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Certainly. I haven't heard the harp as prominent as in this glorious rendition and recording.

Damn, you’re making me want to revisit his entire cycle!

(I’ll probably end up doing this when off next week along with revisiting Tennstedt’s Mahler recordings, which are a scattered mess in terms of his discography.)
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Mirror Image has done this on a regular basis, just because mailing is not usually immediate.

 :P So true!
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Pounds the table! And Barbirolli’s interpretation is superb.

Certainly. I haven't heard the harp as prominent as in this glorious rendition and recording.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Vagn Holmboe (1909-1996)
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:31:16 PM »
Kind words, sir! Never fear, I'm nothing if not self-aware 🙂. Today has been mainly a black metal day for myself and my wife as we've gone about our business. Always good to change it up!

This is certainly true, although I don’t think I could listen to black metal. ;D
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The Diner / Re: Coronavirus thread
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 07:14:07 PM »


I think this is a good example of covid populism, an example of why science has got a bad name in the pandemic. The problem, and it is a serious one, is in the first clause: the latest data showing us something very important. The paper in question does not show anything - the sample is too small for that. It suggests something possibly, an area for further investigation, an unlikely possibility. But it doesn’t show anything.

But here we see it used to project the scientist Redlener into a prime media position, someone who knows an important fact, a voice who gives us a solemn warning. And we all know that fear means clicks, and clicks mean money.
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I agree with your current incarnation rather than your previous one...

It's interesting that you connect with Holmboe's string quartets more than his symphonies, because for a lot of people it seems to be the other way around (can we talk about "a lot of people" when referring to a not-that-well-known Danish 20th century composer?).

My sympathies swing a bit. I still find with Holmboe that I frequently have to listen to a piece a couple of times when I return to it before I remember what I got out of it previously. He is such a tricky composer to grasp in my view.

Well, I enjoyed the later SQs, I don’t remember much about the earlier ones. Yes, repeat listenings is definitely beneficial I think for Holmboe, although, sometimes, they don’t always help, which is where I’m at with the symphonies right now. He’s just not a composer I ‘reach for’ when I want to hear some Nordic music. Sibelius and Nielsen, on the other hand, are my go-to Nordic composers, although I do quite like Atterberg and enjoy a good bit of Stenhammar, Nystroem and Rangström that I’ve heard. In terms of more contemporary music from the northlands, Aho is becoming a favorite.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Brewski on Today at 07:03:22 PM »
Respighi: Feste Romane (Antonio Pappano / Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, live Jan. 23, 2007) - Just uploaded in December 2020, a live performance that captures all the exuberance. I love all three of the composer's great tone poems, but as the years go by, this one has claimed the top spot, for its orchestration.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xss9poiICXQ

--Bruce
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Madiel on Today at 07:01:30 PM »
I did, indeed, but looking back on it --- I shouldn't have wrote it. :)

I agree with your current incarnation rather than your previous one...

It's interesting that you connect with Holmboe's string quartets more than his symphonies, because for a lot of people it seems to be the other way around (can we talk about "a lot of people" when referring to a not-that-well-known Danish 20th century composer?).

My sympathies swing a bit. I still find with Holmboe that I frequently have to listen to a piece a couple of times when I return to it before I remember what I got out of it previously. He is such a tricky composer to grasp in my view.
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Opera and Vocal / Re: What Opera Are You Listening to Now?
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:01:20 PM »


Peter Grimes must surely be the most recorded opera of all post WWII operas and I don't think it's ever had a bad recording, right from this its very first, recorded in 1958. It stil sounds very good in this transfer.

What did you think of the newer Gardner recording on Chandos?
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Symphony No. 1

Ultra-romantic approach to this masterpiece. I feel the first three movements like unmistakably Sibelian, but the 4th does have something of Tchaikovsky. I can't get enough of this work.



Pounds the table! And Barbirolli’s interpretation is superb.
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