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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 08:21:06 AM »
That sounds more or less right. The tempo is Andante (a moderate tempo) and the beat is the whole note; there are two beats to a bar (not four and definitely not eight). I think I probably play it a bit slower but I'm also not a professional pianist lol. (That set of recordings looks especially interesting for the Fauré; I might have to get it as well. There's a lot of world-class Fauré recordings from that era.)


I’d be interested in what you have to say about Rudolph Serkin’s D958 on this CD



I vaguely remember there were some other rapid early Schubert things from Cassadesus. But that Serkin is astonishingly . . . something. Fast. The rmcr heavy thought it was just an artefact of the medium, no one in their right mind would play like that blah blah blah
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 08:17:01 AM »
.I should just buy the darn discs.


If you’re interested in Fauré maybe.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by amw on Today at 08:15:22 AM »
While you're here, I'd be curious about your reaction to the sample clip on this page of Emma Boynet playing Schubert D. 899 No. 3 in the 1930s. To me it's breathtaking...I should just buy the darn discs.
That sounds more or less right. The tempo is Andante (a moderate tempo) and the beat is the whole note; there are two beats to a bar (not four and definitely not eight). I think I probably play it a bit slower but I'm also not a professional pianist lol. (That set of recordings looks especially interesting for the Fauré; I might have to get it as well. There's a lot of world-class Fauré recordings from that era.)

Quote
EDIT: wow, Koch is an interesting guy...takes 3 minutes to play the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata, but takes 32 minutes to play the first movement of Schubert D. 960?
Yes, that's the frustrating thing about him; one can never unreservedly recommend anything he records because he knows better than most what the music should sound like, but lets his personal taste [or in some cases technical limitations] run away with him. In this case, choosing a tempo for D960 that's exactly half of what it "should" be simply because of a modern interpretation of the 19th century belief in "heavenly lengths" (what people in the 21st century never remember is that in 1838 any continuous single movement over a quarter of an hour was already considered extremely long and taxing for audiences; a Bruckner symphony would have been unthinkable, until of course Bruckner did think it in the 1860s-1870s, and received the backlash. Today we have a much longer attention span and a very different way of looking at concerts.)
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The Diner / Re: What TV series are you currently watching?
« Last post by milk on Today at 08:05:26 AM »
I'm just not into any series on TV anymore. I'd like to enjoy a "show" again. Meanwhile, this is fascinating. How do I shrink this????? Sorry folks.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by milk on Today at 08:01:34 AM »
What I noticed is that Hough mentions how Chopin's preference for the Pleyel played such an import role in writing this music:

"There is significance too that his indications are generally faster than later norms (the much-loved Op 27 No 2 is a startling example). Chopin’s original tempi and long phrase markings encourage melodies to float in one breath across the bar lines; and his preferred Pleyel piano had a much faster decay of resonance than modern instruments, compelling the pianist to move on to the next note before the sound literally dies."

But of course, he doesn't use a Pleyel...   ::)
Not like this:
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Todd on Today at 07:50:28 AM »
To me it's breathtaking...I should just buy the darn discs.


Yes, you should - right now.  You shan't regret it.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Krzysztof Penderecki (b. 1933)
« Last post by Maestro267 on Today at 07:49:50 AM »
Yes, I think there's a lot to enjoy in all of Penderecki's oeuvre. Also, this belief that his earlier, more avant-garde works are somehow better just because they're wilder and more spontaneous is wrong-headed, IMHO. The composer has stated many times that he needed to move away from this style as he felt he had exhausted it, which I believe he did and the proof of this in the pudding as the saying goes. Penderecki's more tonal works are incredibly focused works that require more than a passing listen to get into and understand. One can very well just not like the music, but no one should make the mistake of completely writing these works off. Works like the Horn Concerto, String Quartet No. 3, "Leaves of an unwritten diary", Symphonies Nos. 6, 7 & 8, A Sea of Dreams Did Breathe on Me, the Sinfoniettas, the Sextet, Violin Sonata No. 2 et. al. all demonstrate a wide range of style. I think once a person actually starts digging into his oeuvre and not just superficially, they will begin to realize there's more variety in his writing then what was initially thought.

This, 100%. He got 40+ years of works out of the tonal idiom compared to 20 years at most out of avant-garde.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: 18th Chopin Competition
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:42:22 AM »
Of course, one of main squeezes Bartók had this to say: "Competitions are for horses, not artists." And I'm pretty much in agreement with him.
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Wölfl, Joseph - String Quartets, Op. 4, 10, & 30 w/ the three groups shown below, all performing on period instruments - Wölfl (also Woelfl) wrote at least 18 string quartets (see HERE) - 9 are performed on these 3 recordings, although there is one duplication, thus 8 in toto.  I own about 10 CDs of this short lived composer, the rest mainly piano sonatas/concertos (except for one disc of Symphonies).  Dave :)

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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Brian on Today at 07:36:34 AM »
(While I'm here and on my soapbox: listen to Tobias Koch's recording of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata)
While you're here, I'd be curious about your reaction to the sample clip on this page of Emma Boynet playing Schubert D. 899 No. 3 in the 1930s. To me it's breathtaking...I should just buy the darn discs.

EDIT: wow, Koch is an interesting guy...takes 3 minutes to play the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata, but takes 32 minutes to play the first movement of Schubert D. 960?
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