going through the PCs. The whole Cycle may be my fav PCs of the 20th Century, followed by the Concertinos of Honegger and Francaix, with the Helffer disc of Milhaud PCs rounding out. And then Stravinsky.

But the Malipiero set have an illumination to them... I have raved on and on... ahhhhhh... tonic!!
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 26, 2017, 05:36:18 AM
They're good concerti!  They deserve performances!  (“Yes, any performance would be more....”)
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: snyprrr on July 26, 2017, 07:30:54 AM
They're good concerti!  They deserve performances!  (“Yes, any performance would be more....”)

Well, they don't have BigTunes for the BlueHairs. I'm still in awe over that CPO Cycle, though. How about that early 'Variations w/o A Theme'?

I'd like to hear those newer Naxos discs...
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on October 09, 2017, 08:30:42 AM
Time to bring this thread out of from the dustbins...

One wishes these symphonies from Malipiero would get some modern performances and an enterprising label like CPO would record them. I suppose we’re stuck with Antonio de Almeida. ;) But this isn’t to say his performances are in any way ‘terrible’ of course, he must be commended for even recording them and having such a strong passion for this composer (amongst other out-of-the-way 20th Century repertoire). I do feel that the performances are completely serviceable even if they never should be considered the last word on the music, but with the way things are going, it sure does feel like they are! The piano concerto set on CPO is fantastic and I’m going to be revisiting some of those works today. I’d like to get around to his SQs, too. Any one have any thoughts on those works?
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: kyjo on October 09, 2017, 09:11:16 AM
Time to bring this thread out of from the dustbins...

One wishes these symphonies from Malipiero would get some modern performances and an enterprising label like CPO would record them. I suppose we’re stuck with Antonio de Almeida. ;) But this isn’t to say his performances are in anyway ‘terrible’ of course, he must be commended for even recording them and having such a strong passion for this composer (amongst other out-of-the-way 20th Century repertoire). I do feel, however, that the performances are completely serviceable even if they never should be considered the last word on the music, but with the way things are going, it sure does feel like they are! The piano concerto set on CPO is fantastic and I’m going to be revisiting some of those works today. I’d like to get around to his SQs, too. Any one have any thoughts on those works?

Great to hear that the Naxos recordings of the symphonies aren't as "terrible" as some have said they are :) Part of the reason I've delayed exploring the symphonies is because of the negative criticisms the performances have received, but I'll be sure to put any pre-conceived notions behind me and just listen.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Mirror Image on October 09, 2017, 09:17:42 AM
Great to hear that the Naxos recordings of the symphonies aren't as "terrible" as some have said they are :) Part of the reason I've delayed exploring the symphonies is because of the negative criticisms the performances have received, but I'll be sure to put any pre-conceived notions behind me and just listen.

Well, they’re not great performances, Kyle, but ‘serviceable’. That’s it. I can hear some other conductor doing so many great things with them. Imagine if Riccardo Muti had recorded them? Holy cow! Alun Francis, a very capable conductor and has turned in one great performance after another for the CPO label, would be an ideal conductor for this job. Hire the Cologne RSO and get to recording, Maestro Francis!

Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Rons_talking on August 04, 2020, 08:14:11 AM
I've just finished listening to Malipiero's first quartet and am amazed at the degree of invention. As you might know, Malipiero was fervent in is anti-development stance (he considered development germanic) and composed in "panels", some related motivically, others not.  SQ 1 has over 20 unique ideas which seem to work the same way great ballets work. SQs can get boring at times due to lack of sonic variety (though some composers try every technique in the book to circumvent the limitation) but this one keeps my interest and is tonal to boot.https://open.spotify.com/track/5JfqtAr5VC7T48Gp4R6aDF?si=SL2P_za4SEisrwC2TiWrkg
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: Symphonic Addict on August 04, 2020, 05:38:36 PM
Good to see more love for his SQs. Malipiero's string quartets are certainly rather original in their respective forms. The Orpheus SQ recordings on ASV are sonically better recorded than those by the Quartetto d'Archi di Venezia on Dynamic.
Title: Re: Malipiero's mausoleum
Post by: vandermolen on August 05, 2020, 06:54:21 AM
I also really like the SQs; one in particular although I couldn't remember which one, so I tracked back to page 1 of this thread (2007) to learn that it was SQ No.5 which I'm playing now:
(http://)