GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: vandermolen on June 12, 2007, 12:21:32 PM

Title: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 12, 2007, 12:21:32 PM
Any other nutter fans of this great Russian composer? Am listening to Polyansky's fine recording of Symphony 27 (Chandos) with a fine coupling of the Cello Concerto (Alexander Ivashkin, soloist).

The 27th is a valedictory work, written when the composer was dying of cancer (he postponed an operation to complete the work) and , to add insult to injury, was under the displeasure of the soviet regime having had his music denounced (alongside that of Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Khachaturian, Shebalin and Popov) at the notorious 1948 denunciation of composers from party hack Zhdanov. Miaskovsky's creative reply was the 27th Symphony a work of great autumnal beauty and power which (ironically) received a posthumous Stalin prize for the composer.

The slow, movement in particular is terribly moving and the symphony (from 1949/50) is, I believe, the last great,belated flowering of the spirit of Russian Romanticism that had moved Glazunov and Rachmaninov to create some of their finest work.

Miaskovsky (or Myaskovsky) is the link between the Russian nationalist composers of the 19th Century and the great figures of the 20th Century like Shostakovich and Prokofiev.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Guido on June 12, 2007, 01:50:21 PM
The cello concerto is a superb work. It has the same sort of world weary nostalgia as the Elgar cello concerto, and was written at the end of the second world war (rather than the first). It's been recorded a few times, but I only recently heard the Rostropovich version - don't know why I'm surprised but it's easily the best version out there - his first recording. There's a live version too that is also superb. I thought I already loved the piece, but Rostropovich reveals it to be great work that it is - his colouring of the solo part is just wonderful.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 12, 2007, 10:33:22 PM
The cello concerto is a superb work. It has the same sort of world weary nostalgia as the Elgar cello concerto, and was written at the end of the second world war (rather than the first). It's been recorded a few times, but I only recently heard the Rostropovich version - don't know why I'm surprised but it's easily the best version out there - his first recording. There's a live version too that is also superb. I thought I already loved the piece, but Rostropovich reveals it to be great work that it is - his colouring of the solo part is just wonderful.

I agree. EMI have just reissued the studio recording with Malcolm Sargent. The Chandos version is very good too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry on June 13, 2007, 07:54:00 AM
The only works I have are on Naxos, and what I have heard of it, its right in my alley, but to find good recordings is another matter. The Naxos is very good, but were to go from there.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: tjguitar on June 13, 2007, 01:49:28 PM
No idea if this is a new recording, but I just saw this review of Op. 9:


http://www.goldenscores.com/?a=classical&id=63
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Nunc Dimittis on June 13, 2007, 03:48:02 PM
Any other nutter fans of this great Russian composer? Am listening to Polyansky's fine recording of Symphony 27 (Chandos) with a fine coupling of the Cello Concerto (Alexander Ivashkin, soloist).

Listened to that CD last night. I love the theme in the first movement at about the 3 minute mark.   The only other works I have by him are the Symphony no. 5 and the Violin Concerto, both on Melodiya LPs.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry Collier on June 13, 2007, 11:06:51 PM
The violin concerto is excellent. There is a good modern recording of it by Vadim Repin with Gergiev. Also a 1939 recording with Oistrakh, or a recording by Grigory Feyghin.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on June 14, 2007, 12:21:14 AM
I love nr 22 under Svetlanov on Olympia, elegic, nostalgic and very sad.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 17, 2007, 11:06:54 PM
No idea if this is a new recording, but I just saw this review of Op. 9:


http://www.goldenscores.com/?a=classical&id=63

No, it's an old recording but a fine one. There is a good, underrated, performance of Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony on Marco Polo (Stankovsky).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: m_gigena on June 18, 2007, 04:49:07 PM
The violin concerto is excellent. There is a good modern recording of it by Vadim Repin with Gergiev. Also a 1939 recording with Oistrakh, or a recording by Grigory Feyghin.


And there's a fourth one on Naxos, coupled with Vainberg's vc.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 29, 2007, 05:46:28 AM
Very good news that the company Alto will issue all the Svetlanov Myaskovsky symphonies that did not appear when Olympia crashed. They will be available (in the UK) at budget price (£4.99) and will feature the same cover art as the Olympias (with letters on the spine that will eventually spell the composer's name). Symphony15 and Symphony 27 (a wonderful valedictory score) will be available in August 2007 with the remaining issues (nos 16,17,19,21,23,24) being issued in 2008.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/announce.html
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Don on June 29, 2007, 06:07:54 AM
And there's a fourth one on Naxos, coupled with Vainberg's vc.

And that's a fantastic disc and coupling.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on July 04, 2007, 07:29:09 AM
From the note on musicweb it seems that only the unreleased symphonies will be released. Since Olympia cuirrently is unavailable, does anybody know what will happen to those CDs already released and which currently seems to be unavailable?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 05, 2007, 01:09:49 AM
From the note on musicweb it seems that only the unreleased symphonies will be released. Since Olympia cuirrently is unavailable, does anybody know what will happen to those CDs already released and which currently seems to be unavailable?

Good point. I don't know. Some of them are available, usually at incredibly expensive prices on Amazon. I hope that Regis might issue them in due course as they have done with other Olympia issues.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on July 05, 2007, 01:32:51 AM
Regis was my hope as well until I heard about the Alton reissues. I'm interestyed in the complete series.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: johnQpublic on July 05, 2007, 03:42:21 AM
The news about the reissues is indeed good.

It was less than a week ago I listened to the Violin Concerto. It's very much a delight except for an eratic last movement. It always hits me as a letdown.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 05, 2007, 07:50:42 AM
From the note on musicweb it seems that only the unreleased symphonies will be released. Since Olympia cuirrently is unavailable, does anybody know what will happen to those CDs already released and which currently seems to be unavailable?

Alto has the option of issuing the old Olympia Myaskovsky symphony discs once the four, previously unissued discs are released in 2008.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jurajjak on July 17, 2007, 03:55:12 PM
I love Svetlanov's old recording of the Symphony #27--the final movement is perfect (though I wish it were longer).

Miaskovsky's Symphony #10 is, apart from the #27, the best work of his I've heard.  This is the "modernist" Miaskovsky we rarely see--a tumultuous, driving, moderately dissonant one-movement symphony, brilliantly conceived and orchestrated.


andrew 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on July 19, 2007, 11:54:15 PM
And the first Alto issue (15/27) is listed in the August prerelease list on mdt!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 04, 2007, 02:03:09 AM
And the first Alto issue (15/27) is listed in the August prerelease list on mdt!

Just received it; a wonderful disc and a great introduction to Myaskovsky's music. Both symphonies are amongst Myaskovsky's finest and I had forgotten what a great work Symphony 15 is. The valedictory No 27 is perhaps my favourite (together with nos 6, 17, 21 and 25), very moving in view of the circumstances of its composition (Myaskovsky dying of cancer and under critical dissaproval following Zhdanov's denunciation of leading composers).

All this for £5.00  :D 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on August 15, 2007, 02:18:44 PM
Just received it; a wonderful disc and a great introduction to Myaskovsky's music. Both symphonies are amongst Myaskovsky's finest and I had forgotten what a great work Symphony 15 is. The valedictory No 27 is perhaps my favourite (together with nos 6, 17, 21 and 25), very moving in view of the circumstances of its composition (Myaskovsky dying of cancer and under critical dissaproval following Zhdanov's denunciation of leading composers).

All this for £5.00  :D 

Just listened to this disc. I have admired Miaskovsky's music for a very long time and have all of the symphonies released so far in my collection(with quite a few duplications). I had not listened to any of them for quite a long time and had forgotten how intensely moving No. 27 actually is. When one takes account of the tragic circumstances of Miaskovsky's last two years-for the reasons you describe-the music makes even more impact. I can never understand the notion that the appreciation of music should in some way be disassociated from the context in which it was written. Here was the most respected teacher in Soviet Russia who had produced a stream of beautiful but essentially conservative works humiliated by the Communist party machine.
Within two years he was dead. To produce such a glowing and triumphal score as the twenty seventh symphony is testimony to his spirit and the power of music!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 16, 2007, 12:41:19 AM
Just listened to this disc. I have admired Miaskovsky's music for a very long time and have all of the symphonies released so far in my collection(with quite a few duplications). I had not listened to any of them for quite a long time and had forgotten how intensely moving No. 27 actually is. When one takes account of the tragic circumstances of Miaskovsky's last two years-for the reasons you describe-the music makes even more impact. I can never understand the notion that the appreciation of music should in some way be disassociated from the context in which it was written. Here was the most respected teacher in Soviet Russia who had produced a stream of beautiful but essentially conservative works humiliated by the Communist party machine.
Within two years he was dead. To produce such a glowing and triumphal score as the twenty seventh symphony is testimony to his spirit and the power of music!

I think that you have stated this very eloquently and I totally agree with what you say. Do you know the Myaskovsky website? It is very informative and there are some good photos;

http://www.myaskovsky.ru/?mode=main

Am listening to Svetlanov's performance of Symphony 27 on the new Alto disc. The performance of the slow movements is overwhelming, the best I have ever heard (ie the older Svetlanov on Olympia and Polyansky on Chandos...never heard the Gauk).

This really is a wonderful disc (for£5.00!) and I can't recommend it strongly enough. Best introduction I know to Myaskovsky (or Miaskovsky).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on August 16, 2007, 02:16:42 AM
Ah, I had assumed that the Svetlanov performance of the 27th on the Alto disc was the same one as on the older Olympia disc(coupled with the Sinfonietta in A minor) where his orchestra is described as the USSR Academic Symphony Orchestra but I do see that the timings are slightly different.

Incidentally, I seem to remember a letter-may have been in "International Record Review"-which gave a quite excellent survey of all the principal Russian orchestras with their confusing name changes over the last twenty years. Must try to look it out again!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on November 30, 2007, 11:44:53 AM
And vol 12 with symphony 16 & 19 form Alto on the January prerelase list on Mdt.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 03, 2008, 02:46:35 PM
And vol 12 with symphony 16 & 19 form Alto on the January prerelase list on Mdt.

Received it today; wonderful CD (and for £5.00!). No 16 is new to CD in the UK. It was written to commemorate an air disaster; the loss of the gigantic "Maxim Gorky" in an air accident in 1936. It is "populist" to some extent and shows Miaskovsky (during the depths of Stalin's purges) trying to come to terms with the regime. The funereal slow movement is one of his finest creations and has one of those tunes which remain in the memory long afterwards. Symphony No 19 for band is also a fine work.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on January 03, 2008, 03:05:04 PM
Received it today; wonderful CD (and for £5.00!). No 16 is new to CD in the UK. It was written to commemorate an air disaster; the loss of the gigantic "Maxim Gorky" in an air accident in 1936. It is "populist" to some extent and shows Miaskovsky (during the depths of Stalin's purges) trying to come to terms with the regime. The funereal slow movement is one of his finest creations and has one of those tunes which remain in the memory long afterwards. Symphony No 19 for band is also a fine work.
Sent from mdt yesterday (with the new disc of Koechlin string quartets in a series which will include them all). Really looking forward to it!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 04, 2008, 07:01:57 AM
Sent from mdt yesterday (with the new disc of Koechlin string quartets in a series which will include them all). Really looking forward to it!

Let us know what you think. Next up are symphonies 17 and 21 and next winter nos 23 and 24. I think that these are four of the finest Myaskovsky symphonies. I wish that RCA would reissue Morton Gould's recording of Symphony 21.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: rubio on January 10, 2008, 04:01:50 AM
The violin concerto is excellent. There is a good modern recording of it by Vadim Repin with Gergiev. Also a 1939 recording with Oistrakh, or a recording by Grigory Feyghin.


How is this violin concerto performed by Feyghin/Svetlanov on Melodiya? It's coupled with Svetlanov's account of the 22nd symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: rubio on January 10, 2008, 04:38:34 AM
It seems like there is a recently released 16CD-set of Svetlanov's symphonies (Warner Classics France) available from Amazon France for 64 EURO (a nice price, I think!). It says Orchestre D'Etat De Russie, and I guess these are the same as Russian Federation Academic SO? So are these recordings the same as the old Melodiya/Olympia CD's? I guess he cannot have recorded all of them twice?

http://www.amazon.fr/Int%C3%A9grale-Symphonies-Nikola%C3%AF-Miaskovsky/dp/B000XCTD5S/ref=sr_1_2/402-9098922-6672134?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1194306386&sr=1-2

A nice write-up on musicweb:

http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2002/Nov02/Miaskovsky_survey.htm

or

http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2002/Mar02/miask6olympia1.htm
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Benny on January 20, 2008, 03:23:03 PM
It seems like there is a recently released 16CD-set of Svetlanov's symphonies (Warner Classics France) available from Amazon France for 64 EURO (a nice price, I think!). It says Orchestre D'Etat De Russie, and I guess these are the same as Russian Federation Academic SO? So are these recordings the same as the old Melodiya/Olympia CD's? I guess he cannot have recorded all of them twice?

http://www.amazon.fr/Int%C3%A9grale-Symphonies-Nikola%C3%AF-Miaskovsky/dp/B000XCTD5S/ref=sr_1_2/402-9098922-6672134?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1194306386&sr=1-2

A nice write-up on musicweb:

http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2002/Nov02/Miaskovsky_survey.htm

or

http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2002/Mar02/miask6olympia1.htm

Hi. I took a look at that package deal with Brilliant Classics and it appears to be a repackaging of the sixteen CDs originally sold on Russian Disc. The Svetlanov recordings of Miaskovsky's complete orchestral works were first issued by a private foundation on the label Russian Disc. Olympia used the same recordings, Alto is doing it now, and Brilliant Classics appear to have thrown a monkey's wrench in that marketing plan by getting the whole thing out before Alto is done. I think that's about right.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 22, 2008, 06:34:23 AM
Hi. I took a look at that package deal with Brilliant Classics and it appears to be a repackaging of the sixteen CDs originally sold on Russian Disc. The Svetlanov recordings of Miaskovsky's complete orchestral works were first issued by a private foundation on the label Russian Disc. Olympia used the same recordings, Alto is doing it now, and Brilliant Classics appear to have thrown a monkey's wrench in that marketing plan by getting the whole thing out before Alto is done. I think that's about right.

Alto are very unhappy about this as they were licensed to issue the Svetlanov recordings, although I guess that those of us who have been collecting the Olympia/Alto set will wait for their remaining issues.  Alexander Gauk's fine old recording of Myaskovsky's 17th Symphony is just issued again in a Brilliant box set devoted to Gauk's recordings.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Pierre on March 02, 2008, 06:41:43 AM
I'm listening to Myaskovsky's Second String Quartet as I type this - played by the Taneyev Quartet (Russian Disc, where it's coupled with Quartets Nos 6 & 10; I believe that this recording's just been reissued on Northern Flowers, btw, but cw Quartets Nos 1 & 3). I'd forgotten what an excellent work this, and indeed Quartet No. 6 (can't quite remember No. 10 so look forward to reaching that work): a fascinating kaleidoscope of colours, but full of poignant melodies and in a very accessible style. Definitely worth looking out for.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 12, 2008, 05:15:25 AM
My copy of the newly released Alto CD of Miaskovsky(or should that be Myaskovsky?)'s Symphonies Nos. 17 and 21 has just arrived.
Looking forward to listening to the symphonies very much.

I notice that the booklet note is written by one "Jeffrey Davis". vandermolen is that you?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: ChamberNut on May 12, 2008, 06:03:06 AM
I'm embarrassed to say I am not at all familiar with this composer.   ???

If this composer has some good Russian chamber music, I'll most definitely be interested. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 12, 2008, 03:19:55 PM
I'm embarrassed to say I am not at all familiar with this composer.   ???

If this composer has some good Russian chamber music, I'll most definitely be interested. 

Sorry, ChamberNut, I am not familiar with Miaskovsky's chamber music but I do know that-in addition to 27 symphonies-he did write 13 string quartets which I suspect have the same vein of slightly melancholic nostaglia of the best of his symphonic music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 13, 2008, 03:09:15 AM
My copy of the newly released Alto CD of Miaskovsky(or should that be Myaskovsky?)'s Symphonies Nos. 17 and 21 has just arrived.
Looking forward to listening to the symphonies very much.

I notice that the booklet note is written by one "Jeffrey Davis". vandermolen is that you?

Yes, Colin that is me.  Thank you for noticing. My colleagues at school have been kindly pointing out my syntax errors etc >:(

I have been asked to do the notes for Symphony 23 and a Vaughan Williams CD of sting quartets (formerly on Unicorn). The Myaskovsky (actually I prefer the spelling "Miaskovsky", but Olympia and Alto use the "Y") CD you have is the first one I have ever written notes for (and possibly last ;D). Exciting but daunting.

Do let me know what you think.
 
Jeffrey
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 13, 2008, 03:12:15 AM
I'm embarrassed to say I am not at all familiar with this composer.   ???

If this composer has some good Russian chamber music, I'll most definitely be interested. 

Try the Cello Sonata No 2. A really beautiful work I think. There are several recordings around.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: ChamberNut on May 13, 2008, 03:29:01 AM
Try the Cello Sonata No 2. A really beautiful work I think. There are several recordings around.

Thank you for the recommendation.  I'll be on the lookout!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 13, 2008, 06:47:05 AM
Yes, Colin that is me.  Thank you for noticing. My colleagues at school have been kindly pointing out my syntax errors etc >:(

I have been asked to do the notes for Symphony 23 and a Vaughan Williams CD of sting quartets (formerly on Unicorn). The Myaskovsky (actually I prefer the spelling "Miaskovsky", but Olympia and Alto use the "Y") CD you have is the first one I have ever written notes for (and possibly last ;D). Exciting but daunting.

Do let me know what you think.
 
Jeffrey

Congratulations on your excellent notes, Jeffrey! They are succinct and informative, setting the works in their proper historical context. 'Syntax errors'-oh, stuff and nonsense(as Victorian ladies used to remark). I had no idea, incidentally, that Miaskovsky(yes, I prefer that spelling too)'s father had been murdered during the Revolution and that the son had witnessed his father's murder. Possibly a unique claim to fame amongst composers?

Am listening to the CD now and will let you have considered views in due course. I do think that the Salutatory Overture is rather a 'pot-boiler' and that the CD does remind one of the 'unique' quality of Russian recording qualities! (I once had to sit through a concert in St.Petersburg by a folk orchestra of sorts. Sitting just above the brass section almost gave me toothache!).There is no mention on the cover of the CD when the pieces were actually recorded.

It will be interesting to compare Svetlanov's version of No.21 with Measham's on the old Unicorn CD.

Any idea when we might expect No.23-the Symphony on Kabardanian Themes?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 13, 2008, 10:02:00 AM
Congratulations on your excellent notes, Jeffrey! They are succinct and informative, setting the works in their proper historical context. 'Syntax errors'-oh, stuff and nonsense(as Victorian ladies used to remark). I had no idea, incidentally, that Miaskovsky(yes, I prefer that spelling too)'s father had been murdered during the Revolution and that the son had witnessed his father's murder. Possibly a unique claim to fame amongst composers?

Am listening to the CD now and will let you have considered views in due course. I do think that the Salutatory Overture is rather a 'pot-boiler' and that the CD does remind one of the 'unique' quality of Russian recording qualities! (I once had to sit through a concert in St.Petersburg by a folk orchestra of sorts. Sitting just above the brass section almost gave me toothache!).There is no mention on the cover of the CD when the pieces were actually recorded.

It will be interesting to compare Svetlanov's version of No.21 with Measham's on the old Unicorn CD.

Any idea when we might expect No.23-the Symphony on Kabardanian Themes?

Thanks very much Colin for your kind comments about my booklet notes, they have helped to restore my faith in myself!

The information on the murder of General Miaskovsky came from the notes for the Kondrashin 1978 recording of Symphony 6 on Melodiya (not the famous old Russian Disc recording), which is my one and only review for the Music Web. I have not seen it mentioned elsewhere but Ikkonikov's biography of Miaskovsky (1944) makes no mention of the death of Miaskovsky's father, but it has the ring of truth about it.

Alto have asked me to do the notes for Symphony 23 by early June, so I guess it will come out around August. They are in a rush because of the appearance of the Warner box set of the complete symphonies. Gauk's performance of Symphony 17 in the Brilliant box set is the best I know, though it's an old recording. Gauk was the dedicatee of Symphony 17.

Just received a great CD from a contact in Slovenia (sounds like a spy film!). Gauk's 1949 recording of Myaskovsky's 27th Symphony (transferred from an ancient LP). I am unaware of it ever appearing on LP let alone CD in the UK. Sad that it was not included in the Gauk box set on Brilliant (which I very strongly recommend). The recording is rather crackly, but the performance is wonderful. When the Slovenian guy gets his mono recording machine later in the year, he is going to do another transfer for me. Let me know if you want a copy. Very happy to do it but have to wait until my daughter is home from university as she is the only one who knows how to do it.

Thanks again Colin,

Jeffrey
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 13, 2008, 03:33:26 PM
The recording of Symphony No. 21 seems more modern than that of No. 17. Do you know when the Svetlanov recordings were made?

The only references I can find on the net suggest that Miaskovsky's father was a military engineer who was gunned down on a train station platform by a revolutionary soldier. Would be interesting to find out more about this.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 13, 2008, 09:54:07 PM
The recording of Symphony No. 21 seems more modern than that of No. 17. Do you know when the Svetlanov recordings were made?

The only references I can find on the net suggest that Miaskovsky's father was a military engineer who was gunned down on a train station platform by a revolutionary soldier. Would be interesting to find out more about this.

Yes, I agree. I'll try to find out about the recording dates.

Symphony 17 has certainly been available before, as I have it on an old Melodiya CD.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: karlhenning on May 14, 2008, 02:44:04 AM
Berkshire Record Outlet now has available the complete Myaskovsky symphonies, for any who may be interested.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2008, 02:45:54 AM
Thank you for the recommendation.  I'll be on the lookout!  :)

Despite the bizarre cover photograph, this is a very good (and very cheap) Miaskovsky CD which contains both cello sonatas, as well as a good performance of the Cello Concertro (Miaskovsky's best known work).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikolai-Miaskovsky-Cello-Concerto-Sonatas/dp/B000F9RLDK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1210765346&sr=1-5
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on May 14, 2008, 03:15:58 AM
Despite the bizarre cover photograph, this is a very good (and very cheap) Miaskovsky CD which contains both cello sonatas, as well as a good performance of the Cello Concertro (Miaskovsky's best known work).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikolai-Miaskovsky-Cello-Concerto-Sonatas/dp/B000F9RLDK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1210765346&sr=1-5
I think there are also a Regis CD with the same coupling in very good Russian performances!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2008, 09:58:32 PM
I think there are also a Regis CD with the same coupling in very good Russian performances!

Yes, you are right. It is also excellent value. It's an old Olympia disc which was "CD of the Month" in CD Review magazine (sadly now folded), when it first came out.

Here is is, with less bizarre cover art!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Miaskovsky-Cello-Concerto-Sonatas/dp/B000UNMU9Q/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1210834542&sr=1-6
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 17, 2008, 06:13:25 AM
The recording of Symphony No. 21 seems more modern than that of No. 17. Do you know when the Svetlanov recordings were made?

The only references I can find on the net suggest that Miaskovsky's father was a military engineer who was gunned down on a train station platform by a revolutionary soldier. Would be interesting to find out more about this.

Colin, my Melodiya CD tells me that Symphony No 17 is a 1991 recording. Not sure about No 21.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 17, 2008, 06:14:41 AM
Colin, my Melodiya CD tells me that Symphony No 17 is a 1991 recording. Not sure about No 21.

Sounds earlier!! :) Thanks, though!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 17, 2008, 06:20:00 AM
Sounds earlier!! :) Thanks, though!

I shouldn't be disloyal to Alto but I actually think that the best performance of Miaskovsky's 17th Symphony can be found in the Gauk box set on Brilliant and that is a 1956 recording. Gauk was the dedicatee of the Symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 17, 2008, 06:28:14 AM
I shouldn't be disloyal to Alto but I actually think that the best performance of Miaskovsky's 17th Symphony can be found in the Gauk box set on Brilliant and that is a 1956 recording. Gauk was the dedicatee of the Symphony.

One of my oldest LPs is of David Oistrakh playing Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole with Gauk conducting! A Fidelio LP from 1963(now we really are going back in time!) but goodness knows when it was recorded!

Gauk doesn't usually get that good a press from the critics but he was obviously a sound conductor.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 17, 2008, 07:27:49 AM
One of my oldest LPs is of David Oistrakh playing Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole with Gauk conducting! A Fidelio LP from 1963(now we really are going back in time!) but goodness knows when it was recorded!

Gauk doesn't usually get that good a press from the critics but he was obviously a sound conductor.

The Gauk box set on Brilliant is well worth investigating. I know that Shostakovich was apparently scathing about "Gauk" in "Testimony" but the Brilliant box has fine performances of Symphony 5 and 11 as well as Khachaturian Symphony 1 (an underrated score) and of course the Miaskovsky, with much else besides(lots of Tchaikovsky).

http://www.selections.com/AH416/alexander-gauk-edition-10cds/
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 24, 2008, 02:37:53 PM
Very pleased to report that I've just returned from seeing my first ever live concert featuring the music of Miaskovsky: Symphony No 21 performed by the Kensington Symphony Orchestra under Russell Keable at St John's Smith Square London. The Kensington SO is truly "the most professional of non-professional orchestras" and the performance was excellent, sandwiched between some Smetana and Dvorak's 6th Symphony. Never though I'd ever hear a Miaskovsky symphony in England!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on June 24, 2008, 02:46:52 PM
Very pleased to report that I've just returned from seeing my first ever live concert featuring the music of Miaskovsky: Symphony No 21 performed by the Kensington Symphony Orchestra under Russell Keable at St John's Smith Square London. The Kensington SO is truly "the most professional of non-professional orchestras" and the performance was excellent, sandwiched between some Smetana and Dvorak's 6th Symphony. Never though I'd ever hear a Miaskovsky symphony in England!

Of course it was the Kensington Symphony Orchestra under Leslie Head which gave the first performances of Havergal Brian's 2nd and 5th Symphonies.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 24, 2008, 03:13:20 PM
Of course it was the Kensington Symphony Orchestra under Leslie Head which gave the first performances of Havergal Brian's 2nd and 5th Symphonies.

You are quite right. I'd forgotten that. Thanks for reminding me.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 25, 2008, 05:29:43 AM
Made a very interesting discovery. Miaskovsky's 21st Symphony in a classic 1968 recording from Morton Gould and the Chicago SO is available on CD, with a fine performance of Rimsky Korsakov's 'Antar' Symphony (its companion on the old RCA LP).

It is issued by a small company who make private reissues of material otherwise not on CD.

www.bearacreissues.com  (it is no BRC-2869)

The package was sent from Greece. I have just listened to it and am very pleased. The Miaskovsky was commissioned during the War for Chicago and this is a unique performance. The transfer from LP has a warmth, depth and richness missing from many CDs.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: scarpia on August 07, 2008, 07:06:13 AM

I noticed that his complete symphonies are soon to be available on Warner (the Olympia set).  Twenty seven symphonies, such a daunting pile of works.  Did he really have that much to say, or was he just churning them out?  Where is one to start?

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on August 07, 2008, 07:18:32 AM
I noticed that his complete symphonies are soon to be available on Warner (the Olympia set).  Twenty seven symphonies, such a daunting pile of works.  Did he really have that much to say, or was he just churning them out?  Where is one to start?


Not soon to be available, but already available from Berkshirerecordoutlet since May. But they ran out and had to restock in July. Then they ran out again and says they will have more in September. It seems to be a popular item since it only took two days for them to run out both times. The asking price is 60 something dollars which I guess is pretty reasonable for 17cds. It might be slightly cheaper in Europe. I almost bought it from Berkshirerecordoutlet but I don't think I will ever listen to them so I passed.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: scarpia on August 07, 2008, 07:57:49 AM
Not soon to be available, but already available from Berkshirerecordoutlet since May. But they ran out and had to restock in July. Then they ran out again and says they will have more in September.

In other words, soon to be available (in the US).  The set has been available for some time in the UK for a slightly higher price.   Given the exchange rates I'm expecting the best deals to be available when the set is officially distributed in the states.

Still, anyone actually listen to any of this set?  The individual discs are also available in many cases, is there one that would be recommended as a litmus test of whether this music is to my taste?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on August 07, 2008, 08:16:33 AM

Still, anyone actually listen to any of this set?  The individual discs are also available in many cases, is there one that would be recommended as a litmus test of whether this music is to my taste?

You can listen to some of Miaskovsky's works on rhapsody.com as in symphonies 7 and 10 from Marco Polo (http://www.rhapsody.com/nicolaimiaskovsky/symphoniesnos710), or the 6th symphony conducted by N. Jarvi (http://www.rhapsody.com/goteborgssymfoniker/miaskovskysymphonyno6). You have to download the player and you get 25 free tracks to play.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: scarpia on August 14, 2008, 08:40:19 PM
Well, I managed to get one volume of the complete symphony set, including #27 and #15.   One of the worst things I can remember.  Poor audio quality, lackadaisical performance, incoherent composition.  Saved myself a lot of money!
 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 14, 2008, 11:39:43 PM
Well, I managed to get one volume of the complete symphony set, including #27 and #15.   One of the worst things I can remember.  Poor audio quality, lackadaisical performance, incoherent composition.  Saved myself a lot of money!
 

I disagree. I believe that Symphony 15 and 27 are both fine works, especially No 27, Miaskovsky's swan song.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on August 15, 2008, 04:52:31 AM
Well, I managed to get one volume of the complete symphony set, including #27 and #15.   One of the worst things I can remember.  Poor audio quality, lackadaisical performance, incoherent composition.  Saved myself a lot of money!
 
I don't like it from the samples myself, seems way to rambling and incoherent, remind me a bit of Pettersson I guess.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 16, 2008, 01:20:56 AM
I don't like it from the samples myself, seems way to rambling and incoherent, remind me a bit of Pettersson I guess.

Fully respect your views but don't share them. Never thought of a Miaskovsky/Pettersson connection before, but they are both composers whose music means a lot to me. Maybe try Miaskovsky's Cello Concerto before you give up on him  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: John Copeland on August 23, 2008, 06:41:11 AM
Miaskovsky

This is one composer who wrote exciting music with drama between the lines.  What a shame he has been duffed here and there.  Listening to Symphony 17 at the moment - typical Russian romanticism at its best, and most definitely on a par with more famous Russian composers.  Tell you what, I'd play Miaskovsky before Balkariev or his pals.
17th is great, but by no means his best methinks.

SCARPIA:  "One of the worst things I can remember.  Poor audio quality, lackadaisical performance, incoherent composition.  Saved myself a lot of money!"

Having listened to most of the set, this is not a review I can agree with - I hope you spend the cash you saved on something as good or better than Miaskovsky or...er...a Hearing Aid. :P
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Superhorn on October 26, 2008, 01:53:38 PM
   I have CDs of several of the Myaskovsky symphonies, including some on Marco Polo which I believe have yet to appear on Naxos. Also, the Rostropovich and Mischa Maisky recordings of the cello concerto, and the Taneyev quartet with three string quartets.
  Myaskovsky's music is not the kind that has the immediate melodic appeal of Tchaikovsky,Rimsky-Korsakov and Rachmaninov ,for example, but it has grown on me. There is something brooding and elusive about the music, almost like listening to someone's inner thoughts.
   The slow movement of the 8th symphony is absolutely haunting; it features an English horn solo playing a Tatar/Bashkir melody, and  sounds curiously American Indian. Did you know that the late,great ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev was an ethnic Tatar, and also the present day bass Ildar Abrazakov?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Christo on October 26, 2008, 02:02:29 PM
Did you know that the late, great ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev was an ethnic Tatar, and also the present day bass Ildar Abrazakov?

No. But I do know that Sofia Asgatovna Gubaidulina stems from Tatarstan and indeed from a Tatar dynasty of imams (as was her grandfather) - though from her mother's side she's Russian.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on October 26, 2008, 04:09:14 PM
There is a new Alto CD being released in November which contains a number of Miaskovsky's lesser orchestral works-

http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product/NR_November08/ALC1041.htm
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on October 27, 2008, 07:01:52 AM
The November issue of International Record Review carries a superb 3 page survey by Richard Whitehouse of the Svetlanov recordings of the Miaskovsky symphonies. (It also contains a 5 page survey of Messiaen on record!)

I cannot recommend this magazine highly enough for its detailed, comprehensive and serious approach to recorded music(so much better now than the Gramophone magazine!)

http://www.recordreview.co.uk/
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on October 27, 2008, 08:19:56 AM
The November issue of International Record Review carries a superb 3 page survey by Richard Whitehouse of the Svetlanov recordings of the Miaskovsky symphonies. (It also contains a 5 page survey of Messiaen on record!)

I cannot recommend this magazine highly enough for its detailed, comprehensive and serious approach to recorded music(so much better now than the Gramophone magazine!)

http://www.recordreview.co.uk/
Is that Sarah Palin on the front cover?

I agree BTW and have been a strong supporter of IRR as the prime magazine if you are into records and don't need lots of stuff about celebrities, concerts and composer background which are better aquired through books anyway.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on October 27, 2008, 08:36:15 AM
It does look like her, doesn't it :)

Doubt that she plays the piano as well as Kathryn Stott though ;D
Title: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: vandermolen on November 19, 2008, 09:01:57 AM
Olympia were a small British company specialising in Russian/Soviet music. They were I believe more or less bankrupted over the problems experienced with Svetlanov's widow over the release of their Miaskovsky series. The CD issues fizzled out about two thirds of the way through which was very frustrating for Miaskovsky nutters (sorry, connoisseurs) like myself. Fortunately, through a deal with Olympia, Alto have released the remaining Miaskovsky recordings over the last couple of years (with two more to go). The Award winning Warner box has caused uproar at Alto as they beleive that Mrs Svetlanov ('Baba Yaga') did a deal, behind their back with Warner after having agreed to an exclusive release with Alto.

Olympia CDs were well known for their attractive socialist realist cover art the Miaskovsky series, presumably for financial reasons,used the same uniform design with different colours (a bit like the much more drab Bax Symphony LP series on Lyrita). Also, the Olympias were highly regarded for the excellent booklet notes from Per Skans. I have many of the releases including fine symphonies by Shebalin, Popov, Weinberg, Shostakovich, Kabalevsky, Glazunov and, of course, Miaskovsky.

The Olympias are now sold for ridiculous prices on amazon etc. Some stuff is being released on Regis or Alto but by no means all of it for reasons of copyright. I have asked Alto to look into the possibility of reissuing the old Olympias of Weinberg's choral 6th symphony and his Piano Quintet.
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: The new erato on November 19, 2008, 09:55:50 AM
Thanks for clearing this up. I feel almost sorry for buying the Warner box, particularly in regard of Altos' fine packaging and notes. My main concern, however, was never being able to get the symphonies issued by Olympia if I bought tha Alto single discs (I have a couple). And Olympia is really sorely missed. Fortunately I have the 6th (both as a Melodiya LP and CD).
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: Daverz on November 19, 2008, 07:35:29 PM
Also, the Olympias were highly regarded for the excellent booklet notes from Per Skans.

And let's not forget that if you have all the Olympia releases and collect all the Alto releases, their spines will spell out

N I K O L A I M Y A S K O V S K Y

when arranged on your shelf.

I'm a cheap and impatient bastard and got the Warner set when it first came out in France.
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: Lethevich on November 19, 2008, 09:44:23 PM
I am going to buy the Warner box at some point in the future, as while I am not happy to condone the actions against such an enterprising small label, I simply cannot afford the alternative...

And let's not forget that if you have all the Olympia releases and collect all the Alto releases, their spines will spell out

N I K O L A I M Y A S K O V S K Y

when arranged on your shelf.

Cute - my Judas Priest CDs do the same ;D
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: vandermolen on November 20, 2008, 01:59:48 AM
Thanks for clearing this up. I feel almost sorry for buying the Warner box, particularly in regard of Altos' fine packaging and notes. My main concern, however, was never being able to get the symphonies issued by Olympia if I bought tha Alto single discs (I have a couple). And Olympia is really sorely missed. Fortunately I have the 6th (both as a Melodiya LP and CD).

I bought the Warner box myself although I feel a bit disloyal to Alto for doing so. I also have all the Olympias and Altos. If you haven't already collected the Olympias the Warner box is the only way of collecting the whole series.
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: Maciek on November 20, 2008, 02:13:12 AM
The Weinberg symphonies when arranged on the shelf spelled out "Nikolai Myaskovsky"? Sounds kind of subversive... ;)
Title: Re: Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
Post by: vandermolen on November 20, 2008, 02:18:45 AM
The Weinberg symphonies when arranged on the shelf spelled out "Nikolai Myaskovsky"? Sounds kind of subversive... ;)

 ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 07, 2008, 10:24:02 AM
There is a new Alto CD being released in November which contains a number of Miaskovsky's lesser orchestral works-

http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product/NR_November08/ALC1041.htm

Listening to this new cd as I type! The excellent notes for the cd are written again by our own vandermolen(he goes by the pseudonym of Jeffrey Davis for the purpose ;D).

Not necessarily the greatest music Miaskovsky wrote-certainly compared to the symphonies or the cello and violin concertos-but worth hearing nevertheless. I was impressed by the opening movement of "Links" and by the Slav Rhapsody.

Not quite sure why Alto label the Serenade as "No.1" since I don't think Miaskovsky wrote more than one. Is it a confusion with the opus number: Op.32/1?

Alto will be releasing a further cd next month containing the Symphonic Poem "Silence"(already available in a so-so performance on Marco Polo), the Divertissement and the Sinfonietta, Op.32/2.

Jeffrey:by my calculations that leaves the Symphonic Poem "Alastor", the Pathetic Overture, the Lyric Concertino and the Sinfonietta in A minor, op.68/2. These last two works were on old Olympia discs, although the Sinfonietta was, puzzlingly, called No.2 when surely it is actually No.3(the op.10, op.32/2 and 68/2). Do you know how these are being coupled? It seems to me that in total they are (just) too long for a single cd.

PS: the slow movement of the Serenade is lovely :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Superhorn on December 07, 2008, 01:38:18 PM
    Here's  an  interesting  story. While  checking  out  a  website  about  the  Tatars  of  Russia,  a  list there of  famous  ethnic  Tatars  or  Russians  of  Tatar  descent  included  none  other  than  Rachmaninov  himself  !  Apparently  his  family  was  of  Tatar  origin . Some  converted  from  Islam  to  Orthodox  Christianity. 
   I  like  Balakirev's  music,  and wish  that  conductors  would  play  his  wonderfully  melodious  first  symphony  instead  of  the  same  old  ones  by  Tchaikovsky,  marvelous  as  those  are.  From his  facial  appearance,  Balakirev  probably  had  Tatar  ancestry.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on December 07, 2008, 02:01:43 PM
I cannot recommend this magazine highly enough for its detailed, comprehensive and serious approach to recorded music(so much better now than the Gramophone magazine!)

http://www.recordreview.co.uk/

Ouch, $99/year for US delivery.  For that I can get a year of both Fanfare and ARG, and have $10 left over to buy a CD.  What kind of page count does a typical issue of IRR have?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 07, 2008, 02:09:40 PM
Listening to this new cd as I type! The excellent notes for the cd are written again by our own vandermolen(he goes by the pseudonym of Jeffrey Davis for the purpose ;D).

Not necessarily the greatest music Miaskovsky wrote-certainly compared to the symphonies or the cello and violin concertos-but worth hearing nevertheless. I was impressed by the opening movement of "Links" and by the Slav Rhapsody.

Not quite sure why Alto label the Serenade as "No.1" since I don't think Miaskovsky wrote more than one. Is it a confusion with the opus number: Op.32/1?

Alto will be releasing a further cd next month containing the Symphonic Poem "Silence"(already available in a so-so performance on Marco Polo), the Divertissement and the Sinfonietta, Op.32/2.

Jeffrey:by my calculations that leaves the Symphonic Poem "Alastor", the Pathetic Overture, the Lyric Concertino and the Sinfonietta in A minor, op.68/2. These last two works were on old Olympia discs, although the Sinfonietta was, puzzlingly, called No.2 when surely it is actually No.3(the op.10, op.32/2 and 68/2). Do you know how these are being coupled? It seems to me that in total they are (just) too long for a single cd.

PS: the slow movement of the Serenade is lovely :)

Colin, thank you very much for your kind, much appreciated, comments about my sleeve notes. I agree with you that the opening of 'Links' and the Slav Rhapsody are the most interesting pieces on the latest Alto Miaskovsky CD (although I have a soft spot for the middle movement of Divertissement).

I hope that you will like the notes for 'Silence' which I recently completed. I have quoted a large chunk of Edgar Allan Poe in my notes to set the mood (I hope!) for 'Silence'. The Miaskovsky piece is not, incidentally, based on Poe's 'The Raven' as suggested in the Marco Polo notes. Miaskovsky's grand-niece in Moscow has been very helpfully sending me (in Russian!) extracts of his diary entries and letters relating to the various pieces I am supposed to be writing about. It was clear to me that the piece seemed to have no relation to The Raven and some exhaustive research (ie google search!) suggested to me that the piece is in fact based on Poe's 'Silence - A Fable' of 1837. to make matters even more confusing Poe alse wrote a Sonnet called 'Silence' but that is not what Miaskovsky's tone poem is based on.  I agree with you that Svetlanov's performance is much more gripping than the more drawn out version on Marco Polo.  I like 'Silence' very much. Music which conveys a sense of looming catastrophe and haunting dread usually appeals to me  :o As mentioned, Miaskovsky's grand-niece in Moscow sends me the material in Russian but fortunately I have some Russian pupils at school who translate it for me (they get a thank you in the notes!)

The reference to 'Serenade No 1' is probably a mistake. Also, I take your point about the Sinfoniettas and, for some reason, the early op 10, doesn't seem to have a number (a bit like Bruckner's 'Symphony 0' I guess). It is rather confusing and, in fact, I nearly wrote about the wrong one  ;D. The last Alto Miaskovsky release will feature 'Alastor', Sinfonietta 'No 2' and the Lyric Concertino, which is my favourite of the three works with the shared opus number. The Pathetique Overture was issued on Svetlanov's chorus-less recording of the Sixth Symphony (OCD 736) and will not be on the Alto CD.

By the was I think that Alto will reissue Shebalin's 1st and 3rd Symphonies, once available on Olympia, as they asked me to send them the booklet information recently. I suggested the release as Shebalin's fine First symphony should appeal to admirers of Miaskovsky (it is dedicated to him and reflects his benevolent influence).

Thanks again Colin. Whilst typing this I have been listening to Gauk's fine old recording of Symphony No 17. I love the defiant ending.

ps Nice Rubbra avatar  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 07, 2008, 03:02:03 PM
Ouch, $99/year for US delivery.  For that I can get a year of both Fanfare and ARG, and have $10 left over to buy a CD.  What kind of page count does a typical issue of IRR have?

Ok. If we take the latest issue of IRR- it has a total of 96 pages. Of these:
 1 is an editorial page
 2 pages for a reviews index
 6 pages consist of an index of new releases
 1 letters page
 4 pages for an article on Christmas discs
4 pages for an article on the composer Ethel Smyth
3 pages for an article on Harmonia Mundi
5 pages for a survey of box sets and other reissues
4 pages for an article on Recent Piano reissues
13 pages of adverts(which are kept to separate pages allowing the article and review pages to remain uncluttered)
1 page for a regular article on a contributer's record collection
52 pages of Reviews-divided into orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal, opera, books

In the orchestral reviews section 21 discs are reviewed with-approximately half a page on each disc. The print is quite small but to give you an idea-the review of the new BIS/Vanska Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2 and 7 is approximately 600 words long, much longer than the average Gramophone review these days! The depth, quality, maturity of the reviews are all very high.

As I said, the November issue with 3 densely packed pages on Miaskovsky and 5 on Messiaen was absolutely invaluable!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 07, 2008, 03:10:15 PM
Right got you, Jeffrey! Thanks for your reply!

So, "Alastor", the Lyric Concertino and the Sinfonietta, Op.68/2(the so-called "No.2") will be on the last disc. Which means that I shall have to buy that one just for "Alastor"! Oh well, at Alto prices, I shouldn't mind ;D

"looming catastrophe and haunting dread", eh? Haha...that's the kind of music I like(and after watching the latest BBC1 production of 'Wallender' with Kenneth Branagh that is my general mood at the moment ;D)

Good news about the Shebalin-although I do have them already on Olympia. Oh for some more Steinberg too!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on December 09, 2008, 08:47:15 AM
Just in passing-- I've lately gotten hung up on his fourth-- he creates so much from the basic motif.  I really like the way it hangs together.  This doesn't have a "killer melody" in it, but the construction and the overall unity is quite impressive.

Another question-- how much is known about his getting "shell shock" in the First World War?  Is it known if this was purely psychological, or had a physical component.  (Current theory is that shell shock not only addresses Post Traumatic Stress Disorder -- PTSD, but actual physical damage cause by repeated concussion injuries, known as mild Traumatic Brain Injury-- TBI). 

This is of personal interest to me because my honor's thesis was a short novel set in WWI about shell shock, and I read a lot of really interesting publications at the Library of Congress that were written in the early 20s about  it.  And now I work in military health IT, and these are both major concerns. 

Also, thanks Jeffrey for sharing your research about "Silence"-- you have  to love any composer that is inspired by Poe. 

"Music which conveys a sense of looming catastrophe and haunting dread usually appeals to me "  Me too!  You know, Poe makes in interesting musical reference in Ullalume, which is one of my favorite poems.  It tries to capture the grief he felt after losing his wife. Here is just the opening

"The skies they were ashen and sober;
The leaves they were crisped and sere -
The leaves they were withering and sere;
It was night in the lonesome October
Of my most immemorial year:
It was hard by the dim lake of Auber,
In the misty mid region of Weir -
It was down by the dank tarn of Auber,
In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir."

Common opinion that he was referring to Daniel Auber, the composer of depressing music.  Weir was an artist whose material was usually dark and downbeat.  Sigh....  I guess this would be another thread....


Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Bulldog on December 09, 2008, 08:54:43 AM
Ouch, $99/year for US delivery.  For that I can get a year of both Fanfare and ARG, and have $10 left over to buy a CD.  What kind of page count does a typical issue of IRR have?

Due to financial considerations, I let my IRR subscription lapse into the night.  It is a fine review magazine, but I have noticed they tend to find a way to like just about every recording reviewed.  In my humble opinion, both Fanfare and ARG are more balanced in their reviews.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 09, 2008, 11:53:04 AM
Just in passing-- I've lately gotten hung up on his fourth-- he creates so much from the basic motif.  I really like the way it hangs together.  This doesn't have a "killer melody" in it, but the construction and the overall unity is quite impressive.

Another question-- how much is known about his getting "shell shock" in the First World War?  Is it known if this was purely psychological, or had a physical component.  (Current theory is that shell shock not only addresses Post Traumatic Stress Disorder -- PTSD, but actual physical damage cause by repeated concussion injuries, known as mild Traumatic Brain Injury-- TBI). 

This is of personal interest to me because my honor's thesis was a short novel set in WWI about shell shock, and I read a lot of really interesting publications at the Library of Congress that were written in the early 20s about  it.  And now I work in military health IT, and these are both major concerns. 

Also, thanks Jeffrey for sharing your research about "Silence"-- you have  to love any composer that is inspired by Poe. 

"Music which conveys a sense of looming catastrophe and haunting dread usually appeals to me "  Me too!  You know, Poe makes in interesting musical reference in Ullalume, which is one of my favorite poems.  It tries to capture the grief he felt after losing his wife. Here is just the opening

"The skies they were ashen and sober;
The leaves they were crisped and sere -
The leaves they were withering and sere;
It was night in the lonesome October
Of my most immemorial year:
It was hard by the dim lake of Auber,
In the misty mid region of Weir -
It was down by the dank tarn of Auber,
In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir."

Common opinion that he was referring to Daniel Auber, the composer of depressing music.  Weir was an artist whose material was usually dark and downbeat.  Sigh....  I guess this would be another thread....




Very interesting post John which has encouraged me to listen to Miaskovsky's 4th Symphony again.

The mountain pinnacles slumber; valleys, crags and caves are silent......The waters of the river have a saffron and a sickly hue; and they flow not onwards to the sea, but palpitate forever and forever beneath the red eye of the sun with a tumultuos and compulsive motion  [Edgar Allan Poe; Silence - A Fable 1837]

Yes, it is great stuff, which I have enjoyed discovering.  I will see what I can find out about Miaskovsky's Shell Shock in World War One. At least they appear to have diagnosed it as such; in the British army of World War One he would probably have been handed over to a firing squad!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 09, 2008, 12:01:19 PM
Due to financial considerations, I let my IRR subscription lapse into the night.  It is a fine review magazine, but I have noticed they tend to find a way to like just about every recording reviewed.  In my humble opinion, both Fanfare and ARG are more balanced in their reviews.

I reckon that the price paid for the length of the IRR reviews is to exclude those recordings which are deemed to be in some way unsatisfactory.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Bulldog on December 09, 2008, 02:41:51 PM
I reckon that the price paid for the length of the IRR reviews is to exclude those recordings which are deemed to be in some way unsatisfactory.

I can't buy that argument, but it doesn't make any difference for me now. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Christo on December 10, 2008, 01:23:32 AM
    Here's  an  interesting  story. While  checking  out  a  website  about  the  Tatars  of  Russia,  a  list there of  famous  ethnic  Tatars  or  Russians  of  Tatar  descent  included  none  other  than  Rachmaninov  himself  !  Apparently  his  family  was  of  Tatar  origin . Some  converted  from  Islam  to  Orthodox  Christianity. 
   I  like  Balakirev's  music,  and wish  that  conductors  would  play  his  wonderfully  melodious  first  symphony  instead  of  the  same  old  ones  by  Tchaikovsky,  marvelous  as  those  are.  From his  facial  appearance,  Balakirev  probably  had  Tatar  ancestry.

Actually, this applies to many "Russians" (but similar stories can be told about "Germans", "Frenchmen", "Turks" and so many other nationalities. Ethnically speaking, Europe is very much a mixed bag. Dramatically expanding nations, like Russia in the 18th-19th Century, often adopted dozens of smaller nations and ethnicities, and large portions were "russified" in the process. No doubt, a large proportion of the presentday "Russians" descend from these new areas, the Tatars among them. But the same applies to all those "Germans" of Slavonic descent (former wild theories about their racial purity as "Aryans" notwithstanding) and many other nations, especially the bigger, expansive ones.

In names like "Rachmaninov" this non-Slavonic element is clearly visible to all Russian eyes: "Rakhman" is no doubt a Turkic (Tatar?) name and only makes a Russian name with this Slavonic suffix added to it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 16, 2008, 05:51:38 AM
Have been listening to Brilliant Classics Evgeny Svetlanov Edition boxed set (10CDs). It contains a great performance from 1957 of Miaskovsky's 25th Symphony, more atmospheric and deeply felt I think than either the Naxos version or Svetlanov's later recording (Melodiya/Olympia). The box is full of good stuff - a
fine Balakirev Symphony No 1 and works by Glazunov, Rachmaninov, Boiko, Parsadanian, Rimsky-Korsakov, Lyadov, Lyapunov, Mazaev etc.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 19, 2008, 01:43:33 PM
Miaskovsky on youtube:

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=GFguwHcsNZA&feature=related
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on January 16, 2009, 10:54:36 AM
One listen so far to the new Miaskovsky disc on Alto(with notes written by Jeffrey/vandermolen :))

'Silence' is the dark, brooding work I remembered from the old Marco Polo recording(Stankovsky) but in a better performance. The other pieces are pleasant, easy-going examples of Miaskovsky in his most lyrical mood. Not great music but attractive enough. I think that I slightly preferred the Divertissement-although at 26 minutes it is slightly (over) long for a 'divertimento' ;D

One quibble! I really wish that Alto would provide the recording dates for these Svetlanov performances.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 11, 2009, 01:56:40 PM
Just heard that Miaskovsky's epic 6th Symphony is to be performed at the Festival Hall in London on Weds 28th April 2010 (LPO/Jurowski) Very exciting news.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Martin Lind on March 29, 2009, 04:27:28 PM
Hi to all friends of Miaskovsky,

Recently I got finally the symphony box with all the symphonies of Miaskovsky. I am very glad even happy.

I already had some works of Miaskovsky. And I already liked this composer alot. 10 years ago or so, there were 5 CDs or so published by Zyx in Germany containing Melodya recordings. I really loved especially the 22th and 27th with Svetlanov, but I also liked the 3rd. I also loved the last string quartett ( and others) which was also a Melodya/ Zyx CD. Later I bought the 5th and 9th with Downes of which I really loved the 5h. Even later the 24 th and 25th from Naxos, nice symphonies but I was never completely happy with the interpretation. And recently the 6th with Järvi which has his moments but appeared to be a bit overblown ( by far the longest). I have heard that the Swetlanov is without choire, but this is "ad libitum" so it is the good right of Swetlanov to perform the work purely instrumental.

Now I listened to the first 4 CDs and I am pretty enthusiastic. OK the 1 st is a very likable but not completely convincing work. The 25th on the other hand is glorious with Svetlanov much better than Naxos. I didn't like the 10th and was astonished that this work was praised here. The 11th on the other hand was a work I heard very often and I like it alot. The 17th is a slighter work, I had this already on Zyx. The 9th on the other hand which I never really liked with Downes I really love with Swetlanov. The 7th appears fascinating on first sight but I can't judge it yet. The 14th appears very optimistic but I am not convinced yet.

I think all these things will last but I am really glad to have acquired this up to now wonderful set.

I am hopefull for further discussions about this wonderful composer.

Regards
Martin
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 30, 2009, 01:53:34 PM
Hi to all friends of Miaskovsky,

Recently I got finally the symphony box with all the symphonies of Miaskovsky. I am very glad even happy.

I already had some works of Miaskovsky. And I already liked this composer alot. 10 years ago or so, there were 5 CDs or so published by Zyx in Germany containing Melodya recordings. I really loved especially the 22th and 27th with Svetlanov, but I also liked the 3rd. I also loved the last string quartett ( and others) which was also a Melodya/ Zyx CD. Later I bought the 5th and 9th with Downes of which I really loved the 5h. Even later the 24 th and 25th from Naxos, nice symphonies but I was never completely happy with the interpretation. And recently the 6th with Järvi which has his moments but appeared to be a bit overblown ( by far the longest). I have heard that the Swetlanov is without choire, but this is "ad libitum" so it is the good right of Swetlanov to perform the work purely instrumental.

Now I listened to the first 4 CDs and I am pretty enthusiastic. OK the 1 st is a very likable but not completely convincing work. The 25th on the other hand is glorious with Svetlanov much better than Naxos. I didn't like the 10th and was astonished that this work was praised here. The 11th on the other hand was a work I heard very often and I like it alot. The 17th is a slighter work, I had this already on Zyx. The 9th on the other hand which I never really liked with Downes I really love with Swetlanov. The 7th appears fascinating on first sight but I can't judge it yet. The 14th appears very optimistic but I am not convinced yet.

I think all these things will last but I am really glad to have acquired this up to now wonderful set.

I am hopefull for further discussions about this wonderful composer.

Regards
Martin

Martin, do you know Symphony No 16 - written to commemorate the crash of the giant aircraft 'Maxin Gorky'? - it has the most wonderful slow movement -one of Miaskovsky's finest inspirations. My favourite symphonies are 3,6,16,17,21,24,25,27. 17 is underrated I think and I agree that No 10 is overrated. The Lyric Concertino (especially the central movement, is a work I love).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on March 30, 2009, 02:40:51 PM
Martin, do you know Symphony No 16 - written to commemorate the crash of the giant aircraft 'Maxin Gorky'? - it has the most wonderful slow movement -one of Miaskovsky's finest inspirations. My favourite symphonies are 3,6,16,17,21,24,25,27. 17 is underrated I think and I agree that No 10 is overrated. The Lyric Concertino (especially the central movement, is a work I love).

If I could only have three I think they would be Nos. 16, 21, & 27, - and I'd add 20 & 22 to the rest of your list for a top ten.
No.16 is the real darkhorse because never recorded (to my knowledge) before the Svetlanov set.  As Jeffrey affirms, the slow
movement is a pinnacle.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 30, 2009, 03:24:26 PM
If I could only have three I think they would be Nos. 16, 21, & 27, - and I'd add 20 & 22 to the rest of your list for a top ten.
No.16 is the real darkhorse because never recorded (to my knowledge) before the Svetlanov set.  As Jeffrey affirms, the slow
movement is a pinnacle.

Yes, those three are amongst the greatest. I like No 3 too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on March 31, 2009, 05:44:07 AM
Let me echo on 16-- that is a true masterpiece.    I'm also a big fan of 24.  You can also get it on Naxos.  It also has a classic slow movement you won't forget easily.

I've been listening a lot to 4, 8, 9 and 12 lately.  8 and twelve have great slow movements, and 4 and 9 and really interesting.  13 is about the most "out there"
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 31, 2009, 11:31:00 AM
Let me echo on 16-- that is a true masterpiece.    I'm also a big fan of 24.  You can also get it on Naxos.  It also has a classic slow movement you won't forget easily.

I've been listening a lot to 4, 8, 9 and 12 lately.  8 and twelve have great slow movements, and 4 and 9 and really interesting.  13 is about the most "out there"

Yes, 8 and 12 are good. I have seen the slow movement of No 8 described as sounding like the the work of 'a mournful Delius of the steppes'. 4 and 9 I hardly know - must listen to them.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 12, 2009, 08:01:10 PM
I was going to review the 13 quartets, but....
I was one of those suckers who came to Myaskovsky through Julian Lloyd Webber! and I've been trying to find the "piece that sounds like the cello cto" ever since, haha!! (and I suppose that would be the cello sonata? duh!)  I had the sym6/kondrash...but it was NOT the cello cto!!!

I "love" Myaskovsky?...but I understand why someone might have a problem.  I mean, what's the LEAST attractive place to get to know Mia?  Imagine a virgin getting sym (pick your least fav) for their first!

I have stayed away from the syms until I read enough reviews and forums to make some sense.  And, honestly, it's STILL confusing. Sym17 seems to be leading the pack...but

I seem to have bought every string quartet EXCEPT the "cello cto" one, which I believe is No8 in f# minor.

Nos 1-2 were written @1930 and, to me, mmm, er...sound kind of "gothic", whatever I mean by that...there's a lot of modulating, crafty, Brahmsy yet edgy, No1 in four mvmts, No2 in three.  Though in a minor and c minor, both quartets, to me, don't have that echt Mia sound...they are a bit "rad" for our man.

Nos 3-4 are revisions of schoolboy qrts. No.3 is the early masterpiece, in 2 mvmts, with the second a 15min variations on a Grieg melody.  This qrt really has that "edgar allen poe" sound to it!  No4, on the other hand, made not that great an impression.

Nos5-9 continue from where 1-2 left off.  With each qrt, we get closer and closer to "THAT" melody.  No6 starts off in that territory, but there is just too much "craftsmanship" and "composing"...oh, listen to me complain...as I said, I believe No8 is the grail.

No9 is very strange sounding, and I wonder what sym it might mirror.  This is one of my favs, very unorthodox sounding, with certain navy songs and such. Myask. in a laboratory?

No10 is another schoolboy revision...not that special to me...a nice Haydnesque affair.

No11 is a revision?, or reconstruction?, or recomp?, or just a newly composed "old fashioned" work..."from old notebooks"...and this one is my really just fav as a general quartet. It's not the meloncoly, but the wistful...this is the most elusive, perfect, nicely behaved and consistently beautiful...not so much modulating...just a relaxed qrt.

No12 I haven't heard
No13 is the one everyone turns to, and just like No6, it starts off in the territory, and it DOES continue, but here too I find Mias "craftmanship" getting in the way of MY melody (I know, I know).  Can't you just let me wallow, sir???  Either way, this is the end of the old russia as far as SQs are concerned, and it IS very fine.  It does make me wonder about No12.

so...No3, No11, No8(the supposed masterpiece), No13...with No9  as a pleasant head scratcher.  yea, honestly, I was kinda of disappointed...but I'll hold out for No8.

Myaskovsky...wow!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 14, 2009, 04:20:27 AM
I was going to review the 13 quartets, but....
I was one of those suckers who came to Myaskovsky through Julian Lloyd Webber! and I've been trying to find the "piece that sounds like the cello cto" ever since, haha!! (and I suppose that would be the cello sonata? duh!)  I had the sym6/kondrash...but it was NOT the cello cto!!!

I "love" Myaskovsky?...but I understand why someone might have a problem.  I mean, what's the LEAST attractive place to get to know Mia?  Imagine a virgin getting sym (pick your least fav) for their first!

I have stayed away from the syms until I read enough reviews and forums to make some sense.  And, honestly, it's STILL confusing. Sym17 seems to be leading the pack...but

I seem to have bought every string quartet EXCEPT the "cello cto" one, which I believe is No8 in f# minor.

Nos 1-2 were written @1930 and, to me, mmm, er...sound kind of "gothic", whatever I mean by that...there's a lot of modulating, crafty, Brahmsy yet edgy, No1 in four mvmts, No2 in three.  Though in a minor and c minor, both quartets, to me, don't have that echt Mia sound...they are a bit "rad" for our man.

Nos 3-4 are revisions of schoolboy qrts. No.3 is the early masterpiece, in 2 mvmts, with the second a 15min variations on a Grieg melody.  This qrt really has that "edgar allen poe" sound to it!  No4, on the other hand, made not that great an impression.

Nos5-9 continue from where 1-2 left off.  With each qrt, we get closer and closer to "THAT" melody.  No6 starts off in that territory, but there is just too much "craftsmanship" and "composing"...oh, listen to me complain...as I said, I believe No8 is the grail.

No9 is very strange sounding, and I wonder what sym it might mirror.  This is one of my favs, very unorthodox sounding, with certain navy songs and such. Myask. in a laboratory?

No10 is another schoolboy revision...not that special to me...a nice Haydnesque affair.

No11 is a revision?, or reconstruction?, or recomp?, or just a newly composed "old fashioned" work..."from old notebooks"...and this one is my really just fav as a general quartet. It's not the meloncoly, but the wistful...this is the most elusive, perfect, nicely behaved and consistently beautiful...not so much modulating...just a relaxed qrt.

No12 I haven't heard
No13 is the one everyone turns to, and just like No6, it starts off in the territory, and it DOES continue, but here too I find Mias "craftmanship" getting in the way of MY melody (I know, I know).  Can't you just let me wallow, sir???  Either way, this is the end of the old russia as far as SQs are concerned, and it IS very fine.  It does make me wonder about No12.

so...No3, No11, No8(the supposed masterpiece), No13...with No9  as a pleasant head scratcher.  yea, honestly, I was kinda of disappointed...but I'll hold out for No8.

Myaskovsky...wow!

Thanks for your interesting survey. Do you know Cello Sonata No 2 - my favourite piece of Miaskovsky's chamber music? A beautiful, moving work IMHO. There are several recordings (Chandos/ Arte Nova/Regis etc)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on April 14, 2009, 01:40:27 PM
I know there's a non-commercial tape of the piece circulating around - but why hasn't any label seen fit to record and issue Miaskovsky's violin & piano sonata?  The cost would be modest enough, and given the attention and enthusiasm Svetlanov's Symphony cycle has generated, it might do pretty well.  Or is it of inferior quality?  I've not heard it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 15, 2009, 10:49:04 PM
I used to have cello sonata on MDG (w/ Poulenc and Carter!), but now have on Globe with the obl. DSCH/Schnittke.

But yes,  the sonata delivers the goods.

I just brought all the qrts. over to listen to.  I tried some of the ones I've been having problems with (1-2,5-6)... and though they are not really immediately attractive (though 5-6 start out in the echt Mia. manner)-there are disturbing "avant" type moments, jarring modulatory anguishes- the overall "Edgar Allen Poe" gothic atmosphere and Mia's craftmanship (the same I was complaining about!) keep one well within the comfort zone, though none are especially "easy" on the ears.  The man has angst!!

Still have to hear No.8 in f# minor...I do believe it was written during that holiday with Prokofiev when they were using the "Kardashian"? themes.

And I JUST noticed Grechaninov has 4 quartets!  Anyone?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 19, 2009, 05:55:33 PM
There's a great little chamber music publishing site...silvertrust editions...(punch that into the search), and they offer Mia's SQ No.8 in f#minor, and they have samples so I finally heard it.
Instead of being the Finzi-athon I thought, it turned out to be quite rarified, a logical progression from 5-7 (7 I still haven't heard). The slow mvmt wasn't the cello cto dream I had imagined either, and did seem peculiarly non-Miaskovskian.

so...having heard all but 7 and 12, for the discrimminator, I would rank Mia's SQs:

No.11* (the most delicate)
No.3* (the gothic masterpiece)
No.9* (the quirkiest)

No.13

1-2 (a pair- very advanced and stormy)

5-8 (pick one: the development of his style)

4, 10 (revised student works, slightly Haydnesque?)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 20, 2009, 10:11:23 PM
I've been obsessing on these quartets for days now, plunging into the problems, and I do believe we're making headway.

Again I listened to No.4 in f minor (1909; rev. 1936), in four mvmts, and found it to be very creepy gothic indeed, in the good way! Nos.3-4 were composed early, and in the 30s were booked together with SQs 1-2 (both composed 1930) as Op.33 1-4.
I'm going to call these two early quartets (3-4) the darkest sounding quartets I've heard of any composer.  If anyone can think of any other more minor key wallowing "ruins in the moonlight" creepy gothic chamber music than this...Schmitt's Piano Qnt???

In a way I almost enjoy these two quartets more than his later innovations, since they are free of a lot of the procedurals Mia began using in the 30s.  They sound like what I had hoped Tchaikovsky would sound like (he only scratched the surface of sad for me), and almost on a "sad" par with Lekeu's Molto Adagio.

I listened again to the sound bites of No.8 in f# minor, and then to No.5 in e minor. No.5 (1939)picks up almost 10 years after the last "modern" SQ, No.2(1930).  I started to notice how all the quartets 5-8 (still haven't heard No.7) start with "the" Miaskovsky trademark melody: wistful, melancoly, perfect; and then he begins to...I'm going to say "torture" the melody(but in the good way), and every time he gets on the threshold of a Finzian moment, he pulls back. He is not making it easy for us here, there is always trouble brewing around the melody.

I listened hard to No.5 (1939), and heard things in a different way, and I realized that you HAVE to listen hard to these SQs; but that's when I heard the delicates. No.5 and No.6 start off pretty much the same, but No.5 is the more intimate.

And No.8 (1942), which is made a lot of hay over because it is written for a dead friend (in the war?), it seems to sidestep ever opportunity for crushing emotional release in favor of a very enigmatic and slightly aloof elegiac sound. The "echt" melody in this one reminds me slightly of the opening of Ravel's violin and cello Duo...hence the "aloof."

There is a general feeling like the SQ is Mia's "laboratory", that he is subjecting "melody" to various tests, but also that these are not just mere experiments. This cycle (5-9; 1939-43) encircles the Sym 21,
, which I haven't heard but once long ago, so I can't do any relational comparisons, but I have the feeling that the concentration and compactness of Sym.21 has it's seeds in Myaskovsky's SQ writing.

Forgive me for going on ad infinitum here, but if there ARE so many riches in Myaskovsky, then shouldn't revelations follow? I had just noticed how Mia's SQ No.5 starts off almost exactly like Milhaud's SQ No.9, written a couple of years earlier, and Milhaud himself seems to be going through a similar transformational process with his SQs 8-11.  Maybe also Villa-Lobos, Malipiero, Bloch, and others have more than a passing similarity during this time of upheaval.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 02, 2009, 04:03:52 AM
Two new recordings of Miaskovsky symphonies-

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/May09/miaskovsky_sys.htm

And-very interestingly-news that Scherbachov's Fifth Symphony has been recorded on the same label :) One to investigate for definite ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2009, 08:42:07 PM
Two new recordings of Miaskovsky symphonies-

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/May09/miaskovsky_sys.htm

And-very interestingly-news that Scherbachov's Fifth Symphony has been recorded on the same label :) One to investigate for definite ;D

Ordered all three yesterday  ::)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on May 02, 2009, 10:21:01 PM
Ordered all three yesterday  ::)
Are they distributed solely from the NF website or are there other sources?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 03, 2009, 12:32:56 AM
Are they distributed solely from the NF website or are there other sources?

Not sure but got mine here:

http://www.russiancdshop.com/music.php?zobraz=details&id=20469&lang=en

Look under 'great composers' section for the others in the series.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 05, 2009, 05:26:58 PM
Jeffrey - Trying to PM you, but your inbox is full.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 06, 2009, 12:40:44 AM
Jeffrey - Trying to PM you, but your inbox is full.

Sorry about that. Have cleared some space now.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry on May 06, 2009, 12:48:45 AM
Will start very soon with this box again, which I abandoned some months ago, due to illness.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 06, 2009, 06:29:24 AM
Will start very soon with this box again, which I abandoned some months ago, due to illness.

Hope you are better now.  Symphonies 6, 16,17,21,24,25 and 27 are my favourites.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Lethevich on November 14, 2009, 04:56:45 AM
I've been listening to his symphonies a lot recently, but I was wondering - why was he criticised for "formalism"? They all sound accessable, often excessively so, rendering him less interesting than Shostakovich, for example. It's very good music, but I hear nothing questioning the Soviet's "artistic goals" in it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry on November 14, 2009, 05:05:02 AM
I've been listening to his symphonies a lot recently, but I was wondering - why was he criticised for "formalism"? They all sound accessable, often excessively so, rendering him less interesting than Shostakovich, for example. It's very good music, but I hear nothing questioning the Soviet's "artistic goals" in it.

Agreed Sarah, but somehow I failed to start again with this box with the complete Symphonies. Its lying around now for a year, but I did not manage till now to get as far as disc 8. I think I get a little bored with his music, which is odd, for I love his music. A puzzling paradox.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 14, 2009, 05:50:24 AM
Agreed Sarah, but somehow I failed to start again with this box with the complete Symphonies. Its lying around now for a year, but I did not manage till now to get as far as disc 8. I think I get a little bored with his music, which is odd, for I love his music. A puzzling paradox.

Harry,

You should enjoy the discs you are coming to. Disc 9 has No 24 and the valedictory No 27 (Miaskovsky's creative answer to the denunciation of his music in 1948 - the slow movement is especially moving). The wartime No 24 is also a top-ranker in my view. Disc 10 has Symphony No 3 on - the best of the early symphonies (before No 6) - the funeral march at the end is very darkly powerful. CD 11 has Symphony No 16 on. It commemorates the Maxim Gorky air disaster and has perhaps the best slow movement of all. Hopefully these works will revive your enthusiasm for Miaskovsky!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry on November 14, 2009, 08:28:46 AM
Harry,

You should enjoy the discs you are coming to. Disc 9 has No 24 and the valedictory No 27 (Miaskovsky's creative answer to the denunciation of his music in 1948 - the slow movement is especially moving). The wartime No 24 is also a top-ranker in my view. Disc 10 has Symphony No 3 on - the best of the early symphonies (before No 6) - the funeral march at the end is very darkly powerful. CD 11 has Symphony No 16 on. It commemorates the Maxim Gorky air disaster and has perhaps the best slow movement of all. Hopefully these works will revive your enthusiasm for Miaskovsky!

No doubt it will. But you know what, this is more a problem of me, then Miaskovsky's compositions. You have to sit emotional comfortable in your own skin, to completely grasp this composer. I think I am bored with myself. Maybe my life is too mundane.....sigh!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: springrite on November 14, 2009, 08:33:10 AM
Just got the cello concerto, part of the Brilliant Rostropovich box. I have the Olympia recording for years. Love the work. Will give the Rostropovich a spin as soon as I have a chance.

Listened to the complete piano sonatas last week. Glenn Gould was right. Magnificent works that should be heard more often!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 14, 2009, 08:46:18 AM
No doubt it will. But you know what, this is more a problem of me, then Miaskovsky's compositions. You have to sit emotional comfortable in your own skin, to completely grasp this composer. I think I am bored with myself. Maybe my life is too mundane.....sigh!

I am not entirely 'emotionally comfortable' in my own skin but that does not stop me enjoying Miaskovsky! The composer himself was a very retiring, introverted character and I think that his music might appeal to similar types. Just a thought  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Harry on November 14, 2009, 08:51:49 AM
I am not entirely 'emotionally comfortable' in my own skin but that does not stop me enjoying Miaskovsky! The composer himself was a very retiring, introverted character and I think that his music might appeal to similar types. Just a thought  :)

I will keep that in mind Jeffrey, thank you for putting up with my ramblings.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 14, 2009, 03:26:25 PM
I will keep that in mind Jeffrey, thank you for putting up with my ramblings.

Not 'ramblings' Harry - what you have to say is always of interest. I am interested in that Istanbul CD - the Alan Bush was a great discovery - thanks to you.
Title: SQs 7-8
Post by: snyprrr on January 25, 2010, 12:11:41 PM
I finally got another piece of the puzzle. Now the only one I haven't heard is No.12 (anyone?).

I have truly agonized over this cycle, as if it was something I was supposed to like, and yet have had problems with. I have always sought a corresponding "Cello Cto" in the SQs, and, until now (1-6, 9-11, 13) I had found precious little of the stereotypically "nostalgia for the irretrieveably lost" Myaskovsky that sucked me in in the first place.

This cycle is more in line with the thoroughly wrought craftsmanship and elusive harmony of Taneyev than with Finzi, haha. Every time Mya starts one of these ultra beautiful melodies, he always subjects it to rigorous, tortured development of the kind I'm not always very partial to; however, the thing is, Mya is suuuch a Great Composer that he compels you to agree with him in the end.



Anyhow, No.7 (1941), in F Major, is the SQ that I knew the least about, and, poof!, it shot right up there in my Top3 favs immediately. It's my fav in the 5-8 series (sounds like Pettersson, haha) simply because, finally, Mya delivers the goods for my bleeding sentimental heart. The Andante con moto contains, IMO, the most beautiful music Mya penned for SQ. The other three mvmts, also, though still under the same rigorous hand, appear not to have one chromatic note out of place, in a Mozartean kind of way (which brings up a comparison, I think).

This SQ I would put with the folky yet thorough No.11. Both are steeped in the fantasy music of the Caucases. No.7 truly could be the Missing Link of the whole cycle.

No.8 (1942), in f# minor, is the one pointed to most often (besides No.13) as the echt Mya SQ, or, the most "Cello Cto'd", haha, but... no, it's not, sorry. What it is, is the deepest expression, next to perhaps No.13, of his by now trademark SQ style of tortured minor key development that begun with Nos. 5-6, and culminates in the more wildly (for his SQs) experimental No.9 (hallucinatory band music for SQ!).

But No.8 is one of the most intensely wrought of them all. Sure, there is elegiac pathos throughout, but it is very human, and not idealized (like Barber's Adagio). It reminds me of Shosty's SQ No.14. Mya's inspiration is deeper than first listen will allow. He's not giving things away here, that's for sure. I'm going to have to fully compare Nos. 5, 6, & 8 before I get any farther. Both 5 & 6 have "bigger" melodies, but No.8 isn't as overtly tortured, perhaps?

My impression of Mya sitting in an old tower writing SQs on a dark and stormy day has now been solidified. Nobody speaks to my Nerdy Angst like the Last of the Russian Romantics. My NewOrder (w/o No.12):

1) No.11
2) No.7
               No.13
3) No.4
4) No.3
               No.13
5) No.9
6) No.8
7) Nos. 5-6

8) Nos. 1-2 (1 > 2)

9) No.10
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 01, 2010, 01:25:46 AM
Had one of the great musical experiences of my life last week.  I was contacted by someone who sang in the LPO choir who had read a contribution of mine to the Miaskovsky website (it does exist!), inviting me to attend the rehearsal for the performance of Miaskovsky's epic 6th Symphony at the Festival Hall in London last Thursday. On Wednesday I turned up, with a friend who shares my musical tastes, for the rehearsal at the Henry Wood Hall in London.  I was taken in to be introduced to the conductor - Vladimir Jurowski, who was very nice, chatted to me about the composer and showed me his copy of the score which was a copy of the one given to his grandfather by Khachaturian (who had inscribed it to him) - they had both been in Miaskovsky's composition class together in Moscow. When we were taken in to the rehearsal I assumed that we would be sat somewhere unobtrusively at the back - but instead of that we were seated three feet behind the conductor (the only audience there). It was like being in the London Philharmonic and absolutely riveting. Jurowski, for example, told them to perform a section of the finale 'more like Korngold' and got the choir to sing their very moving contribution to the finale 'more in the style of a russian, peasant folk-song' and he sang it himself with great feeling. And to cap it all, when he'd finished the rehearsal of the last movement I thought that we'd slip out but, instead of that, Jurowski turned round and summoned me up to the rostrum to continue our conversation about the composer and I was able to introduce him to my friend.  We were really on a high after this and had to have several drinks at a pub to wind down.

The performance the next day was a wonderful experience, although it was a pity that there were not more people in the Festival Hall to hear it.

Just thought that I wanted to share this unique experience (for me) with you.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Lethevich on May 01, 2010, 02:19:15 AM
Wow, that sounds absolutely wonderful! I'm very jealous :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 01, 2010, 02:54:30 AM
Wow, that sounds absolutely wonderful! I'm very jealous :)

Thanks Lethe - it was the most amazing experience for me.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 01, 2010, 02:55:18 AM
Had one of the great musical experiences of my life last week....Just thought that I wanted to share this unique experience (for me) with you.

I'm in awe, and terribly envious, both of your experience at the rehearsal and the concert you attended.

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 01, 2010, 06:13:33 AM
I'm in awe, and terribly envious, both of your experience at the rehearsal and the concert you attended.

Sarge

Thanks Sarge  :)

In an odd way the concert was a slight anti-climax as the rehearsal experience had been so special - we were spoilt I guess.  But, I loved hearing that Symphony in concert - possibly a once in a decade or once in a lifetime experience. When was it last performed in England? I guess in the 1920s or 30s by Sir Henry Wood or someone like that.  The opening work was Prokofiev's Symphony-Concerto. I have to say, as a Prokofiev fan, that I don't really like this work very much but it was a very good performance - interrupted by the soloist having to walk off stage when he broke a string on the cello. The reviews are full of praise for the Prokofiev work and largely dismissive of the Miaskovsky. I find this really annoying as I think that Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony is one of the great scores of the early 20th Century.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 01, 2010, 06:23:59 AM
But, I loved hearing that Symphony in concert - possibly a once in a decade or once in a lifetime experience.

That's exactly how I feel about hearing the Rott Symphony live a week ago. I don't expect there will be another chance in my lifetime. Hope I'm wrong  ;)

I've been listening to the Svetlanov recording of the Sixth, and also auditioning clips of Miaskovsky's piano sonatas and string quartets (snyprr's malign influence ;D )  Ordered several discs: Sonatas 1 and 4, SQs 12+13 and 7+8, and the Cello Concerto (coupled with the two Cello Sonatas--I already have versions of the First but not the Second). Anyway...a Miaskovsky kind of afternoon  8)

Sarge 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on May 01, 2010, 12:31:43 PM
Had one of the great musical experiences of my life last week.  I was contacted by someone who sang in the LPO choir who had read a contribution of mine to the Miaskovsky website (it does exist!), inviting me to attend the rehearsal for the performance of Miaskovsky's epic 6th Symphony at the Festival Hall in London last Thursday. On Wednesday I turned up, with a friend who shares my musical tastes, for the rehearsal at the Henry Wood Hall in London.  I was taken in to be introduced to the conductor - Vladimir Jurowski, who was very nice, chatted to me about the composer and showed me his copy of the score which was a copy of the one given to his grandfather by Khachaturian (who had inscribed it to him) - they had both been in Miaskovsky's composition class together in Moscow. When we were taken in to the rehearsal I assumed that we would be sat somewhere unobtrusively at the back - but instead of that we were seated three feet behind the conductor (the only audience there). It was like being in the London Philharmonic and absolutely riveting. Jurowski, for example, told them to perform a section of the finale 'more like Korngold' and got the choir to sing their very moving contribution to the finale 'more in the style of a russian, peasant folk-song' and he sang it himself with great feeling. And to cap it all, when he'd finished the rehearsal of the last movement I thought that we'd slip out but, instead of that, Jurowski turned round and summoned me up to the rostrum to continue our conversation about the composer and I was able to introduce him to my friend.  We were really on a high after this and had to have several drinks at a pub to wind down.

The performance the next day was a wonderful experience, although it was a pity that there were not more people in the Festival Hall to hear it.

Just thought that I wanted to share this unique experience (for me) with you.

Wow.   So happy you had this experience.  I have a glow just reading about it.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 02:04:20 AM
That's exactly how I feel about hearing the Rott Symphony live a week ago. I don't expect there will be another chance in my lifetime. Hope I'm wrong  ;)

I've been listening to the Svetlanov recording of the Sixth, and also auditioning clips of Miaskovsky's piano sonatas and string quartets (snyprr's malign influence ;D )  Ordered several discs: Sonatas 1 and 4, SQs 12+13 and 7+8, and the Cello Concerto (coupled with the two Cello Sonatas--I already have versions of the First but not the Second). Anyway...a Miaskovsky kind of afternoon  8)

Sarge

Yes, I bet hearing the Rott Symphony was great - I like that work enormously with its echoes of Mahler, Bruckner and, oddly, Nielsen. I have two recordings. I hope that you get to hear it live again. By the way, you need to hear Miaskovsky's 6th with the choir at the end - such a pity that Svetlanov chose not to incorporate it in his otherwise fine performance. I've been listening to List with the Ural Philharmonic (+Ekaterinburg Choir) - a version I like more and more.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 02:12:05 AM
Wow.   So happy you had this experience.  I have a glow just reading about it.

Thank you John  :)

I'm trying to think of what else Jurowski said - he mentioned that Kondrashin said that Miaskovsky's music 'needed help' from the conductor to work - I guess because the orchestration can be a bit dense (although I love the orchestration of No 6). It was great to hear the harp clearly at the end and the funereal, Boris Gudonov type, drumbeats at the end of the first movement (which are lost on most recordings other than Jarvi's). He also commented on how, after Miaskovsky's death in 1950 the younger composers turned against his music (as with Vaughan Williams).  I believe that both Vaughan Williams' and Miaskovsky's music really has to be heard live to work its magic - although I guess that this could be said of all composers.

Thanks guys for the nice responses.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2010, 02:20:24 AM
Yes, I bet hearing the Rott Symphony was great - I like that work enormously with its echoes of Mahler, Bruckner and, oddly, Nielsen.

Hearing it live I heard some Smetana too for the first time!

Quote
By the way, you need to hear Miaskovsky's 6th with the choir at the end - such a pity that Svetlanov chose not to incorporate it in his otherwise fine performance. I've been listening to List with the Ural Philharmonic (+Ekaterinburg Choir) - a version I like more and more.

I was going to PM you about recommended versions with choir. I was disappointed the first time I listened to Svetlanov's Sixth....kept expecting to hear voices! I even had a momentary panic thinking the booklet was wrong or the CDs were mislabeled (I'd never heard the work before so couldn't identify it by sound). But I subsequently read (in wiki, I think) that Svetlanov omitted the choir, possibly for financial reasons. Anyway, you've read my mind  ;D  I'll track down List.

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 02:37:40 AM
Hearing it live I heard some Smetana too for the first time!

I was going to PM you about recommended versions with choir. I was disappointed the first time I listened to Svetlanov's Sixth....kept expecting to hear voices! I even had a momentary panic thinking the booklet was wrong or the CDs were mislabeled (I'd never heard the work before so couldn't identify it by sound). But I subsequently read (in wiki, I think) that Svetlanov omitted the choir, possibly for financial reasons. Anyway, you've read my mind  ;D  I'll track down List.

Sarge

Sarge,

The Kondrashin version on Russian Disc is the greatest performance on CD, but difficult to track down.  There is a later (Kondrashin) Melodiya version which is very good but unfortunately the magical flute episode in the trio of the scherzo is played too fast IMHO. This is one of my all time favourite moments in all music, as is the entry of the choir in the finale. The Jarvi on DGG is the best recording and a strong performance. Stankowsky on Marco Polo was poorly reviewed when it appeared (the first CD version) but I rather like it and for me it works in a kind of understated way(both the flute and choir episodes are effectively realised). Dudarova on Olympia still seems to be around and unlike most of the old Olympias is reasonably priced. It is an ok version and at least it has the choir. I like the Ural Philharmonic - obviously not the Leningrad Philharmonic of the Mravinsky period but it is a deeply felt version, which I enjoy. I hope that the Stankowsky version gets on to Naxos as that will make the Symphony better known.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 02:42:01 AM
Sarge,

My one and only Musicweb review was of the later Kondrashin version, which you might find of interest - as I comment on the other recordings (apart from the List which was issued subsequently)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/May06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2010, 02:49:43 AM
Sarge,

The Kondrashin version on Russian Disc is the greatest performance on CD, but difficult to track down.  There is a later (Kondrashin) Melodiya version which is very good but unfortunately the magical flute episode in the trio of the scherzo is played too fast IMHO. This is one of my all time favourite moments in all music, as is the entry of the choir in the finale. The Jarvi on DGG is the best recording and a strong performance. Stankowsky on Marco Polo was poorly reviewed when it appeared (the first CD version) but I rather like it and for me it works in a kind of understated way(both the flute and choir episodes are effectively realised). Dudarova on Olympia still seems to be around and unlike most of the old Olympias is reasonably priced. It is an ok version and at least it has the choir. I nlike the Ural Philharmonic - obviously not the Leningrad Philharmonic of the Mravinsky period but it is a deeply felt version, which I enjoy. I hope that the Stankowsky version gets on to Naxos as that will make the Symphony better known.

Sarge,

My one and only Musicweb review was of the later Kondrashin version, which you might find of interest - as I comment on the other recordings (apart from the List which was issued subsequently)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/May06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm

Thank you for the additional information and recommendations. I was intrigued by what you said of the Järvi recording in a previous message: that the drumbeats could be heard. That's the kind of clarity I appreciate in a recording although it doesn't necessarily trump other considerations. Off to read the musicweb review now.

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 03:06:35 AM
Thank you for the additional information and recommendations. I was intrigued by what you said of the Järvi recording in a previous message: that the drumbeats could be heard. That's the kind of clarity I appreciate in a recording although it doesn't necessarily trump other considerations. Off to read the musicweb review now.

Sarge

You are most welcome. The conductor of the Ural Philharmonic is, I should have said, Dmitri Liss not 'List' ::)

ps You wont go wrong with the Jarvi on DGG, but not that easy to find at a reasonable price (in the UK) at least.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 03:14:30 AM
Sarge,

Just checked; the Jarvi DGG version is available at c $15.00 on the US Amazon site.

ps Just to confuse you there are a couple of enthusiastic reviews of the Liss version on the UK Amazon site - and you can get it dirt cheap.


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myaskovsky-Symphonies-Nos-6-10/dp/B000GRU6WY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1272802511&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2010, 03:26:29 AM
Sarge,

Just checked; the Jarvi DGG version is available at c $15.00 on the US Amazon site.

ps Just to confuse you there are a couple of enthusiastic reviews of the Liss version on the UK Amazon site - and you can get it dirt cheap.


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myaskovsky-Symphonies-Nos-6-10/dp/B000GRU6WY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1272802511&sr=1-1

Thanks...and I found Liss even cheaper at amazon.fr (10 Euro for a new copy). Ordered it. Really appreciate your help in sorting through the available versions. By the way, I found used copies of the first Kondrashin, Dudarova and Stankowsky also but I think I'll stop with one purchase for now.

ps You wont go wrong with the Jarvi on DGG, but not that easy to find at a reasonable price (in the UK) at least.

I couldn't find it at all in Germany or France.

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Drasko on May 02, 2010, 03:40:52 AM
You are most welcome. The conductor of the Ural Philharmonic is, I should have said, Dmitri Liss not 'List' ::)
Liss was conducting Miaskovsky's 6th here in Belgrade few months ago, I had tickets but couldn't go. Who knows when/if I'll get the next chance to hear the piece live :P

Quote from: Sergeant Rock link=topic=1523.msg410828#msg410828

I couldn't find it at all in Germany or France.

http://www.amazon.de/Sinfonie-6-Järvi/dp/B000066I70
http://www.amazon.fr/Miaskovski-Symphonie-n°6-Nikolaï/dp/B000066I70
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2010, 03:52:06 AM
Liss was conducting Miaskovsky's 6th here in Belgrade few months ago, I had tickets but couldn't go. Who knows when/if I'll get the next chance to hear the piece live :P

I feel your pain, dude. That is a pity.

Quote
http://www.amazon.de/Sinfonie-6-Järvi/dp/B000066I70
http://www.amazon.fr/Miaskovski-Symphonie-n°6-Nikolaï/dp/B000066I70

I searched yesterday for Järvi and again today and amazon's search machines came up with nothing. I then went through each page after searching simply for "Miaskovsky" and "Myaskovsky" and again could not find Järvi on either amazon site. Weird. I'm either blind or amazon is trying to gaslight me  :D

Anyway, thanks for the links. I should just hire you to do all my searches for me  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2010, 05:37:35 AM
Drasko - that is a pity - I hope that you'll get another opportunity.

Sarge,

I just played the Liss again - my favourite at the moment - a deeply felt performance (and you get Symphony 10 thrown in). The Jurowski concert was recorded - it would be great if the LPO could issue it as they now have their own CD label.

I remember now that in the rehearsal, Jurowski told the choir that he wanted the men to sound like the wails of the damned in Hell, while the women were to sing their contribution in the style of a traditional Russian folk song.

Here is a useless review of the concert - just what I expected. The comments below, including a stroppy couple from me, might be of interest, especially for the speculation about the (fine) cellist walking off stage and not reappearing for an extended period in the Prokofiev work.


http://www.theartsdesk.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=1407:lpo/jurowski-music-review&Itemid=27

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Superhorn on May 04, 2010, 06:05:18 AM
  Wow !  A conductor actually programmed a Myaskovsky symphony at a live concert !  Live performances of this composer's music are as scarce as hen's teeth!
 (I do have a few hens with teeth,though).  Way to go Vladimir!  Give us more Myaskovsky,please! 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 04, 2010, 10:11:12 PM
  Wow !  A conductor actually programmed a Myaskovsky symphony at a live concert !  Live performances of this composer's music are as scarce as hen's teeth!
 (I do have a few hens with teeth,though).  Way to go Vladimir!  Give us more Myaskovsky,please!

Yes, it was fairly amazing to see this live - especially in London. I saw Symphony No 21 (semi-professional performance) in London a year or two back - also an excellent performance. Seeing Gliere's Third Symphony live a few years ago was also a wonderful and unexpected experience. It was the first performance of the full work in England since about 1913!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: lescamil on May 05, 2010, 08:54:03 PM
This is surely to be interest of many people here. Here is the recent performance by Jurowski of the Myaskovsky Sixth Symphony, captured off the BBC Radio 3 website by yours truly. The full program of the concert and the commentaries by the host and Jurowski are included, and it makes for some very interesting listening for those interested in the history of the work. Enjoy!

-----------------------------

Presented by Ian Skelly

Conductor Vladimir Jurowski highlights a musical friendship between two Russian composers with very different personalities. Nikolai Myaskovsky began his music studies at the St Petersburg Conservatory at the mature age of 25, where he met the brash, 15 year old Prokofiev, and their friendship blossomed.

As Russia lurched into turbulence in the early 1900s, Myaskovsky had a ringside seat as a serving officer, trying to fulfill his duty as a military engineer followng in his father's footsteps, whilst also pursuing his passion for music. He witnessed first-hand the events which culminated in the First World War and the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. His Sixth symphony is influenced by these events, and it became a monumental choral symphony of heroism and revolution, including themes from French revolutionary songs and a Russian sacred text. But for all its large scale, it is also a deeply personal testament.

Prokofiev left Russia after the revolution but returned in the 1930s. His Sinfonia concertante for cello and orchestra, written near the end of his life, was prompted by Mstislav Rostropovich, whose playing had reawakened Prokofiev's interest in the cello, inspiring him to re-work an earlier concerto into this new piece.

Prokofiev: Sinfonia concertante
Myaskovsky: Symphony no.6

Danjulo Ishizaka (cello)
London Philharmonic Orchestra
London Philharmonic Choir
conductor Vladimir Jurowski

Followed by performances by nominees for the 2010 Royal Philharmonic Society Awards, ahead of the awards ceremony which takes place on 11th May. Tonight features the nominees in the Chamber Music category - The Schubert Ensemble, the Takacs Quartet and the Wigmore Hall Haydn Bicentenary Season.

----------------------------------------

I apologize for the RapidShare link, but it was too big for Mediafire.

http://bit.ly/bojG7Q
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 06, 2010, 02:19:37 AM
This is surely to be interest of many people here. Here is the recent performance by Jurowski of the Myaskovsky Sixth Symphony, captured off the BBC Radio 3 website by yours truly. The full program of the concert and the commentaries by the host and Jurowski are included, and it makes for some very interesting listening for those interested in the history of the work. Enjoy!

Thanks! For those wanting to jump right into the Miaskovsky, the introduction starts at 45:30 with the music beginning at 45:57.

Sarge
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on May 06, 2010, 05:01:04 AM
This is surely to be interest of many people here. Here is the recent performance by Jurowski of the Myaskovsky Sixth Symphony, captured off the BBC Radio 3 website by yours truly. The full program of the concert and the commentaries by the host and Jurowski are included, and it makes for some very interesting listening for those interested in the history of the work. Enjoy!

-

Wow!  Thanks VERY much!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 07, 2010, 11:12:06 PM
This is surely to be interest of many people here. Here is the recent performance by Jurowski of the Myaskovsky Sixth Symphony, captured off the BBC Radio 3 website by yours truly. The full program of the concert and the commentaries by the host and Jurowski are included, and it makes for some very interesting listening for those interested in the history of the work. Enjoy!

-----------------------------

Presented by Ian Skelly

Conductor Vladimir Jurowski highlights a musical friendship between two Russian composers with very different personalities. Nikolai Myaskovsky began his music studies at the St Petersburg Conservatory at the mature age of 25, where he met the brash, 15 year old Prokofiev, and their friendship blossomed.

As Russia lurched into turbulence in the early 1900s, Myaskovsky had a ringside seat as a serving officer, trying to fulfill his duty as a military engineer followng in his father's footsteps, whilst also pursuing his passion for music. He witnessed first-hand the events which culminated in the First World War and the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. His Sixth symphony is influenced by these events, and it became a monumental choral symphony of heroism and revolution, including themes from French revolutionary songs and a Russian sacred text. But for all its large scale, it is also a deeply personal testament.

Prokofiev left Russia after the revolution but returned in the 1930s. His Sinfonia concertante for cello and orchestra, written near the end of his life, was prompted by Mstislav Rostropovich, whose playing had reawakened Prokofiev's interest in the cello, inspiring him to re-work an earlier concerto into this new piece.

Prokofiev: Sinfonia concertante
Myaskovsky: Symphony no.6

Danjulo Ishizaka (cello)
London Philharmonic Orchestra
London Philharmonic Choir
conductor Vladimir Jurowski

Followed by performances by nominees for the 2010 Royal Philharmonic Society Awards, ahead of the awards ceremony which takes place on 11th May. Tonight features the nominees in the Chamber Music category - The Schubert Ensemble, the Takacs Quartet and the Wigmore Hall Haydn Bicentenary Season.

----------------------------------------

I apologize for the RapidShare link, but it was too big for Mediafire.

http://bit.ly/bojG7Q

Yes, thanks very much for this - good of you to provide the link.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Martin Lind on June 19, 2010, 05:07:54 PM
I skimmed a bit through this thread. I didn't want to read really everything. I possess some Miaskovski, first of all the Swetlanov box. But also some string quartets ( his last is great), violin concerto, Downes with the 5th and 9th symphonies.

But I must admit that my exploration of Miaskovskis symphonies at some time haltered. There are some who I like: His 3rd, 5th ( Downes is better than Swetlanov here ), 6th, 7th, 11th, 22nd, 25th, 27th. But often I was bored and so somehow I didn't manage to hear all of them. Now I try to understand better Bach's Well Tampered Klavier or listen to more Mozart for example which I don't know, classical music is a wide field and competition is hard.

Please tell me regarding the symphonies which I should maybe listen to more and which deserve more attention. I know that some of his symphonies disappointed me, for example the 4th or the 8th ( who has a good slow set still) and so on. I really was glad when I got the box and discovered some good works, for example his 7th, but then more and more I was bored or thought: Not bad, but there is better music.

Regards
Martin
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 19, 2010, 10:03:48 PM
I skimmed a bit through this thread. I didn't want to read really everything. I possess some Miaskovski, first of all the Swetlanov box. But also some string quartets ( his last is great), violin concerto, Downes with the 5th and 9th symphonies.

But I must admit that my exploration of Miaskovskis symphonies at some time haltered. There are some who I like: His 3rd, 5th ( Downes is better than Swetlanov here ), 6th, 7th, 11th, 22nd, 25th, 27th. But often I was bored and so somehow I didn't manage to hear all of them. Now I try to understand better Bach's Well Tampered Klavier or listen to more Mozart for example which I don't know, classical music is a wide field and competition is hard.

Please tell me regarding the symphonies which I should maybe listen to more and which deserve more attention. I know that some of his symphonies disappointed me, for example the 4th or the 8th ( who has a good slow set still) and so on. I really was glad when I got the box and discovered some good works, for example his 7th, but then more and more I was bored or thought: Not bad, but there is better music.

Regards
Martin

Martin,

Symphony No 16 has perhaps my favourite Miaskovsky slow movement - it was to commemorate an air disaster (the crash of the giant plane 'Maxim Gorky') - so, I'd try No 16 and No 17, written during Stalin's Purges, is IMHO the most underrated of them all. Allegedly a piece of Socialist Realism, I think that there is much more to this work. The slow movement is beautiful and the end, to me at least, sounds oddly defiant. There are also echoes of Tchaikovsky and Lyadov. So, have a listen to symphonies 16 and 17 and also the lyrical Cello Sonata No 2 if you don't know it.

Hope you enjoy these.

Best wishes

Jeffrey

ps I don't know if you know the shorter works but the Lyric Concertino has a great slow movement, which belies the diminutive title. 'Silence' (Tone poem after Poe) is a darkly brooding early work, in the spirit of Rachmaninov's Isle of the Dead and Skryabin. It might appeal if, like me, you enjoy music suggestive of brooding despair and looming catastrophe. I think that they are all to be found in the Svetlanov box.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Martin Lind on June 19, 2010, 11:08:42 PM
Dear Jeffrey,

thank you very much for your recommendations and the descriptions of the works. I don't posses the cello sonata, but will listen to all other works. Maybe, when I have done this, we could talk on? By the way do you know the Downes in the 5th? I know him and was then disappointed by the Svetlanov. Downes plays the set quicker, bringing a pastoral, fluently lyrical, singing mood to the set, very enchanting, Swetlanov is slower, more meaningfull, missing completely these elements which I love in the Downes. But Downes is not better in the 9th. But I wouldn't like to miss the Downes because of the 5th.

Regards
Martin
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 19, 2010, 11:20:39 PM
Dear Jeffrey,

thank you very much for your recommendations and the descriptions of the works. I don't posses the cello sonata, but will listen to all other works. Maybe, when I have done this, we could talk on? By the way do you know the Downes in the 5th? I know him and was then disappointed by the Svetlanov. Downes plays the set quicker, bringing a pastoral, fluently lyrical, singing mood to the set, very enchanting, Swetlanov is slower, more meaningfull, missing completely these elements which I love in the Downes. But Downes is not better in the 9th. But I wouldn't like to miss the Downes because of the 5th.

Regards
Martin

Hi Martin,

Yes, of course I'd be delighted to carry on discussing Miaskovsky with you after you've heard the works (or before!). I have the Downes on Marco Polo but haven't listened to it for ages - so, I'll give it another listen to soon.  It is worth looking out for Cello Sonata No 2 - my favourite Miaskovsky chamber work - I think that there is a budget version.

Kind regards

Jeffrey

ps Here it is - ignore the incorrect Amazon pricing on Amazon UK - but you can pick it up there for under £5.00 if you like.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: False_Dmitry on June 20, 2010, 01:12:33 AM
Here is a useless review of the concert - just what I expected. The comments below, including a stroppy couple from me, might be of interest, especially for the speculation about the (fine) cellist walking off stage and not reappearing for an extended period in the Prokofiev work.


Frankly David Nice is a talentless scribbler, and his opinions and assessments are worth 0.  He's sadly typical of that breed of never-made-it-as-a-performer, who failed to justify the hopes of his ambitious parents.  He uses his reviews as a channel to take-out his bitterness on the profession he didn't have the talent and application to enter. It's the reason that his reviews appear in an amateur blog, instead of a newspaper.

It all prompts the question - which is somewhat off-topic - where are the perceptive and able critics now?  Only Michael Church has any credibility.  Christiansen's pompous ultra-conservative views can't be backed-up with any acuity of observation or objective comment - I think he writes his crits off the Press Releases?   Simon Heffer is a pretentious vacuous popinjay - a rank amateur who shouldn't be allowed to review concerts at all, and is only there to gladhand it with his bow-tied chums.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 20, 2010, 01:17:34 AM
Frankly David Nice is a talentless scribbler, and his opinions and assessments are worth 0.  He's sadly typical of that breed of never-made-it-as-a-performer, who failed to justify the hopes of his ambitious parents.  He uses his reviews as a channel to take-out his bitterness on the profession he didn't have the talent and application to enter. It's the reason that his reviews appear in an amateur blog, instead of a newspaper.

It all prompts the question - which is somewhat off-topic - where are the perceptive and able critics now?  Only Michael Church has any credibility.  Christiansen's pompous ultra-conservative views can't be backed-up with any acuity of observation or objective comment - I think he writes his crits off the Press Releases?   Simon Heffer is a pretentious vacuous popinjay - a rank amateur who shouldn't be allowed to review concerts at all, and is only there to gladhand it with his bow-tied chums.

Really enjoyed this post! certainly Simon Heffer's biography of Vaughan Williams was a big disappointment - it was just the re-hashed views of other, better-informed, writers and had absolutely nothing new to say about VW whatsoever.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Martin Lind on June 20, 2010, 03:46:39 AM
I enjoyed the posting of False Dimitri too. But back to Miaskovski. I have some other recordings too not mentioned yet. For example Verbitzky in the 3rd, haven't heard the Svetlanov yet and I like that alot. Or the Naxos recordings of 24th and 25th. Swetlanov is much better, more energetic and more subtle at the same time. For example this special effect, that the violins start a tone very quiet, I don't know weather this performing technic has a name, which I also know from the 22nd symphony with Svetlanov.  I also possess the 6th with Järvi.

I also praised the Downes in especially the 1st set of the 5th, as - when I started to explore the Swetlanov set, I did this really on my knees, thinking Swetlanov could only be the best. Swetlanov is a great conductor, has all credentials to perform this repertoire and his is the only complete set of symphonies.

The 5th has changed this attitude where I find the Downes better. The Swetlanov is certainly very good but maybe we will have other performances in the future who will be even more revealing. Maybe the Svetlanov set will once acquire a status like the Jochum in Bruckner or the first Bernstein in Mahler: A towering classic but flawed or at least questionable.

This is always the problem with composers rarely performed and recorded. OT For example I don't like the Schwarz in Hansons symphonies, but they were praised, but would they have been praised if there would be more competition? This is of course a situation to be wished: That conductors really compete to perform Miaskovski.

Regards
Martin

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 20, 2010, 10:12:07 AM
I enjoyed the posting of False Dimitri too. But back to Miaskovski. I have some other recordings too not mentioned yet. For example Verbitzky in the 3rd, haven't heard the Svetlanov yet and I like that alot. Or the Naxos recordings of 24th and 25th. Swetlanov is much better, more energetic and more subtle at the same time. For example this special effect, that the violins start a tone very quiet, I don't know weather this performing technic has a name, which I also know from the 22nd symphony with Svetlanov.  I also possess the 6th with Järvi.

I also praised the Downes in especially the 1st set of the 5th, as - when I started to explore the Swetlanov set, I did this really on my knees, thinking Swetlanov could only be the best. Swetlanov is a great conductor, has all credentials to perform this repertoire and his is the only complete set of symphonies.

The 5th has changed this attitude where I find the Downes better. The Swetlanov is certainly very good but maybe we will have other performances in the future who will be even more revealing. Maybe the Svetlanov set will once acquire a status like the Jochum in Bruckner or the first Bernstein in Mahler: A towering classic but flawed or at least questionable.

This is always the problem with composers rarely performed and recorded. OT For example I don't like the Schwarz in Hansons symphonies, but they were praised, but would they have been praised if there would be more competition? This is of course a situation to be wished: That conductors really compete to perform Miaskovski.

Regards
Martin

I have a fine old-series Olympia CD of Symphony No 5 conducted by Konstantin Ivanov with the USSR SO, coupled with Symphony 11, Moscow RSO cond. Veronika Dudarova. The other symphony I should have mentioned is No 24, one of the most deeply felt I think.  Tend to agree about the Hanson Schwarz set. Koussevitsky's No 3 is in a class of its own and this is perhaps my favourite Hanson symphony.

Regards

Jeffrey
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on June 22, 2010, 12:44:40 AM
The other symphony I should have mentioned is No 24, one of the most deeply felt I think.

Regards

Jeffrey

I should echo this.  It was the 24th that first really drew me to Miaskovsky-- yet another really powerful and moving slow movement.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 22, 2010, 04:31:43 AM
I should echo this.  It was the 24th that first really drew me to Miaskovsky-- yet another really powerful and moving slow movement.

Yes - it sounds a movingly valedictory note too  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 22, 2010, 05:44:01 AM
I own the Svetlanov symphony cycle that reissued on Warner Classics. This set is incredibly good. Miaskovsky is so underrated. I think his Symphonies Nos. 20-27 are some of the finest Russian symphonies ever written.

Anyone else here own the Svetlanov set? I have been looking at getting other recordings, but have been really digging through this box set for the past year and half.

It is encouraging to see that he has been at least acknowledged by members of this forum. That, in itself, is a major feat.

By the way Vandermolen, excellent picture of Braga Santos. He's an outstanding composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 22, 2010, 09:48:10 AM
I own the Svetlanov symphony cycle that reissued on Warner Classics. This set is incredibly good. Miaskovsky is so underrated. I think his Symphonies Nos. 20-27 are some of the finest Russian symphonies ever written.

Anyone else here own the Svetlanov set? I have been looking at getting other recordings, but have been really digging through this box set for the past year and half.

It is encouraging to see that he has been at least acknowledged by members of this forum. That, in itself, is a major feat.

By the way Vandermolen, excellent picture of Braga Santos. He's an outstanding composer.

Thank you (re Braga Santos pic). Actually it appears to be the ONLY photo of Braga Santos that I can find on the Internet!

I have the Svetlanov Miaskovsky box - it is a great way to inexpensively discover the symphonies and other orchestral works. My favourite symphonies are 3,6,17,21,24 and 27. However, I am biased in favour of the Olympia/Alto releases as I contributed to the notes for a few of the Alto releases and felt sorry for them when the whole project was torpedoed by the Warner release. Apparently the redoubtable Mrs Svetlanov acted in a rather underhand way by agreeing to the Warner release whilst allegedy supporting the Alto project.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 22, 2010, 04:42:45 PM
Thank you (re Braga Santos pic). Actually it appears to be the ONLY photo of Braga Santos that I can find on the Internet!

I have the Svetlanov Miaskovsky box - it is a great way to inexpensively discover the symphonies and other orchestral works. My favourite symphonies are 3,6,17,21,24 and 27. However, I am biased in favour of the Olympia/Alto releases as I contributed to the notes for a few of the Alto releases and felt sorry for them when the whole project was torpedoed by the Warner release. Apparently the redoubtable Mrs Svetlanov acted in a rather underhand way by agreeing to the Warner release whilst allegedy supporting the Alto project.

I'm not surprised that your avatar is the only picture of Braga Santos on the Web. It seems like outside of Portugal he's not well known and that's a real shame. I still return to his "Symphony No. 4" from time to time. This symphony and probably his 3rd are my favorites. In later years, he got very harsh and dissonant.

The Svetlanov set is a great way to hear all the Mysaskovsky symphonies and there were many obstacles in the way to get that box set released I'm sure, but I'm very grateful for Svetlanov.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 23, 2010, 12:51:09 AM
I'm not surprised that your avatar is the only picture of Braga Santos on the Web. It seems like outside of Portugal he's not well known and that's a real shame. I still return to his "Symphony No. 4" from time to time. This symphony and probably his 3rd are my favorites. In later years, he got very harsh and dissonant.

The Svetlanov set is a great way to hear all the Mysaskovsky symphonies and there were many obstacles in the way to get that box set released I'm sure, but I'm very grateful for Svetlanov.

Oddly enough I was listening to Braga Santos' Symphony No 4 in the car today - one of my favourite symphonies. I'm not sure that he's that well known even in Portugal - although I hope he is. Symphony No 3 is my other favourite.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: jowcol on June 23, 2010, 06:48:09 AM
I'm not surprised that your avatar is the only picture of Braga Santos on the Web. It seems like outside of Portugal he's not well known and that's a real shame. I still return to his "Symphony No. 4" from time to time. This symphony and probably his 3rd are my favorites. In later years, he got very harsh and

Wandering a bit off topic-- but I also like Braga Santos's 2nd very much-- more than the 3rd.  But the first 4 are essential listening in my book.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 24, 2010, 02:27:28 PM
But the first 4 are essential listening in my book.

Absolutely, I only wished more people would take a chance and explore this great composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: just Jeff on November 17, 2010, 04:51:46 AM
Just got the cello concerto, part of the Brilliant Rostropovich box. I have the Olympia recording for years. Love the work. Will give the Rostropovich a spin as soon as I have a chance.

Listened to the complete piano sonatas last week. Glenn Gould was right. Magnificent works that should be heard more often!

Paul, just as an excuse to bump up this thread, these pictures are of the works as they appeared on original Melodiya vinyl issues.  10" LPs as a matter of fact for these two.

Btw, how did you like the CD issue you have of the Rostropovich Cello?

(http://i995.photobucket.com/albums/af80/hiptone/BIG%2010%20INCH%20RECORDS/MYASKOVSKYCELLO10IN.jpg)
(http://i995.photobucket.com/albums/af80/hiptone/BIG%2010%20INCH%20RECORDS/BRUMBERG10IN.jpg)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: madaboutmahler on March 26, 2013, 02:08:22 PM
Listening to Myaskovsky's 24th symphony at the moment, one John has been recommending for quite a while. Absolutely loving it, this is absolutely great music!! The slow movement was incredible, extremely moving, very emotional indeed! One of the the themes seemed very familiar... did Shosty refer to it in his 12th symphony? It was Svetlanov's recording I listened to. :)



This recording looks very nice and has good reviews, anyone here have it?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 26, 2013, 03:15:55 PM
Listening to Myaskovsky's 24th symphony at the moment, one John has been recommending for quite a while. Absolutely loving it, this is absolutely great music!! The slow movement was incredible, extremely moving, very emotional indeed! One of the the themes seemed very familiar... did Shosty refer to it in his 12th symphony? It was Svetlanov's recording I listened to. :)



This recording looks very nice and has good reviews, anyone here have it?

Glad you enjoyed it, Daniel. Svetlanov's performance is the one to own. Yablonsky is too pedestrian and mild-mannered in this particular performance. Go ahead and buy Svetlanov's Myaskovsky symphony set and be done with it. ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: madaboutmahler on March 26, 2013, 03:26:57 PM
Glad you enjoyed it, Daniel. Svetlanov's performance is the one to own. Yablonsky is too pedestrian and mild-mannered in this particular performance. Go ahead and buy Svetlanov's Myaskovsky symphony set and be done with it. ;D

Thanks, John! haha, I'll try and save up for it! Which of his symphonies would you recommend I listen to next?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 26, 2013, 03:30:59 PM
Thanks, John! haha, I'll try and save up for it! Which of his symphonies would you recommend I listen to next?

Symphony No. 27 is a masterful work. You will enjoy it no doubt about it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: madaboutmahler on March 26, 2013, 03:53:05 PM
Symphony No. 27 is a masterful work. You will enjoy it no doubt about it.

Thanks for the recommendation, John! I shall make sure to listen to it soon! :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2013, 07:02:30 PM
Thank you (re Braga Santos pic). Actually it appears to be the ONLY photo of Braga Santos that I can find on the Internet!

You mean that's NOT Myaskovsky in you pic right there?? :o ??? :o ??? whaaaat????
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2013, 07:35:26 PM

Btw, how did you like the CD issue you have of the Rostropovich Cello?

(http://i995.photobucket.com/albums/af80/hiptone/BIG%2010%20INCH%20RECORDS/MYASKOVSKYCELLO10IN.jpg)
(http://i995.photobucket.com/albums/af80/hiptone/BIG%2010%20INCH%20RECORDS/BRUMBERG10IN.jpg)

I pulled out Lloyd Webber's Cello Concerto (Philips). I have really yet to venture into the Symphonies, but I have been slightly disappointed by my past forays,... I'm ALWAYS led back to the CC, and that plaintive melody,... and then that crushing climax with the mighty, Sibelian-like Panavision Melody,... yaaah  yaaah yaaah yah yah yah... you know! :D

Anyhow, again, I was drawn to, and again slightly repelled by Myaskovsky's congenital use of his favorite techniques. He's aaaalways modulating, up up up, like Rubinstein's ghost hanging over our forlorn hero. The CC, in two movements, seems perfect Myaskovsky to me, the actual FIRST recommendation anyone should take. It has all the best traits in spades.

btw- I find the Philips crisper than a head of Iceberg chopped by a Ginsu! 'Noble' sound throughout.


Seriously I NEED a Myaskovsky recommends, BUT, I already know too much. Just off the top of my head, here's the ones I'd like to try:

No.13 - this is the one with the 'bad' reputation, very wild?

No.11- is this the one I recall getting high marks?

No.19- if this is the Band Symphony, I'd love to hear it in perhaps a non Russian performance? How are the ones now?

No.16- is this the one dedicated to the airman? I hear this one is beautiful.


Actually, guys, could maybe one of you just do us the favor?? NO ONE EVER EVER talks about the rarest of the Symphonies, like, why don't I hear anything about 20 in f#-minor and 21 in b-minor, the Symphony-Ballade...

and 25 in Db-Major or 26 in C-Major, Symphony on Russian Themes?

14 in C-Major

15 in d-minor

18 in C-Major

19 in Eb-Major

and what of No.17 in g#-minor?


Iwaaaaaaaah :'(, come on guys, help us OUT here!!! Listen, and Post. Listen, and Post.

I just don't recall this Thread being all that substantiative. Myaskovsky is... what...

I'll just go to amazon...
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on March 27, 2013, 01:18:25 AM
My favorite is no 22!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on March 27, 2013, 05:39:08 AM
My favorite is no 22!

Great! And I was also feeling No.17. Can't wait to check YT!!
Title: Re: Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 27, 2013, 09:38:36 AM
The Pacifica Quartet included the Thirteenth String Quartet (Op.86, in a minor) in their Vol. I of The Soviet Experience (the Shostakovich quartets are nos. 5-8).  The writing is self-consciously more conservative than that of his famous friend Prokofiev.  The Pacificas play their heart out here, as for the whole disc.  I'm not sure that Myaskovsky is, overall, my thing, but I am glad to know this piece, and applaud the quartet both for intelligent, sensitive programming, and no-reservations commitment in execution.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on March 27, 2013, 10:01:15 AM
I listened to most of 17, 22, and some of 23, but, wow, I'm just not in the mood for the Technicolor Panavision thing right now in my life. Yea, I heard Finzi-meets-Harris in places, and it's all very lovely, but, it reminds me of a bunch of modern drunks reading the AA book from 1939. I can't help but be transported to a specific time and places with Myaskovsky, and, I'm just not there right now in my life.

I WILL continue through the Symphonies on YT.


Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: mszczuj on March 27, 2013, 11:21:42 AM
I have listened to the whole Svetlanov box his month. I have started with the 1st Symphony, planning to listen to all the works once. But I have liked it so much, that I have relistened it at once. So I have gone further with next opuses with relistening of all work. But after the 3rd Symphony I have completely changed my mind and have started to listen to the box from the first to the last CD without care of chronology and without relistening.

So I don't remember which symphonies are better and which are worse. Good music but it is not very comfortable to stay, live and think in the world in which it was created.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on March 27, 2013, 06:17:49 PM
I have listened to the whole Svetlanov box his month. I have started with the 1st Symphony, planning to listen to all the works once. But I have liked it so much, that I have relistened it at once. So I have gone further with next opuses with relistening of all work. But after the 3rd Symphony I have completely changed my mind and have started to listen to the box from the first to the last CD without care of chronology and without relistening.

So I don't remember which symphonies are better and which are worse. Good music but it is not very comfortable to stay, live and think in the world in which it was created.

THAT'S! how I feel about it. Perfect. It IS disturbing music.


Well, I HAVE to listen to the infamous 13that least once. And I still have a few more I want to dip into... but it's very hard to digest for me right now.


The Pacifica Quartet included the Thirteenth String Quartet (Op.86, in a minor) in their Vol. I of The Soviet Experience (the Shostakovich quartets are nos. 5-8).  The writing is self-consciously more conservative than that of his famous friend Prokofiev.  The Pacificas play their heart out here, as for the whole disc.  I'm not sure that Myaskovsky is, overall, my thing, but I am glad to know this piece, and applaud the quartet both for intelligent, sensitive programming, and no-reservations commitment in execution.

The 13th is a little more vigorous than I would have liked: I love the minor key melodic stuff, but, again, Myaskovsky modulates and 'develops' in his way, which CAN tax one's sense of free flow. The 7th and 11th SQs, I believe, are the absolute best examples, the 11th especially sounding like nothing else.

His 3rd SQ, a student work, is wonderfully funereal, with a Grieg theme, wonderfully malincolico.

The 7th and 11th SQs (the early 3rd,... even the 9th as an example of his brand of avant-garde), the Cello Concerto, the Cello Sonata No.2,... these are the works I stand behind. I'm sure one of his Symphonies will hit in a way... perhaps.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 27, 2013, 06:28:11 PM
Well, I've really enjoyed the symphonies I've listened to thus far.  But, I am taking my time going through the set, as these are very dark, and yes, disturbing works in some ways.  Even darker than Shostakovich.

Hmm, I'm tempted to explore the string quartets now, too!  :)

In a few of the symphonies I've heard thus far, I can almost hear a quasi Jaws theme!   ;D

AND, I love that about 18 or 19 of the 27 symphonies are in minor keys!  :D (I'm just guessing the #, don't quote me on it).  ;)

The symphonies I've 'first listened to so far are:

#1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 19 and 25.  Also, the Symphony-Suite in A minor, and the Slav Rhapsody in D minor.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 27, 2013, 06:32:14 PM
Wow, Ray, wait until you heard Symphonies 24 & 27. These are, for me, the best of the lot.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 27, 2013, 06:36:43 PM
Wow, Ray, wait until you heard Symphonies 24 & 27. These are, for me, the best of the lot.

Well, I have a lot to look forward to yet!  ;D  I'm going to save these for last!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 27, 2013, 06:42:08 PM
Well, I have a lot to look forward to yet!  ;D  I'm going to save these for last!  :)

Symphony No. 27 is especially poignant as he was writing this work as he was dying.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 29, 2013, 05:24:22 AM
This set is great, thus far, in every way.  Another great thing about this set is this:  16 discs, all over 75 minutes, except one at a paltry 74:01 minutes.  ;D  Great value for money.

Highly recommended!

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 29, 2013, 05:33:39 AM
I have been enjoying these for the last month or so -









(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41YbOnbb0RL.jpg)

Ooh!!  Thanks for posting these.  Being a chamber nut, and I love the Taneyev Qt's performances of same name composer on the Northern Flowers label, this seems like a natural no-brainer choice for these!

Thanks again, Sanantonio!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Beorn on March 29, 2013, 05:34:36 AM
I'm not sure I've heard Miaskovsky, but there is plenty on Spotify.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 29, 2013, 05:36:50 AM
I'm not sure I've heard Miaskovsky, but there is plenty on Spotify.

Check it out (some symphonies).  If you like Shostakovich, you might dig some of these Dave!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Beorn on March 29, 2013, 05:37:49 AM
Check it out (some symphonies).  If you like Shostakovich, you might dig some of these Dave!  :)

Yes, I do like some Shostakovich. Thank you.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 29, 2013, 06:07:10 AM
You mean that's NOT Myaskovsky in you pic right there?? :o ??? :o ??? whaaaat????

Yes it is - Braga Santos made a guest appearance only!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 29, 2013, 06:18:27 AM
Pressure of work and family illness has kept me away from GMG Forum but I'm pleased to see the phoenix-like revival of my old Miaskovsky thread and I've been enjoying the postings.

Here is my recommendation today - a fine recording of the 15th Symphony which has been enquired about here. I think that it is one of the best (along with 17, 21, 27 and 6). Kondrashin was a fine conductor of Miaskovsky (his Russian Disc version of No 6 is my favourite). Also the Shostakovich coupling was considered the best version in a music magazine recently. The CD is under £6.00 on UK Amazon.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 10, 2013, 05:20:59 PM
Yes it is - Braga Santos made a guest appearance only!  :)

So far I have liked Symphony No.11 the best of what I've listened to so far (22, 24, 25, 17, 13). It sounds 'right' to me in ways that the others haven't. Goldilock's Favorite so far!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 10, 2013, 11:03:29 PM
So far I have liked Symphony No.11 the best of what I've listened to so far (22, 24, 25, 17, 13). It sounds 'right' to me in ways that the others haven't. Goldilock's Favorite so far!

Do listen to the epic no 6 and the concise No 21 - these are two of the very best. No 16 (in commemoration of an air disaster) has a wonderful slow movement, No 23 is one of the most approachable (based on Caucasian folk songs) and the valedictory Symphony No 27, written at the very end of Miaskovsky's life, is very moving and also has a wonderful slow movement. My favourite chamber work is Cello Sonata No 2.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Octave on April 22, 2013, 11:04:00 PM
I'm interested in getting this EMI-GROC edition of the Miaskovsky cello concerto by Rostropovich/Sargent.  Just curious how the performance compares to the one included in that Brilliant box, or for that matter how either of those Slava recordings compare with any others. 



I have done a little footwork, but mainly looking for opinions on the Slava.  Here are some interchanges between Vandermolen and Guido from 4-6 years ago:

For the Miaskovsky there are also many fine recordings - again Tarasova is great because it comes coupled with the two cello sonatas, but Rostropovich's live account or studio account really can't be beaten - it was the first thing he recorded, very early in his career. Actually I believe he recorded it more than twice, but I've only heard two versions.

Totally agree, also about the Rostropovich/Sargent Miaskovsky Cello Concerto, although the version on Chandos (with Symphony 27 is also excellent).

The cello concerto is a superb work. It has the same sort of world weary nostalgia as the Elgar cello concerto, and was written at the end of the second world war (rather than the first). It's been recorded a few times, but I only recently heard the Rostropovich version - don't know why I'm surprised but it's easily the best version out there - his first recording. There's a live version too that is also superb. I thought I already loved the piece, but Rostropovich reveals it to be great work that it is - his colouring of the solo part is just wonderful.

I agree. EMI have just reissued the studio recording with Malcolm Sargent. The Chandos version is very good too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 23, 2013, 11:46:34 AM
The Rostropovich/Sargent version is the best version I have heard - it would be my desert island choice, both for the soulful playing of the solo part and for Sargent's sensitive accompaniment. Although Prokofiev was a great composer and a great friend of Miaskovsky I do not like his Sinfonia Concertante. I think that the Miaskovsky is a much greater work.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on April 23, 2013, 11:50:01 AM
The Rostropovich/Sargent version is the best version I have heard - it would be my desert island choice, both for the soulful playing of the solo part and for Sargent's sensitive accompaniment. Although Prokofiev was a great composer and a great friend of Miaskovsky I do not like his Sinfonia Concertante. I think that the Miaskovsky is a much greater work.

I definitely don't like Rostropovich's performance of Prokofiev's Sinfonia Concertante and the unflattering accompaniment of Malcolm Sargent doesn't help.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Octave on April 23, 2013, 12:25:15 PM
FYI for those who'd like the Miaskovsky/Rostropovich/Sargent, but not the Prokofiev, this disc might have the more appetizing filler: Taneyev's SUITE DE CONCERT w/Oistrakh/Malko:



It doesn't make sense for me, because I already have the Taneyev in the EMI Oistrakh box; but it's an option.

I miss the EMI Matrix series!  I liked the artwork on those discs.  It had a psychotropic kids' storybook flavour.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 24, 2013, 11:36:11 AM
FYI for those who'd like the Miaskovsky/Rostropovich/Sargent, but not the Prokofiev, this disc might have the more appetizing filler: Taneyev's SUITE DE CONCERT w/Oistrakh/Malko:



It doesn't make sense for me, because I already have the Taneyev in the EMI Oistrakh box; but it's an option.

I miss the EMI Matrix series!  I liked the artwork on those discs.  It had a psychotropic kids' storybook flavour.

Yes, I agree. This is a fine CD. Shostakovich's 8th Symphony (Previn) was in the same series with a drawing of a boot on the cover. It is my favourite version of the symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on April 25, 2013, 07:36:35 AM
The Rostropovich/Sargent version is the best version I have heard - it would be my desert island choice, both for the soulful playing of the solo part and for Sargent's sensitive accompaniment. Although Prokofiev was a great composer and a great friend of Miaskovsky I do not like his Sinfonia Concertante. I think that the Miaskovsky is a much greater work.

Lloyd Webber (Philips) is a sleeper here! Sleeper Alert! Plus Sound!

waaaah  waaaah  waaaah waaaah

Sleeper Alert!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: pencils on July 14, 2013, 04:38:35 AM
Attempting to work while listening to Miaskovsky 3. Not going well. Too much listening, not enough writing.

Bad Miaskovsky!

This really is an excellent piece - tuneful, thoughtful, well paced, inventive...
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2013, 09:03:50 AM
Attempting to work while listening to Miaskovsky 3. Not going well. Too much listening, not enough writing.

Bad Miaskovsky!

This really is an excellent piece - tuneful, thoughtful, well paced, inventive...

The Third is great. Some influence perhaps of Cesar Franck and Scriabin but Miaskovsky's personal brand of lugubrious melancholy is definitely there and I love the doleful ending.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 14, 2013, 11:23:00 AM
. . . Although Prokofiev was a great composer and a great friend of Miaskovsky I do not like his Sinfonia Concertante.

Jeffrey, I'm cryin' here . . . .
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: pencils on July 14, 2013, 11:31:16 AM
Well, 1 through 6 are excellent. I think I am going to listen chronologically seeing as how I have started that way.I am loving it so far.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2013, 01:44:22 PM
Well, 1 through 6 are excellent. I think I am going to listen chronologically seeing as how I have started that way.I am loving it so far.

No 6 is a great epic. I was very lucky to see it live in London a while back. No 21 is the other one I have heard live. No 21 is considered the finest by many.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2013, 01:49:09 PM
Jeffrey, I'm cryin' here . . . .
But I like much Prokofiev Karl. Like symphonies 3,5 and 6+ Ivan the Terrible, which I think is a greater work than Alexander Nevsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 17, 2013, 04:32:06 AM
I have been listening to Miaskovsky's 11th Symphony (1931-2) and have come to the conclusion that it is one of the best. Of it Miaskovsky said: I wanted to give free rein to certain moods of subjective substance. The slow movement (out of three) is especially impressive - it has a dark chill wind quality about it. Miaskovsky said that part of the epic Sixth Symphony was inspired by the windswept and depopulated Petrograd and memories of his deserted family house following the death of his aunt (a surrogate mother figure). Well, the 11th Symphony has something of that feel to it. Well worth exploring. It seems to be one of those old pre-Svetlanov Olympia CDs that are available (on UK Amazon at least) at a non ridiculous price ( having said that I just checked - it is available new for £99 new  :o or second hand for £3.99  :)). It is a great disc with both the 5th and 11th symphonies featured (USSR SO/Moscow SO, conds. Ivanov/Dudarova.

Actually, you can get the same CD in a Melodiya manifestation on American Amazon very cheaply (they spell his name: 'Miaskowsky'). The Sveltanov recording (see below, with Symphony 4) is available at under £3.00 on UK Amazon. I could, however, only get the picture link to work from the US Amazon site, where it is more expensive.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: pencils on July 18, 2013, 02:12:37 AM
I have been listening to Miaskovsky's 11th Symphony (1931-2) and have come to the conclusion that it is one of the best. Of it Miaskovsky said: I wanted to give free rein to certain moods of subjective substance. The slow movement (out of three) is especially impressive - it has a dark chill wind quality about it. Miaskovsky said that part of the epic Sixth Symphony was inspired by the windswept and depopulated Petrograd and memories of his deserted family house following the death of his aunt (a surrogate mother figure). Well, the 11th Symphony has something of that feel to it. Well worth exploring. It seems to be one of those old pre-Svetlanov Olympia CDs that are available (on UK Amazon at least) at a non ridiculous price ( having said that I just checked - it is available new for £99 new  :o or second hand for £3.99  :)). It is a great disc with both the 5th and 11th symphonies featured (USSR SO/Moscow SO, conds. Ivanov/Dudarova.

Actually, you can get the same CD in a Melodiya manifestation on American Amazon very cheaply (they spell his name: 'Miaskowsky'). The Sveltanov recording (see below, with Symphony 4) is available at under £3.00 on UK Amazon. I could, however, only get the picture link to work from the US Amazon site, where it is more expensive.



Thank you for this!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 19, 2013, 02:02:25 AM
Thank you for this!

My pleasure  :).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 19, 2013, 04:29:58 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61eMty8RtOL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61UNiRq5sRL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Gxlqw2bnL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51X6nNo7orL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41YbOnbb0RL._AA160_.jpg)

As is usually the case, I prefer the string quartets to the symphonies. 

This recent CD by the Pacifica Quartet couples Shostakovich 5-8 quartets with the Myaskovsky 13th; first rate.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61r-7evXBsL._SY300_.jpg)

Thanks. The last CD looks especially interesting.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on September 11, 2013, 04:41:06 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61eMty8RtOL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61UNiRq5sRL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Gxlqw2bnL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51X6nNo7orL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41YbOnbb0RL._AA160_.jpg)

As is usually the case, I prefer the string quartets to the symphonies. 


Hmm, this is going to have to go on my wish list!!  :)  I thoroughly enjoyed my first run through all the Miaskovsky complete symphonies.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 11, 2013, 05:11:42 AM
This recent CD by the Pacifica Quartet couples Shostakovich 5-8 quartets with the Myaskovsky 13th; first rate.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61r-7evXBsL._SY300_.jpg)

+ 1
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 11, 2013, 06:16:06 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61eMty8RtOL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61UNiRq5sRL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Gxlqw2bnL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51X6nNo7orL._AA160_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41YbOnbb0RL._AA160_.jpg)

As is usually the case, I prefer the string quartets to the symphonies. 

This recent CD by the Pacifica Quartet couples Shostakovich 5-8 quartets with the Myaskovsky 13th; first rate.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61r-7evXBsL._SY300_.jpg)

Personally, I'd recommend the Volume with 7 & 8, otherwise just start with No.13 (which is on a couple of different issues of various guises). If you like No.13, be warned: it's the closest to the Myaskovsky of the Cello Concerto, and you will collect the series in vain looking for smooth melancolie(?). Myaskovsky has an overwrought development gene that does not seem to allow him to completely relax, which gets in the way of my pleasure of his music. 5-6 have moments of great beauty that are swept into a modulating development style that drives me crazy.

Trust me here. In order of preference:

No.11- magical
No.7- should be paired with 11
No.9- paired with 11 on the original Russian Disc. Very gothic

No.3- early, creepy, gothic, Grieg
Nos. 1-2, 4- early, interesting, gothic... I like early Myaskovsky here

No.13- the one everyone cites as their basic favorite. Lots of beauty in the first movement, but there is still oodles of wrought development that makes it less pleasing than a solid DSCH SQ (like DSCH No.6).

No.8- my favorite of the last four. The melodies aren't exactly minor key,... this might be the most... mm... it's definitely an elegy, but a very 'not obvious melodies' type.

Nos. 5-6- these have moments of beauty rubbing right up against Myaskovsky's 'development bug'. He gives you a little halcyon peace, and then goes and develops and modulates to no end.

No.12- those thinking it's another No.13 will be disappointed. It's well wrought, but the melodies won't leave you weeping. Put this in his 'craftsmanship' category.

No.10- a Haydnesque throwback. Nothing bad, just not what I wanted from him. It's a youth SQ redone in later years (No.11 is the same, but wholly original and beguiling).


I believe No.11 is the most magical, followed by No.7.

There, that should kept curiosity seekers busy!! ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 12, 2013, 09:27:10 AM
Personally, I'd recommend the Volume with 7 & 8, otherwise just start with No.13 (which is on a couple of different issues of various guises). If you like No.13, be warned: it's the closest to the Myaskovsky of the Cello Concerto, and you will collect the series in vain looking for smooth melancolie(?). Myaskovsky has an overwrought development gene that does not seem to allow him to completely relax, which gets in the way of my pleasure of his music. 5-6 have moments of great beauty that are swept into a modulating development style that drives me crazy.

Trust me here. In order of preference:

No.11- magical
No.7- should be paired with 11
No.9- paired with 11 on the original Russian Disc. Very gothic

No.3- early, creepy, gothic, Grieg
Nos. 1-2, 4- early, interesting, gothic... I like early Myaskovsky here

No.13- the one everyone cites as their basic favorite. Lots of beauty in the first movement, but there is still oodles of wrought development that makes it less pleasing than a solid DSCH SQ (like DSCH No.6).

No.8- my favorite of the last four. The melodies aren't exactly minor key,... this might be the most... mm... it's definitely an elegy, but a very 'not obvious melodies' type.

Nos. 5-6- these have moments of beauty rubbing right up against Myaskovsky's 'development bug'. He gives you a little halcyon peace, and then goes and develops and modulates to no end.

No.12- those thinking it's another No.13 will be disappointed. It's well wrought, but the melodies won't leave you weeping. Put this in his 'craftsmanship' category.

No.10- a Haydnesque throwback. Nothing bad, just not what I wanted from him. It's a youth SQ redone in later years (No.11 is the same, but wholly original and beguiling).


I believe No.11 is the most magical, followed by No.7.

There, that should kept curiosity seekers busy!! ;)

A very helpful survey. Many thanks. 7 and 11 are high on my listen to list. I like No 13 very much.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 13, 2013, 07:03:59 AM
A very helpful survey. Many thanks. 7 and 11 are high on my listen to list. I like No 13 very much.

Just put in No.7. Same basic Myaskovsky searching, but the melody is quite early-evening pastoral. Same development, but not so overwrought as in other works.

Oh... wait... I just heard some of that stuff... you know, it may actually be the infamous playing of the Taneyev Quartet (some love, some hate the... was it Cato who found the playing absolutely microtonal?).

Well, the sound of it all has an old fashioned charm (that Russian style of playing?) Still, on Myaskovsky's more vigorous music, the Taneyev will transport you to a place where you may get that 'huh? dog face'. Perhaps it is because Myaskovsky goes everywhere in his developments, always wringing cross notes out of the simplest melodies.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Octave on September 13, 2013, 07:12:32 AM
Sorry if this is a bad place to ask, but has anyone purchased any of those Northern Flowers quartets discs over the past several months, and if so, were they CDRs? 

I ask because I purchased the 2cd of Taneyev quintets (Northern Flowers) from Importcds, and after a long backorder, it arrived and was CDRs.  I complained to the label and they were really nice to correct the problem; but it sounds like different 'wings' of the NF operation put out different kinds of product.  It almost sounds like Albany does burn-to-order stuff for them in the USA.

I have been jamming the Myaskovsky symphony recordings by Svetlanov and I am pretty keen on scooping up at least several of these quartets discs; but I'd hate to get a bunch of expensive CDRs.

Also my thanks to snyprrr for the rundown.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 13, 2013, 07:17:45 AM
Sorry if this is a bad place to ask, but has anyone purchased any of those Northern Flowers quartets discs over the past several months, and if so, were they CDRs? 

I ask because I purchased the 2cd of Taneyev quintets (Northern Flowers) from Importcds, and after a long backorder, it arrived and was CDRs.  I complained to the label and they were really nice to correct the problem; but it sounds like different 'wings' of the NF operation put out different kinds of product.  It almost sounds like Albany does burn-to-order stuff for them in the USA.
I have been jamming the Svetlanov symphony recordings and I am pretty keen on scooping up at least several of these quartets discs; but I'd hate to get a bunch of expensive CDRs.

Also my thanks to snyprrr for the rundown.

My Northern Flowers SQ discs look legit. You can always get the same recordings on RussianDisc, Used.

CRI is the label that is re-issuing their old catalog in CDr.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Octave on September 14, 2013, 02:56:57 PM
Where did you buy your NF discs, snyprr?  I'd prefer to not have to deal with the CDR hassle again.  Also I'd prefer to find an outlet that offers them for less than $18 a pop if such can be had.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on September 14, 2013, 03:18:27 PM
Where did you buy your NF discs, snyprr?  I'd prefer to not have to deal with the CDR hassle again.  Also I'd prefer to find an outlet that offers them for less than $18 a pop if such can be had.

Try Amazon Marketplace. They have great deals on new and used CDs alike. :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 16, 2013, 01:18:03 PM
Can't stop listening to String Quartet No 13. In its way as moving as the valedictory Symphony 27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 17, 2013, 07:41:07 AM
Where did you buy your NF discs, snyprr?  I'd prefer to not have to deal with the CDR hassle again.  Also I'd prefer to find an outlet that offers them for less than $18 a pop if such can be had.

Yea, I think mine came from some odd place on Amazon. Perhaps when they first came out they were normal cds, but maybe the went OOP and they're now making CDrs? Get it Used.

Otherwise, it probably WILL be $18 a pop.

Also, you can just get the old RussianDiscs for Used (should be cheaper): same recordings, no dif to my ears. Sorry I didn't get back earlier.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 21, 2013, 10:11:35 AM
I have been listening to Symphony No 15 (Svetlanov and Kondrashin versions) and consider it one of the very best, as it features the characteristic Miaskovsky gloomy, soul-searching nostalgia with the heroic 'triumph against the odds' ending. I find the climax of the slow movement to be extremely moving ( in much the same way as I find similar moments in Piston's Second Symphony and David Diamond's Third Symphony). I love the triumphant ending. In many ways I think that Symphony 15 would be an ideal introduction to Miaskovsky as it demonstrates his importance as the link between the old Russian Romantics, Glazunov, Rimsky-Korsakov, Liadov (Miaskovsky's teacher), Balakirev and the great 20th Century composers, Shostakovich and Prokofiev (the great friend of Miaskovsky). So, a strong recommendation for Symphony 15 (I marginally prefer the Kondrashin but both CDs are great). In some ways Miaskovsky's music is rather 'academic' but, at key moments (as in the middle of the slow, second movement of the 15th Symphony) the emotion, which had previously been hinted at, finally breaks through, and I find the effect even more overwhelming in this context. It is the juxtaposition of the 'academic' with the emotional that I find so poignant about Miaskovsky and this is why I love his music so much.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: The new erato on September 21, 2013, 12:14:00 PM
Where did you buy your NF discs, snyprr?  I'd prefer to not have to deal with the CDR hassle again.  Also I'd prefer to find an outlet that offers them for less than $18 a pop if such can be had.
I bought mine here:

http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en (http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en)

No hassles.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on September 30, 2013, 10:30:29 AM
I bought mine here:

http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en (http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en)

No hassles.

Thanks NErato!  I may have to go that route.  Amazon (even Amazon marketplace) seems excessively pricey on some of the Northern Flowers/Taneyev Q. recordings of the 5 volumes (?) of Miaskovsky's string quartets.

I must have them!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 30, 2013, 10:39:29 AM
Thanks NErato!  I may have to go that route.  Amazon (even Amazon marketplace) seems excessively pricey on some of the Northern Flowers/Taneyev Q. recordings of the 5 volumes (?) of Miaskovsky's string quartets.

I must have them!  :)

Ahh, I can't believe you disrupted my Frenchy Thing with Myaskovsky!! ??? ??? what now?!?! :o :o :o
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on September 30, 2013, 01:59:13 PM
I bought mine here:

http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en (http://www.russiancdshop.com/?lang=en)

No hassles.

Took the plunge and ordered mine today, from the Russian CD shop.  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on September 30, 2013, 02:11:37 PM
This past week I obtained, cleaned up and uploaded scores of nine of Myaskovsky's string quartets to IMSLP. I don't have recordings of any of them, yet just from examining the individual score pages for scanning artifacts and the like, I've already got large portions of them stuck in my head. Bloody Myaskovsky. :\ Ah well, there's always NML, even if it is only 64kbps/44.1kHz (on the plan my institution subscribes to) and thus makes string instruments sound rather dreadful
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on September 30, 2013, 03:51:17 PM
This past week I obtained, cleaned up and uploaded scores of nine of Myaskovsky's string quartets to IMSLP. I don't have recordings of any of them, yet just from examining the individual score pages for scanning artifacts and the like, I've already got large portions of them stuck in my head. Bloody Myaskovsky. :\ Ah well, there's always NML, even if it is only 64kbps/44.1kHz (on the plan my institution subscribes to) and thus makes string instruments sound rather dreadful

Which ones has piqued your interest? I like 11 and 7.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on September 30, 2013, 06:47:36 PM
Which ones has piqued your interest? I like 11 and 7.

The odd-numbered ones look especially promising (5, 7, 9, 11, 13), but I think I'll listen to all of them before settling on favourites.

I'm pretty familiar with Myaskovsky's symphonies from the Svetlanov box, plus the Violin Concerto and the first two volumes of piano sonatas on Olympia (I've tried a few of them out—bit of a chore to play, but easier than Skryabin and often more interesting; 7, 8, 9 are a bit meh) but string quartets often contain some of the most telling music of a composer's output so I'm not sure why I neglected Myaskovsky's for so long. Apart from the difficulty of finding Northern Flowers in NZ.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Octave on September 30, 2013, 07:05:05 PM
Late thanks for the online shop tip, Erato.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on October 09, 2013, 12:59:41 PM
Took the plunge and ordered mine today, from the Russian CD shop.  ;D

Already received my order from the Russian CD Shop today (complete Miaskovsky string quartets).  Actually, it arrived yesterday, but I was at work, and had to pick them up today.

Impressed by the fast delivery.

I had my doubts when Igor from the Czech Republic emailed me from his personal email address, saying my order was being shipped.  ;D

Major hat tip to The New Erato (or New Erato Virgin)!  :D ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on November 15, 2013, 07:21:23 PM
Have just now finished my first run through the entire 13 string quartets, performed by the Taneyev Qt. on Northern Flowers.

I fully enjoyed my first run through Miaskovsky's symphonies, and now the string quartets?  Even more so!  :)

Major thumbs up, and Miaskovsky is most definitely, hands down, my 'composer of the year' discovery for 2013!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on November 15, 2013, 07:58:04 PM
Have just now finished my first run through the entire 13 string quartets, performed by the Taneyev Qt. on Northern Flowers.

I fully enjoyed my first run through Miaskovsky's symphonies, and now the string quartets?  Even more so!  :)

Major thumbs up, and Miaskovsky is most definitely, hands down, my 'composer of the year' discovery for 2013!

Thrilled to read this, Ray! :) Miaskovsky is definitely a composer of great substance and one of my favorite "unsungs". What are you favorite works by him that you've heard thus far? Mine are Symphonies 6, 21, 24, 25, and 27, String Quartet no. 13 and Cello Sonata no. 2. Love your avatar BTW!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on November 15, 2013, 08:05:51 PM
Thrilled to read this, Ray! :) Miaskovsky is definitely a composer of great substance and one of my favorite "unsungs". What are you favorite works by him that you've heard thus far? Mine are Symphonies 6, 21, 24, 25, and 27, String Quartet no. 13 and Cello Sonata no. 2. Love your avatar BTW!

Well, it is too early for me to name outright favourites, for both the symphonies and quartets.

Definitely Symphony No. 27 and String Quartet No. 12 stand out, but I'll need multiple listens before I can name a handful of faves.

I've heard many great things about the Cello Sonatas (especially from Vandermolen), so I will have to check those out.  :)

Thanks, I hope Vandermolen doesn't mind sharing Miaskovsky avatars for awhile (at least it is a different one).   ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on November 15, 2013, 08:09:38 PM
Well, it is too early for me to name outright favourites, for both the symphonies and quartets.

Definitely Symphony No. 27 and String Quartet No. 12 stand out, but I'll need multiple listens before I can name a handful of faves.

I've heard many great things about the Cello Sonatas (especially from Vandermolen), so I will have to check those out.  :)

Thanks, I hope Vandermolen doesn't mind sharing Miaskovsky avatars for awhile (at least it is a different one).   ;D

Yep, SQ no. 12 is another great one! I'm sure Jeffrey (vandermolen) will be thrilled to have another Miaskovskian in his company! :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on November 15, 2013, 08:48:27 PM
Have just now finished my first run through the entire 13 string quartets, performed by the Taneyev Qt. on Northern Flowers.

I fully enjoyed my first run through Miaskovsky's symphonies, and now the string quartets?  Even more so!  :)

Major thumbs up, and Miaskovsky is most definitely, hands down, my 'composer of the year' discovery for 2013!

Since mine got here a couple of weeks ago (not NFlowers but Ru Disc, from Japan... internet is a weird place) I've not been in the mood to listen to "traditional" music very much—mostly sound art, soundscapes, etc—but when I have it's been mostly the quartets. I'm also very impressed so far, even more so than I was with the symphonies (of course, the Taneyev Quartet is a superb ensemble—occasional intonation problems aside—whereas the State Orchestra of the Russian Federation, while valiant, is often outclassed). And sort of shocked that no one else seems to have taken this cycle up in thirty years. I mean... imagine if Schoenberg decided to compose another thirteen string quartets in a late-romantic style instead of adopting serialism, or Webern kept on writing in the style of Im Sommerwind up into the 1940s. E: Should also not understate the similarities to Debussy. Really, just imagine a German Impressionist.

Perhaps it's explained to some extent by the fact that in the USA copyright over all of Myaskovsky's works was "restored" by a Congressional amendment a few years back, but no active publisher currently owns the copyright, so physical copies of the score (& parts) are near impossible to find. But they've all been available on the internet for years now, and presumably that problem doesn't apply in Europe, let alone Canada or NZ (where Myaskovsky is public domain). And he will enter the public domain almost worldwide (except Russia) in 2021, so perhaps we'll see a more significant Myaskovsky revival around then.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 16, 2013, 09:37:00 AM


Thanks, I hope Vandermolen doesn't mind sharing Miaskovsky avatars for awhile (at least it is a different one).   ;D

On the contrary, I am shocked and appalled and take a very dim view of this kind of thing  >:D

Hahaha - of course I don't mind - am only too delighted to find another admirer of this fine composer.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on November 16, 2013, 09:39:12 AM
On the contrary, I am shocked and appalled and take a very dim view of this kind of thing  >:D

Hahaha - of course I don't mind - am only too delighted to find another admirer of this fine composer.  :)

 :D  Hello Jeffrey.  He's my 'composer discovery of the year'.  Hands down.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 17, 2013, 12:45:32 AM
:D  Hello Jeffrey.  He's my 'composer discovery of the year'.  Hands down.

Delighted to hear it :)

I'm ashamed to say that I should know the quartets better than I do.  The problem is that I intended to play them all recently and then got stuck on No 13, which I play over and over again. No 12 next I think from the above recommendations. Cello Sonata No 2 remains one of my very favourite works by Miaskovsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on November 17, 2013, 01:04:25 AM
Delighted to hear it :)

I'm ashamed to say that I should know the quartets better than I do.  The problem is that I intended to play them all recently and then got stuck on No 13, which I play over and over again. No 12 next I think from the above recommendations. Cello Sonata No 2 remains one of my very favourite works by Miaskovsky.

So far No. 9 is leading the pack for me, though not by much. 7, 11 and 12 have stood out as well, along with 2, which is possibly the most overtly wacky of the lot. (Well, the Myaskovskian sort of wackiness. It is in C minor after all. :P) I haven't yet listened to 3 or 6.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 17, 2013, 04:02:17 AM
So far No. 9 is leading the pack for me, though not by much. 7, 11 and 12 have stood out as well, along with 2, which is possibly the most overtly wacky of the lot. (Well, the Myaskovskian sort of wackiness. It is in C minor after all. :P) I haven't yet listened to 3 or 6.

Thank you  :)

No 9 is now high on my agenda too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on November 17, 2013, 05:28:56 AM
What I found through my first run of the quartets, is that they seemed 'easier' for me to enjoy or 'get into' as I went towards the middle and late quartets (which was my opposite experience many years ago with Beethoven's quartets).

Time will tell though through multiple listens.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 17, 2013, 09:51:03 AM
I'm seeing double. Double Myaskovskys!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on November 17, 2013, 03:55:53 PM
I'm seeing double. Double Myaskovskys!

Miaskovsky*

 :P
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 21, 2013, 09:02:15 AM
A new biography (in English  :)) is coming out next Spring: 'Myaskovsky, the conscience of Russian music' by Gregor Tassie. This will be the first one in English since the one written by Ikkonikov in c 1944 (translated from Russian). Great news!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on November 21, 2013, 10:02:35 AM
A new biography (in English  :)) is coming out next Spring: 'Myaskovsky, the conscience of Russian music' by Gregor Tassie. This will be the first one in English since the one written by Ikkonikov in c 1944 (translated from Russian). Great news!

Good news, - a wish of mine for many years (the Ikkonikov volume is slender overall and the biographical
section even more meagre).

Now, if only an English language biography of Gustav Allan Pettersson would appear also (my other great
desire along these lines). 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 21, 2013, 10:28:29 AM
Good news, - a wish of mine for many years (the Ikkonikov volume is slender overall and the biographical
section even more meagre).

Now, if only an English language biography of Gustav Allan Pettersson would appear also (my other great
desire along these lines).

Yes, the Ikkonikov, useful as it was, was very much a soviet view of the great man.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on June 22, 2014, 05:05:33 PM
A new biography (in English  :)) is coming out next Spring: 'Myaskovsky, the conscience of Russian music' by Gregor Tassie. This will be the first one in English since the one written by Ikkonikov in c 1944 (translated from Russian). Great news!

I see the Tassie biography (a 450 page volume) now available, Jeffrey.  It's pricey (as feared).   Have you acquired and/or read it yet?  Quite probably I'll be biting the bullet soon enough, long as I have wished for this, but a positive review would lessen my anxiety.   
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: torut on June 24, 2014, 06:52:49 PM
I see the Tassie biography (a 450 page volume) now available, Jeffrey.  It's pricey (as feared).   Have you acquired and/or read it yet?  Quite probably I'll be biting the bullet soon enough, long as I have wished for this, but a positive review would lessen my anxiety.   
That's good news. Thank you for your post. I missed or have forgotten vandermolen's notice. The book seems informative.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 26, 2014, 06:42:24 AM
I see the Tassie biography (a 450 page volume) now available, Jeffrey.  It's pricey (as feared).   Have you acquired and/or read it yet?  Quite probably I'll be biting the bullet soon enough, long as I have wished for this, but a positive review would lessen my anxiety.   

Greg,  I proof read it and therefore got a free copy (and a mention in the acknowledgments)  :). I think that it is a fine book, especially strong in the discussion of the music - great photos too. I am sure that you will not regret getting hold of it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on June 27, 2014, 02:09:47 PM
I think that it is a fine book, especially strong in the discussion of the music - great photos too.

One expects in a substantive composer biography to encounter detailed consideration of the music, of course, but non-musicologist that I am I always dread long sections of over-my-head technical analyses (with score extracts), and prefer treatment of the music to be more descriptively oriented within the thread of the life itself.

How do things go in the Tassie volume?  Does he keep to a narrative flow throughout its course and closely integrate music with life in a holistic way, or are there interludes and even whole chapters given over to musicological analysis of the scores?

Is the flavor of the book more one of literary biography or specialist monograph?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 28, 2014, 11:26:13 AM
One expects in a substantive composer biography to encounter detailed consideration of the music, of course, but non-musicologist that I am I always dread long sections of over-my-head technical analyses (with score extracts), and prefer treatment of the music to be more descriptively oriented within the thread of the life itself.

How do things go in the Tassie volume?  Does he keep to a narrative flow throughout its course and closely integrate music with life in a holistic way, or are there interludes and even whole chapters given over to musicological analysis of the scores?

Is the flavor of the book more one of literary biography or specialist monograph?

Greg, there is no highly technical musical analysis, which I would not understand anyway. Instead there is, as you suggested, close integration of 'life' and 'music' which achieves a genuine synthesis. Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: torut on June 28, 2014, 11:04:55 PM
I received a copy of the Tassie book and just read the first chapter. It is very interesting so far. The photos are so nice (I saw photos of Myaskovsky with a (faint) smile on his face for the first time), and the discography, the list of the works and the detailed index are very useful.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 29, 2014, 12:02:09 AM
I received a copy of the Tassie book and just read the first chapter. It is very interesting so far. The photos are so nice (I saw photos of Myaskovsky with a (faint) smile on his face for the first time), and the discography, the list of the works and the detailed index are very useful.

I agree very much. The photos are super.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on June 29, 2014, 11:44:09 AM
I'll be acquiring the book, - but one thing I've wondered about in passing from time to time is whether Miaskovsky was married and had a family?

Now that it's mentioned, Miaskovsky with even a faint smile will be unprecedented for me also, I believe.  Can't imagine that.

BTW, listening to Gould's rendering of Symphony 21 again just now (thanks Jeffrey) I must say how superb it is, - far more urgent than the languorous Svetlanov which I like also, and surely my favorite recording of the piece.  He seems to get the flow of things just right for me in a way I perfectly resonate with.  Very communicative and satisfying.

BTW too, Gregor Tassie has quite the alluring stable of beautiful young Japanese babes (one after another) among his Facebook Friends.  What does he do besides writing?  You stick out there like a sore thumb, Jeffrey.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 29, 2014, 11:12:58 PM
I'll be acquiring the book, - but one thing I've wondered about in passing from time to time is whether Miaskovsky was married and had a family?

Now that it's mentioned, Miaskovsky with even a faint smile will be unprecedented for me also, I believe.  Can't imagine that.

BTW, listening to Gould's rendering of Symphony 21 again just now (thanks Jeffrey) I must say how superb it is, - far more urgent than the languorous Svetlanov which I like also, and surely my favorite recording of the piece.  He seems to get the flow of things just right for me in a way I perfectly resonate with.  Very communicative and satisfying.

BTW too, Gregor Tassie has quite the alluring stable of beautiful young Japanese babes (one after another) among his Facebook Friends.  What does he do besides writing?  You stick out there like a sore thumb, Jeffrey.


Greg, totally agree with you about the Gould performance, which is my favourite, although I also like the Measham and Ormandy (oddly none of them are Russian!) Miaskovsky was never married and I think lived a rather solitary existence. I would have been interested to know more about his personal life but my guess is that he was very shy. As a young man he was good looking but there is no information about anything other than close friendships. Tassie interestingly implies that some terrible childhood trauma may have affected him. He was very close to his two sisters and indeed is buried alongside them.

As for the 'Japanese babes' my guess is that they could be former students - who knows? As a teacher my Facebook includes many former students from the Far East.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on July 04, 2014, 07:45:23 PM

Greg, totally agree with you about the Gould performance, which is my favourite, although I also like the Measham and Ormandy (oddly none of them are Russian!)

Measham's recording of No.21 was the first to be issued on CD and my initial exposure to the work, - but I recall after reading so often previously about this being Miaskovsky's finest Symphony feeling somewhat let down by it at the time.  It was only with the appearance of Svetlanov's take on the piece that it really became significant for me, and Gould unveiled another dimension entirely that deepened my absorption.  The Titov recording is different again, and my other favorite among those now available.  As I hear them, Titov expertly brings out the counterpoint in the score, - one can hear all the layering and individual voices within it clearly exposed and contrasted, whereas Svetlanov emphasizes the Symphony's Russian Romantic roots, - dark, heavy, and throbbing.  Gould OTOH makes it sound as anticipatorily modern as the music can bear, - streamlined and seamless, completely unsentimental, unindulgent, and unlingering, with perfect ensemble and unflagging direction.  Whatever the approach, in its combination of structural coherence and thematic distinction I now cede to the consensus judgement that No.21 is Miaskovsky's most perfect and effective Symphony. There may be individual movements in some of the others that move or excite me more while listening, but No.21 I find makes the deepest impression and stays in my consciousness the longest.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 05, 2014, 12:27:17 AM
Measham's recording of No.21 was the first to be issued on CD and my initial exposure to the work, - but I recall after reading so often previously about this being Miaskovsky's finest Symphony feeling somewhat let down by it at the time.  It was only with the appearance of Svetlanov's take on the piece that it really became significant for me, and Gould unveiled another dimension entirely that deepened my absorption.  The Titov recording is different again, and my other favorite among those now available.  As I hear them, Titov expertly brings out the counterpoint in the score, - one can hear all the layering and individual voices within clearly exposed and contrasted, whereas Svetlanov emphasizes its Russian Romantic roots, - dark, heavy, and throbbing.  Gould OTOH makes it sound as anticipatorily modern as the music can bear, - streamlined and seamless, completely unsentimental, unindulgent, and unlingering, with perfect ensemble and unflagging direction.  Whatever the approach, in its combination of structural coherence and thematic substance I now cede to the consensus judgement that No.21 is Miaskovsky's most perfect and effective Symphony. There may be individual movements in some of the others that move or excite me more while listening, but No.21 I find makes the deepest impression and stays in my consciousness the longest.

What a fine analysis Greg! Don't know the Titov version at all. Is it on Northern Flowers? The Measham Unicorn LP was my first encounter with the work and I did greatly enjoy it although the Gould was in a class of its own (it can be found on Bearac Reissues with 'Antar' as on the original RCA LP). Do you know the Salmanov symphonies? I like the recent issue of Symphony 21 by Blunier.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on July 05, 2014, 07:58:51 AM
What a fine analysis Greg! Don't know the Titov version at all. Is it on Northern Flowers? The Measham Unicorn LP was my first encounter with the work and I did greatly enjoy it although the Gould was in a class of its own (it can be found on Bearac Reissues with 'Antar' as on the original RCA LP). Do you know the Salmanov symphonies? I like the recent issue of Symphony 21 by Blunier.

Jeffrey, you sent me the Titov recording, he-he (yes, Northern Flowers).  You should revisit it.  As I said, he lays bare like no other everything happening in the music at once (all the interwoven strands of it), - a vertically oriented rather than horizontally ordered perspective on the piece one might say.  Very distinctive and compelling.  But as we agree, Gould is matchless and supreme in this Symphony.  It's the Chicago SO playing, and their miraculous focus and togetherness in the performance make one wonder just what qualities other of the top flight orchestras could bring to and uncover in many of the Symphonies if given an opportunity.  Blunier in No.21 is news to me, - I'll need to investigate. Surprising how many alternatives there are now for this work, albeit deserved.  Salmanov's Symphonies (again, another long ago gift from you) I recall finding difficult to get into at the time, but they're here to revisit at some point.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on July 05, 2014, 08:35:21 AM
Mistaken over what I referred to as the "Titov recording" of Symphony No.21 on Northern Flowers. Jeffrey.  In fact the conductor is Leonid Nikolayev (It's Titov that conducts the other Miaskovsky Symphonies on NF, hence my confusion).  Probably you can 'place" it now in your memory.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 05, 2014, 12:10:22 PM
Mistaken over what I referred to as the "Titov recording" of Symphony No.21 on Northern Flowers. Jeffrey.  In fact the conductor is Leonid Nikolayev (It's Titov that conducts the other Miaskovsky Symphonies on NF).  Probably you can 'place" it now in your memory.

Hi Greg, I was doing panicky searches online today for a Titov recording hehe. Anyway, delighted that I sent you the Nikolayev. Just fished it out I will play it later. The Blunier is a great recording on an interesting CD. I actually saw No 21 live in London as a birthday treat about five years ago. The other one I heard live is No 6. Have another go at Salmanov if you get the chance. 1 and 2 are especially good and the valedictory No 4 I find very moving.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on July 07, 2014, 07:04:47 AM
I'm afraid I once again attempted some slow movements (22,23,24,25) and was just singularly unimpressed with what I was hearing. The 'Caucaus'? Symphony seemed to have the most "Cello Concerto" melodies, but even it went off in directions that I personally wouldn't have wanted. I understand Miaskovsky as an "old worlder", caught up in the changes, and expressing a nostalgia that speaks to an older generation perhaps. It's music for Navy Men, imo. I DO appreciate the sentiment behind the pathos, but so much of the 'yearning' is in such a "stiff upper lip" way that I can't tell if it's a Funeral or a Graduation Ceremony. I still think there's a Miaskovsky Symphony out there for ME, but it's probably one I wouldn't have initially picked?

I'm like, Give me the payoff already!! Stop developing and just give me some Endless Melody!!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 07, 2014, 11:48:09 AM
I'm afraid I once again attempted some slow movements (22,23,24,25) and was just singularly unimpressed with what I was hearing. The 'Caucaus'? Symphony seemed to have the most "Cello Concerto" melodies, but even it went off in directions that I personally wouldn't have wanted. I understand Miaskovsky as an "old worlder", caught up in the changes, and expressing a nostalgia that speaks to an older generation perhaps. It's music for Navy Men, imo. I DO appreciate the sentiment behind the pathos, but so much of the 'yearning' is in such a "stiff upper lip" way that I can't tell if it's a Funeral or a Graduation Ceremony. I still think there's a Miaskovsky Symphony out there for ME, but it's probably one I wouldn't have initially picked?

I'm like, Give me the payoff already!! Stop developing and just give me some Endless Melody!!

Try the funereal slow movement of No. 16 if you get the chance (it commemorates an air disaster). I would also recommend the slow movements of No 17 and 15. In fact No 17 is one of my favourites. The short, single movement No 21 is one of the finest and most poetic as is the valedictory No 27 which perhaps has the most moving slow movement of all. There is a fine Chandos CD (the only one on Chandos) with the Cello Concerto). No. 6 has a fine choral final section and a most beautiful flute episode in the trio of the second movement - for me one of the greatest moments in all music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on July 07, 2014, 01:41:37 PM
I'm afraid I once again attempted some slow movements (22,23,24,25) and was just singularly unimpressed with what I was hearing. The 'Caucaus'? Symphony seemed to have the most "Cello Concerto" melodies, but even it went off in directions that I personally wouldn't have wanted. I understand Miaskovsky as an "old worlder", caught up in the changes, and expressing a nostalgia that speaks to an older generation perhaps. It's music for Navy Men, imo. I DO appreciate the sentiment behind the pathos, but so much of the 'yearning' is in such a "stiff upper lip" way that I can't tell if it's a Funeral or a Graduation Ceremony. I still think there's a Miaskovsky Symphony out there for ME, but it's probably one I wouldn't have initially picked?

All heresy, of course, for which you should be put in the blocks, or worse >:D.

My own favorite M slow movements are those from No.16, 25(I), & 27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 08, 2014, 07:37:41 AM
All heresy, of course, for which you should be put in the blocks, or worse >:D.

My own favorite M slow movements are those from No.16, 25(I), & 27.

Yes, in a less tolerant age snyprrr would have been burnt at the stake.  >:D

 ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on July 08, 2014, 08:25:17 AM
Slow movements of Nos. 2, 6, 11 and 20 should also get a mention.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on July 08, 2014, 10:14:27 AM
Slow movements of Nos. 2, 6, 11 and 20 should also get a mention.

Yes, - in fact which Miaskovsky Symphonies DON'T have an attention grabbing romantic sounding slow movement, for those of us who like that sort of thing (contra snyprr)? 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on July 08, 2014, 11:03:01 AM
3, 10, 13, 21.

(hmm, four of my favourites actually)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 11, 2014, 08:56:59 AM
Mistaken over what I referred to as the "Titov recording" of Symphony No.21 on Northern Flowers. Jeffrey.  In fact the conductor is Leonid Nikolayev (It's Titov that conducts the other Miaskovsky Symphonies on NF, hence my confusion).  Probably you can 'place" it now in your memory.
Greg,
I finally got round to listening to the Nikolayev today. Thank you for reminding me how good it is. I don't think that I had appreciated it properly before. I loved the deliberate spacing of the opening notes, creating a more tentative, hesitant and eloquent effect compared with any other recording. This version has a uniquely searching quality to it and the climax has more urgency than other recordings. The recording was better than I recalled. This is a genuinely classic performance of Symphony No. 21.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: snyprrr on July 12, 2014, 05:35:30 AM
All heresy, of course, for which you should be put in the blocks, or worse >:D.

My own favorite M slow movements are those from No.16, 25(I), & 27.

I know. Maybe I'll try again today!

His sadness is just so... so... "wrought".
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on July 24, 2014, 01:20:32 PM
A composer I am just beginning to spend a little time with.  One day I will be able to recliner-chair his aural output at my leisure.   :P

With his military experience he should be able to transfer the emotions/life situation from that to the music - he was highly regarded as a teacher.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: Scion7 on July 27, 2014, 12:53:11 AM
Violin Sonata in F major, Op. 70
(for violin and piano)
I. Allegro amabile
II. Tema con variazione. Andante con moto a molto cantabile
Composed in 1947, when Myaskovsky [Miaskovskii] was around 66 years old


Violin Sonata

No recordings, alas, of the 1946 Op. 70 Violin Sonata but I’d like to put in a plea for one. There has only been one broadcast on British radio in the last twenty years that I’m aware of, and that was by Nona Liddell, ever-questing musician, and Daphne Ibbott. David Oistrakh went to Prokofiev’s dacha outside Moscow in 1946 to find not only the laconic Prokofiev but also the pensive Miaskovsky both clutching manuscripts of new works for him to try out. And this was one of them, the elusive, lyrical violin sonata. It’s songful, expressive with some clotted piano writing in the first movement, double-stopping and G string intensity; in the second movement beautiful tumbling leaf violin writing and a muted section and fascinating trilling over the piano’s rolled chords; in the finale propulsive, energetic and emphatic, reminiscent of Franck and Grieg. Light-headed, light-hearted, never simple-minded. Surely there’s a record company and violinist out there prepared to end 55 plus years of discographic silence?

- Nikolai Miaskovsky. A Survey of the Chamber Works, Orchestral Music and Concertos on Record, By Jonathan Woolf  [MusicWeb]


(http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/info_Op70_zpsa6cd2b83.jpg)

- from Nikolay Myaskovsky: The Conscience of Russian Music, By Gregor Tassie


(http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/Score_Op70_zps8d8b8509.jpg)


Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: vandermolen on July 27, 2014, 01:51:10 AM
Violin Sonata in F major, Op. 70
(for violin and piano)
I. Allegro amabile
II. Tema con variazione. Andante con moto a molto cantabile
Composed in 1947, when Myaskovsky [Miaskovskii] was around 66 years old


Violin Sonata

No recordings, alas, of the 1946 Op. 70 Violin Sonata but I’d like to put in a plea for one. There has only been one broadcast on British radio in the last twenty years that I’m aware of, and that was by Nona Liddell, ever-questing musician, and Daphne Ibbott. David Oistrakh went to Prokofiev’s dacha outside Moscow in 1946 to find not only the laconic Prokofiev but also the pensive Miaskovsky both clutching manuscripts of new works for him to try out. And this was one of them, the elusive, lyrical violin sonata. It’s songful, expressive with some clotted piano writing in the first movement, double-stopping and G string intensity; in the second movement beautiful tumbling leaf violin writing and a muted section and fascinating trilling over the piano’s rolled chords; in the finale propulsive, energetic and emphatic, reminiscent of Franck and Grieg. Light-headed, light-hearted, never simple-minded. Surely there’s a record company and violinist out there prepared to end 55 plus years of discographic silence?

- Nikolai Miaskovsky. A Survey of the Chamber Works, Orchestral Music and Concertos on Record, By Jonathan Woolf  [MusicWeb]


(http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/info_Op70_zpsa6cd2b83.jpg)

- from Nikolay Myaskovsky: The Conscience of Russian Music, By Gregor Tassie


(http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/Score_Op70_zps8d8b8509.jpg)

Interesting post. Would be great to have a recording. Have been listening to the Sonatine for piano - my favourite piano work by Miaskovsky with a moving and entirely characteristic central movement.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: torut on July 27, 2014, 06:50:30 AM
Interesting post. Would be great to have a recording. Have been listening to the Sonatine for piano - my favourite piano work by Miaskovsky with a moving and entirely characteristic central movement.
I like Myaskovsky's piano sonatas. My favorite is No. 4, the most adventurous piece, imo. The last 3 sonatas are also very nice, more accessible with many attractive melodies. Hagedus's set which I only have does not contain Sonatine Op. 57. It seems that the only recording of Sonatine is McLachlan's disc, which has been OOP I think, but I found that alto is going to release this disc in August.

Myaskovsky Piano Sonatas Nos. 4 & 5, Sonatine, Prelude - Murray McLachlan



Is it a reissue of McLachlan's Olympia disc? I am looking forward to listening to Sonatine.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: vandermolen on July 27, 2014, 06:55:43 AM
I like Myaskovsky's piano sonatas. My favorite is No. 4, the most adventurous piece, imo. The last 3 sonatas are also very nice, more accessible with many attractive melodies. Hagedus's set which I only have does not contain Sonatine Op. 57. It seems that the only recording of Sonatine is McLachlan's disc, which has been OOP I think, but I found that alto is going to release this disc in August.

Myaskovsky Piano Sonatas Nos. 4 & 5, Sonatine, Prelude - Murray McLachlan



Is it a reissue of McLachlan's Olympia disc? I am looking forward to listening to Sonatine.

I have the CD in your picture. It has presumably been released over here (UK) sooner than in the USA. It is an Olympia reissue but the remastered sound on the Alto disc  is much better than what I remember from the Olympia. You will enjoy the Sonatine (called Sonatina in Gregor Tassie's recent biography of the composer).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: torut on July 27, 2014, 07:08:36 AM
I have the CD in your picture. It has presumably been released over here (UK) sooner than in the USA. It is an Olympia reissue but the remastered sound on the Alto disc  is much better than what I remember from the Olympia. You will enjoy the Sonatine (called Sonatina in Gregor Tassie's recent biography of the composer).
Thank you. I hope alto will reissue all the McLachlan's albums. I am satisfied with Hagedus, but I would like to listen to the other piano pieces of Myaskovsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950) THE MISSING VIOLIN SONATA
Post by: torut on July 28, 2014, 06:11:25 PM
Violin Sonata in F major, Op. 70
(for violin and piano)
I. Allegro amabile
II. Tema con variazione. Andante con moto a molto cantabile
Composed in 1947, when Myaskovsky [Miaskovskii] was around 66 years old
This seems to be it.
https://www.youtube.com/v/PLtPjQqnxwo
Eloquent and melodious. It is a nice piece.
Google translated:
N. Myaskovsky - Sonata for Violin and Piano in F Major
Ilya Konstantinov (violin), Victoria Grishchenko (piano). Recorded in the Small Hall of the House of Scientists
25.05.2007
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 10, 2014, 03:06:12 AM
Measham's recording of No.21 was the first to be issued on CD and my initial exposure to the work, - but I recall after reading so often previously about this being Miaskovsky's finest Symphony feeling somewhat let down by it at the time.  It was only with the appearance of Svetlanov's take on the piece that it really became significant for me, and Gould unveiled another dimension entirely that deepened my absorption.  The Titov recording is different again, and my other favorite among those now available.  As I hear them, Titov expertly brings out the counterpoint in the score, - one can hear all the layering and individual voices within it clearly exposed and contrasted, whereas Svetlanov emphasizes the Symphony's Russian Romantic roots, - dark, heavy, and throbbing.  Gould OTOH makes it sound as anticipatorily modern as the music can bear, - streamlined and seamless, completely unsentimental, unindulgent, and unlingering, with perfect ensemble and unflagging direction.  Whatever the approach, in its combination of structural coherence and thematic distinction I now cede to the consensus judgement that No.21 is Miaskovsky's most perfect and effective Symphony. There may be individual movements in some of the others that move or excite me more while listening, but No.21 I find makes the deepest impression and stays in my consciousness the longest.
J (how's that for short and sweet!) is absolutely right,vandermolen! I loved the Measham Miaskovsky Twenty First (and it's coupling) as a youngster. I played it over and over again! Having said that I downloaded the Gould performance from Klassik Haus yesterday,coupled with his recording of Rimsky Korsakov's Antar Symphony for a measly Five dollars (comes out on my bank statement as £4.31,or at least it did last time!). The performance is superb. The way he shapes it! It feels so perfect. And I mustn't leave out Antar! I love this piece of music and I think this is the best performance I have heard. I do like Abravanel's recording (Utah seems appropriate for a storyline which takes in a desert!) but Antar does need a more sumptuous sound,good as the old Utah recording is! The RCA recording is superb for it's era and the Klassik Haus resoration sounds very good (I have some of their Brian restorations). I have no comparison transfer,of course and I did listen on Sennheiser wireless headphonnes!! I coupled the recordings with another RK favourite,The Tale of Tsar Saltan suite (and Bumblebee!) conducted by Ashkenazy. Maybe not the finest recording,but it's the only one I have at the moment  and it sounds okay to me (I chose it for the coupling,Antar and it's included on a DG 'Panorama' 'twofer!').

Apologies,this is,after all,a Miaskovsky thread. I really would recommend the Gould recording and the Klassk Haus transfer certainly won't break the old bank!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 13, 2014, 05:29:59 AM
The Morton Gould is on a Bearac Reissues CD too with Antar. I like Ormandy's recording of Symphony 21 too.

On a separate note the 4th Symphony is apparently being performed by the Rotterdam PO tonight (13th September 2014) and is on NL Radio 4 at about 8.15 pm local time. The conductor is Gergiev.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 21, 2014, 02:20:35 PM
New Melodiya release - all amongst his greatest works:


Features symphonies 16, 17, 21, 22, 25 and 27. Conductors Ivanov and Svetlanov.

This set included the 16th and 21st symphonies conducted by Konstantin Ivanov, never before released on CD as far as I am aware. Both recorded in 1950 and both very fine performances and interesting alternatives to Svetlanov's later recordings. A pity that Melodiya chose to include Svetlanov's fine but already released version of the valedictory 27th Symphony instead of the even more moving earlier recording by Alexander Gauk which has never been released on CD - an opportunity missed but never mind, this is still a fine set.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 08, 2014, 09:32:13 AM
Have now listened to the new Melodiya set (see above message).

It is worth having alone for the wonderful theme five minutes into the first movement of Symphony 25.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 14, 2015, 09:00:12 AM
I've defected from the Havergal Brian thread. :P

Just to say the Melodiya new release, pictured two message above this, would be a great introduction to NM's symphonies, as it contains a selection of his best ones with, in my opinion, the exception of symphonies 3 and 6 (possibly his greatest). I agree with how fine Morton Gould's fine old RCA LP was which contained perhaps the best performance of the poetic and concise 21st Symphony along with Rimsky's 'Antar'. Sad that together with some other fine RCA LPs (Bax, Symphony 3/Downes, Khachaturian's First Symphony/Tjeknavorian - much better than the ASV version) it was never released on CD. If you only have time to hear one Miaskovsky symphony, No 21 would be a great choice (there are several fine recordings on CD).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on March 14, 2015, 02:24:49 PM
Indeed....I actually thought the Havergal Brian thread WAS the Miaskovsky thread;when I 'popped in' a while back!!
Gould was a fine conductor,it seems. I particularly like his recordings of Copland's Billy the Kid and Rodeo,on RCA Living Stereo.
I didn't know Ormandy had recorded Miaskovsky's Twenty First! Sounds interesting!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: calyptorhynchus on March 14, 2015, 04:42:40 PM
In response to the outbreak of Myaskovskism on the Havergal Brain thread I dug out some downloads from my unsightly MP3 pile and listened to the Symphony 27 and the SQ 13.

I wasn't expecting what I heard... which was music that sounded like late Dvorak, almost devoid of chromaticism, seeming to have completely ignored the C20. I mean, I quite liked it, and I can understand why Myaskovsky would have ignored the C20, which was a little bit disastrous for Russia, to say the least. But are these typical works, or are they nostalgic, valedictory pieces looking back to his youth?

What's the rowdiest symphony he wrote?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 15, 2015, 12:49:34 AM
In response to the outbreak of Myaskovskism on the Havergal Brain thread I dug out some downloads from my unsightly MP3 pile and listened to the Symphony 27 and the SQ 13.

I wasn't expecting what I heard... which was music that sounded like late Dvorak, almost devoid of chromaticism, seeming to have completely ignored the C20. I mean, I quite liked it, and I can understand why Myaskovsky would have ignored the C20, which was a little bit disastrous for Russia, to say the least. But are these typical works, or are they nostalgic, valedictory pieces looking back to his youth?

What's the rowdiest symphony he wrote?

I like the nostalgic valedictory tone  ::). Try No 6 which is an epic work, once described as like an Eisenstein Film. It is considered the greatest by many. The trio of the scherzo is one of my all time greatest moments in music and the choral apotheosis is terribly moving. Don't get the Svetlanov as he dispenses with the chorus - a pity as otherwise this is a fine performance. The funeral march in No 16 is very fine and memorable.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2015, 06:12:58 AM
What's the rowdiest symphony he wrote?

No doubt (in my mind at least) the Sixth. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._6_%28Myaskovsky%29
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: calyptorhynchus on March 15, 2015, 12:17:57 PM
The sixth it is.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 15, 2015, 01:29:16 PM
The sixth it is.

Let us know what you think of it.

I'd recommend the Ural Philharmonic under Dmitri Liss. It is a fine performance plus you get the more modernistic Symphony 10 thrown in which might appeal to you:


Also, you can pick it up inexpensively on Amazon.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: calyptorhynchus on April 12, 2015, 07:17:35 PM
For the past few weeks I have been listening to Mysaskovksy, I hadn’t previously heard a note of his music.

I discovered that most of the Svetlanov recordings of the symphonies had made their way on to YouTube, so I was able to use these like the old record-listening booth.

I found Myaskovsky’s music quite odd, in that normally I either love all the works of a composer, or I hate them all. In contrast I found that I respected Myaskovsky’s works, and I regard a few of them as masterpieces, but most of them I find rather uninspired.

I thought there was a good comparison to be made between the music of NM and that of Rubbra. Both wrote modest, unassuming music in traditional forms, with no flashiness or display. Both use the strings as the basis of their orchestration and both are skilled in extending melodies seamlessly (sometimes they write single-movement symphonies) and with both their best works are inspired declamations. (I found Mysaskovsky’s two cello sonatas reminiscent of the Rubbra Cello Sonata).

I thought the best of the Myaskovsky symphonies were 21, 22 and 25. Of the remaining symphonies 8, 10, 11, 13, 16, 27 weren’t bad. The rest though were uninspired. At times in his music there is an agreeable folky liveliness, and a fine sense of Russian melody, but neither of these are really sustained. The Cello Concerto I thought was a masterpiece, though the Violin Concerto wasn’t up to the same level. My thesis about his music is that Myaskovsky hated Communism and felt under pressure all the time (justifiably); unlike Shostakovich he didn’t respond with works full of snark, or by keeping works hidden, instead he just kept churning works out whether he was inspired or not. In an ideal world he would have produced  5 or 6 symphonies in his life. His great symphonies came about because WW2 reawakened his Russian patriotism, 21 is on the eve of WW2, he senses something about to happen, 22 is a response to the early days of the war, 25 and the Cello Concerto are a reaction to Soviet Russian victory.

I didn’t really investigate any of his other works except a few String Quartets. I found these agreeable enough, but not really string quartets, ie contrapuntal motivic discussion. Instead I thought they sounded like orchestral music arranged for SQ.

So I don’t think I’ll be buying the big box, but I will buy a few of the Svetlanov disks individually, and I have already got the Tarasova version of the Cello Concerto (which has the Cello Sonatas with it).

That's what I thought.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2015, 10:48:40 PM
For the past few weeks I have been listening to Mysaskovksy, I hadn’t previously heard a note of his music.

I discovered that most of the Svetlanov recordings of the symphonies had made their way on to YouTube, so I was able to use these like the old record-listening booth.

I found Myaskovsky’s music quite odd, in that normally I either love all the works of a composer, or I hate them all. In contrast I found that I respected Myaskovsky’s works, and I regard a few of them as masterpieces, but most of them I find rather uninspired.

I thought there was a good comparison to be made between the music of NM and that of Rubbra. Both wrote modest, unassuming music in traditional forms, with no flashiness or display. Both use the strings as the basis of their orchestration and both are skilled in extending melodies seamlessly (sometimes they write single-movement symphonies) and with both their best works are inspired declamations. (I found Mysaskovsky’s two cello sonatas reminiscent of the Rubbra Cello Sonata).

I thought the best of the Myaskovsky symphonies were 21, 22 and 25. Of the remaining symphonies 8, 10, 11, 13, 16, 27 weren’t bad. The rest though were uninspired. At times in his music there is an agreeable folky liveliness, and a fine sense of Russian melody, but neither of these are really sustained. The Cello Concerto I thought was a masterpiece, though the Violin Concerto wasn’t up to the same level. My thesis about his music is that Myaskovsky hated Communism and felt under pressure all the time (justifiably); unlike Shostakovich he didn’t respond with works full of snark, or by keeping works hidden, instead he just kept churning works out whether he was inspired or not. In an ideal world he would have produced  5 or 6 symphonies in his life. His great symphonies came about because WW2 reawakened his Russian patriotism, 21 is on the eve of WW2, he senses something about to happen, 22 is a response to the early days of the war, 25 and the Cello Concerto are a reaction to Soviet Russian victory.

I didn’t really investigate any of his other works except a few String Quartets. I found these agreeable enough, but not really string quartets, ie contrapuntal motivic discussion. Instead I thought they sounded like orchestral music arranged for SQ.

So I don’t think I’ll be buying the big box, but I will buy a few of the Svetlanov disks individually, and I have already got the Tarasova version of the Cello Concerto (which has the Cello Sonatas with it).

That's what I thought.

Thanks for taking the trouble to feed back on your NM listening. I like your Rubbra comparison - both composers wrote 'unflashy' music of considerable depth although perhaps Rubbra's scores were more consistently of a high standard. You do not include some of my favourite NM symphonies in your list of the better ones and I would have included also nos 3,6,15 and 17. In fact I was listening to No. 15 in the car this morning. No.17 I regard as one of the very best and the Alto CD which links symphonies 17 and 21 is a very fine one I think (not to mention the fab booklet notes  8)). I have recently been listening to the piano sonatas, some of which are very good. Also, I think that the valedictory string quartet No.13 is a wonderful and very moving work.
Thanks very much again for reporting back and I enjoyed reading your comments even if I am not in full agreement.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on April 13, 2015, 09:08:29 PM
Myaskovsky's Symphony No. 24 is still my favorite with Symphony No. 27 coming in a distant second place.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on April 13, 2015, 09:53:02 PM
For the past few weeks I have been listening to Mysaskovksy, I hadn’t previously heard a note of his music.

Myaskovsky is a high-calorie composer and consuming in large quantities is not recommended. Symptoms of Myaskovsky overdose may include pathological resistance to half-diminished sevenths, trumpet fanfares and anything described as 'valedictory'. Recommended dosage of Myaskovsky is one (1) symphony or string quartet every two (2) weeks, or as needed; consumption not to exceed three (3) symphonies or string quartets per 24-hour period. If you believe you have experienced excess Myaskovsky, seek out your nearest Stravinsky, Poulenc or Bartók immediately.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 14, 2015, 01:29:35 AM
Myaskovsky is a high-calorie composer and consuming in large quantities is not recommended. Symptoms of Myaskovsky overdose may include pathological resistance to half-diminished sevenths, trumpet fanfares and anything described as 'valedictory'. Recommended dosage of Myaskovsky is one (1) symphony or string quartet every two (2) weeks, or as needed; consumption not to exceed three (3) symphonies or string quartets per 24-hour period. If you believe you have experienced excess Myaskovsky, seek out your nearest Stravinsky, Poulenc or Bartók immediately.

Hilarious. So what's wrong with 'valedictory'?  Most of the symphonies I enjoy have a valedictory quality, as well as demonstrating a mad and hopeless defiance.  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: calyptorhynchus on April 14, 2015, 12:47:31 PM
If you believe you have experienced excess Myaskovsky, seek out your nearest Stravinsky, Poulenc or Bartók immediately.

I composers I compare Myaskovsky to are those Soviet composers of a later generation who are still quite traditional, Salmanov, Eshpai, Ivanovs (Latvian, probably unwilling Soviet).

 ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 14, 2015, 09:59:40 PM
I composers I compare Myaskovsky to are those Soviet composers of a later generation who are still quite traditional, Salmanov, Eshpai, Ivanovs (Latvian, probably unwilling Soviet).

 ;)

His pupil Shebalin also comes to mind. His First Symphony has echoes of Miaskovsky as does the underrated First Symphony of Kabalevsky. Shebalin's valedictory ( :P) Fifth Symphony is a fine work.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on April 20, 2015, 03:28:55 AM
I composers I compare Myaskovsky to are those Soviet composers of a later generation who are still quite traditional, Salmanov, Eshpai, Ivanovs (Latvian, probably unwilling Soviet).
I was thinking more in terms of antidotes.

For similarities, I've also felt he has a lot in common with some of the more cosmopolitan westerners of his day—Bax, Schoeck, Zemlinsky, etc., even Ravel—as seen through a Borodin/Rimsky tinted lens.
(I've also been listening to some of the Shebalin symphonies which are valedictory, hopelessly defiant and, of course, inspiriting >.> and quite decent though they do tend to sound like undiscovered Myaskovsky works a bit)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 20, 2015, 12:12:28 PM
I was thinking more in terms of antidotes.

For similarities, I've also felt he has a lot in common with some of the more cosmopolitan westerners of his day—Bax, Schoeck, Zemlinsky, etc., even Ravel—as seen through a Borodin/Rimsky tinted lens.
(I've also been listening to some of the Shebalin symphonies which are valedictory, hopelessly defiant and, of course, inspiriting >.> and quite decent though they do tend to sound like undiscovered Myaskovsky works a bit)
Shebalin's valedictory No.5 is especially moving and the Miaskovsky influence is very clear in Symphony 1.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: torut on April 29, 2015, 06:37:17 PM
Murray Mclachlan's complete piano sonatas set has been reissued.


Including not only the piano sonatas but also: Sonatine (Op. 57), Prelude & Rondo-Sonata (Op. 58), Reminiscences (Op. 29), Yellowed Leaves (Op. 31), and Scherzo from String Quartet No. 5.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 30, 2015, 09:57:46 AM
Murray Mclachlan's complete piano sonatas set has been reissued.


Including not only the piano sonatas but also: Sonatine (Op. 57), Prelude & Rondo-Sonata (Op. 58), Reminiscences (Op. 29), Yellowed Leaves (Op. 31), and Scherzo from String Quartet No. 5.

Yes, that's a nice set, originally on Olympia. Love the cover image.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 04, 2016, 04:04:20 PM
This set restores to the catalogue the greatest ever (IMHO) performance and recording of Miaskovsky's concise and poetic Symphony 21, commissioned by the Chicago SO (in a rare gesture of solidarity between the USSR of Stalin and USA).  This is a fine box with some interesting Ives discs, all presented in mini versions of the original LP sleeves:

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 10, 2016, 09:32:04 PM
I was sorry to read of the death of the Russian cellist Alexander Ivashkin in 2014 at the age of 65. In my opinion he was responsible for a wonderful performance of Miaskovsky's great Cello Concerto. It is my favourite performance after the classic one by Rostropovich/Sargent and much better recorded. The CD with Polyansky conducting the moving/valedictory Symphony 27 is one of the great Miaskovsky CDs and an ideal introduction to the composer as it features two of his greatest works. I see that I mentioned it in my opening post in this thread (it is available very inexpensively on both the Amazon UK and U.S. Sites):
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/10634183/Alexander-Ivashkin.html

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 14, 2016, 09:06:22 PM
I just listened to this on YouTube (the Cello Concerto that is) and am surprised you rate it so highly.  I found Ivashkin's playing rather labored and inelegant, and his tone unattractively muddy and too resonant (maybe somewhat the recording here), overall missing the elegiac delicacy and twilight nostalgia I love in the piece.

We can commune once again, however, over Gould's superlative 21rst Symphony performance, a marvel of precision and perfect ensemble, seamless and inevitable from start to finish.


Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 14, 2016, 10:10:40 PM
Have not heard that recording of the Cello Concerto -

I have the [Knjazev, Helsinki Philharmonic, Vedernikov] recording,
and the [Tarasova, Moscow New Opera Orchestra, Samailov] CD.

Ah, it is on YT - will have a listen.  Thanks.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 15, 2016, 12:27:22 AM
I just listened to this on YouTube (the Cello Concerto that is) and am surprised you rate it so highly.  I found Ivashkin's playing rather labored and inelegant, and his tone unattractively muddy and too resonant (maybe somewhat the recording here), overall missing the elegiac delicacy and twilight nostalgia I love in the piece.

We can commune once again, however, over Gould's superlative 21rst Symphony performance, a marvel of precision and perfect ensemble, seamless and inevitable from start to finish.
We'll have to differ on that one.  :)
The Sargent/Rostropovich remains my favourite version. No other recording, in my view, of the 21st Symphony, including fine ones by Svetlanov and Measham are as poetic and eloquent as Morton Gould's recording. The score was commissioned by the Chicago SO at a rare moment of inter-allied wartime rapprochement. It amuses me that what the British and Americans called the 'Grand Alliance' was described, with greater accuracy, by the USSR as the 'Anti-Hitler Coalition.'
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 15, 2016, 12:31:09 AM
Myaskovsky's Symphony No. 24 is still my favorite with Symphony No. 27 coming in a distant second place.
There's a very good new Japanese recording of Symphony 24, interestingly coupled with Franz Schmidt's 4th Symphony. Unfortunately it's doubled in price since I obtained a copy:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/MYASKOVSKY-Hiroshi-Kiyotaka-Symphony-Orchestra/dp/B00Z7NC3XM/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1463304511&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=Myaskovsky+symphony+24
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 15, 2016, 01:07:38 AM
Well, it's not my favorite - I like the other two better.
It's not bad but it isn't outstanding.  The playing is sort of subdued.
The score may be marked in this way (?), and the other players are ignoring this and playing with a romantic verve,
which would make Ivashkin's more authentic - but less emotionally involving.

http://eventful.com/helsinki/events/hpo-schubert-v-/E0-001-064286585-1

Some day I'd like to track this one down:

(http://s32.postimg.org/v7igr1ab9/R_4071529_1427014926_4669_jpeg.jpg)

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 15, 2016, 01:54:11 AM
Well, it's not my favorite - I like the other two better.
It's not bad but it isn't outstanding.  The playing is sort of subdued.
The score may be marked in this way (?), and the other players are ignoring this and playing with a romantic verve,
which would make Ivashkin's more authentic - but less emotionally involving.

http://eventful.com/helsinki/events/hpo-schubert-v-/E0-001-064286585-1

Some day I'd like to track this one down:

(http://s32.postimg.org/v7igr1ab9/R_4071529_1427014926_4669_jpeg.jpg)
Looks like a fascinating release; hope you track it down to its lair.  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 15, 2016, 05:34:38 AM
Well, it's not my favorite - I like the other two better.
It's not bad but it isn't outstanding.  The playing is sort of subdued.
The score may be marked in this way (?), and the other players are ignoring this and playing with a romantic verve,
which would make Ivashkin's more authentic - but less emotionally involving.

http://eventful.com/helsinki/events/hpo-schubert-v-/E0-001-064286585-1

Some day I'd like to track this one down:

(http://s32.postimg.org/v7igr1ab9/R_4071529_1427014926_4669_jpeg.jpg)


Wow.  This Gutman recording (which I was never aware of) appears to be on YouTube also (I can't provide a link at the moment, but just do a search).  What a fabulous video, - until now I don't think I'd ever viewed a live performance of the piece.  Gutman plays it right. 

You must check it out Scion & Jeffrey.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 15, 2016, 05:42:57 AM
All I found was a live performance of the Sonata, not the Concerto.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 15, 2016, 06:54:04 AM
Well, that's a live performance - which for some reason my search on YT didn't list!!
I have found that YouTube's search engine is one strange varmint.
Would like to find a rip of that Melodya LP.   :-[
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 15, 2016, 07:17:50 AM
You don't believe that live performance is what's on Melodiya?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 15, 2016, 07:29:33 AM

Wow.  This Gutman recording (which I was never aware of) appears to be on YouTube also (I can't provide a link at the moment, but just do a search).  What a fabulous video, - until now I don't think I'd ever viewed a live performance of the piece.  Gutman plays it right. 

You must check it out Scion & Jeffrey.
Will do my best to do so Greg.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 15, 2016, 07:36:51 AM
No, the LP is a studio recording.

NO!  It is a live LP.  Well, duh!

Concerto For Cello And Orchestra In C Minor, Op. 66   (28:38)
A1   Lento Ma Non Troppo   
A2   Allegro Vivace
   
Symphony No. 7 In B Minor, Op. 24   (23:44)
B1   Andante Sostenuto, Calmo. Allegro Minaccioso, Poco Stravagante   
B2   Andante. Allegro Scherzando E Tenebroso   
 
Recorded At – Grand Hall Of The Moscow Conservatoire
 
Cello – Natalia Gutman* (tracks: A1, A2)
Composed By – N. Myaskovsky*
Conductor – Evgeni Svetlanov, Leo Ginzburg*
Orchestra – USSR TV And Radio Large Symphony Orchestra, The* (tracks: B1, B2),
                  USSR Symphony Orchestra, The* (tracks: A1, A2)
 
Recorded live at the Grand Hall of the Moscow Conservatoire, 1985 (A1, A2), 1964 (B1, B2)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on May 15, 2016, 07:48:00 AM
Too bad there is no information on the YT video of when, where, and who the conductor-orchestra is ..........
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 17, 2016, 11:41:30 PM
Perhaps Miaskovsky's most beautiful short piece, especially the first movement of Two Pieces for String Orchestra Op.46, featuring his characteristic sadness, melancholy and nostalgic longing. It is an arrangement for string orchestra of the middle movements of his Symphony 19 written for Military Band. There are several recordings but this one by Veronika Dudarova with the Moscow SO is the best:

https://youtu.be/AxiHfa66oX8
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on March 29, 2017, 07:50:32 PM
His first symphonies really did not impress me and I found them a little boring (except No. 5, No. 6, the third movement of No. 8 and maybe the No. 11). I found them very diffuse and flat, the moments of climax in them were not exciting, I was somewhat disappointed ... but when I got to No. 15 everything began to change for the better: what a great change there was in his music! From the 15th onwards they have been really fine and worth listening to. These are the symphonies "tasty" of him, great moments of strength, passion and expressivity accompanied by a more concrete melodic line. So far the best for me have been the Nos. 6, 15, 16 (stirring 3rd movement as vandermolen has stressed  ;) , 17 (another astounding slow movement), 20, 22 and the folk No. 23. I hope to hear the rest this week.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 31, 2017, 05:31:43 AM
His first symphonies really did not impress me and I found them a little boring (except No. 5, No. 6, the third movement of No. 8 and maybe the No. 11). I found them very diffuse and flat, the moments of climax in them were not exciting, I was somewhat disappointed ... but when I got to No. 15 everything began to change for the better: what a great change there was in his music! From the 15th onwards they have been really fine and worth listening to. These are the symphonies "tasty" of him, great moments of strength, passion and expressivity accompanied by a more concrete melodic line. So far the best for me have been the Nos. 6, 15, 16 (stirring 3rd movement as vandermolen has stressed  ;) , 17 (another astounding slow movement), 20, 22 and the folk No. 23. I hope to hear the rest this week.
Of the early ones I like No.3, rather influenced by Cesar Franck and Scriabin. You should like 24 which is one of the best and I think that 25 and especially the movingly valedictory No.27 are amongst the finest of his symphonies.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 01, 2017, 03:02:04 PM
I downloaded a sixties recording of Miaskovsky's Sixteenth Symphony today and transferred it to a cd-r. I find this a very interesting piece of music. Very absorbing indeed! Not what I expected from a soviet composer of this period at all.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 01, 2017, 04:12:26 PM
Of the early ones I like No.3, rather influenced by Cesar Franck and Scriabin. You should like 24 which is one of the best and I think that 25 and especially the movingly valedictory No.27 are amongst the finest of his symphonies.

I finished listening to them all. All of them are grandiose. In conclusion, the second half of the symphonies are the best ones (15 to 27 + 6). Miaskovsky could find his style (not quite as he wished), but he left a great legacy for all of us.

I downloaded a sixties recording of Miaskovsky's Sixteenth Symphony today and transferred it to a cd-r. I find this a very interesting piece of music. Very absorbing indeed! Not what I expected from a soviet composer of this period at all.

I agree. It's one of my favorite ones.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 02, 2017, 01:14:52 AM
I finished listening to them all. All of them are grandiose. In conclusion, the second half of the symphonies are the best ones (15 to 27 + 6). Miaskovsky could find his style (not quite as he wished), but he left a great legacy for all of us.

I agree. It's one of my favorite ones.

Inspired by the 'Maxim Gorky Air Disaster' - the funereal slow movement is one of the best.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 02, 2017, 03:17:14 AM
I found the whole of the Sixteenth very absorbing. I'd never heard it until last night. The performance was from an old Melodiya Lp;and the sound was a bit rough and ready,being a transfer from an old Lp,as opposed to a professional job. The addition of a little surface noise actually contributing a nice little nostalgic ambience to the music itself. Incidentally,when I observed that it was "Not what I expected from a soviet composer of this period at all",I didn't mean that in a disparaging way. I just expected something more outgoing or heroic. The Sixteenth reminded me of late Havergal Brian. No,I don't mean it sounds like Brian;but that feeling of a strange hinterland. Not quite as blatantly strange or remote as Brians,but one of those pieces of music that seem quite different to anything else being composed around it (at the time of it's composition). The music really gets into the corners of your mind and draws you in. The performance of Symphony No 21,that accompanied it,was very absorbing I might add. One of the best single movement symphonies ever,imho! The Sixteenth is a fascinating piece of music,though. I was really impressed. The recordings I listened to were conducted by Konstantin Ivanov (I think? I'll have to check!).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 04, 2017, 07:17:42 AM
I found the whole of the Sixteenth very absorbing. I'd never heard it until last night. The performance was from an old Melodiya Lp;and the sound was a bit rough and ready,being a transfer from an old Lp,as opposed to a professional job. The addition of a little surface noise actually contributing a nice little nostalgic ambience to the music itself. Incidentally,when I observed that it was "Not what I expected from a soviet composer of this period at all",I didn't mean that in a disparaging way. I just expected something more outgoing or heroic. The Sixteenth reminded me of late Havergal Brian. No,I don't mean it sounds like Brian;but that feeling of a strange hinterland. Not quite as blatantly strange or remote as Brians,but one of those pieces of music that seem quite different to anything else being composed around it (at the time of it's composition). The music really gets into the corners of your mind and draws you in. The performance of Symphony No 21,that accompanied it,was very absorbing I might add. One of the best single movement symphonies ever,imho! The Sixteenth is a fascinating piece of music,though. I was really impressed. The recordings I listened to were conducted by Konstantin Ivanov (I think? I'll have to check!).


I think that the same performances are featured on this great set with its extraordinary cover image.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 05, 2017, 10:44:56 AM
Another incentive! ;D I tend to agree with SymphonicAddict about the early symphonies. I recall not being too excited by No 6,for example,when a recording was broadcast some years ago. The Sixteenth was a differnt kettle of fish (sorry to call it that!). I was just thinking wouldn't it be a good idea if someone was to package the later symphonies separately,and then you posted that! Interesting that I like the later Miaskovsky symphonies first. In the case of Havergal Brian it was the bigger,more expansive ones I liked first (bar 10 & 16,which I've always enjoyed). Of course,unlike HB,Miaskovsky doesn't actually abandon the 'punctuation marks',which makes the discourse allot easier to follow. The fact that Miaskovsky's later symphonies are on a smaller,more pared down scale is hardly a surprise,though. Allot of composers seem to follow this trajectory. Even a throwback like Holbrooke took this approach later in his composing career. Indeed,are there any composers whose symphonies progressively became bigger and more expansive in scale....perhaps finishing off with a final blockbuster? 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 05, 2017, 11:51:55 AM
Another incentive! ;D I tend to agree with SymphonicAddict about the early symphonies. I recall not being too excited by No 6,for example,when a recording was broadcast some years ago. The Sixteenth was a differnt kettle of fish (sorry to call it that!). I was just thinking wouldn't it be a good idea if someone was to package the later symphonies separately,and then you posted that! Interesting that I like the later Miaskovsky symphonies first. In the case of Havergal Brian it was the bigger,more expansive ones I liked first (bar 10 & 16,which I've always enjoyed). Of course,unlike HB,Miaskovsky doesn't actually abandon the 'punctuation marks',which makes the discourse allot easier to follow. The fact that Miaskovsky's later symphonies are on a smaller,more pared down scale is hardly a surprise,though. Allot of composers seem to follow this trajectory. Even a throwback like Holbrooke took this approach later in his composing career. Indeed,are there any composers whose symphonies progressively became bigger and more expansive in scale....perhaps finishing off with a final blockbuster?
Miaskovsky's last-ditch, valedictory 27th Symphony, for which he was posthumously awarded a Stalin Prize is quite an expansive work. It has a characteristically gloomy opening, a deeply moving slow movement and a life-affirming finale. It's a wonderful work in my opinion.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 05, 2017, 04:32:19 PM
Another incentive! ;D I tend to agree with SymphonicAddict about the early symphonies. I recall not being too excited by No 6,for example,when a recording was broadcast some years ago. The Sixteenth was a differnt kettle of fish (sorry to call it that!). I was just thinking wouldn't it be a good idea if someone was to package the later symphonies separately,and then you posted that! Interesting that I like the later Miaskovsky symphonies first. In the case of Havergal Brian it was the bigger,more expansive ones I liked first (bar 10 & 16,which I've always enjoyed). Of course,unlike HB,Miaskovsky doesn't actually abandon the 'punctuation marks',which makes the discourse allot easier to follow. The fact that Miaskovsky's later symphonies are on a smaller,more pared down scale is hardly a surprise,though. Allot of composers seem to follow this trajectory. Even a throwback like Holbrooke took this approach later in his composing career. Indeed,are there any composers whose symphonies progressively became bigger and more expansive in scale....perhaps finishing off with a final blockbuster?

Glière comes to my mind. He didn't compose many symphonies, but the scale on them was growing until finalizing in the sumptuos 'Ilya Murometz' (at least in duration).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 05, 2017, 09:31:31 PM
Glière comes to my mind. He didn't compose many symphonies, but the scale on them was growing until finalizing in the sumptuos 'Ilya Murometz' (at least in duration).
He was one of the teachers of Miaskovsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 06, 2017, 03:44:30 AM
Glière comes to my mind. He didn't compose many symphonies, but the scale on them was growing until finalizing in the sumptuos 'Ilya Murometz' (at least in duration).
;D Yes,that's the one I couldn't think of!! Way to go!! ??? ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 06, 2017, 03:11:55 PM
He was one of the teachers of Miaskovsky.

A good coincidence!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 06, 2017, 09:45:47 PM
A good coincidence!  :)

Apparently NM had some private lessons with Gliere. Gliere's 'Ilya Murometz' Symphony and NM's 3rd Symphony are both sprawling epics which I greatly enjoy. I have also been lucky enough to see both performed live.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 07, 2017, 02:21:33 AM
Where did you see the live performance of the 3rd. Was it in Russia? I will have a listen to the third on Youtube this weekend. I would buy that box set,but I'm trying to save at the moment,and there are twenty seven to collect!! ???
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 07, 2017, 08:40:10 PM
Where did you see the live performance of the 3rd. Was it in Russia? I will have a listen to the third on Youtube this weekend. I would buy that box set,but I'm trying to save at the moment,and there are twenty seven to collect!! ???

Sorry, I meant NM's 6th Symphony and Gliere's 3rd Symphony. I heard the Gliere' at the Barbican in London and the Miaskovsky at the Festival Hall in London as well as attending the rehearsal and getting to talk to the conductor Vladimir Jurowski who was very nice. You should listen to NM's 3rd however as it is IMHO the best of the very early symphonies. The old Olympia recording with the lovely Lyric Concertino is usually available cheaply on CD unlike nearly all the other Olympias:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Myaskovsky-Lyric-Concertino-Symphony-Minor/dp/B000LTW2P6/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1491630340&sr=8-3&keywords=Myaskovsky+symphony+3

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Symphony-Concerto-Lyric-N-Miaskovsky/dp/B000003EFS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491630489&sr=8-1&keywords=miaskovsky+symphony+3
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 07, 2017, 11:58:59 PM
Yes,but then,if you like it,you want all the others! That's the main reason I've always avoided Miaskovsky! Havergal Brian composed more;but when I started listening to him,all those years ago,there weren't many on Lp. The result? Brown packages filled with off air cassettes arriving in the post. All for the price of a couple of D90 cassettes!! I must admit,I still find Brian the more compelling (or is that compulsive?) of the two! So far,anyway! The other problem? Limited room here! Much more and I will have to hang the furniture from the ceiling,or devise some ingeniious contraption,as in one of those brilliant old W Heath Robinson illustrations. Or vice-versa?!!
Having said that,Derek Bourgoise,who has a few fans at the AMF it seems,makes Miaskovsky look like Liadov by comparison!! You'd need that spare room for the cycle!! ??? :(

(http://i.imgur.com/F42sw6F.png)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 10, 2017, 12:31:07 AM
Yes,but then,if you like it,you want all the others! That's the main reason I've always avoided Miaskovsky! Havergal Brian composed more;but when I started listening to him,all those years ago,there weren't many on Lp. The result? Brown packages filled with off air cassettes arriving in the post. All for the price of a couple of D90 cassettes!! I must admit,I still find Brian the more compelling (or is that compulsive?) of the two! So far,anyway! The other problem? Limited room here! Much more and I will have to hang the furniture from the ceiling,or devise some ingeniious contraption,as in one of those brilliant old W Heath Robinson illustrations. Or vice-versa?!!
Having said that,Derek Bourgoise,who has a few fans at the AMF it seems,makes Miaskovsky look like Liadov by comparison!! You'd need that spare room for the cycle!! ??? :(

(http://i.imgur.com/F42sw6F.png)
Always good to see a Heath Robinson image.  :)
I rather like the fact that he called his cat Saturday Morning. Sorry, a bit off topic here but blame cilgwyn  8).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 01, 2017, 12:10:33 AM
The Third is my favourite of the earlier Miaskovsky symphonies (until the epic No.6). It seems influenced by Scriabin and Cesar Frank. There are two CDs of it (same performance I think) both on the sadly disappeared Olympia label. The newer release is now increasingly expensive online (with Symphony 13) but I actually prefer the earlier release coupled with the fine Lyric Concertino - my favourite of the composer's shorter works. Despite the diminutive title its middle movement has one of the most darkly impressive moments in Miaskovsky - a troubled ostinato passage. The outer movements are very charming. Amazingly the earlier release is still available incredibly cheaply (around £2 or $2) on both the U.S. and UK Amazon sites. It would be an ideal introduction to the music of Miaskovsky. Can't get the picture to appear but here is the link to the U.S. Amazon site:
https://www.amazon.com/N-Myaskovsky-Lyric-Concertino-Symphony/dp/B000LTW2P6/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1506848508&sr=8-11&keywords=Myaskovsky+symphony+3

Here is the more recent issue:

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 13, 2017, 01:16:42 AM
This is a reissue of the classic Rostropovich/Sargent recording of the Cello Concerto. If you only wanted one Miaskovsky CD in your collection this is a great introduction to the composer and, in my view, incomparably the best performance on disc. Would appeal to admirers of Elgar's Cello Concerto.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 29, 2018, 12:40:27 AM
I realise that I'm largely talking to myself here ( 8)) but I have been greatly enjoying symphonies 24 and 25 - two of the best in the series of 27 symphonies I think. 24 is dedicated in memory of Miaskovsky's friend and is a dark and poetic work and Symphony 25 has one of Miaskovsky's most characteristically soulful themes early on in the opening movement. Both works are together on a Naxos CD and form a great introduction to NM's music.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on April 01, 2018, 06:51:55 PM
I realise that I'm largely talking to myself here ( 8)) but I have been greatly enjoying symphonies 24 and 25 - two of the best in the series of 27 symphonies I think. 24 is dedicated in memory of Miaskovsky's friend and is a dark and poetic work and Symphony 25 has one of Miaskovsky's most characteristically soulful themes early on in the opening movement. Both works are together on a Naxos CD and form a great introduction to NM's music.



Those are two of my favorite of Miaskovsky's symphonies. Eloquent, dramatic, and lyrical music. I've only heard the Svetlanov recordings.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 02, 2018, 05:35:49 AM
Those are two of my favorite of Miaskovsky's symphonies. Eloquent, dramatic, and lyrical music. I've only heard the Svetlanov recordings.

The Svetlanov is the  best version I think Kyle. He invests the fine theme towards the start of Symphony 25 with more gravity than Yablonsky, by taking it slower but the Yablonsky is very enjoyable as well.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 06, 2018, 11:59:40 PM
While downloading one,or two files,from the Art Music Forum's "library" of music upoads,I decided to have a quick look to see if there was anything I'd missed out,or new. I discovered an upoad of a performance of Gergiev conducting Miaskovsky's Fourth. It was in very good sound,and I rather enjoyed it. It could be,roughly described,I think,as a cross between Scriabin and Gliere;with a bit more of the former,perhaps? The slow movement was rather beautiful. I don't know Miaskovsky's music really;beyond the twenty-first;there's just so much. I always avoid buying any cd's of his musicbecause of the potential expense! If I like these Simpson symphonies I bought,the other week;at least there will only be another four cd's at the most!! Just imagine if Derek Bourgeois ever get's a complete cycle?!!!! I gather it's not a Miaskovsky "fan" favourite;but I rather enjoyed it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 07, 2018, 12:17:02 AM
While downloading one,or two files,from the Art Music Forum's "library" of music upoads,I decided to have a quick look to see if there was anything I'd missed out,or new. I discovered an upoad of a performance of Gergiev conducting Miaskovsky's Fourth. It was in very good sound,and I rather enjoyed it. It could be,roughly described,I think,as a cross between Scriabin and Gliere;with a bit more of the former,perhaps? The slow movement was rather beautiful. I don't know Miaskovsky's music really;beyond the twenty-first;there's just so much. I always avoid buying any cd's of his musicbecause of the potential expense! If I like these Simpson symphonies I bought,the other week;at least there will only be another four cd's at the most!! Just imagine if Derek Bourgeois ever get's a complete cycle?!!!! I gather it's not a Miaskovsky "fan" favourite;but I rather enjoyed it.
Good morning cigwyn! You could try the Naxos CD of symphonies 24 and 25 - two of the best I think, as does Kyle. I have three different versions of that coupling ( ::)) by Yablonsky, Svetlanov and Titov, not to mention a fine Japanese version of Symphony 24. However, the Yablonsky on Naxos is very enjoyable and one of my favourite Naxos CDs.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 07, 2018, 03:46:50 AM
No,I've got to resist for the time being. So much temptation and so many symphonies! If I could sell something now;and get that boxed set?!!  Of course,I could filch them all off Youtube. That would go against my own personal values,though. The odd cd-r is okay,if the material is unobtainable,very old,or for evaluation purposes. But people do have to earn a living;and I like to feel I'm supporting recording labels and musicians. On the other hand;if I like a cd-r I make I usually end up buying the recording. Cdr-s just aren't the same! And getting all twenty seven off Youtube,even if they are up there,would be hell on earth,anyway! I spent a couple of hours converting sound files and burning cdr-s yesterday;and it's the sort of thing that almost makes me yearn for the days of sitting next to a radio,usually tuned to Radio 3,with my finger poised next to "Play" and "Record". I enjoyed the Miaskovsky.....and Boris Asafiev,for what it was worth! I have to say though,that the Symphony No 4 "Epitaph" by Karen Khatchaturian,was one of the worst I've ever heard. It was dated 1985;but it sounded like some of the worst kind of 60's trendy c***! There were noises like someone sneezing,too?!! ??? I only downloaded it because I read that he was a nephew of Aram (Khatchaturian,of course) and I remember seeing his name in the old Russian Record Company and Melodiya lists. His name stood out,because of the erm,name!! :D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 08, 2018, 12:38:11 AM
No,I've got to resist for the time being. So much temptation and so many symphonies! If I could sell something now;and get that boxed set?!!  Of course,I could filch them all off Youtube. That would go against my own personal values,though. The odd cd-r is okay,if the material is unobtainable,very old,or for evaluation purposes. But people do have to earn a living;and I like to feel I'm supporting recording labels and musicians. On the other hand;if I like a cd-r I make I usually end up buying the recording. Cdr-s just aren't the same! And getting all twenty seven off Youtube,even if they are up there,would be hell on earth,anyway! I spent a couple of hours converting sound files and burning cdr-s yesterday;and it's the sort of thing that almost makes me yearn for the days of sitting next to a radio,usually tuned to Radio 3,with my finger poised next to "Play" and "Record". I enjoyed the Miaskovsky.....and Boris Asafiev,for what it was worth! I have to say though,that the Symphony No 4 "Epitaph" by Karen Khatchaturian,was one of the worst I've ever heard. It was dated 1985;but it sounded like some of the worst kind of 60's trendy c***! There were noises like someone sneezing,too?!! ??? I only downloaded it because I read that he was a nephew of Aram (Khatchaturian,of course) and I remember seeing his name in the old Russian Record Company and Melodiya lists. His name stood out,because of the erm,name!! :D

I think that the Symphony by Khachaturian's wife Nina Makarova is excellent - you might enjoy that much more.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 08, 2018, 01:33:31 AM
And not so many collect! ;D Someone did post,that they thought Nina Makarova might even be a finer symphonies than her husband. I don't know if it was you. It might be true. It might not. She wouldn't be the first talented person,overshadowed by an even more talented relative,sibling or "other 'arf! Did Melodiya ever record any of her music? As to Karen Khatchaturian? Maybe he was just trying to keep up with the times? I read that his works have been recorded by Heifetz,Oistrakh and Rostropovich and received numerous awards. So,I will be kind and reserve judgement,for now!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 08, 2018, 01:47:12 AM
And not so many collect! ;D Someone did post,that they thought Nina Makarova might even be a finer symphonies than her husband. I don't know if it was you. It might be true. It might not. She wouldn't be the first talented person,overshadowed by an even more talented relative,sibling or "other 'arf! Did Melodiya ever record any of her music? As to Karen Khatchaturian? Maybe he was just trying to keep up with the times? I read that his works have been recorded by Heifetz,Oistrakh and Rostropovich and received numerous awards. So,I will be kind and reserve judgement,for now!

The Symphony I have is on Russian Disc cilgwyn.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: cilgwyn on April 13, 2018, 12:01:31 AM
If somebody drops the price of the Svetlanov box low enough I may take the plunge. Until then?!!! :( ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 27, 2018, 04:06:30 PM
I'm revisiting a symphony that impressed me very much the first time I heard it, and right now is delighting me again: the Symphony No. 22 Symphony-Ballad, an authentic war symphony (I'm wanting to hear the Merikanto's symphony 2 next (related to war, too)). It's a solid single-movement symphony, imbued with the strength of a battletank, immensely haunting, a poem for bravery. The conducting is under Svetlanov (from the old box set).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2018, 12:48:59 AM
I'm revisiting a symphony that impressed me very much the first time I heard it, and right now is delighting me again: the Symphony No. 22 Symphony-Ballad, an authentic war symphony (I'm wanting to hear the Merikanto's symphony 2 next (related to war, too)). It's a solid single-movement symphony, imbued with the strength of a battletank, immensely haunting, a poem for bravery. The conducting is under Svetlanov (from the old box set).

I remember getting a record token for Christmas or my birthday in the early 1970s and spending on the EMI/Melodiya LP of Symphony 22 (coupled with a work by the conductor Svetlanov). Somewhere there exists a recording by Bernard Herrmann I think although I gather that NM himself was displeased by it as Herrmann cut somevofvthe material. Must have been recorded during the war I think during the period of US/Soviet rapprochement (the Chicago SO had commissioned the poetic, concise and eloquent Symphony 21 - one of his greatest I think).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 28, 2018, 09:50:23 AM
I remember getting a record token for Christmas or my birthday in the early 1970s and spending on the EMI/Melodiya LP of Symphony 22 (coupled with a work by the conductor Svetlanov). Somewhere there exists a recording by Bernard Herrmann I think although I gather that NM himself was displeased by it as Herrmann cut somevofvthe material. Must have been recorded during the war I think during the period of US/Soviet rapprochement (the Chicago SO had commissioned the poetic, concise and eloquent Symphony 21 - one of his greatest I think).

I'll revisit the symphonies at some point since the impressions I have from them are very positive, some masterpieces there without doubt. I still feel thrilled by the poetry of the 22. It's like a symphonic poem rather than a symphony, though.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on April 28, 2018, 03:16:33 PM
I'm revisiting a symphony that impressed me very much the first time I heard it, and right now is delighting me again: the Symphony No. 22 Symphony-Ballad, an authentic war symphony (I'm wanting to hear the Merikanto's symphony 2 next (related to war, too)). It's a solid single-movement symphony, imbued with the strength of a battletank, immensely haunting, a poem for bravery. The conducting is under Svetlanov (from the old box set).

I am listening to this now and interestingly, I thought "wow, I am surprised by the diversity and the quality of this symphony" only to realize later that spotify was randomly jumping between various symphonies!!  I now realize I had the "shuffle" button enabled!  Ok, so after re-listening, yes I agree this is a very musical and interesting work.  Not particularly war like in the way of a Prokofiev or Shostakovitch symphony might be.  For example, I find this somewhat like Gliere and Eshpai...very fine examples of Slavic Russian music which I love but not similar to the Soviet era such as Stravinsky, Shostakovitch, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, etc.  Also interesting, we can hear Boris Tchaikovsky, Sviridov, Shchedrin, and Boris Tishchenko.  Sergei Slonimsky (b. 1932) might be his closest musical heir stylistically and has surpassed symphony no. 32. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on April 28, 2018, 04:16:46 PM
I am listening to this now and interestingly, I thought "wow, I am surprised by the diversity and the quality of this symphony" only to realize later that spotify was randomly jumping between various symphonies!!  I now realize I had the "shuffle" button enabled!  Ok, so after re-listening, yes I agree this is a very musical and interesting work.  Not particularly war like in the way of a Prokofiev or Shostakovitch symphony might be.  For example, I find this somewhat like Gliere and Eshpai...very fine examples of Slavic Russian music which I love but not similar to the Soviet era such as Stravinsky, Shostakovitch, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, etc.  Also interesting, we can hear Boris Tchaikovsky, Sviridov, Shchedrin, and Boris Tishchenko.  Sergei Slonimsky (b. 1932) might be his closest musical heir stylistically and has surpassed symphony no. 32.

I also hear reminiscences/influences from those composers you mentioned (except Tishchenko and Slonimsky whose works I don't know yet). On the other hand, I concur with you about the No. 22, which is not at the same league of war symphonies as those by Khachaturian et al. I feel this symphony is much more expressive, contemplative, less crude, albeit it has some shattering moments. All in all, an impressive symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 29, 2018, 08:37:52 AM
I am listening to this now and interestingly, I thought "wow, I am surprised by the diversity and the quality of this symphony" only to realize later that spotify was randomly jumping between various symphonies!!  I now realize I had the "shuffle" button enabled!  Ok, so after re-listening, yes I agree this is a very musical and interesting work.  Not particularly war like in the way of a Prokofiev or Shostakovitch symphony might be.  For example, I find this somewhat like Gliere and Eshpai...very fine examples of Slavic Russian music which I love but not similar to the Soviet era such as Stravinsky, Shostakovitch, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, etc.  Also interesting, we can hear Boris Tchaikovsky, Sviridov, Shchedrin, and Boris Tishchenko.  Sergei Slonimsky (b. 1932) might be his closest musical heir stylistically and has surpassed symphony no. 32.

That's quite funny about 'shuffle'. I remember my brother telling me that years ago at an Arts cinema he had seen a very modernist film in which people who had apparently died earlier in the film appeared alive and well later on. It was only at the end that they were told that the film reels had been played in the wrong order.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 29, 2018, 08:40:07 AM
I also hear reminiscences/influences from those composers you mentioned (except Tishchenko and Slonimsky whose works I don't know yet). On the other hand, I concur with you about the No. 22, which is not at the same league of war symphonies as those by Khachaturian et al. I feel this symphony is much more expressive, contemplative, less crude, albeit it has some shattering moments. All in all, an impressive symphony.

Yes, I never really think of No.22 as a 'War Symphony' but I always enjoy it. The wartime No.24 is a darker work and the poignancy of the Cello Concerto of 1945 always strike me as more war-influenced although No.24 is in commemoration of a friend of the composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on May 01, 2018, 04:05:50 PM
I remember getting a record token for Christmas or my birthday in the early 1970s and spending on the EMI/Melodiya LP of Symphony 22 (coupled with a work by the conductor Svetlanov). Somewhere there exists a recording by Bernard Herrmann I think although I gather that NM himself was displeased by it as Herrmann cut somevofvthe material. Must have been recorded during the war I think during the period of US/Soviet rapprochement (the Chicago SO had commissioned the poetic, concise and eloquent Symphony 21 - one of his greatest I think).

Yes, 21 is a gem. One of my favorites, or maybe the favorite of the bunch. What do you think of 9?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2018, 02:18:14 AM
Yes, 21 is a gem. One of my favorites, or maybe the favorite of the bunch. What do you think of 9?

Haven't heard it for ages but that will be rectified soon!

No.21 is arguably the greatest of them all. The longest and shortest (6 and 21) are my favourites although 3,5,8,11,12,15,16,17, 22, 23,24,25 and 27 rate highly as well. I like the middle two movements of Symphony 19 for Band transcribed for string orchestra.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on May 02, 2018, 07:51:43 AM
Haven't heard it for ages but that will be rectified soon!

No.21 is arguably the greatest of them all. The longest and shortest (6 and 21) are my favourites although 3,5,8,11,12,15,16,17, 22, 23,24,25 and 27 rate highly as well. I like the middle two movements of Symphony 19 for Band transcribed for string orchestra.

I have the Svetlanov complete set and like most of the interpretations. Not his 9 though. The first movement is ponderously slow. Have a live performance by Edward Downes and the BBC Phil that is much better. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2018, 10:23:03 AM
I have the Svetlanov complete set and like most of the interpretations. Not his 9 though. The first movement is ponderously slow. Have a live performance by Edward Downes and the BBC Phil that is much better.
Ok I'll try to fish out the Downes recording.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 08, 2018, 07:29:23 AM
As I think Jeffrey will agree, the Morton Gould recording of Symphony 21 beats all the alternatives.  It's comparatively fast, and just utterly cohesive, seamless, and inexorable, with perfect ensemble.  As compelling a Miaskovsky recording as there is in my judgment, and essential listening for all Miaskovskians, - especially so if you're an enthusiast for this work.  Stylistically the very antithesis of Svetlanov (which I like very much too, however).  For Symphony 22 there's also a Northern Flowers recording that I find preferable to Svetlanov, - slower, better played, and in much better sound (Svetlanov's 22 was among the oldest of his cycle, I believe).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 09, 2018, 01:07:47 PM
As I think Jeffrey will agree, the Morton Gould recording of Symphony 21 beats all the alternatives.  It's comparatively fast, and just utterly cohesive, seamless, and inexorable, with perfect ensemble.  As compelling a Miaskovsky recording as there is in my judgment, and essential listening for all Miaskovskians, - especially so if you're an enthusiast for this work.  Stylistically the very antithesis of Svetlanov (which I like very much too, however).  For Symphony 22 there's also a Northern Flowers recording that I find preferable to Svetlanov, - slower, better played, and in much better sound (Svetlanov's 22 was among the oldest of his cycle, I believe).

Greg is absolutely right about that Morton Gould Chicago SO recording of the poetic 21st Symphony which is in a class of its own. I was so happy to see it released on CD in a mini-version of the attractively colourful RCA LP sleeve (and alongside its original LP partner Rimsky Korsakov's 'Antar') in a Morton Gould boxed set. I had been waiting for this to appear on CD for decades.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on May 11, 2018, 07:45:40 PM
Greg is absolutely right about that Morton Gould Chicago SO recording of the poetic 21st Symphony which is in a class of its own. I was so happy to see it released on CD in a mini-version of the attractively colourful RCA LP sleeve (and alongside its original LP partner Rimsky Korsakov's 'Antar') in a Morton Gould boxed set. I had been waiting for this to appear on CD for decades.

It's not just a great recording of a Miaskovsky symphony, it's one of the greatest recordings of anything.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2018, 02:06:35 AM
It's not just a great recording of a Miaskovsky symphony, it's one of the greatest recordings of anything.

It does have a very special atmosphere - I agree.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on May 14, 2018, 06:47:24 PM
I'm revisiting a symphony that impressed me very much the first time I heard it, and right now is delighting me again: the Symphony No. 22 Symphony-Ballad, an authentic war symphony (I'm wanting to hear the Merikanto's symphony 2 next (related to war, too)). It's a solid single-movement symphony, imbued with the strength of a battletank, immensely haunting, a poem for bravery. The conducting is under Svetlanov (from the old box set).

It's a great symphony, for sure. I especially like the expansive cello theme in the first movement and the "cavalry charge" of the trumpets in the finale. Merikanto's Symphony no. 2 is also great, btw!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 14, 2018, 07:24:24 PM
It's a great symphony, for sure. I especially like the expansive cello theme in the first movement and the "cavalry charge" of the trumpets in the finale. Merikanto's Symphony no. 2 is also great, btw!

I can't do anything but agree. It has a sort of epic atmosphere that I find so appealing. The ending (with the 'cavalry charge') happens a bit sudden, yet effective after all.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 16, 2018, 12:33:29 PM
Today I started listening to the 13 string quartets, especifically with the Nr. 1. I didn't expect a so bitter and lugubrious work, rather pessimistic and dissonant. I wonder what inspired Miaskovsky to write his 1st quartet in this way. I think it's a very strong and serious work which I liked very much.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 16, 2018, 01:14:40 PM
Today I started listening to the 13 string quartets, especifically with the Nr. 1. I didn't expect a so bitter and lugubrious work, rather pessimistic and dissonant. I wonder what inspired Miaskovsky to write his 1st quartet in this way. I think it's a very strong and serious work which I liked very much.

At the other end 13 is my favourite - very moving and memorable.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: schnittkease on July 16, 2018, 07:45:22 PM
At the other end 13 is my favourite - very moving and memorable.

Ditto. While Myaskovsky was able to produce masterpieces in a more conservative vein, it's unfortunate that he (in Boris Schwarz' words) "retreated into safe conventionality" - a sizeable loss, but at least he didn't suffer the same fate as Mosolov or Popov.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 16, 2018, 09:39:37 PM
Ditto. While Myaskovsky was able to produce masterpieces in a more conservative vein, it's unfortunate that he (in Boris Schwarz' words) "retreated into safe conventionality" - a sizeable loss, but at least he didn't suffer the same fate as Mosolov or Popov.

I don't know so much about Mosolov apart from the famous 'Iron Foundry' but Popov is a very tragic figure who drank himself to death. His phantasmagoric First Symphony is IMHO one of the only works which can stand alongside Shostakovich's 4th Symphony (Weinberg's 5th Symphony is the other one I have in mind). His Symphony 2 'Motherland' although more conventional is very moving in its wartime context and the last one No.6 is genuinely tragic with its references to Boris Godunov at the end.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 20, 2018, 05:08:46 PM
At the other end 13 is my favourite - very moving and memorable.

I'm making my way through the quartets. I've listened to the 5th one (and my favorite) thus far. I can feel a strong mix of sentiments and emotions, many of them being pessimistic and desolate, but at the end of the day the works have been engaging.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 20, 2018, 09:24:50 PM
I'm making my way through the quartets. I've listened to the 5th one (and my favorite) thus far. I can feel a strong mix of sentiments and emotions, many of them being pessimistic and desolate, but at the end of the day the works have been engaging.

Pleased to hear this Cesar - makes me want to listen to them again. I always tend to listen to No. 13 but will especially look out for No. 5.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 22, 2018, 09:43:13 AM
Pleased to hear this Cesar - makes me want to listen to them again. I always tend to listen to No. 13 but will especially look out for No. 5.

I'm realizing they are worth listening with each listen with no doubts. I'm looking forward to listening to the 13th.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 08, 2018, 12:34:55 PM
The otherwise, as far as I'm aware, unrecorded, Violin Sonata (1947) is a major discovery as far as I'm concerned. I can't understand why it's not as well known (or at least as well recorded) as Miaskovsky's cello sonatas, string quartets or violin and cello concertos. It's melodic and highly approachable with memorable thematic material. Apparently the self-critical composer found it awkward and intractable which might explain its neglect. This fine CD should help to make it much better known. It dates from the period of his 25th Symphony, considered one of his finest symphonies:

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: torut on September 08, 2018, 04:03:10 PM
The otherwise, as far as I'm aware, unrecorded, Violin Sonata (1947) is a major discovery as far as I'm concerned. I can't understand why it's not as well known ( or at least as well recorded) as Miaskovsky's cello sonatas, string quartets or violin and cello concertos. It's melodic and highly approachable with memorable thematic material. Apparently the self-critical composer found it awkward and intractable which might explain its neglect. This fine CD should help to make it much better known. It dates from the period of his 25th Symphony, considered one of his finest symphonies:



I didn't know about this work. Thank you for posting it. I downloaded the album and just listened to the Myaskovsky's piece. The first movement is very melodic, and the lively 2nd movement is captivating. The composition is nice, but to be honest, the violin's vibrato is a bit too much for me. Anyway, this release is a good news.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 08, 2018, 10:04:44 PM
I didn't know about this work. Thank you for posting it. I downloaded the album and just listened to the Myaskovsky's piece. The first movement is very melodic, and the lively 2nd movement is captivating. The composition is nice, but to be honest, the violin's vibrato is a bit too much for me. Anyway, this release is a good news.
I'm glad that you enjoyed it despite the vibrato. I listened to the Shebalin yesterday with much pleasure as well. Yes, I especially like the first movement of the Miaskovsky but thoroughly enjoyed the whole work - a nice discovery.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: torut on September 09, 2018, 02:09:23 PM
I'm glad that you enjoyed it despite the vibrato. I listened to the Shebalin yesterday with much pleasure as well. Yes, I especially like the first movement of the Miaskovsky but thoroughly enjoyed the whole work - a nice discovery.

I am mostly listening to early and contemporary music recently, and perhaps that is the reason I don't get used to this style. But I agree that Shebalin is very good. It is a substantial work, no less than Myaskovsky, and much better than Nechaev (IMO).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 09, 2018, 10:10:16 PM
I am mostly listening to early and contemporary music recently, and perhaps that is the reason I don't get used to this style. But I agree that Shebalin is very good. It is a substantial work, no less than Myaskovsky, and much better than Nechaev (IMO).
Shebalin was a fine composer. Symphony 1 and 5 in particular of those I know. I haven't heard the Nechaev yet. Shebalin's 5th Symphony is in memory of his teacher Miaskovsky and No.1 shows the influence of NM.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roy Bland on June 02, 2019, 01:09:01 PM
I can't understand why Myaskovsky's cycle of symphonies doesn't follow chronological criterion so we could follow artistic path of composer:
https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.573988
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 02, 2019, 08:32:53 PM
I can't understand why Myaskovsky's cycle of symphonies doesn't follow chronological criterion so we could follow artistic path of composer:
https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.573988
Interesting looking release though - 'Ural Youth Orchestra'. Wasn't aware of it and thanks for posting it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on June 03, 2019, 02:44:25 AM
I can't understand why Myaskovsky's cycle of symphonies doesn't follow chronological criterion so we could follow artistic path of composer:
https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.573988


Because No. 2 wouldn't fit on a single CD with No. 1, and they've got to fill it with something, so they might as well kill two birds with one stone and include one of the shorter symphonies. I'd rather this than just No. 1 on its own.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 03, 2019, 08:01:41 AM
Because No. 2 wouldn't fit on a single CD with No. 1, and they've got to fill it with something, so they might as well kill two birds with one stone and include one of the shorter symphonies. I'd rather this than just No. 1 on its own.
Good point. Olympia coupled 1 and 25 from opposite ends of his career.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on June 03, 2019, 10:54:18 AM
Something that I noticed, and idk if it's in line with the actual no. of movements in the symphony, but Nos. 2 & 3, in the Svetlanov recordings, are both cast in two movements. In No. 2, they are 20 and 25 minutes respectively, and in No. 3, 13 and 33 minutes. Making the "finale" (?) of No. 3 one of the longer movements in the symphonic repertoire.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on July 16, 2019, 11:52:49 PM
Interesting looking new release.
I have the Ural PO's excellent recording of Myaskovsky's 6th Symphony but I wonder what the Youth Orchestra will be like:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vers la flamme on August 12, 2019, 02:49:54 PM
I have been dipping my toes into Myaskovsky's music a bit, his 13th string quartet in A minor as well as some of his earlier piano sonatas, from this set, which I picked up as a download for dirt cheap:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71l7XbfUW1L._SS500_.jpg)

A particularly beautiful work is the Prelude and Rondo-Sonata, op.58, aka "Song & Rhapsody". But I also love the 1st sonata with its fugato first movement. Overall, though, I must say that my favorite of the works I've heard thus far is the aforementioned string quartet.

I believe the next step from here would be his symphonies, as this is what he is most acclaimed for. If anyone here can recommend me a good place to start with those, I would greatly appreciate it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on August 12, 2019, 03:09:57 PM
Miaskovsky is a very good symphony composer, though there are some of them that are more diffuse than others to be honest. The Nos. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 5, 6, 8, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19 are the ones I consider the best ones out of the 27. The group of 21-27 would be a good starting point, they represent Miaskovsky in his utmost essence.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on August 12, 2019, 06:14:05 PM
Nos. 16, 21, & 27 would be my top three choices.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 12, 2019, 11:25:58 PM
I have been dipping my toes into Myaskovsky's music a bit, his 13th string quartet in A minor as well as some of his earlier piano sonatas, from this set, which I picked up as a download for dirt cheap:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71l7XbfUW1L._SS500_.jpg)

A particularly beautiful work is the Prelude and Rondo-Sonata, op.58, aka "Song & Rhapsody". But I also love the 1st sonata with its fugato first movement. Overall, though, I must say that my favorite of the works I've heard thus far is the aforementioned string quartet.

I believe the next step from here would be his symphonies, as this is what he is most acclaimed for. If anyone here can recommend me a good place to start with those, I would greatly appreciate it.

The middle movement on the Sonatine, included in this set, is especially moving, in Miaskovsky's classic gloomy way IMO. My favourite of the sonatas in No.5 it has a lovely, memorable, noble, Russian-sounding tune in the last movement. It's on the same disc as the Sonatine.

As for the symphonies, my favourites are 3,6,12,15,16,17,21,23,24,25 and 27 although I largely agree with Cesar and Greg above. I think that 21 is a good place to start - it is concise, poetic and eloquent and the epic No. 6 is perhaps the greatest. The valedictory, last ditch No. 27 has to be heard as well. Do report back and let us know what you think. The Piano Sonata No.5 is my favourite - it has a highly memorable tune in the last movement.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on August 13, 2019, 12:09:49 AM
Something that I noticed, and idk if it's in line with the actual no. of movements in the symphony, but Nos. 2 & 3, in the Svetlanov recordings, are both cast in two movements. In No. 2, they are 20 and 25 minutes respectively, and in No. 3, 13 and 33 minutes. Making the "finale" (?) of No. 3 one of the longer movements in the symphonic repertoire.
No. 3 is in two movements of 20 and 25 minutes each. No. 2 is in three movements (Allegro, Molto sostenuto, Allegro con fuoco) with the middle movement being the longest; the movement break is pretty obvious when you listen to the recording. In any case the Symphony-Ballade (No. 22) is even longer, and a single unbroken movement, at about 36 minutes.

I honestly don't have a problem with listening to the Myaskovsky symphonies in order although my favourites tend to be in the first half of his output (3, 5, 10, 11, 13)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 13, 2019, 12:17:11 AM
No. 3 is in two movements of 20 and 25 minutes each. No. 2 is in three movements (Allegro, Molto sostenuto, Allegro con fuoco) with the middle movement being the longest; the movement break is pretty obvious when you listen to the recording. In any case the Symphony-Ballade (No. 22) is even longer, and a single unbroken movement, at about 36 minutes.

I honestly don't have a problem with listening to the Myaskovsky symphonies in order although my favourites tend to be in the first half of his output (3, 5, 10, 11, 13)

Although I only included 3 (which I rate very highly) in my list above I also like 5 and 11 and am just getting to appreciate the more modernist (IMO) 13 which is included on the new Naxos release.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on August 13, 2019, 12:38:20 AM
Although I only included 3 (which I rate very highly) in my list above I also like 5 and 11 and am just getting to appreciate the more modernist (IMO) 13 which is included on the new Naxos release.
No. 3 is a symphony in the mold of Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy, although in my view Myaskovsky's craftsmanship exceeds Scriabin's even if his ideas may be less brilliant. The final funeral march is my favourite passage among his symphonies I think.

Nos. 5 and 11 are very "Russian school" a la the Mighty Kuchka, in an updated, more modern style, and both have beautiful slow movements. To be honest the slow movements are pretty consistently the best parts of Myaskovsky's symphonies, from No.1 to No.27 (the latter with Myaskovsky's favourite elevato marking). 10 and 13 are his other major attempts at the Scriabinesque style and probably his most individual works.

I will admit to also really enjoying the symphony for wind band (No. 19) and probably a few of the other later ones that aren't coming to mind right away, but they are certainly much more "neoclassical".
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 13, 2019, 02:59:06 AM
No. 3 is a symphony in the mold of Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy, although in my view Myaskovsky's craftsmanship exceeds Scriabin's even if his ideas may be less brilliant. The final funeral march is my favourite passage among his symphonies I think.

Nos. 5 and 11 are very "Russian school" a la the Mighty Kuchka, in an updated, more modern style, and both have beautiful slow movements. To be honest the slow movements are pretty consistently the best parts of Myaskovsky's symphonies, from No.1 to No.27 (the latter with Myaskovsky's favourite elevato marking). 10 and 13 are his other major attempts at the Scriabinesque style and probably his most individual works.

I will admit to also really enjoying the symphony for wind band (No. 19) and probably a few of the other later ones that aren't coming to mind right away, but they are certainly much more "neoclassical".

Yes, that last movement of Symphony No.3 is quite something, ending in the deepest gloom, something which always appeals to me. It's sometimes compared to the symphony by Cesar Frank.  I really like the version for string orchestra ('Two Pieces for Strings' I think) of the middle movements of Symphony 19. Do you know that version? I'm really getting to appreciate Symphony 13 at the moment although I haven't (yet) bought the new Naxos CD.

Here's the Two Pieces for Strings. I wish I'd bought that fine old EMI/Melodiya LP when it first came out:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=E68o0xf0evA
I find the opening piece very moving and entirely characteristic of the composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 15, 2019, 01:31:56 AM
I was very pleased to find this online: 'Kremlin by Night' (1947). Much as I love the music of this composer, apart from the choral end of Symphony No.6, I don't think that I have heard any of his choral music, which seems largely unknown. I can't find any CD or LP featuring it. It's quite a concise work (20 mins) but I found it enchanting, sections of it reminded me of Vaughan Williams and Rachmaninov's 'The Bells' as well as Boris Godonov:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on August 15, 2019, 03:40:10 PM
I was very pleased to find this online: 'Kremlin by Night' (1947). Much as I love the music of this composer, apart from the choral end of Symphony No.6, I don't think that I have heard any of his choral music, which seems largely unknown. I can't find any CD or LP featuring it. It's quite a concise work (20 mins) but I found it enchanting, sections of it reminded me of Vaughan Williams and Rachmaninov's 'The Bells' as well as Boris Godonov:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

This rarity has drawn my attention. I'm gonna check it later. Thanks for sharing it, Jeffrey! The sound quality is decent, fortunately! Checking the comments on the video, there is another rare piece by him: Kirov is with us.

http://www.youtube.com/v/cQSyQgvgYfM
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 31, 2019, 10:40:07 AM
New release of Complete Symphonies:
 :)
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roy Bland on September 01, 2019, 11:14:10 AM
IMHO Symphony n 27 is a masterwork .Its triumphal ending isn't forced as DSCH but is the answer of composer towards illness and
death .I love Fifth of Shebalin for the same reason.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 03, 2019, 01:33:23 AM
IMHO Symphony n 27 is a masterwork .Its triumphal ending isn't forced as DSCH but is the answer of composer towards illness and
death .I love Fifth of Shebalin for the same reason.
I'm totally with you on both counts here. The slow movement of Symphony 27th is one of the most moving I know and I see the finale as a joyous celebration of life; as if Miaskovsky, after the winter, is welcoming the return of spring in full knowledge that he would not be there to see it. Shebalin's 5th Symphony has a sad eloquence which I also find very moving.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on October 04, 2019, 02:00:18 AM
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on October 04, 2019, 03:51:29 AM
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.

The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2019, 03:52:06 AM
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.

I don't think that any of those Marco Polo releases have been transferred to Naxos. The releases of symphonies 1, 13, 24 and 25 are new recordings. I hope that the fine Ural Youth Orchestra go on to record more of the Miaskovsky symphonies. I'm sorry that Kondrashin only recorded symphonies 6 and 15 as far as I'm aware as those performances are in a class of their own IMO although I also rate Alexander Gauk's recordings of symphonies 17 (dedicated to Gauk I think), 19 and 27 (annoyingly never released on CD - it is the most moving of all).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2019, 03:53:16 AM
The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort.
Yes, that's a fine CD.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on October 04, 2019, 04:11:42 AM
The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort.

Ooh, OK! I never expected a glowing recommendation here. Early Marco Polo/Naxos is very hit and miss, by most accounts. I'll keep this in mind.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2019, 10:09:37 AM
Ooh, OK! I never expected a glowing recommendation here. Early Marco Polo/Naxos is very hit and miss, by most accounts. I'll keep this in mind.

I enjoyed Stankovsky's version of Symphony 6 on Marco Polo - very underrated I think:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 13, 2020, 01:10:48 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/xtdJvVgM_8jhofLop5lzKmn7Jtw=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-12863453-1543410593-9190.jpeg.jpg)

What an impressive symphony the 11th is! The arresting opening which grips immediately with a motif which reminded me of the music of "Jaws" with the great white circling. In three movements, all very Russian, the first two have serious things to say and in the finale Miaskovsky lets his guard down just a bit, as always he keeps his emotions in check but they are there all right!

 A birthday on the horizon. The Alto set may give some compensation for being a year older. :(
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 14, 2020, 06:00:21 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/xtdJvVgM_8jhofLop5lzKmn7Jtw=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-12863453-1543410593-9190.jpeg.jpg)

What an impressive symphony the 11th is! The arresting opening which grips immediately with a motif which reminded me of the music of "Jaws" with the great white circling. In three movements, all very Russian, the first two have serious things to say and in the finale Miaskovsky lets his guard down just a bit, as always he keeps his emotions in check but they are there all right!

 A birthday on the horizon. The Alto set may give some compensation for being a year older. :(

Oddly enough I recently bought that LP. It is one that I much regretted not buying when it first appeared. The Two Pieces for String Orchestra (adapted from the middle movements of Symphony No.19) are a marvellous bonus. I agree with your comments.
I'm glad that your getting the boxed set for your birthday Lol. Don't forget to read the notes for symphonies 17, 21 and 23.  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Papy Oli on January 14, 2020, 06:09:08 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/xtdJvVgM_8jhofLop5lzKmn7Jtw=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-12863453-1543410593-9190.jpeg.jpg)

What an impressive symphony the 11th is! The arresting opening which grips immediately with a motif which reminded me of the music of "Jaws" with the great white circling. In three movements, all very Russian, the first two have serious things to say and in the finale Miaskovsky lets his guard down just a bit, as always he keeps his emotions in check but they are there all right!

 A birthday on the horizon. The Alto set may give some compensation for being a year older. :(

Lol,
If you want to sample it cheaply, you can get the set as downloads for £6.00 here :

https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov?variant=31095292330045 (https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov?variant=31095292330045)

They sell the boxset at £36.00

https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/copy-of-myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov?_pos=2&_sid=b430acb8f&_ss=r (https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/copy-of-myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov?_pos=2&_sid=b430acb8f&_ss=r)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 14, 2020, 08:53:06 AM
Jeffrey: I have not come across Veronika Dudarova before. Has he only conducted the 11th?

Oliver: Stuck in the past I don't partake in downloads. For me CD is the new technology. :) That is an amazing price for a new set. Second-hand on eBay is more expensive. Thanks. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Papy Oli on January 14, 2020, 09:02:38 AM
Oliver: Stuck in the past I don't partake in downloads. For me CD is the new technology. :) That is an amazing price for a new set. Second-hand on eBay is more expensive. Thanks.

Fair enough. I used downloads some years back on e-music as a cheap discovery tool but always been keener on CD myself, although at that price, Myaskovsky, who i don't know the music of at all, is a cheap temptation. Which symphonies should I sample first to have a good idea of his sound ?

FYI, the set is only slightly dearer on AMZ UK at £39 - £40 New.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on January 14, 2020, 11:31:37 AM
Jeffrey: I have not come across Veronika Dudarova before. Has he only conducted the 11th?

She also recorded Symphony No. 6.  This recording includes the chorus, which was omitted in the Svetlanov recording.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91U9i5PGmhL._SX522_.jpg)

https://www.amazon.com/Symphony-6-Myaskovsky/dp/B000003W9T

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 14, 2020, 11:52:36 AM
She also recorded Symphony No. 6.  This recording includes the chorus, which was omitted in the Svetlanov recording.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91U9i5PGmhL._SX522_.jpg)

https://www.amazon.com/Symphony-6-Myaskovsky/dp/B000003W9T

Yes, Daverz is right. Her recording of Symphony No.6 is solid enough but I think that the Stankovsky on Marco Polo is better.   I've always thought that was a rather underrated performance. Nothing wrong with the Dudarova and it is usually available much more cheaply than the old Olympia Svetlanov series (now reissued in the Alto boxed set). Best of all is Kondrashin's earlier performance shortly to be reissued on Alto.
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 15, 2020, 12:44:30 AM
Fair enough. I used downloads some years back on e-music as a cheap discovery tool but always been keener on CD myself, although at that price, Myaskovsky, who i don't know the music of at all, is a cheap temptation. Which symphonies should I sample first to have a good idea of his sound ?

FYI, the set is only slightly dearer on AMZ UK at £39 - £40 New.

Jeffrey is the one to answer that.

On order. Excellent deal for fourteen CDs.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on January 15, 2020, 05:24:37 AM
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81KLe2t6%2BQL._SX522_.jpg)(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91VyScGdUcL._SL1500_.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo

https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IvQAAOSwHLFa63Jv/s-l1600.jpg)

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 15, 2020, 09:56:43 AM
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81KLe2t6%2BQL._SX522_.jpg)(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91VyScGdUcL._SL1500_.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo

https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IvQAAOSwHLFa63Jv/s-l1600.jpg)

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html
Thanks. They are both good but the earlier one is very special IMO. Above all the crucial flute episode in the Trio of the Scherzo is taken much too fast in the later recording which, in my opinion, robs it of its impact.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 15, 2020, 10:01:24 AM
Fair enough. I used downloads some years back on e-music as a cheap discovery tool but always been keener on CD myself, although at that price, Myaskovsky, who i don't know the music of at all, is a cheap temptation. Which symphonies should I sample first to have a good idea of his sound ?

FYI, the set is only slightly dearer on AMZ UK at £39 - £40 New.
Greetings Olivier!

I would suggest symphonies 3,5,6,8 (slow movement), 11, 12, 13 (more modernist), 15, 16 and 17 (all excellent) 21 (possibly the finest along with 6 and 17), 21-25 and 27 ( a very moving, valedictory work written under the shadow of death). I'd start with 21 which is most concise, poetic and approachable. There is a fine old Unicorn CD which it is usually possible to pick up cheaply, second-hand, online:
(http://)
PS I note that I've recommended sixteen of them! Let's narrow it down further (3,6, 15, 17, 21, 23, which is very tuneful and approachable, 24, 27).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Papy Oli on January 15, 2020, 11:33:33 AM
Greetings Olivier!

I would suggest symphonies 3,5,6,8 (slow movement), 11, 12, 13 (more modernist), 15, 16 and 17 (all excellent) 21 (possibly the finest along with 6 and 17), 21-25 and 27 ( a very moving, valedictory work written under the shadow of death). I'd start with 21 which is most concise, poetic and approachable. There is a fine old Unicorn CD which it is usually possible to pick up cheaply, second-hand, online:
(http://)
PS I note that I've recommended sixteen of them! Let's narrow it down further (3,6, 15, 17, 21, 23, which is very tuneful and approachable, 24, 27).

Thank you Jeffrey for the numerous recommendations. I'll check some in due course.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 15, 2020, 11:12:36 PM
Thank you Jeffrey for the numerous recommendations. I'll check some in due course.
Your very welcome Olivier. Apart from the symphonies I'd recommend the Cello Concerto, Violin Concerto, String Quartet 13, the Sonatine and Piano Sonata No.5. Sadly his cantata 'The Kremlin by Night' has never been released on a recording as far as I'm aware although it is on You Tube:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 20, 2020, 06:07:41 AM
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81KLe2t6%2BQL._SX522_.jpg)(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91VyScGdUcL._SL1500_.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo

https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IvQAAOSwHLFa63Jv/s-l1600.jpg)

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html

February 2020 release:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 21, 2020, 12:53:30 AM
Miaskovsky: 3rd Symphony.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/altoalc3141.jpg?1565619382)

There is so much to look out for in the 3rd, not least the subterranean bass of the opening which later makes reappearances. Every discussion on Russian orchestras always comments on "fruity" brass (yawn), well, listen to the delicacy of the string playing during a magical peacefull interlude of an otherwise mostly turbulent symphony at the end of the first movement. The Tchaikovsky -ish melody of the second movement (half really). I love a funeral march, and there is a great one to finish the work off - who for though? The 3rd does seem to my ears a program symphony, and 1914 were grave times in Russia and Europe as a whole. The excellent notes claim Miaskovsky was suffering depression when he composed the 3rd so my guess is that this quite long funeral march that stutters to a close, is for himself.

A mention of the sonics as Russian recordings can be iffy. This is very fine and well done to Paul Arden-Taylor who has achieved a fine mastering result for Alto. My only slight concern is that this 3rd is one of only a few of the set that Svetlanov recorded in the 1960's the main body of the set are DDD recordings from the 1990's. Fingers crossed the later recordings are at least as good. I will soon be finding out! 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on January 21, 2020, 01:04:43 AM
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 21, 2020, 01:46:35 AM
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:



That's very tempting I must say.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 21, 2020, 01:52:22 AM
Miaskovsky: 3rd Symphony.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/altoalc3141.jpg?1565619382)

There is so much to look out for in the 3rd, not least the subterranean bass of the opening which later makes reappearances. Every discussion on Russian orchestras always comments on "fruity" brass (yawn), well, listen to the delicacy of the string playing during a magical peacefull interlude of an otherwise mostly turbulent symphony at the end of the first movement. The Tchaikovsky -ish melody of the second movement (half really). I love a funeral march, and there is a great one to finish the work off - who for though? The 3rd does seem to my ears a program symphony, and 1914 were grave times in Russia and Europe as a whole. The excellent notes claim Miaskovsky was suffering depression when he composed the 3rd so my guess is that this quite long funeral march that stutters to a close, is for himself.

A mention of the sonics as Russian recordings can be iffy. This is very fine and well done to Paul Arden-Taylor who has achieved a fine mastering result for Alto. My only slight concern is that this 3rd is one of only a few of the set that Svetlanov recorded in the 1960's the main body of the set are DDD recordings from the 1990's. Fingers crossed the later recordings are at least as good. I will soon be finding out!
I like your analysis of the fine 3rd Symphony Lol. It was one of the first that I got to know, borrowed from the record library. I record my moody late adolescent or early twenties self listening to it over and over again. I seem to recall that the LP notes referred to the 'hero' of the symphony as a noble spirit doomed to disappointment and frustration.'  I'm sure you're right that the hero is Miaskovsky himself, by all accounts a noble and shy individual. That final funeral march ending in nothingness is very powerful.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 21, 2020, 07:20:26 AM
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:



I do have most if not all the string quartets on LP. It is through the encouragement of Jeffrey that I have set out on a symphony odyssey.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on January 21, 2020, 06:17:28 PM
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on January 21, 2020, 06:29:35 PM
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.

It's in this set and sounds fantastic on CD.



I'll also note that the old Ormandy mono recording has made it to CD and digital streaming as part of Sony's Gyorgy Sandor box (since it was coupled with Sandor's Bartok PC3 on LP).

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71KvyevcxKL._SS500_.jpg)

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 21, 2020, 11:22:34 PM
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.

I agree with Greg - it's a very fine performance. I have the Morton Gould box.

This is another fine version of Symphony 21:

'The Art of Eugene Ormandy' 2 CD set on the Biddulph label.

The Gould box reproduces the original, exotic LP sleeve which I like:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on January 22, 2020, 09:30:59 AM
Credit to Gould, of course, - but in my mind what this recording shows more than anything is how marvelous the really elite Orchestras could likely make many other of Miaskovsky's scores sound were they given the opportunity.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 22, 2020, 09:40:45 AM
Credit to Gould, of course, - but in my mind what this recording shows more than anything is how marvelous the really elite Orchestras could likely make many more of Miaskovsky's scores sound were they given the opportunity.
Yes, and of course Symphony No.21 was written for the Chicago SO.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on January 23, 2020, 06:22:09 AM
I picked up a disc of Myaskovsky works, mainly for chamber orchestra today. Serenade, Op. 32/1, Sinfonietta, Op. 32/2, Lyric Concertino, Op. 32/3 and Salutatory Overture, Op. 48

I'm curious what connect those three Opus 32 works, for them to be collected together like this. They're all scored for different ensembles, so it can't be that.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 23, 2020, 07:51:12 AM
I picked up a disc of Myaskovsky works, mainly for chamber orchestra today. Serenade, Op. 32/1, Sinfonietta, Op. 32/2, Lyric Concertino, Op. 32/3 and Salutatory Overture, Op. 48

I'm curious what connect those three Opus 32 works, for them to be collected together like this. They're all scored for different ensembles, so it can't be that.

I think that Miaskovsky composed them at more or less the same time - whilst lying in a field! I'll check. The Lyric Concertino is especially good.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 24, 2020, 01:27:35 AM
5th Symphony conducted by Svetanov.

Reading the excellent notes by Per Skans, with the Svetlanov set, Miaskovsky's 5th was a break-through work for him in both Russia and abroad. I have also read in other places that this symphony is his most approachable. This does not chime with my reaction, as I found the first pastoral movement distinctly odd. Meandering, distant and uneventful although a beautiful theme permeates which is playing in your head long after it is all over. This movement is my problem with the work so out of desperation I listened to Ivanov's recording on YT. Despite a less then stellar recording Ivanov brings out the delicacy and beauty of this music which in my opinion Svetlanov fails to do. Svetlanov is not helped by a distant recording which results in loss of detail in essentially quiet and peaceful music but more importantly he is too slow.

The timings of the first movement -   

Svetlanov: 14.39

Ivanov: 11.29

For a single conductor to get every one right in such a large body of work as Miaskovsky symphonies is impossible.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 24, 2020, 02:15:09 AM
5th Symphony conducted by Svetanov.

Reading the excellent notes by Per Skans, with the Svetlanov set, Miaskovsky's 5th was a break-through work for him in both Russia and abroad. I have also read in other places that this symphony is his most approachable. This does not chime with my reaction, as I found the first pastoral movement distinctly odd. Meandering, distant and uneventful although a beautiful theme permeates which is playing in your head long after it is all over. This movement is my problem with the work so out of desperation I listened to Ivanov's recording on YT. Despite a less then stellar recording Ivanov brings out the delicacy and beauty of this music which in my opinion Svetlanov fails to do. Svetlanov is not helped by a distant recording which results in loss of detail in essentially quiet and peaceful music but more importantly he is too slow.

The timings of the first movement -   

Svetlanov: 14.39

Ivanov: 11.29

For a single conductor to get every one right in such a large body of work as Miaskovsky symphonies is impossible.
Interesting analysis Lol. The 6th Symphony is in a different league altogether IMO.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 24, 2020, 02:38:41 AM
Interesting analysis Lol. The 6th Symphony is in a different league altogether IMO.

Yes, looking forward to the "epic" 6th, Jeffrey.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 26, 2020, 02:29:50 AM
I picked up a disc of Myaskovsky works, mainly for chamber orchestra today. Serenade, Op. 32/1, Sinfonietta, Op. 32/2, Lyric Concertino, Op. 32/3 and Salutatory Overture, Op. 48

I'm curious what connect those three Opus 32 works, for them to be collected together like this. They're all scored for different ensembles, so it can't be that.


'Myaskovsky told the conductor Nikolai Malko that he composed the 27 themes which feature in the Serenade, Sinfonietta and Lyric Concertino during the course of one day, as he lay in the grass in a forest!'
(Notes to Alto CD ALC 1042.

The three works were, unusually, the only works composed by the composer between 1927 and 1931.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 29, 2020, 02:08:44 AM
6th Symphony conducted by Svetlanov.

The symphonic and string quartet Miaskovsky are different animals, unlike Shostakovich who is cut from the same cloth. After hearing 1, 3, 5, and most of all 6th I get a strong impression these are autobiographical works. Possibly mistaken, but I have thought his string quartets as purely musical the result of a composer's musical mind. The 6th is about relentless drive and agitation. Living under the Soviet yoke in the 1920's must have been unimaginably hard and this is reflected in the music. Miaskovsky is an optimist not a pessimist, and through all this emotional intensity the symphony has to end well and he pulls this off with great skill by incorporating the theme from the (lovely) slow movement into a finale coda. A symphony of pain, and not a little anger, closes with serene blissful peace and well being. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 29, 2020, 02:29:18 AM
6th Symphony conducted by Svetlanov.

The symphonic and string quartet Miaskovsky are different animals, unlike Shostakovich who is cut from the same cloth. After hearing 1, 3, 5, and most of all 6th I get a strong impression these are autobiographical works. Possibly mistaken, but I have thought his string quartets as purely musical the result of a composer's musical mind. The 6th is about relentless drive and agitation. Living under the Soviet yoke in the 1920's must have been unimaginably hard and this is reflected in the music. Miaskovsky is an optimist not a pessimist, and through all this emotional intensity the symphony has to end well and he pulls this off with great skill by incorporating the theme from the (lovely) slow movement into a finale coda. A symphony of pain, and not a little anger, closes with serene blissful peace and well being.
Very nice analysis Lol. Wait until you hear the (IMO) even more moving version with chorus! I think the impact of his father's murder by a Bolshevik soldier cannot have failed to influence Miaskovsky at that time and he himself said that the opening of the second movement was related to visiting the deserted flat of his deceased aunt, who had looked after him since the death of his mother when he was nine, on a freezing cold day and had heard the wind whistling through the trees. He himself said that the jagged chords which open the work relate to hearing a Soviet official shouting 'Death, Death to the Enemies of the Revolution' at the end of a meeting shortly after the attempted assassination of Lenin. Obviously these literal interpretations can only take us so far but I agree that the symphony reflects an especially turbulent part of Russian history.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on January 30, 2020, 01:10:31 AM
Very nice analysis Lol. Wait until you hear the (IMO) even more moving version with chorus! I think the impact of his father's murder by a Bolshevik soldier cannot have failed to influence Miaskovsky at that time and he himself said that the opening of the second movement was related to visiting the deserted flat of his deceased aunt, who had looked after him since the death of his mother when he was nine, on a freezing cold day and had heard the wind whistling through the trees. He himself said that the jagged chords which open the work relate to hearing a Soviet official shouting 'Death, Death to the Enemies of the Revolution' at the end of a meeting shortly after the attempted assassination of Lenin. Obviously these literal interpretations can only take us so far but I agree that the symphony reflects an especially turbulent part of Russian history.

I read of his father's murder in the notes, Jeffrey. Shocking! Fascinating to read what you say of the second movement which in my view is the best. Not being clear on where the chorus actually appears my initial guess was 3rd movement - wrong, then 1st - wrong again. ??? I now understand it to be the finale, I am fast running out of options! :)

Listened to the 6th SQ yesterday not that it has any relevance date-wise to the same numbered symphony. A gorgeous string quartet.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Christo on January 30, 2020, 02:58:12 AM
The complete Svetlanov symphonies set now for 45 euros at JPC.de:  https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/nikolai-miaskowsky-symphonien-nr-1-27/hnum/9456173
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 30, 2020, 10:30:58 AM
I read of his father's murder in the notes, Jeffrey. Shocking! Fascinating to read what you say of the second movement which in my view is the best. Not being clear on where the chorus actually appears my initial guess was 3rd movement - wrong, then 1st - wrong again. ??? I now understand it to be the finale, I am fast running out of options! :)

Listened to the 6th SQ yesterday not that it has any relevance date-wise to the same numbered symphony. A gorgeous string quartet.

Yes, I contributed that bit to the notes!  Must listen to the 6th Quartet. Thanks for the recommendation Lol. Yes, the chorus come in right at the end singing a tradional Russian funeral hymn. I find it very moving (as you will see  ;D).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on January 30, 2020, 04:34:25 PM
I think that Miaskovsky composed them at more or less the same time - whilst lying in a field! I'll check. The Lyric Concertino is especially good.

Indeed, the Lyric Concertino is quite lovely. In its sunny, pastoral disposition it is rather atypical for the composer and took me by surprise at first hearing. It sounds more “English pastoral” than Russian to my ears!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 31, 2020, 12:01:23 AM
Indeed, the Lyric Concertino is quite lovely. In its sunny, pastoral disposition it is rather atypical for the composer and took me by surprise at first hearing. It sounds more “English pastoral” than Russian to my ears!
I agree Kyle. It also has a much darker and deeply felt section as well.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roy Bland on January 31, 2020, 04:55:49 PM
I would recommend colorful  n°23 ,one of few opportunity listening kabardian orchestral music
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on January 31, 2020, 05:52:42 PM
I would recommend colorful  n°23 ,one of few opportunity listening kabardian orchestral music

Oooo, good double bill with the Prokofiev String Quartet No. 2.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 01, 2020, 10:26:56 AM
I would recommend colorful  n°23 ,one of few opportunity listening kabardian orchestral music
Yes, one of my earliest and most pleasurable encounters with the music of NYM, coupled, on LP with the, IMO, terrific First Symphony by Rodion Shchedrin:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on February 03, 2020, 05:24:05 PM
The other day I listened to the Lyric Concertino for the first time following the conversation here. I thought it was undoubtedly charming, if a bit bland. It's not one of his best pieces, but it has something appealing.

On the other hand, I listened to on the radio a work that surprised me but I couldn't recognize. It reminded me a bit of Sibelius's 7th Symphony, don't know why! It was the slow movement from the Symphony No. 20. A lovely and soulful movement whose calm nature I found a bit touching. I liked it a lot.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 04, 2020, 08:08:08 AM
The other day I listened to the Lyric Concertino for the first time following the conversation here. I thought it was undoubtedly charming, if a bit bland. It's not one of his best pieces, but it has something appealing.

On the other hand, I listened to on the radio a work that surprised me but I couldn't recognize. It reminded me a bit of Sibelius's 7th Symphony, don't know why! It was the slow movement from the Symphony No. 20. A lovely and soulful movement whose calm nature I found a bit touching. I liked it a lot.

Interesting Cesar. I hardly know the 20th Symphony so must give it a listen to. I'm very fond of the Lyric Concertino, especially the dark, soulful ostinato section.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 12, 2020, 01:34:56 AM
Miaskovsky : 6th Symphony.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/altoalc1421.jpg?1579105671)

Many thanks directed to our esteemed forum member, Jeffrey, for sending me hot off the press Alto's release of Kondrashin's recording of the Miaskovsky 6th Symphony. A kind and generous gesture, by I might add the author of the notes of this issue. He did ask me to post what I think, so here goes and I will attempt not to sink into inane comments - not many anyway!

1/ Restless urgency interspersed with calm resignation. I have read this as possessing a Tchaikovsky influence something which completely passes me by. If anything the stop-go nature is more Borodin.

2/ The only movement which is not tragic which of course befits a Scherzo. Jaunty and scurrying and great fun - Svetlanov does this movement very well. Amongst this helter-skelter there is a hat tip to Miaskovsky's teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov. An interlude that could have been pulled from Scheherazade.

3/ The slow movement is the most conventional of the three. Serious and heart-felt, predominately played by strings.

4/ I didn't get the full measure of the finale from Svetlanov's recording for some reason. This is a tour de force with a kaleidoscope of colour and themes. The opening is so Respighi I laughed, not plagiarism as NYM is obviously an admirer. This lasts no time and then we are into a Russian knees up (dance) and then, and then, the list is endless. Themes come and go from previous movements and much else. Miaskovsky is a skilful composer, he can, and does, jump from idea to idea seamlessly. After this so far amazing movement NYM throws in the proverbial kitchen sink in the form of a choir! Who sing a French song in a Russian way. The finale coda is pure magic with peace descending with the entry of a harp and (this) listener spending a fleeting moment with the angels. 

I can be obsessive far as sound is concerned and this is typical of a Soviet recording and not the best example either. But oddly less then stellar sonics adds to the authenticity of very Russian music. The likes of Kondrashin and Svenlanov are not with us anymore, they lived and breathed this music. Very much of its time and place and I can't help feeling a modern digital recording by a top orchestra from the West conducted by someone like Rattle (I'm aware of Jarvi's recording but not heard it) would be an act of throwing out the baby with the bathwater.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 12, 2020, 08:42:52 AM
Miaskovsky : 6th Symphony.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/altoalc1421.jpg?1579105671)

Many thanks directed to our esteemed forum member, Jeffrey, for sending me hot off the press Alto's release of Kondrashin's recording of the Miaskovsky 6th Symphony. A kind and generous gesture, by I might add the author of the notes of this issue. He did ask me to post what I think, so here goes and I will attempt not to sink into inane comments - not many anyway!

1/ Restless urgency interspersed with calm resignation. I have read this as possessing a Tchaikovsky influence something which completely passes me by. If anything the stop-go nature is more Borodin.

2/ The only movement which is not tragic which of course befits a Scherzo. Jaunty and scurrying and great fun - Svetlanov does this movement very well. Amongst this helter-skelter there is a hat tip to Miaskovsky's teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov. An interlude that could have been pulled from Scheherazade.

3/ The slow movement is the most conventional of the three. Serious and heart-felt, predominately played by strings.

4/ I didn't get the full measure of the finale from Svetlanov's recording for some reason. This is a tour de force with a kaleidoscope of colour and themes. The opening is so Respighi I laughed, not plagiarism as NYM is obviously an admirer. This lasts no time and then we are into a Russian knees up (dance) and then, and then, the list is endless. Themes come and go from previous movements and much else. Miaskovsky is a skilful composer, he can, and does, jump from idea to idea seamlessly. After this so far amazing movement NYM throws in the proverbial kitchen sink in the form of a choir! Who sing a French song in a Russian way. The finale coda is pure magic with peace descending with the entry of a harp and (this) listener spending a fleeting moment with the angels. 

I can be obsessive far as sound is concerned and this is typical of a Soviet recording and not the best example either. But oddly less then stellar sonics adds to the authenticity of very Russian music. The likes of Kondrashin and Svenlanov are not with us anymore, they lived and breathed this music. Very much of its time and place and I can't help feeling a modern digital recording by a top orchestra from the West conducted by someone like Rattle (I'm aware of Jarvi's recording but not heard it) would be an act of throwing out the baby with the bathwater.
Very interesting analysis Lol. There is a kind of authenticity about those old Soviet recordings which adds to the atmosphere for me. I was very lucky to attend a live performance of the work in London conducted by Vladimir Jurowski whom I had the pleasure of meeting. I wish that the recording was issued on CD. In the rehearsal I recall him requiring the LPO choir to 'sound like Demons from Hell' at the opening of the wailing choir in the fourth movement and telling the ladies of the choir that they needed to sound like 'Russian peasant women'.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on February 12, 2020, 09:02:03 AM
Ordered a copy of Myaskovsky's Cello Concerto coupled with Prokofiev's Symphony-Concerto. Maisky/Russian National Orchestra/Pletnev.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 12, 2020, 10:10:23 AM
Ordered a copy of Myaskovsky's Cello Concerto coupled with Prokofiev's Symphony-Concerto. Maisky/Russian National Orchestra/Pletnev.
The Myaskovsky is a great work. I much prefer it to the Prokofiev.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 13, 2020, 12:55:33 AM
Very interesting analysis Lol. There is a kind of authenticity about those old Soviet recordings which adds to the atmosphere for me. I was very lucky to attend a live performance of the work in London conducted by Vladimir Jurowski whom I had the pleasure of meeting. I wish that the recording was issued on CD. In the rehearsal I recall him requiring the LPO choir to 'sound like Demons from Hell' at the opening of the wailing choir in the fourth movement and telling the ladies of the choir that they needed to sound like 'Russian peasant women'.

I would love to attend a concert of the 6th, or any other Miaskovsky symphony, Jeffrey. In the country of his birth would probably be a step too far - although I did for a Prokofiev ballet - a Prom would be great. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 13, 2020, 01:49:26 AM
I would love to attend a concert of the 6th, or any other Miaskovsky symphony, Jeffrey. In the country of his birth would probably be a step too far - although I did for a Prokofiev ballet - a Prom would be great.
Apparently it was performed in Manchester recently Lol.

https://seenandheard-international.com/2020/02/sinaisky-and-the-bbc-phil-look-east-from-manchester/

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 17, 2020, 01:48:17 PM
8th Symphony.

Right from the opening bars this symphony does not have a bad word to say, and I love that. More contentment then unbridled joy. Miaskovsky shows this work as another side of his nature and I find this most attractive. All four movements are excellent but the third is something else, for those unconvinced of the composer listen to this movement on YT. A critic described it as “Delius of the Steppes”, I beg to differ, if Delius has written anything as beautiful I have yet to hear it.

The sound of this set I find so far as variable. Svetlanov’s 6th pretty poor, no.5 OK and no.3 excellent. This, the 8th, is thankfully as good as the 3rd and such beautiful orchestration deserves nothing less.

I’m not claiming this the best so far, I believe that to be the 6th. But the 8th is the one that gave the most pleasure to this listener.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on February 17, 2020, 02:05:18 PM
8th Symphony.

Right from the opening bars this symphony does not have a bad word to say, and I love that. More contentment then unbridled joy. Miaskovsky shows this work as another side of his nature and I find this most attractive. All four movements are excellent but the third is something else, for those unconvinced of the composer listen to this movement on YT. A critic described it as “Delius of the Steppes”, I beg to differ, if Delius has written anything as beautiful I have yet to hear it.

The sound of this set I find so far as variable. Svetlanov’s 6th pretty poor, no.5 OK and no.3 excellent. This, the 8th, is thankfully as good as the 3rd and such beautiful orchestration deserves nothing less.

I’m not claiming this the best so far, I believe that to be the 6th. But the 8th is the one that gave the most pleasure to this listener.

The 9th is my favorite among the early ones but, alas, in the Svetlanov performance the first movement is so lugubrious that I couldn't get through it. It starts out grim but ends optimistically.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 17, 2020, 02:32:07 PM
8th Symphony.

Right from the opening bars this symphony does not have a bad word to say, and I love that. More contentment then unbridled joy. Miaskovsky shows this work as another side of his nature and I find this most attractive. All four movements are excellent but the third is something else, for those unconvinced of the composer listen to this movement on YT. A critic described it as “Delius of the Steppes”, I beg to differ, if Delius has written anything as beautiful I have yet to hear it.

The sound of this set I find so far as variable. Svetlanov’s 6th pretty poor, no.5 OK and no.3 excellent. This, the 8th, is thankfully as good as the 3rd and such beautiful orchestration deserves nothing less.

I’m not claiming this the best so far, I believe that to be the 6th. But the 8th is the one that gave the most pleasure to this listener.
That slow movement of No.8 is very special and I'm glad you enjoyed it Lol. There is also a recording of the work on Marco Polo which is where I first discovered it. Stankovsky conducted the first recording of Symphony No.6 to be released on CD and I rate that version very highly although some others don't. I much prefer it to the (perfectly serviceable) recording by Dudarova for example.
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 17, 2020, 02:37:39 PM
The 9th is my favorite among the early ones but, alas, in the Svetlanov performance the first movement is so lugubrious that I couldn't get through it. It starts out grim but ends optimistically.
Must listen to No.9 again. I think that Edward Downes recorded it for Marco Polo.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 18, 2020, 12:30:26 AM
The 9th is my favorite among the early ones but, alas, in the Svetlanov performance the first movement is so lugubrious that I couldn't get through it. It starts out grim but ends optimistically.

Next up is 11th I think. As Svetlanov is the 9th I have, after reading your post not sorry I’m missing it.

Jeffrey, uncanny effect from the strings at the opening and coda of the third movement. The sound was of a hushed choir.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 18, 2020, 12:47:13 AM
Next up is 11th I think. As Svetlanov is the 9th I have, after reading your post not sorry I’m missing it.

Jeffrey, uncanny effect from the strings at the opening and coda of the third movement. The sound was of a hushed choir.

No.11 is very good indeed. I have the old Olympia recording conducted by Veronika Dudarova, coupled with Symphony No.5 (Ivanov conducting). I like the cover photo which reminds me of my visit to the USSR over New Year 1985. I'll post it if I can find it.
Here it is:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 18, 2020, 12:55:38 AM
Those old Olympias had some nice cover art:


(http://)
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on February 18, 2020, 05:53:34 AM
Idk what to do about Myaskovsky symphonies, whether to pick up some of these recommended recordings already out or to follow (if it's even happening) this apparent new Naxos cycle that started last autumn with 1 & 13.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 18, 2020, 06:09:29 AM
Idk what to do about Myaskovsky symphonies, whether to pick up some of these recommended recordings already out or to follow (if it's even happening) this apparent new Naxos cycle that started last autumn with 1 & 13.
Alto have recently collected all the original Olymia recordings and the ones that Alto released after the collapse of Olympia into a boxed set:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Daverz on February 18, 2020, 12:18:10 PM
Alto have recently collected all the original Olymia recordings and the ones that Alto released after the collapse of Olympia into a boxed set:
(http://)

The Alto set includes excellent notes by the late Per Skans.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 18, 2020, 01:51:33 PM
The Alto set includes excellent notes by the late Per Skans.

Our own vandermolen took over the baton from Per Skans on the same set and they are excellent too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 19, 2020, 12:47:36 AM
Our own vandermolen took over the baton from Per Skans on the same set and they are excellent too.
:)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 26, 2020, 02:46:58 AM
11th Symphony.

A fine symphony of which I'm fortunate to own two recordings, Svetlanov (CD) and Dudarova (LP). Comparisons I did not find easy or straightforward and not just owing to different formats although that is a factor. Both interpretations engaged me as a listener, and with both I found the music came first and worrying about finer points of detail a distraction. Overall Svetlanov is more epic and Dudarova lighter.

EMI issued a host of Melodiya recordings under license. Musically I find all most interesting but it must be said that sonics can be variable. Not here though, this Dudarova issue sounds wonderful, one of the best. It will be interesting in the later symphonies comparing Svetlanov in Alto/CD and EMI/LP.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 26, 2020, 05:58:30 AM
11th Symphony.

A fine symphony of which I'm fortunate to own two recordings, Svetlanov (CD) and Dudarova (LP). Comparisons I did not find easy or straightforward and not just owing to different formats although that is a factor. Both interpretations engaged me as a listener, and with both I found the music came first and worrying about finer points of detail a distraction. Overall Svetlanov is more epic and Dudarova lighter.

EMI issued a host of Melodiya recordings under license. Musically I find all most interesting but it must be said that sonics can be variable. Not here though, this Dudarova issue sounds wonderful, one of the best. It will be interesting in the later symphonies comparing Svetlanov in Alto/CD and EMI/LP.
The Dudarova is also available on CD Lol:

(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 26, 2020, 07:48:06 AM
The Dudarova is also available on CD Lol:

(http://)

Which maybe a fairer comparison, Jeffrey.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 04, 2020, 12:35:54 AM
12th Symphony.

Roughly half way on a journey through a set of symphonies which has never been dull or routine, quite the opposite as Miaskovsky always has a surprise or two up his sleeve. The 12th on paper with the long opening slow movement followed by two quicker ones seems unbalanced, which it is in a way but not in the way expected.

Quite simply the 1st movement is a symphonic nocturne. The wide open plains of the Russian countryside under a pitch black night sky are caught so evocatively that it made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up! There is a contrasting section of a scene from village life, also brilliantly done, but the movement ends as it began, music of the night.

After that, the following two movements were a bit after the Lord Mayor's show for me. Is it this unevenness the reason that Miaskovsky is not a household name like his good friend, Prokofiev? Saying that, the latter did not write anything remotely close as an evocation of a time and place as the first movement of Miaskovsky's 12th.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on March 04, 2020, 07:20:43 AM
How is this set?

(https://reviews.azureedge.net/gramophone/media-thumbnails/825646968985.jpg)

I will confess, I've only heard No. 6 but many posts here make me want to remedy that.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 04, 2020, 07:33:49 AM
How is this set?

(https://reviews.azureedge.net/gramophone/media-thumbnails/825646968985.jpg)

I will confess, I've only heard No. 6 but many posts here make me want to remedy that.

Go with the Alto set of the same recordings.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 04, 2020, 07:47:31 AM
12th Symphony.

Roughly half way on a journey through a set of symphonies which has never been dull or routine, quite the opposite as Miaskovsky always has a surprise or two up his sleeve. The 12th on paper with the long opening slow movement followed by two quicker ones seems unbalanced, which it is in a way but not in the way expected.

Quite simply the 1st movement is a symphonic nocturne. The wide open plains of the Russian countryside under a pitch black night sky are caught so evocatively that it made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up! There is a contrasting section of a scene from village life, also brilliantly done, but the movement ends as it began, music of the night.

After that, the following two movements were a bit after the Lord Mayor's show for me. Is it this unevenness the reason that Miaskovsky is not a household name like his good friend, Prokofiev? Saying that, the latter did not write anything remotely close as an evocation of a time and place as the first movement of Miaskovsky's 12th.
Another nice analysis and totally agree with you about the opening movement of Symphony No.12 'Kolkhoz'. I find a similar experience with Symphony 25.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 04, 2020, 07:50:03 AM
How is this set?

(https://reviews.azureedge.net/gramophone/media-thumbnails/825646968985.jpg)

I will confess, I've only heard No. 6 but many posts here make me want to remedy that.
I agree with Lol (Irons) but I'm biased as I had some involvement with the Alto set. I think that the Alto pressings (from the original Olympia discs) are superior to the ones on Warner and the Alto set includes detailed notes whereas the Warner set includes next-to-nothing. Try symphonies 3,17,21, 24 and 27 for starters 16 has a marvellous, lugubrious slow movement. If you want to investigate Miaskovsky beyond the 6th Symphony this is a good 3 CD set to start with:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on March 04, 2020, 05:39:30 PM
I agree with Lol (Irons) but I'm biased as I had some involvement with the Alto set. I think that the Alto pressings (from the original Olympia discs) are superior to the ones on Warner and the Alto set includes detailed notes whereas the Warner set includes next-to-nothing. Try symphonies 3,17,21, 24 and 27 for starters 16 has a marvellous, lugubrious slow movement. If you want to investigate Miaskovsky beyond the 6th Symphony this is a good 3 CD set to start with:
(http://)

Am I missing out by not exploring Miaskovsky beyond No. 6?  For example, I don't feel like I'm missing out on not hearing all of Leif Segerstam's 337 symphonies.  There might be some really great stuff in there, but nothing I've heard makes me want to hear more.  That is in contrast to other prolific composers like Derek Bourgeois' 116 entries where I find a unique sound but wide range, an unraveling journey of sorts.  Very few composers deserve to have all their symphonies heard. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on March 04, 2020, 08:02:36 PM
Very few composers deserve to have all their symphonies heard.

But we have to have heard all of them to know that, right?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 04, 2020, 11:49:58 PM
Am I missing out by not exploring Miaskovsky beyond No. 6?  For example, I don't feel like I'm missing out on not hearing all of Leif Segerstam's 337 symphonies.  There might be some really great stuff in there, but nothing I've heard makes me want to hear more.  That is in contrast to other prolific composers like Derek Bourgeois' 116 entries where I find a unique sound but wide range, an unraveling journey of sorts.  Very few composers deserve to have all their symphonies heard.
Personally I think that you're missing out by not hearing nos 17, 21 and 27, for example, if you don't know them. At least try the poetic No.21 - it is very short, in one movement, and there are several good recordings. Alto has an inexpensive CD linking 17 and 21 which IMO are two of the best.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 05, 2020, 12:58:38 AM
Am I missing out by not exploring Miaskovsky beyond No. 6?  For example, I don't feel like I'm missing out on not hearing all of Leif Segerstam's 337 symphonies.  There might be some really great stuff in there, but nothing I've heard makes me want to hear more.  That is in contrast to other prolific composers like Derek Bourgeois' 116 entries where I find a unique sound but wide range, an unraveling journey of sorts.  Very few composers deserve to have all their symphonies heard.

To really get to know a body of work I think it no bad thing to take the rough with the smooth. Cherry picking is all very well - as already been said how do you know? Once I have listened to all the symphonies I can return to the ones I like best, but more importantly I (in my own way) know and understand his symphonies in the whole.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on March 05, 2020, 01:49:11 AM
I have listened to all of the Myaskovsky symphonies and I don't regret it; there are clear highlights (3, 5, 6, 8, 13; the slow movements of 11, 20, 25 & 27, many of which feature Myaskovsky's favourite Italian adjective elevato) but none of them are "bad" and even the pieces I don't like as much are still fun to listen to.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on March 06, 2020, 05:42:50 PM
My report so far.  Yesterday I listened to Symphony No. 21 and today No. 3.  I enjoyed these works, preferred No. 21 more but can certainly understand why this is a composer worth hearing.  No. 3 second movement sounds a bit like a restrained funeral procession.  This is not Shostakovich nor Mahler’s dirge but more like early Rimsky-Korsakov.  I think one of the complaints I have about this music is it feels mid 19th century.  The harmony and instrumentation is very conservative where my preferences tend to lie in 20th century.  I keep missing some dissonance or expanded percussion.  It is finely crafted but would better suited to someone who favors Brahms or Glazunov.    In contrast, I find Lyadov who was born a generation earlier than Myakovsky far more interesting musically.  That doesn’t mean Myaskovsky is bad, just not that interesting.  I am very happy to explore his music further and enjoy what I’ve heard, I just feel like I haven’t heard something I will revisit.  Any suggestions of where next I should listen?  Otherwise I’ll go sequentially. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 07, 2020, 02:07:35 AM
My report so far.  Yesterday I listened to Symphony No. 21 and today No. 3.  I enjoyed these works, preferred No. 21 more but can certainly understand why this is a composer worth hearing.  No. 3 second movement sounds a bit like a restrained funeral procession.  This is not Shostakovich nor Mahler’s dirge but more like early Rimsky-Korsakov.  I think one of the complaints I have about this music is it feels mid 19th century.  The harmony and instrumentation is very conservative where my preferences tend to lie in 20th century.  I keep missing some dissonance or expanded percussion.  It is finely crafted but would better suited to someone who favors Brahms or Glazunov.    In contrast, I find Lyadov who was born a generation earlier than Myakovsky far more interesting musically.  That doesn’t mean Myaskovsky is bad, just not that interesting.  I am very happy to explore his music further and enjoy what I’ve heard, I just feel like I haven’t heard something I will revisit.  Any suggestions of where next I should listen?  Otherwise I’ll go sequentially.
Interesting to read your views. I rather like the 'restrained funeral procession' of No.3. My advice would be to listen to the valedictory No.27 which has a wonderful slow movement although I find the whole work, including the inspiriting last movement written when Miaskovsky was terminally ill, very moving. Nos 8 and 16 have fine slow movements. No.23 is very tuneful and I'd strongly recommend 15,17,24 and 25 as well. 24 and 25 are together on a Naxos CD. Which recordings did you listen to? Your point about Glazunov rang true as I often listen to his music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on March 07, 2020, 07:01:31 AM
Interesting to read your views. I rather like the 'restrained funeral procession' of No.3. My advice would be to listen to the valedictory No.27 which has a wonderful slow movement although I find the whole work, including the inspiriting last movement written when Miaskovsky was terminally ill, very moving. Nos 8 and 16 have fine slow movements. No.23 is very tuneful and I'd strongly recommend 15,17,24 and 25 as well. 24 and 25 are together on a Naxos CD. Which recordings did you listen to? Your point about Glazunov rang true as I often listen to his music.

I listened to Alto/Svetlanov.  The complete set is on spotify.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 07, 2020, 09:25:38 AM
I listened to Alto/Svetlanov.  The complete set is on spotify.
Excellent. Hope you continue to find them of interest.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 10, 2020, 01:31:23 AM
My report so far.  Yesterday I listened to Symphony No. 21 and today No. 3.  I enjoyed these works, preferred No. 21 more but can certainly understand why this is a composer worth hearing.  No. 3 second movement sounds a bit like a restrained funeral procession.  This is not Shostakovich nor Mahler’s dirge but more like early Rimsky-Korsakov.  I think one of the complaints I have about this music is it feels mid 19th century.  The harmony and instrumentation is very conservative where my preferences tend to lie in 20th century.  I keep missing some dissonance or expanded percussion.  It is finely crafted but would better suited to someone who favors Brahms or Glazunov.    In contrast, I find Lyadov who was born a generation earlier than Myakovsky far more interesting musically.  That doesn’t mean Myaskovsky is bad, just not that interesting.  I am very happy to explore his music further and enjoy what I’ve heard, I just feel like I haven’t heard something I will revisit.  Any suggestions of where next I should listen?  Otherwise I’ll go sequentially.

You make some valid points that have the ring of truth. It is a fact I find Miaskovsky more interesting then you do, but I concede he can be ultra-conventional at times, the second and third movements of the 12th for example but what about the nocturnal 1st which is anything but. I find Miaskovsky much more interesting then Glazunov. Anyway, the reason for this preamble is Miaskovsky's relationship, or not, with modernism. On attending a 1912 concert of Pelleas and Melisande conducted by Schoenberg in St. Petersburg, Miaskovsky wrote the following -

This composition is long and very intricate in its content and abundance of thematic material; it is also extremely complex and refined in its harmony and original orchestration. And though the subjects and ideas are many and strange, they are, at the same time, knit into a web of iron logic. The work is notable for the noble quality of its details and astounding technical virtuosity and finally it is so fervent that notwithstanding its length one not only listens to it without boredom or fatigue but with ever growing interest and delight.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 10, 2020, 05:40:13 AM
You make some valid points that have the ring of truth. It is a fact I find Miaskovsky more interesting then you do, but I concede he can be ultra-conventional at times, the second and third movements of the 12th for example but what about the nocturnal 1st which is anything but. I find Miaskovsky much more interesting then Glazunov. Anyway, the reason for this preamble is Miaskovsky's relationship, or not, with modernism. On attending a 1912 concert of Pelleas and Melisande conducted by Schoenberg in St. Petersburg, Miaskovsky wrote the following -

This composition is long and very intricate in its content and abundance of thematic material; it is also extremely complex and refined in its harmony and original orchestration. And though the subjects and ideas are many and strange, they are, at the same time, knit into a web of iron logic. The work is notable for the noble quality of its details and astounding technical virtuosity and finally it is so fervent that notwithstanding its length one not only listens to it without boredom or fatigue but with ever growing interest and delight.
Very nice! Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on March 10, 2020, 06:10:35 AM
You make some valid points that have the ring of truth. It is a fact I find Miaskovsky more interesting then you do, but I concede he can be ultra-conventional at times, the second and third movements of the 12th for example but what about the nocturnal 1st which is anything but. I find Miaskovsky much more interesting then Glazunov. Anyway, the reason for this preamble is Miaskovsky's relationship, or not, with modernism. On attending a 1912 concert of Pelleas and Melisande conducted by Schoenberg in St. Petersburg, Miaskovsky wrote the following -

This composition is long and very intricate in its content and abundance of thematic material; it is also extremely complex and refined in its harmony and original orchestration. And though the subjects and ideas are many and strange, they are, at the same time, knit into a web of iron logic. The work is notable for the noble quality of its details and astounding technical virtuosity and finally it is so fervent that notwithstanding its length one not only listens to it without boredom or fatigue but with ever growing interest and delight.

Interesting quote.  I think one bias I have against Miaskovsky is that he is near contemporaries are so much more experimental like Prokofiev and Scriabin but even when they were conventional they were still interesting.  I do like some of Miaskovsky's so far, but I also get the sense I don't need to hear more.  Like I've already heard the music to the works I've never heard before.  I will keep chipping away at it thought, just not on the top of the list of music to explore. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: j winter on March 10, 2020, 07:07:36 AM
Alto have recently collected all the original Olymia recordings and the ones that Alto released after the collapse of Olympia into a boxed set:
(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/710eM578FaL.jpg)

Just FYI, I picked up the whole set yesterday on MP3 from Amazon for $7.99.  Looking forward to exploring it...
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 10, 2020, 07:20:39 AM
Just FYI, I picked up the whole set yesterday on MP3 from Amazon for $7.99.  Looking forward to exploring it...

Do tell what you think either negative or positive. Good to hear other impressions.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 10, 2020, 07:26:21 AM
Just FYI, I picked up the whole set yesterday on MP3 from Amazon for $7.99.  Looking forward to exploring it...
Great! Let us know what you think.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 17, 2020, 02:18:09 PM
Symphonies no.13 & no.15.

That there is an absence of linear progression in Miaskovsky’s symphonies is illustrated here. Written within the same year the composer makes a big leap into the 20th Century with the 13th and back to the world of Tchaikovsky and Gluzunov with the 15th. Also non-linear is recording quality with the 13th outstanding and 15th less so. I hope this didn’t colour my judgment, but I admit it possible.

The 13th is made of serious stuff, I would go as far as describing as grim. Some telling use of percussion adds to the doom laden feel of this single movement 20 minute symphony. It matches the mood the whole world feels at the present time. I am greatly impressed with the work and will return.

Cards on table, I didn’t make a connection with the 15th with the caveat I have, unlike the 13th, only listened once. This well thought of symphony, I’m sorry to say, rather passed me by.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 24, 2020, 01:46:17 AM
Symphony no.16 "Aviation Symphony".

(https://i.imgur.com/JfXePbB.jpg)

The crash of "Maxim Gorky" aeroplane is an incredible story. Miaskovsky wrote a symphony which will in the fullness of time stop this tragic event being forgotten - I was unaware, but not now! Not a program symphony, in fact the only part of the symphony that depicts the actual plane/crash (far as I'm aware) is the finale coda. Miaskovsky is more subtle as he alludes to the event without depicting it.

The first movement alternates in typical Miaskovsky fashion between a vigorous Waltonesque march and a secondary noble theme. The march comes out tops.

The second movement has nothing to do with aeroplanes but instead a beautiful pastoral scene. I have always thought that Russian and English music can be alike. Never more so then here, the opening with an oboe's soft tone is RVW to a tee. Best movement of the symphony for me.

A funeral march makes up the third movement for, I would imagine, the 45 who perished on the fateful day of the crash.

Initially I was  flummoxed by the finale. The last thing expected after the previous grave procession was a celebration (based on a song)! But the penny eventually dropped. The national pride of a feat of aero-engineering and at the end of the symphony, the crash, and stunned realisation. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 24, 2020, 07:13:34 AM
Symphony no.16 "Aviation Symphony".

(https://i.imgur.com/JfXePbB.jpg)

The crash of "Maxim Gorky" aeroplane is an incredible story. Miaskovsky wrote a symphony which will in the fullness of time stop this tragic event being forgotten - I was unaware, but not now! Not a program symphony, in fact the only part of the symphony that depicts the actual plane/crash (far as I'm aware) is the finale coda. Miaskovsky is more subtle as he alludes to the event without depicting it.

The first movement alternates in typical Miaskovsky fashion between a vigorous Waltonesque march and a secondary noble theme. The march comes out tops.

The second movement has nothing to do with aeroplanes but instead a beautiful pastoral scene. I have always thought that Russian and English music can be alike. Never more so then here, the opening with an oboe's soft tone is RVW to a tee. Best movement of the symphony for me.

A funeral march makes up the third movement for, I would imagine, the 45 who perished on the fateful day of the crash.

Initially I was  flummoxed by the finale. The last thing expected after the previous grave procession was a celebration (based on a song)! But the penny eventually dropped. The national pride of a feat of aero-engineering and at the end of the symphony, the crash, and stunned realisation.
Nice analysis Lol.
I love the slow movement in particular. I must listen to this symphony again soon. It features in the Melodiya 3 CD set.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on March 24, 2020, 08:29:50 AM
Nice analysis Lol.
I love the slow movement in particular. I must listen to this symphony again soon. It features in the Melodiya 3 CD set.

I omitted to mention, Jeffrey that Ivanov's 1950 recording is on YT. The first movement is very good but I found the second rushed compared to Svetlanov.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on March 24, 2020, 01:46:05 PM
I omitted to mention, Jeffrey that Ivanov's 1950 recording is on YT. The first movement is very good but I found the second rushed compared to Svetlanov.
I agree Lol. Svetlanov's is better.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 06, 2020, 12:48:32 AM
17th Symphony.

The symphony swings on the axis of the magnificent 2nd slow movement but no cherry-picking here which I have been guilty of for some of the others. Omit any movement would diminish the rest. The work opens, not for the first time, with a growling rumble and then proceeds at times triumphant, at others tinged with melancholy. All great themes.
The 2nd, an outpouring of a soul, is beyond description. Only to say at times reminded (opening) of Rachmaninov and others of Mahler (I find the harp such an effective instrument for symphonic works).
A movement of such intensity can only be followed one way, a slightly odd-ball jolly march!
The finale feels right. A logical conclusion to I think Miaskovsky's most coherent symphony so far. It is a Romantic 20th century symphony which is frowned upon by some, but the romanticism in this work is not contrived but a sincere  statement. A wonderful symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 06, 2020, 01:09:39 AM
17th Symphony.

The symphony swings on the axis of the magnificent 2nd slow movement but no cherry-picking here which I have been guilty of for some of the others. Omit any movement would diminish the rest. The work opens, not for the first time, with a growling rumble and then proceeds at times triumphant, at others tinged with melancholy. All great themes.
The 2nd, an outpouring of a soul, is beyond description. Only to say at times reminded (opening) of Rachmaninov and others of Mahler (I find the harp such an effective instrument for symphonic works).
A movement of such intensity can only be followed one way, a slightly odd-ball jolly march!
The finale feels right. A logical conclusion to I think Miaskovsky's most coherent symphony so far. It is a Romantic 20th century symphony which is frowned upon by some, but the romanticism in this work is not contrived but a sincere  statement. A wonderful symphony.
Lovely review Lol. I think that Symphony No.17 is one of his greatest along with 6,21 and 27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 06, 2020, 10:04:57 PM
Lovely review Lol. I think that Symphony No.17 is one of his greatest along with 6,21 and 27.

Thanks Jeffrey. With 21 I can use Measham for comparison. Have you heard Kovalyov's 23?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 07, 2020, 02:39:15 AM
Thanks Jeffrey. With 21 I can use Measham for comparison. Have you heard Kovalyov's 23?

I was delighted when that Measham LP appeared (with Kabalevsky's 2nd Symphony). I knew the work from Morton Gould's fabulous RCA performance, taken out of the record library, but now I could have my own LP version! Measham's terrific LP of Eugene Goossens First Symphony (best recorded performance IMO and that of Christo I think) has never been released on CD which is a great shame. Measham died prematurely - a great loss. Thee is a fine Samuel Barber CD not to mention his collaboration with Rick Wakeman!
No, I'm not aware of Kovalyov's Symphony No. 23 and I'm very interested to know where you came across it Lol. Somewhere there exists a Bernard Herrmann recording of either Symphony 22 or 23 which NYM himself did not like as Herrmann apparently made some unauthorised cuts.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 07, 2020, 06:14:45 AM
I was delighted when that Measham LP appeared (with Kabalevsky's 2nd Symphony). I knew the work from Morton Gould's fabulous RCA performance, taken out of the record library, but now I could have my own LP version! Measham's terrific LP of Eugene Goossens First Symphony (best recorded performance IMO and that of Christo I think) has never been released on CD which is a great shame. Measham died prematurely - a great loss. Thee is a fine Samuel Barber CD not to mention his collaboration with Rick Wakeman!
No, I'm not aware of Kovalyov's Symphony No. 23 and I'm very interested to know where you came across it Lol. Somewhere there exists a Bernard Herrmann recording of either Symphony 22 or 23 which NYM himself did not like as Herrmann apparently made some unauthorised cuts.

I have a copy of 23rd Symphony which I wrongly presumed is Svetlanov.

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 07, 2020, 09:25:43 AM
I have a copy of 23rd Symphony which I wrongly presumed is Svetlanov.

How weird! I made exactly the same mistake too Lol. I recently acquired that LP which I'd taken out of the record library in my youth. The 23rd is perhaps the most approachable of all NYM's symphonies and that is a particularly soulful performance. That LP is great also for the terrific Shchedrin Symphony No.1 which is, by far, my favourite of his works.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 08, 2020, 05:46:09 AM
How weird! I made exactly the same mistake too Lol. I recently acquired that LP which I'd taken out of the record library in my youth. The 23rd is perhaps the most approachable of all NYM's symphonies and that is a particularly soulful performance. That LP is great also for the terrific Shchedrin Symphony No.1 which is, by far, my favourite of his works.

Great minds, Jeffrey. :) I will give the Shchedrin a spin.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 08, 2020, 08:15:53 AM
Great minds, Jeffrey. :) I will give the Shchedrin a spin.
Oh yes, please do Lol. I think that it's a highly memorable and quite exciting work. I love the ending. You think that it's building up to a conventional 'Grand Climax' but instead the music disintegrates down to nothing.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 08, 2020, 10:40:40 PM
Oh yes, please do Lol. I think that it's a highly memorable and quite exciting work. I love the ending. You think that it's building up to a conventional 'Grand Climax' but instead the music disintegrates down to nothing.

You have tipped me over the edge, Jeffrey. First on this evening.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 09, 2020, 04:15:50 AM
You have tipped me over the edge, Jeffrey. First on this evening.
I'm really looking forward to hearing your views, positive or otherwise. That symphony by Shchedrin has given me a lot of emotional pleasure. I'd also like to say how much I'm enjoying following your traversal through Myaskovsky's twenty-seven symphonies Lol.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 09, 2020, 06:04:18 AM
I'm really looking forward to hearing your views, positive or otherwise. That symphony by Shchedrin has given me a lot of emotional pleasure. I'd also like to say how much I'm enjoying following your traversal through Myaskovsky's twenty-seven symphonies Lol.

Nice of you to say that, Jeffrey. Not a hardship by any stretch, far from it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 09, 2020, 01:13:26 PM
+1 to the Shchedrin. A great work. His 2nd Symphony is muuuuch less interesting.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 09, 2020, 01:17:33 PM
+1 to the Shchedrin. A great work. His 2nd Symphony is muuuuch less interesting.
Totally agree Cesar! I wish that Chandos had recorded the 1st rather than the 2nd Symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 09, 2020, 01:20:33 PM
Totally agree Cesar! I wish that Chandos had recorded the 1st rather than the 2nd Symphony.

Let's hope we'll have it in the near future.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 09, 2020, 01:26:32 PM
Let's hope we'll have it in the near future.

I hope so but it's odd that, IMO, his greatest work is comparatively neglected.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 09, 2020, 10:48:05 PM
+1 to the Shchedrin. A great work. His 2nd Symphony is muuuuch less interesting.

Most impressive. I was put off by Shchedrin by his Carmen ballet and dismissed him, but the 1st Symphony is a very different kettle of fish. I loved the oasis of peace at the end of the powerful first movement where he makes a couple of woodwinds sound like an organ! It was like walking in a church. I don't know if that was Shchedrin meant, but no matter either way, as that is how I hear it.

On vinyl the 1962 recording sounds magnificent and no allowances need to be made for squeezing the whole symphony on a single side. Both the Melodiya sound engineers and the EMI transfer team have pulled one out of the bag here. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 09, 2020, 10:54:08 PM
Most impressive. I was put off by Shchedrin by his Carmen ballet and dismissed him, but the 1st Symphony is a very different kettle of fish. I loved the oasis of peace at the end of the powerful first movement where he makes a couple of woodwinds sound like an organ! It was like walking in a church. I don't know if that was Shchedrin meant, but no matter either way, as that is how I hear it.

On vinyl the 1962 recording sounds magnificent and no allowances need to be made for squeezing the whole symphony on a single side. Both the Melodiya sound engineers and the EMI transfer team have pulled one out of the bag here.

Excellent! I thought that you'd probably like it Lol. I'm glad that I heard it before the Carmen ballet which I didn't like either. I preferred 'The Little Humpbacked Horse' and 'Chimes' and recently the Cello Concerto. There's was a CD but it can be difficult to find but you are probably happy with your LP:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 10, 2020, 02:10:46 AM
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,17734.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,17734.0.html)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 10, 2020, 06:47:54 AM
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,17734.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,17734.0.html)

Thanks and point taken but the Shchedrin Symphony No.1 was coupled with Miaskovsky's 23rd Symphony on that fine old EMI/Melodiya LP.
The Anosov version is available as a download.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 11, 2020, 05:40:29 AM
Thanks and point taken but the Shchedrin Symphony No.1 was coupled with Miaskovsky's 23rd Symphony on that fine old EMI/Melodiya LP.
The Anosov version is available as a download.

I think Shchedrin (I came from generation where dyslexia didn't exist but I think I may be afflicted - I find it extremely difficult to type his name even when copying!) and Miaskovsky make excellent bedfellows.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Christo on April 11, 2020, 12:36:31 PM
I think Shchedrin (I came from generation where dyslexia didn't exist but I think I may be afflicted - I find it extremely difficult to type his name even when copying!) and Miaskovsky make excellent bedfellows.
And I came from a generation - back in the Summer of 1997, Lithuania, Trakai festival, where his Carmen Suite was being performed - who actually met the man. Though hardly noticed it, those were the days where East & West met everywhere, anytime. Only now I recall this particular meeting again.  ::)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2020, 12:31:32 AM
I think Shchedrin (I came from generation where dyslexia didn't exist but I think I may be afflicted - I find it extremely difficult to type his name even when copying!) and Miaskovsky make excellent bedfellows.
I've only now learnt to spell his name having enjoyed his First Symphony for about forty years  ::).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 12, 2020, 01:10:21 AM
Came across an article "Myaskovsky on Record" written by Gregor Tassie for the Summer 2012 edition of Classical Recordings Quarterly. All interesting but some snippets particularly so. The first recording was by Prokofiev in 1924 of Whimsies. The first recording of a symphony was that of No.23 by Nathan Rachlin in 1941. During the second world war Miaskovsky was able to hear recordings from America and Europe. Among those he listened to was Elgar's 2nd Symphony, Ireland's PC and Rachmaninov's 3rd Symphony. Richter recorded the 3rd Sonata several times but none of the others although both him and his wife were close friends of the composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2020, 01:14:13 AM
Came across an article "Myaskovsky on Record" written by Gregor Tassie for the Summer 2012 edition of Classical Recordings Quarterly. All interesting but some snippets particularly so. The first recording was by Prokofiev in 1924 of Whimsies. The first recording of a symphony was that of No.23 by Nathan Rachlin in 1941. During the second world war Miaskovsky was able to hear recordings from America and Europe. Among those he listened to was Elgar's 2nd Symphony, Ireland's PC and Rachmaninov's 3rd Symphony. Richter recorded the 3rd Sonata several times but none of the others although both him and his wife were close friends of the composer.
I have that interesting article too Lol. I think that the next issue corrected some print errors in the article and some of the symphonies listed were errors. I'll check later.

PS I found it now:
It was the Symphony 21 and not 23 that was the first ever made by Nathan Rachlin. It was also No.21 and not 24 that was commissioned by the Chicago SO. This can be found on page 8 of the Autumn 2012 issue of the magazine.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 12, 2020, 10:45:14 PM
I have that interesting article too Lol. I think that the next issue corrected some print errors in the article and some of the symphonies listed were errors. I'll check later.

PS I found it now:
It was the Symphony 21 and not 23 that was the first ever made by Nathan Rachlin. It was also No.21 and not 24 that was commissioned by the Chicago SO. This can be found on page 8 of the Autumn 2012 issue of the magazine.

Thanks Jeffrey. Due to editorial errors! I doubt that Gregor Tassie was too pleased with that.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2020, 11:03:34 PM
Thanks Jeffrey. Due to editorial errors! I doubt that Gregor Tassie was too pleased with that.

No,I expect that he wasn't! He wrote a recent biography of the composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on April 13, 2020, 04:42:55 AM
Yesterday, I listened to Symphony No. 13 and 16 and enjoyed them both.  No. 16 seemed to have an unusually fast opening movement and I've come to think of Miaskovsky as a moderato tempo composer.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 13, 2020, 08:02:50 AM
Yesterday, I listened to Symphony No. 13 and 16 and enjoyed them both.  No. 16 seemed to have an unusually fast opening movement and I've come to think of Miaskovsky as a moderato tempo composer.

Both interesting works. No.13 is more modernistic and I like the new Naxos recording with the Ural youth orchestra. The slow movement of No. 16 is very moving.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 16, 2020, 12:58:40 PM
Symphony No.19 (For Wind Band).

All change for Miaskovsky, a symphony for wind band and the biggest surprise for me how conventional - in a good way -it is. This music would not be out of place played on Eastbourne's famous bandstand, in fact I'm convinced big band aficionados would absolutely love it. This is not a symphony without strings but a symphony for a band, I think there is a difference. In style I was reminded of band music composed by Holst. One movement stands out from the other three, the slow one (not for the first time) which is as said on the tin Andante serioso, if you could squeeze it nostalgia would flow out in a torrent.

Symphony No.21.

I was initially puzzled by Jeffrey's comment "You could start here" but after getting to know this symphony I fully understand. It did take time, I listened far more then the others and the appreciation was not immediate - this is often the case for single movement symphonies - but as I acclimatised I became gripped by the work, I fell under its spell.

I used Svetlanov as a reference point and listened to David Measham on vinyl. You cannot go wrong with either and preference comes down to interpretation. The cool Sibelian waters of Measham or the Tchaikovsky heart on sleeve of Svetlanov. Or of course you could always have both!

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 16, 2020, 01:23:29 PM
Symphony No.19 (For Wind Band).

All change for Miaskovsky, a symphony for wind band and the biggest surprise for me how conventional - in a good way -it is. This music would not be out of place played on Eastbourne's famous bandstand, in fact I'm convinced big band aficionados would absolutely love it. This is not a symphony without strings but a symphony for a band, I think there is a difference. In style I was reminded of band music composed by Holst. One movement stands out from the other three, the slow one (not for the first time) which is as said on the tin Andante serioso, if you could squeeze it nostalgia would flow out in a torrent.

Symphony No.21.

I was initially puzzled by Jeffrey's comment "You could start here" but after getting to know this symphony I fully understand. It did take time, I listened far more then the others and the appreciation was not immediate - this is often the case for single movement symphonies - but as I acclimatised I became gripped by the work, I fell under its spell.

I used Svetlanov as a reference point and listened to David Measham on vinyl. You cannot go wrong with either and preference comes down to interpretation. The cool Sibelian waters of Measham or the Tchaikovsky heart on sleeve of Svetlanov. Or of course you could always have both!
Once again a very interesting review Lol. The other great performance of Symphony No.21 was from Morton Gould and the Chicago SO, who commissioned the work. It was reissued on CD in a boxed set of Morton Gould recordings on RCA, with its original coupling Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Antar' Symphony with which it shares some thematic similarities. The middle movements of Symphony No.19 were arranged for string orchestra and I especially like first one:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DGxpkF1yq-w

Original Morton Gould LP:
(http://)
There's also a very fine recording of Symphony No.21 conducted by Eugene Ormandy.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 16, 2020, 10:44:37 PM
Once again a very interesting review Lol. The other great performance of Symphony No.21 was from Morton Gould and the Chicago SO, who commissioned the work. It was reissued on CD in a boxed set of Morton Gould recordings on RCA, with its original coupling Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Antar' Symphony with which it shares some thematic similarities. The middle movements of Symphony No.19 were arranged for string orchestra and I especially like first one:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DGxpkF1yq-w

Original Morton Gould LP:
(http://)
There's also a very fine recording of Symphony No.21 conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

I have seen Morton Gould's LP on my travels, Jeffrey. I had no idea Ormandy had recorded Miaskovsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 16, 2020, 11:00:17 PM
I have seen Morton Gould's LP on my travels, Jeffrey. I had no idea Ormandy had recorded Miaskovsky.
The Morton Gould is worth having as a supplement to your Svetlanov set Lol. It is a very special, poetic and eloquent performance (I notice that the LP is available for about £4.00 second hand).
Here is the Ormandy recording. The 2CD set was expensive. I tried to,order a copy from Harold Moore's Records in London but they told me that they couldn't send it to me as one of the discs was damaged. I asked which one and it turned out to be the CD which did not feature Miaskovsky's symphony, so they sold it to me quite cheaply! I'll post a review of it as well.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2000/dec00/ormandy.htm
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 17, 2020, 06:50:19 AM
Once again a very interesting review Lol. The other great performance of Symphony No.21 was from Morton Gould and the Chicago SO, who commissioned the work. It was reissued on CD in a boxed set of Morton Gould recordings on RCA, with its original coupling Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Antar' Symphony with which it shares some thematic similarities. The middle movements of Symphony No.19 were arranged for string orchestra and I especially like first one:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DGxpkF1yq-w

Original Morton Gould LP:
(http://)
There's also a very fine recording of Symphony No.21 conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

As per normal Jeffrey I am so slow on the uptake - not even 2+2=5! I didn't make the connection between Two Pieces for String Orchestra and Symphony No.19 until you pointed it out although I have both versions and indeed I am aware that Op.46b is a transcription. The richness of the strings in the link has a yearning sadness which I missed in the version for band which to my ears is nostalgic.

Edit: Worth noting I think a difference in timings with with Op. 46 at 7.00 and Op.46b 10.42 (Bolshoi). Miaskovsky slowed the tempo for strings it seems.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 17, 2020, 08:45:30 AM
As per normal Jeffrey I am so slow on the uptake - not even 2+2=5! I didn't make the connection between Two Pieces for String Orchestra and Symphony No.19 until you pointed it out although I have both versions and indeed I am aware that Op.46b is a transcription. The richness of the strings in the link has a yearning sadness which I missed in the version for band which to my ears is nostalgic.

Edit: Worth noting I think a difference in timings with with Op. 46 at 7.00 and Op.46b 10.42 (Bolshoi). Miaskovsky slowed the tempo for strings it seems.

I don't see any reason why you should have made the connection Lol, I certainly didn't until I bought Dudarova's Soviet LP (in that famous Soviet record shop near to Foyle's in Charing X Road, London, which was probably a cover for spying activities) of Symphony 11 and found the two pieces for string orchestra as the fill-up and read that it was a transcription of the middle movements of Symphony 19. I have a very curious Russian CD 'Legendary conductors Alexander Gauk' which includes Gauk's very moving performance of Symphony 17. It also claims to feature Symphony No.18 but it doesn't! It actually features three movements (out of four) of Symphony 19!
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 17, 2020, 09:21:19 AM
I don't see any reason why you should have made the connection Lol, I certainly didn't until I bought Dudarova's Soviet LP (in that famous Soviet record shop near to Foyle's in Charing X Road, London, which was probably a cover for spying activities) of Symphony 11 and found the two pieces for string orchestra as the fill-up and read that it was a transcription of the middle movements of Symphony 19. I have a very curious Russian CD 'Legendary conductors Alexander Gauk' which includes Gauk's very moving performance of Symphony 17. It also claims to feature Symphony No.18 but it doesn't! It actually features three movements (out of four) of Symphony 19!
(http://)

Blimey, that is sloppiness beyond words. I have noted mention on forum previously of the Soviet record shop, fascinating. At around that time I would have been buying imported soul records every Saturday morning from a dusty basement in Soho. For Classical I was a late starter, but have enjoyed a lifetime of recorded music. Many of my Melodiya LPs I have noticed have an imported by Collet’s sticker on back cover.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roy Bland on April 17, 2020, 06:02:41 PM
I don't see any reason why you should have made the connection Lol, I certainly didn't until I bought Dudarova's Soviet LP (in that famous Soviet record shop near to Foyle's in Charing X Road, London, which was probably a cover for spying activities) of Symphony 11 and found the two pieces for string orchestra as the fill-up and read that it was a transcription of the middle movements of Symphony 19. I have a very curious Russian CD 'Legendary conductors Alexander Gauk' which includes Gauk's very moving performance of Symphony 17. It also claims to feature Symphony No.18 but it doesn't! It actually features three movements (out of four) of Symphony 19!
(http://)
Surely Gauk was a great conductor (i have brilliant cofffret) .But there is the trouble of harsh and nousy soviet recording perhaps with a better mastering...
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 18, 2020, 01:03:21 AM
Surely Gauk was a great conductor (i have brilliant cofffret) .But there is the trouble of harsh and nousy soviet recording perhaps with a better mastering...
Yes, I agree about Gauk. His NYM Symphony 17 is very great and there is a fine Khachaturian Symphony No.1 but, as you say, the sound remains problematical.

His NYM Symphony 27 is the most moving of all but never released on CD. I was very disappointed that Brilliant did not include it in either of their Gauk boxed sets.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 20, 2020, 06:26:34 AM
Just ordered the Alto complete symphony set. Looking forward to it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 20, 2020, 08:54:54 AM
Just ordered the Alto complete symphony set. Looking forward to it.

Enjoy!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 20, 2020, 11:20:03 AM
Enjoy!
+1
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 24, 2020, 04:42:50 AM
As mentioned in the Purchases thread, my box set arrived today, and I've started the lengthy task of diving into these 27 symphonies. I begun with No. 19, being one of the shorter works, and also its scoring for wind band intrigued me. Followed that with the two symphonies listed as being in B minor, No. 7 and No. 22. No. 7 opens with a real fascinating sense of mystery. It seems more like F major than B minor.

Update: I loved No. 22! Not what I expected from a "war symphony", especially one where the second movement was subtitled "Listening to the horrors of war". Still, quite intense and that finale is spectacular!

I've started the evening with the two shortest symphonies. No. 10 is a rollercoaster ride, the shortest symphony but scored for the largest orchestra. Currently on No. 21. I'm planning to listen to the longest symphony, No. 6, later.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 24, 2020, 09:10:53 AM
Thumbs up for the 22 Symphony-Ballad, one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 24, 2020, 09:15:18 AM
As mentioned in the Purchases thread, my box set arrived today, and I've started the lengthy task of diving into these 27 symphonies. I begun with No. 19, being one of the shorter works, and also its scoring for wind band intrigued me. Followed that with the two symphonies listed as being in B minor, No. 7 and No. 22. No. 7 opens with a real fascinating sense of mystery. It seems more like F major than B minor.

Update: I loved No. 22! Not what I expected from a "war symphony", especially one where the second movement was subtitled "Listening to the horrors of war". Still, quite intense and that finale is spectacular!

I've started the evening with the two shortest symphonies. No. 10 is a rollercoaster ride, the shortest symphony but scored for the largest orchestra. Currently on No. 21. I'm planning to listen to the longest symphony, No. 6, later.
Very interesting feedback. I totally agree with you that No.22 is not a typical 'war symphony' at all. I hope that you enjoy the epic No.6. Unfortunately Svetlanov's recording does not include the optional choir at the end which, IMO, does make a significant difference.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 24, 2020, 10:18:45 AM
Personally I didn't find the finale lacking, even without the choir. It's a lot to digest in one listen. The ending did bring to mind one of my favourite symphonic conclusions, that of Elgar's 2nd Symphony. Peaceful, contented, E flat major. Also can add this to the pile of works that incorporate the Dies Irae chant.

I struggle to put thoughts into words, especially when it comes to music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 24, 2020, 10:58:18 PM
Personally I didn't find the finale lacking, even without the choir. It's a lot to digest in one listen. The ending did bring to mind one of my favourite symphonic conclusions, that of Elgar's 2nd Symphony. Peaceful, contented, E flat major. Also can add this to the pile of works that incorporate the Dies Irae chant.

I struggle to put thoughts into words, especially when it comes to music.
I agree that it's still a fine version and I find it interesting to hear it without the choir. Svetlanov's version, as far as I know, is the only recording not to include it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 24, 2020, 11:08:47 PM


Update: I loved No. 22! Not what I expected from a "war symphony", especially one where the second movement was subtitled "Listening to the horrors of war". Still, quite intense and that finale is spectacular!



The first time I heard the opening of the finale I was practically propelled from my listening position! Svetlanov comes into his own and I don't think anyone could do it better.

 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on April 25, 2020, 05:40:03 PM
The first time I heard the opening of the finale I was practically propelled from my listening position! Svetlanov comes into his own and I don't think anyone could do it better.

 

I remember the Northern Flowers recording of Symphony No.22 as clearly superior to Svetlanov, and far better played, - though I can't elaborate more on that impression from this distance.   Have you heard it?

For a recently posted concert performance (2009) of the Cello Concerto see:

   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbNpliOsA2E

It's idionsyncratic (very slow and somewhat distended to my ears), and the video is rather amateurishly edited, - but interesting to hear and watch nonetheless.
The 2nd movement especially sounds at times almost like a work I've not heard before, and very peculiar.



Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 25, 2020, 10:43:03 PM
Listening to Symphony No. 20 in E major, and it's another instance where I feel like the composer credited the symphony with the wrong key. No. 7 "in B minor" to me has hardly any B minor in it at all, and it certainly never establishes that key as home. And in No. 20, I'm hearing E minor a lot more than the E major it's listed as being in.

To be clear, I still really enjoyed both works.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 25, 2020, 10:52:16 PM
Must listen to the Northern Flowers version of No.22 which I have somewhere in my collection.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 26, 2020, 12:18:47 AM
I remember the Northern Flowers recording of Symphony No.22 as clearly superior to Svetlanov, and far better played, - though I can't elaborate more on that impression from this distance.   Have you heard it?

For a recently posted concert performance (2009) of the Cello Concerto see:

   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbNpliOsA2E

It's idionsyncratic (very slow and somewhat distended to my ears), - also idiosyncratically and rather amateurishly filmed, - but interesting to hear and watch nonetheless.
The 2nd movement especially sounds at times almost like a work I've not heard before, and very peculiar.

Thanks for posting YT link, I enjoyed the passion of it all. Sad to see that it has been viewed by a paltry 48 in a year without a single comment. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on April 26, 2020, 06:54:35 AM
Must listen to the Northern Flowers version of No.22 which I have somewhere in my collection.

You introduced me to the recording (probably) over a decade ago, Jeffrey.

Dig deep and you'll find it, hehe.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 26, 2020, 07:07:49 AM
You introduced me to the recording (probably) over a decade ago, Jeffrey.

Dig deep and you'll find it, hehe.

I've found it Greg! It was with the Northern Flowers CD of symphonies 24 and 25 - so you see there is some attempt at organisation in my collection  ;D
Will be listening to it later.
You introduced me to so much stuff yourself. Complete NYM string quartets for starters  :)
All good wishes to you
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on April 26, 2020, 10:27:24 AM
OT, I must send you the Moeran study we've corresponded about, - never entirely forgotten, but distractions have intervened.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 26, 2020, 01:46:59 PM
OT, I must send you the Moeran study we've corresponded about, - never entirely forgotten, but distractions have intervened.
OT
Many thanks Greg but in your own time.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2020, 01:22:19 AM
I remember the Northern Flowers recording of Symphony No.22 as clearly superior to Svetlanov, and far better played, - though I can't elaborate more on that impression from this distance.   Have you heard it?

For a recently posted concert performance (2009) of the Cello Concerto see:

   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbNpliOsA2E

It's idionsyncratic (very slow and somewhat distended to my ears), - also idiosyncratically and rather amateurishly filmed, - but interesting to hear and watch nonetheless.
The 2nd movement especially sounds at times almost like a work I've not heard before, and very peculiar.
I agree with you Greg about the Northern Flowers recording of Symphony No.22 conducted by Alexander Titov. From the start it comes across as a more intense, lyrical and deeply felt performance than Svetlanov's recording, good as that one is.
PS the ending of the symphony is incomparably more moving IMO that the Svetlanov, especially due to the spacious and more lyrical treatment of the final minutes - I was moved, as never before by this symphony. There is an underlying sense of sadness and tragedy that I had not fully appreciated before. Thank you for alerting me to how good this performance is.
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 27, 2020, 03:20:02 AM
Listened to Nos. 16 & 17 so far today. After this, I have 12 remaining, including the two I'd already heard prior to getting this box. Plenty of these symphonies have properly weighty and profound slow movements. These two are no exception. And the conclusion of No. 16 is a real hammerblow!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2020, 04:13:04 AM
Listened to Nos. 16 & 17 so far today. After this, I have 12 remaining, including the two I'd already heard prior to getting this box. Plenty of these symphonies have properly weighty and profound slow movements. These two are no exception. And the conclusion of No. 16 is a real hammerblow!

No.17 is one of the best I think and 16 has a wonderfully lugubrious slow movement.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 27, 2020, 07:53:35 AM
What are y'all's favourites among his symphonies?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 27, 2020, 09:30:50 AM
What are y'all's favourites among his symphonies?

So far ( listening to 24 for first time this evening) 8, 11 and 17 left the strongest impression. I also liked 3 very much, especially the finale. *Another, and I need to check back which, a symphony with two ordinary movements and a slow movement containing some Miaskovsky’s greatest music. None are less then excellent and crucially for so many symphonies Miaskovsky never repeats himself which is some achievement.

Edit : * 12th.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 27, 2020, 10:30:38 AM
What are y'all's favourites among his symphonies?

The ones I remember the most are: 5, 8, 15, 16, 17 (wonderful slow movement), 19, 22, 24, 25 (that main theme of the 1st movement is just beautiful) and 27. I find the 6th with several longueurs, albeit I do recognize its merits. I should listen to the right performance in order to make a better opinion of it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2020, 11:47:26 AM
What are y'all's favourites among his symphonies?
Ok here goes:
3,6,11,15,17,21,24,25,27.

Top five would be: 3,6,17, 21,27
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on April 27, 2020, 10:28:35 PM
Listening to Symphony No. 20 in E major, and it's another instance where I feel like the composer credited the symphony with the wrong key. No. 7 "in B minor" to me has hardly any B minor in it at all, and it certainly never establishes that key as home. And in No. 20, I'm hearing E minor a lot more than the E major it's listed as being in.

To be clear, I still really enjoyed both works.
I like No. 20 a lot as well. Richard Taruskin called the slow movement Myaskovsky's "Land of Hope and Glory" but I don't see the resemblance personally; still a quite good slow movement though.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2020, 10:36:27 PM
I like No. 20 a lot as well. Richard Taruskin called the slow movement Myaskovsky's "Land of Hope and Glory" but I don't see the resemblance personally; still a quite good slow movement though.
Right - must give this one another listen to.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 27, 2020, 10:57:52 PM
For a cycle with so many entries, all of them have piqued my interest in one form or another. That is incredibly impressive. It's obviously too early for me to pick out any real favourites. And it might take some months for me to truly digest all of them, as I enter them into my regular listening rota alongside other composers. At the moment I'm still in the process of giving them a first listen. After No. 4 (I'm at the finale as I write this), I have remaining 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 15, 24 and 26.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 27, 2020, 11:26:00 PM
I am surprised that 23 does not figure more prominently in lists, in fact not at all I think. I do like the most Miaskovsky's nostalgic and melancholy side, so this symphony is right up my street. Special mention to the author of the notes (not a million miles from this thread ;)) who's erudite commentary and background of the folk inspired 23rd immeasurably contributed to my understanding and enjoyment of the work. I will add 23 to my list.

I am not sure I completely go along with the premise that 22 is not a war symphony. Not though, I agree, the actual act of war itself. The opening movement seems to depict the gathering threat of war and the ending of normal life. The great slow movement, the anguish and devastation left by war. Followed by an exuberant finale celebrating a great victory - the Soviet authorities would not have it end any other way!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2020, 11:44:07 PM
I am surprised that 23 does not figure more prominently in lists, in fact not at all I think. I do like the most Miaskovsky's nostalgic and melancholy side, so this symphony is right up my street. Special mention to the author of the notes (not a million miles from this thread ;)) who's erudite commentary and background of the folk inspired 23rd immeasurably contributed to my understanding and enjoyment of the work. I will add 23 to my list.

I am not sure I completely go along with the premise that 22 is not a war symphony. Not though, I agree, the actual act of war itself. The opening movement seems to depict the gathering threat of war and the ending of normal life. The great slow movement, the anguish and devastation left by war. Followed by an exuberant finale celebrating a great victory - the Soviet authorities would not have it end any other way!
:)
Actually I do like 23 a lot, especially the soulful opening movement and it's possibly the most approachable of them all. I remember that I was constantly playing that fine old EMI/Melodiya LP featuring it, coupled with Shchedrin's equally fine First Symphony, when I discovered it in the High Street Kensington Music Library in my youth. As for Symphony No.22 my attitude to it has been rather transformed by listening, yesterday, to Alexander Titov's recording on the Northern Flowers label as recommended by Greg ('J'). Good as the Svetlanov recording is (one of the earliest NYM LPs in my collection), the Titov IMO presents it as a much greater work, relating it more closely to its wartime origins.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 28, 2020, 09:58:44 AM
I see there are three more volumes of orchestral works not included in the Complete Symphonies set, which I shall have to acquire individually. The Op. 32 works for small orchestra I already have thanks to a random charity shop purchase back when charity shops were a thing that existed. I'm also looking at picking up at some point the Naxos issue that collects together the Violin Concertos by Myaskovsky and Weinberg. Then that should pretty much be me done as far as orchestral Myaskovsky goes.

It's strange how, given how vast his orchestral repertoire is, he did not leave us with a Piano Concerto.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2020, 10:42:46 AM
I see there are three more volumes of orchestral works not included in the Complete Symphonies set, which I shall have to acquire individually. The Op. 32 works for small orchestra I already have thanks to a random charity shop purchase back when charity shops were a thing that existed. I'm also looking at picking up at some point the Naxos issue that collects together the Violin Concertos by Myaskovsky and Weinberg. Then that should pretty much be me done as far as orchestral Myaskovsky goes.

It's strange how, given how vast his orchestral repertoire is, he did not leave us with a Piano Concerto.

No opera either. The big recording gap in the catalogue is the choral work 'The Kremlin at Night', which is very good (it's on You Tube) and 'Kirov is amongst us'.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 30, 2020, 07:44:33 AM
After six days, I'm reaching the end of this first playthrough of the complete symphonies. I'm ending (for no particular reason) with No. 24.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 30, 2020, 08:03:56 AM
After six days, I'm reaching the end of this first playthrough of the complete symphonies. I'm ending (for no particular reason) with No. 24.
Which is one of the strongest and most deeply felt I think.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on May 05, 2020, 11:01:47 PM
Which is one of the strongest and most deeply felt I think.

It certainly is, and dramatic too, but I tend to recoil against over-emotional (for me) music. I listen at a rough guess only once to a Mahler symphony a year, too much angst. I need to return to 24 and also 15.

On the other hand 25 I loved and, emotion is a funny thing, I felt most moved and sad at the close. I think it was the feeling of resignation. The opening movement is one of the best things Miaskovsky has written - trembling strings with a slow bass tread. Elgar often uses a similar bass line which is one of the finest things in his music. Come to think of it the excellent and lighter second movement is a bit Elgar-ish too. The powerful finale sweeps along to the coda which has a journey's end feel about it, and I am not referring to the symphony.


 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on May 05, 2020, 11:05:09 PM
I don't know how much of it is Wagner's fault, but I found the ending of No. 25 somewhat transcendent in the way that the end of Götterdämmerung is. Both end in the same-sounding key (D flat major) and both final chords reach an intensely fortissississ...imo before dying down to a contended final resting-place.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on May 06, 2020, 07:02:38 AM
A review of the Kondrashin 6th from Gregor Tassie that is well worth reading by anyone with an interest in Miaskovsky or this symphony.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/May/Myaskovsky_sy6_ALC1421.htm
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 10, 2020, 07:28:10 AM
For those yet to dip their toes (or ears!) into the world of Miaskovsky - here's a tempting thing..... the COMPLETE Svetlanov cycle downloadable for £6.00... (yes six) from ClassicSelectWorld.  Not the highest bit-rates but genuine and legit.  Elsewhere on this site you can find a lot of amazing download bargains - the old Bach Guild "big boxes" (often Vanguard/Vox sourced plus some Alto re-releases etc) for just £1.00.  At that price what's not worth the risk!

https://classicselectworlddigital.com/collections/musical-concepts-mc-library/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 10, 2020, 08:00:42 AM
I need to dip back into Myaskovsky’s symphonies. I had recently bought (before the pandemic) the complete symphony sets on Olympia and the SQs on Northern Flowers, but haven’t cracked either open yet. I own the initial set of symphonies on the Warner label, but it had several defective discs and it seems that it wasn’t just one time problem, I had bought another one and the same errors occurred, so I decided to keep it on the condition the seller reimburse me for the shipping, which they thankfully did. Anyway, I’ll be posting my thoughts here in the next week or so. I recall being hugely impressed with the later symphonies, but this has been quite some time ago since I’ve heard any of them. The main caveat of the newer Olympia set is it doesn’t have a lot of the bonus works that came with the Warner set. I’ll have to see if there’s a separate issue on Olympia containing these works or perhaps someone here knows off-hand if such a recording exists?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on May 10, 2020, 08:33:03 AM
The three volumes of other orchestral works are available as individual discs.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 10, 2020, 09:34:34 AM
The three volumes of other orchestral works are available as individual discs.

Kudos, Maestro. 8) I’ll check those out.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 10, 2020, 09:22:00 PM
I need to dip back into Myaskovsky’s symphonies. I had recently bought (before the pandemic) the complete symphony sets on Olympia and the SQs on Northern Flowers, but haven’t cracked either open yet. I own the initial set of symphonies on the Warner label, but it had several defective discs and it seems that it wasn’t just one time problem, I had bought another one and the same errors occurred, so I decided to keep it on the condition the seller reimburse me for the shipping, which they thankfully did. Anyway, I’ll be posting my thoughts here in the next week or so. I recall being hugely impressed with the later symphonies, but this has been quite some time ago since I’ve heard any of them. The main caveat of the newer Olympia set is it doesn’t have a lot of the bonus works that came with the Warner set. I’ll have to see if there’s a separate issue on Olympia containing these works or perhaps someone here knows off-hand if such a recording exists?
I'll be very interested to know what you think of it John. When you say 'Olympia' do you mean the new Alto boxed set (the same recordings as on Olympia and Warner)? If so be aware that the booklet inadvertently missed out the notes for four of the twenty-seven symphonies due to an oversight. However Alto have now loaded them up (typed out by me - a long story), so if you find the boxed set on their website you can download the missing notes. I'll try to find a link in a moment:

Here they are (yellow link):
https://altocd.com/product/alc3141

PS remember that Svetlanov's very good performance of the epic Symphony No.6 in the boxed set does not feature the optional chorus at the end, which I think is a pity. However, I think that you'll find that you do possess a different performance in your collection, also on Alto, featuring the choir at the end.
 8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on May 10, 2020, 11:06:12 PM
I'm curious to hear a version of No. 6 with the choir. To me, I don't feel like the finale is lacking in any way at all.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 11, 2020, 03:03:26 AM
I'll be very interested to know what you think of it John. When you say 'Olympia' do you mean the new Alto boxed set (the same recordings as on Olympia and Warner)? If so be aware that the booklet inadvertently missed out the notes for four of the twenty-seven symphonies due to an oversight. However Alto have now loaded them up (typed out by me - a long story), so if you find the boxed set on their website you can download the missing notes. I'll try to find a link in a moment:

Here they are (yellow link):
https://altocd.com/product/alc3141

PS remember that Svetlanov's very good performance of the epic Symphony No.6 in the boxed set does not feature the optional chorus at the end, which I think is a pity. However, I think that you'll find that you do possess a different performance in your collection, also on Alto, featuring the choir at the end.
 8)

Thanks, Jeffrey. I haven’t even looked at the booklet yet. This is the set I own:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SL1200_.jpg)

Ah yes, that recording you sent me. ;) I’ll have to give it a listen whenever I decide to dig into Myaskovsky --- I see it’s conducted by Kondrashin, so that’s very cool. Thanks again for sending me that recording, especially now that I have a different version of the 6th!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 11, 2020, 04:21:38 AM
Thanks, Jeffrey. I haven’t even looked at the booklet yet. This is the set I own:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SL1200_.jpg)

Ah yes, that recording you sent me. ;) I’ll have to give it a listen whenever I decide to dig into Myaskovsky --- I see it’s conducted by Kondrashin, so that’s very cool. Thanks again for sending me that recording, especially now that I have a different version of the 6th!
Yes, that's the new Alto set John. So, now you have a version of Symphony No.6 with and without the choir! The Svetlanov is excellent but the Kondrashin (the earlier of his two recordings of that score) is in a class of its own IMO.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 11, 2020, 05:15:39 AM
Yes, that's the new Alto set John. So, now you have a version of Symphony No.6 with and without the choir! The Svetlanov is excellent but the Kondrashin (the earlier of his two recordings of that score) is in a class of its own IMO.

Yeah, Svetlanov is excellent in Myaskovsky, but I imagine that Kondrashin is something else. 8) By the way, what do you think of his Cello Sonatas and the concerti for violin and cello? I have the Violin Concerto in two performances, which I recall the Repin/Gergiev performance was the one I liked the best.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 11, 2020, 05:41:42 AM
Yeah, Svetlanov is excellent in Myaskovsky, but I imagine that Kondrashin is something else. 8) By the way, what do you think of his Cello Sonatas and the concerti for violin and cello? I have the Violin Concerto in two performances, which I recall the Repin/Gergiev performance was the one I liked the best.
The Cello Concerto is the first work I ever heard by Miaskovsky - on the radio decades ago. I think that it's great, especially the Rostropovich/Malcolm Sargent recording. I enjoy the Violin Concero as well. It is quite sunny and upbeat with a catchy finale. I like the Feigin/Dmitriev version best (Olympia/Melodiya) probably because it's how I came to know the work in the first place:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 11, 2020, 06:09:56 AM
The Cello Concerto is the first work I ever heard by Miaskovsky - on the radio decades ago. I think that it's great, especially the Rostropovich/Malcolm Sargent recording. I enjoy the Violin Concero as well. It is quite sunny and upbeat with a catchy finale. I like the Feigin/Dmitriev version best (Olympia/Melodiya) probably because it's how I came to know the work in the first place:
(http://)

Great to hear, Jeffrey. Thanks for the feedback.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: J on May 11, 2020, 09:46:00 AM
Agree with Jeffrey that Feigin is top choice for the VC, if you can find it (I think it can be heard on YouTube).  The playing just seems to flow noticeably more naturally than the alternatives, especially in the songful middle (slow) movement.

That Olympia CD (coupled with Svetlanov's Symphony 22) was my very first Myaskovsky encounter, the CD cover of which induces no little nostalgia in me.

As for the Cello Concerto, my preference has long been Lloyd-Webber/M Shostakovich, again, largely for its naturalness and flow (should "natural" be a banned word?).

They don't over interpret the piece, and I like Lloyd-Webber's smooth legato phrasing (not at all bland to my ears).

If you're partial to a lot of fussing and laboring, Feigin & Lloyd Webber aren't the tickets you want for these works, - but did I say how just how smoothly and naturally they flow?

My choices, anyway.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 11, 2020, 09:50:48 AM
Agree with Jeffrey that Feigin is top choice for the VC, if you can find it (I think it can be heard on YouTube).  The playing just seems to flow noticeably more naturally than the alternatives, especially in the songful middle (slow) movement.

That Olympia CD (coupled with Svetlanov's Symphony 22) was my very first Myaskovsky encounter, the CD cover of which induces no little nostalgia in me.

As for the Cello Concerto, my preference has long been Lloyd-Webber/M Shostakovich, again, largely for its naturalness and flow (should "natural" be a banned word?).

They don't over interpret the piece, and I like Lloyd-Webber's smooth legato phrasing (not at all bland to my ears).

If you're partial to a lot of fussing and laboring, Feigin & Lloyd Webber aren't the tickets you want for these works, - but did I say how just how smoothly and naturally they flow?

My choices, anyway.

Very cool. I’ll keep these performances in mind. Thanks!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 11, 2020, 01:10:55 PM
Agree with Jeffrey that Feigin is top choice for the VC, if you can find it (I think it can be heard on YouTube).  The playing just seems to flow noticeably more naturally than the alternatives, especially in the songful middle (slow) movement.

That Olympia CD (coupled with Svetlanov's Symphony 22) was my very first Myaskovsky encounter, the CD cover of which induces no little nostalgia in me.

As for the Cello Concerto, my preference has long been Lloyd-Webber/M Shostakovich, again, largely for its naturalness and flow (should "natural" be a banned word?).

They don't over interpret the piece, and I like Lloyd-Webber's smooth legato phrasing (not at all bland to my ears).

If you're partial to a lot of fussing and laboring, Feigin & Lloyd Webber aren't the tickets you want for these works, - but did I say how just how smoothly and naturally they flow?

My choices, anyway.
Interesting comments. I liked those original Olympia series 'Socialist Realist'-type CD cover images as well. That particular painting is called 'The Return' (from 1969) by M. Kugach. Presumably a Red Army soldier returning from the war and a good choice for Symphony 22 which is from 1942.

PS that CD is available, second-hand, from Amazon.com for about $20. From Amazon UK it is priced at over £1200  :o
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 14, 2020, 06:03:59 AM
Here’s a fantastic photo of two former classmates chatting:

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8HXhkSW0eU0/Vd_T9gdCoBI/AAAAAAAACws/t9k1mlXBs-k/s1600/499730206410f829d5ae06.jpg)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2020, 06:15:17 AM
Here’s a fantastic photo of two former classmates chatting:

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8HXhkSW0eU0/Vd_T9gdCoBI/AAAAAAAACws/t9k1mlXBs-k/s1600/499730206410f829d5ae06.jpg)
Lovely! I think that the 20 year old Miaskovsky was in the same class as the 10 year old Prokofiev or something like that. Prokofiev had a reputation for being acerbic and critical and yet he remained remarkably loyal to Miaskovsky throughout his life.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 14, 2020, 06:56:47 AM
Lovely! I think that the 20 year old Miaskovsky was in the same class as the 10 year old Prokofiev or something like that. Prokofiev had a reputation for being acerbic and critical and yet he remained remarkably loyal to Miaskovsky throughout his life.

Yes, the best I can remember he was good friends with Myaskovsky. I think the relationship between Prokofiev and Shostakovich, however, was an interesting one. Shostakovich said (or believed to have said) that he thought that Prokofiev never took him seriously as a composer. But this was quoted through Testimony and I can’t say if this was accurate or not.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2020, 07:37:10 AM
Yes, the best I can remember he was good friends with Myaskovsky. I think the relationship between Prokofiev and Shostakovich, however, was an interesting one. Shostakovich said (or believed to have said) that he thought that Prokofiev never took him seriously as a composer. But this was quoted through Testimony and I can’t say if this was accurate or not.

I know that if a journalist or writer turned up early to interview Prokofiev a hand would appear out of the front door holding a large clock and the door would then be slammed shut.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 14, 2020, 08:00:36 AM
I know that if a journalist or writer turned up early to interview Prokofiev a hand would appear out of the front door holding a large clock and the door would then be slammed shut.

 :laugh:
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on May 14, 2020, 09:12:07 AM
I know that if a journalist or writer turned up early to interview Prokofiev a hand would appear out of the front door holding a large clock and the door would then be slammed shut.

That is typical of the man, Jeffrey. Prokofiev and Miaskovsky had a great relationship, one played the role of errant son and the other sensible father. I have told the story before that on a picnic Prokofiev teased Miaskovsky by dropping broken egg shells on the ground and watching Miaskovsky digging a small hole to bury them and not leave a mess. There was no jealousy between them which may (only guessing) not be the case with DSCH.     
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2020, 01:12:06 PM
That is typical of the man, Jeffrey. Prokofiev and Miaskovsky had a great relationship, one played the role of errant son and the other sensible father. I have told the story before that on a picnic Prokofiev teased Miaskovsky by dropping broken egg shells on the ground and watching Miaskovsky digging a small hole to bury them and not leave a mess. There was no jealousy between them which may (only guessing) not be the case with DSCH.     
That's a lovely story and, I imagine, typical of Miaskovsky, who, by all accounts was a very courteous and dignified individual. Yes, you are right about the absence of jealousy in their relationship. Somewhere there is a photo of Prokofiev unveiling a plaque in memory of his old friend in Moscow.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 26, 2020, 04:39:23 AM
Just been listening to this fine CD of NYM's piano music, highlights being the Narrante e lugubre central movement of the 'Sonatine' and the noble finale of the 5th Piano Sonata. If you wanted a single CD of Miaskovsky's piano music this is the one that I'd recommend:
(http://)

And here's the finale of the 5th Piano Sonata, featuring one of NYM's finest tunes (IMO):
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=l3RDo9O73x8
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 26, 2020, 05:10:45 AM
Just been listening to this fine CD of NYM's piano music, highlights being the Narrante e lugubre central movement of the 'Sonatine' and the noble finale of the 5th Piano Sonata. If you wanted a single CD of Miaskovsky's piano music this is the one that I'd recommend:
(http://)

And here's the finale of the 5th Piano Sonata, featuring one of NYM's finest tunes (IMO):
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=l3RDo9O73x8

Very nice, Jeffrey. I’ll get around to Myaskovsky’s piano music at some point I’m sure. I’ll probably end up going with the complete set since I’m ‘complete’ kind of guy. ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on May 26, 2020, 09:20:42 AM
It’s a shame that the Taneyev Quartet on Northern Flowers is the only game in town (to my knowledge) for all the Miaskovsky quartets except the 13th. To my ears, they play with a lack of tonal variety and colors that makes the music sound rather dull and lifeless. The Pacifica Quartet’s recording of the 13th quartet on Chandos is proof of what a great group can do with this music!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 26, 2020, 09:27:06 AM
Very nice, Jeffrey. I’ll get around to Myaskovsky’s piano music at some point I’m sure. I’ll probably end up going with the complete set since I’m ‘complete’ kind of guy. ;)
Well, this is the set you need then!
(http://)
😀
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 26, 2020, 09:31:16 AM
It’s a shame that the Taneyev Quartet on Northern Flowers is the only game in town (to my knowledge) for all the Miaskovsky quartets except the 13th. To my ears, they play with a lack of tonal variety and colors that makes the music sound rather dull and lifeless. The Pacifica Quartet’s recording of the 13th quartet on Chandos is proof of a what a great group can do with this music!

True, but, as you mentioned, it’s all we have. I think the performances are serviceable, but it’s true that there could be more nuance and expressiveness in their performances. But, hey, at least we can listen them!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on September 29, 2020, 12:06:45 AM
Enjoyed this live concert of the (concise) 21st Symphony with Vasiliev conducting the Siberian SO.

https://youtu.be/bHb6JMXJW8o

As an aside, I much prefer the static camera presentation used here. I find the BBC constant movement of camera angles and shots distracting.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 29, 2020, 03:01:06 AM
Enjoyed this live concert of the (concise) 21st Symphony with Vasiliev conducting the Siberian SO.

https://youtu.be/bHb6JMXJW8o

As an aside, I much prefer the static camera presentation used here. I find the BBC constant movement of camera angles and shots distracting.

Thanks for posting this Lol. I listened to it with much pleasure. It is a very eloquent and thoughtful performance of what is perhaps Miaskovsky's greatest symphony, although without quite the same level of urgency as in my favourite recorded performances (oddly by non-Russian forces) from Morton Gould with the Chicago SO (RCA) and David Measham with the New Philharmonia Orchestra (Unicorn). However, it's an equally valid lyrical interpretation.  Svetlanov's recording on Olympia/Alto is also excellent. I'm glad that the audience were appreciative of the fine performance and I totally agree with your point about the static camera angle. Symphony No. 21 is one of only two Miaskovsky symphonies that I have seen live (No.6 is the other one). My brother and much-missed sister-in-law took me to see a performance of it in London, as a birthday treat, many years ago. I remember how excited I was to finally hear a Miaskovsky symphony live in concert!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on September 29, 2020, 06:14:24 AM
Thanks for posting this Lol. I listened to it with much pleasure. It is a very eloquent and thoughtful performance of what is perhaps Miaskovsky's greatest symphony, although without quite the same level of urgency as in my favourite recorded performances (oddly by non-Russian forces) from Morton Gould with the Chicago SO (RCA) and David Measham with the New Philharmonia Orchestra (Unicorn). However, it's an equally valid lyrical interpretation.  Svetlanov's recording on Olympia/Alto is also excellent. I'm glad that the audience were appreciative of the fine performance and I totally agree with your point about the static camera angle. Symphony No. 21 is one of only two Miaskovsky symphonies that I have seen live (No.6 is the other one). My brother and much-missed sister-in-law took me to see a performance of it in London, as a birthday treat, many years ago. I remember how excited I was to finally hear a Miaskovsky symphony live in concert!

The Morton Gould recording is on my wish list, Jeffrey. I plan on giving Measham a spin this evening. I enjoyed the Vasiliev performance so much I played the video twice - it was raining! ;) "Eloquent" is spot on and I quite like that. The Siberian Symphony Orchestra are impressive IMO.

Sorry to read that this particular symphony has a sad connotation for you.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 29, 2020, 07:22:19 AM
The Morton Gould recording is on my wish list, Jeffrey. I plan on giving Measham a spin this evening. I enjoyed the Vasiliev performance so much I played the video twice - it was raining! ;) "Eloquent" is spot on and I quite like that. The Siberian Symphony Orchestra are impressive IMO.

Sorry to read that this particular symphony has a sad connotation for you.

Oh, thanks Lol - my sister-in-law was more like the sister that I never had. She died in 2013 and I still miss her a lot.
Yes, that was a lovely reflective performance of the 21st Symphony and I'm not surprised that you listened to it again. Hope you find the Morton Gould LP. Not that long ago it was released finally on CD as part of a Morton Gould boxed set, which I was only aware of through this forum. I'm glad that they reproduced the oriental/psychedelic cover art on the CD. You get a very nice performance of Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Antar' Symphony as well, which shares some thematic material with the Miaskovsky symphony:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Scion7 on September 29, 2020, 08:21:52 AM
Enjoyed this live concert of the (concise) 21st Symphony with Vasiliev conducting the Siberian SO.
https://youtu.be/bHb6JMXJW8o

That oblast is way out there!  (https://i.postimg.cc/fknxQcBg/Omensk.jpg)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on September 29, 2020, 08:28:12 AM
I also like the Ural Philharmonic's recording of the 6th Symphony - one of the best I think.
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Papy Oli on September 29, 2020, 11:24:34 PM
Has anybody downloaded the Myaskovsky set from this site at all please ?

https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov (https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov)

If yes, what is the bit rate of their files please ? Their FAQ only mentions the file type as mp3. Thank you.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on September 30, 2020, 05:09:20 AM
Has anybody downloaded the Myaskovsky set from this site at all please ?

https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov (https://classicselectworlddigital.com/products/myaskovsky-the-complete-symphonies-russian-federation-symphony-orchestra-evgeny-svetlanov)

If yes, what is the bit rate of their files please ? Their FAQ only mentions the file type as mp3. Thank you.

I don't think it's a legitimate outfit.  Not a real company, probably one person selling stuff they downloaded or procure after a sale.  Read through the comments in this thread:
https://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/thoughts-on-classicselect.783711/

Also, how important is bit rate on old Soviet era analog recordings? 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Leo K. on October 07, 2020, 08:35:38 AM
New release of Complete Symphonies:
 :)
(http://)

Wow, I just bought the download on Amazon for $7.99 and so glad I did. Listened to Symphonies 13 and 3 so far, I'm loving this!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 07, 2020, 08:38:39 AM
Wow, I just bought the download on Amazon for $7.99 and so glad I did. Listened to Symphonies 13 and 3 so far, I'm loving this!
That's great value I must say. 13 is one of the best 'modernist' ones and the lugubrious No.3 is an early high-point IMO. It was one of the first that I got to know in the days of LP:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: JBS on October 07, 2020, 04:57:00 PM
Reposting this, which I originally wrote last night in WAYLT2
........
Second listen
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61DmqT5nSvL.jpg)

Myaskovsky String Quartets performed by the Taneyev Quartet.

Second listen to this set, but not in chronological order. At the moment SQs 1-3.

Perhaps the composer was responding to pressure from ideologues and censors, but his quartets are a sort of backwards journey through the genre's history.  The earlier quartets sound 20th century and in line with the era in which they were written; the middle quartets are 19th century Brahms/Schumann/middle period Beethoven, and the final quartets have a Haydnesque atmosphere (but neo-classical would not be a good label).

I do like everything I've heard
......
I'll only add that in saying 20th century I was thinking mostly of Bartok and Shostakovich, and that I didn't notice any flaws in the performances or sonics.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on October 11, 2020, 06:20:04 AM
Only a passing reference to Miaskovsky but Rob Cowen's video-talk on the great Russian conductor Nikolai Golovanov is of interest.

https://youtu.be/J69wVh5epBo
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 11, 2020, 12:53:18 PM
Only a passing reference to Miaskovsky but Rob Cowen's video-talk on the great Russian conductor Nikolai Golovanov is of interest.

https://youtu.be/J69wVh5epBo

Thanks for posting this Lol. Rob Cowan's room rather resembles my own!  ::)
I had no idea that Golovanov had been treated in that appalling way by the soviet authorities for using a Jewish bass in his recording of Boris Godunov. I have some fine recordings by Golovanov of the music of Rachmaninov and Glazunov - what a pity that he did not record Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony following his, by all accounts, overwhelming premiere performance.
Rob Cowan is a bit like a more restrained and less excitable David Hurwitz.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on October 12, 2020, 12:09:26 AM
Thanks for posting this Lol. Rob Cowan's room rather resembles my own!  ::)
I had no idea that Golovanov had been treated in that appalling way by the soviet authorities for using a Jewish bass in his recording of Boris Godunov. I have some fine recordings by Golovanov of the music of Rachmaninov and Glazunov - what a pity that he did not record Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony following his, by all accounts, overwhelming premiere performance.
Rob Cowan is a bit like a more restrained and less excitable David Hurwitz.

I thought the sample Cowan played from Glazunov (6th Symphony?) was lovely, Jeffrey. Never heard 1812 played like that!!

It amuses me comparing Hurwitz and Cowan, if you made up a threesome visit to a pub you would not get a word in edgeways! The one thing they have in common is a boundless enthusiasm for music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on October 12, 2020, 12:52:00 AM
I thought the sample Cowan played from Glazunov (6th Symphony?) was lovely, Jeffrey. Never heard 1812 played like that!!

It amuses me comparing Hurwitz and Cowan, if you made up a threesome visit to a pub you would not get a word in edgeways! The one thing they have in common is a boundless enthusiasm for music.
Haha - indeed - a nice thought.
I have CDs of Golovanov conducting Rachmaninov's symphonies 2 and 3 which are excellent and also this CD featuring that fine performance of Glazunov's 6th Symphony:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 29, 2020, 01:26:20 AM
New release:
(http://)
No 27 with Prokofiev's 6th Symphony will be released next year.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on November 29, 2020, 03:15:10 AM
27 or 21?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 29, 2020, 04:29:31 AM
27 or 21?
21 with Prokofiev Symphony 5 is available now.
27 with Prokofiev Symphony 6 is coming in 2021

Sorry if I didn't make this clear.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 06, 2020, 01:11:53 PM
Cross-posted from the WAYL2 thread, as I’m currently embarked in a listening binge of the symphonies. There may be some repetition from one post to the other... ::)

Quote
From the Alto box:

(https://img.discogs.com/EdA3JXQk8Nm_Wfy_37wXj517hw4=/fit-in/600x592/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10357249-1566504433-4896.jpeg.jpg)

Before I bought the Alto box, I had collected about half of its contents on individual Olympia issues many years ago. Then the missing issues went missing for good  :(. The good thing is that the box takes only a fraction of the shelf space.

Myaskovsky’s themes are often quite simple. From them he patiently builds mighty edifices of sound and from those are generated surging currents and powerful climaxes. Svetlanov’s involvement is almost that of a co-creator. One of the major undertakings of the recording era.

Quote
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5187BFH5DQL._AC_.jpg)

Not masterpieces, but these two symphonies do contain masterful moments that make the whole disc wonderfully satisfying. Myaskovsky’s forte are those big, imposing first movements and soulful, melancholic slow ones. About half of his symphonies are in three movements (which is the case with the two recorded here) with the last movement being more complex structurally (sometimes embedding a scherzo within them). Both no 2 and no 18 contain richly melodic slow movements. The link between Tchaikovsky, Glière and Rachmaninoff is palpable. They drew their inspiration from the same well.

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/CJI-0g6rD99Zu61SMFhU1Q57GBo=/fit-in/600x591/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10357325-1566504474-4560.jpeg.jpg)

That 3rd symphony from 1914 is mighty impressive, maybe the best I’ve heard from that composer. The first movement is a huge edifice building up to intense statements of pain and anguish. In the second (last) movement strong thematic influences by Franck and Wagner are welded in a gripping narrative. There is nothing derivative in the way he uses what was already by then part of the musical tools of 20th century musical language. Myaskovsky is very much his own man.

Symphony no 13 from 1933 is in one movement and is described as akin to a symphonic poem or maybe a symphonic work in the style of Skryabin. It is a somber, melancholy work. I do not hear the strife and conflict of the 3rd, rather a sort of rampant anguish tinged with resignation.

The Alto box respects the Olympia series’ original layout. It brings together early and middle/late works. There is a practical reason behind this programming schedule: the early works are bigger, longer than the middle or late ones, so typically a 45 minute early symphony will be coupled with a 25-30 minute late one. Obviously there could have been many different permutations

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/8C_P6DEps-leDl1voicRa7wV5uo=/fit-in/600x603/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-7779255-1560402029-3030.jpeg.jpg)

From 1918 and 1932.

No 4 is a bleak work, seemingly drained of emotion (the heading of the central movement is Largo, freddo e senza espressione  ???). As if to make up the corpse the following and last movement is an Allegro energico e marcato. It’s also the least interesting movement. The first two are colossally intimidating in their bleakness. I'm not sure they could have been topped - or at least equalled - by anything else.

No 11 was composed in 1932 and was Myaskovsky’s first symphony after an unusually long hiatus of 5 years. He churned out 6 symphonies in the period 1932-34. His lifelong friend Prokofiev had written to him as early as 1908 that « Unlike Richard Wagner, you have the characteristic of always being dissatisfied with yourself ». These bouts of silence followed by a rush of activity were recurrent in his career, suggesting he may have been manic depressive. Be that as it may, the 11th presents strongly profiled themes, a lot of rythmic action as if the composer's creative juices were flowing once more irrepressibly.

These first two movements of no 4 are certain to etch in the memory.

As usual, playing and conducting are extremely committed and the sound fully satisfying. Obviously Svetlanov and friends were on a mission.

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/7tWM_zblsOnSfcYYPrr09I6BOCI=/fit-in/600x601/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13755568-1560437782-6317.jpeg.jpg)

Second listening today.

No 5 (1918) is certainly a highlight of the series, with beautiful themes, superb atmosphere and an excellent balance between moods - both within movements and in its overall structure. Yesterday I listened to the 4th symphony and was bowled over by its first two movements. In contrast the finale - the symphony is in 3 movements - struck me as perfunctory, almost superfluous (I can understand why Schubert left his b minor symphony unfinished. What more could be said after two perfect, almost supernatural movements?). That is not the case with the 5th symphony (in 4 movements) where the inventiveness and artistry of the last two movements perfectly complement the aching beauty and breadth of the first two. A masterpiece IMO.

The 12th from 1932 is in 3 movements - Myaskovsky constantly alternated formats. It is resolutely folk-based in its thematic armoury. Have the composer’s style or ideas evolved in the intervening years ? Not really. The 5th was written at the end of WWI. The 5th as Stalin’s grip on political, social, cultural institutions was becoming absolute. The same kind of oppressiveness, uneasy joy, tragedy, longing recurs throughout, year after year, symphony after symphony. Among the first 14, only one is in a major key. That’s a lot of music in a minor key ! And yet a sense of beauty emerges that keeps the ear not just interested, but wanting more of the stuff. Myaskovsky’s relish for life (even a hard, uneasy one) is evident throughout this 12th symphony.

Sometimes Myskovsky sounds like a precursor of Pettersson, sometimes like a reincarnation of Tchaikovsky, Glazunov or Mussorgsky. The atmosphere of Act III from Tristan und Isolde or that of Act II from Siegfried suffuse the more somber, aching moments. Russian folk songs often break into the mix. Rather curiously, I don’t detect any hint of Prokofiev. And yet both composers were lifelong friends from their early days in the St Petersburg Conservatory. They often worked together, swapping musical ideas. A number of Prokofiev works owe their title to Myaskovsky. Listening to Myaskovsky is like a journey into russian culture, its soil, its soul, its people.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on December 06, 2020, 04:54:30 PM
You're taking seriously this symphonic traversal, André. Very good.

I also felt the Symphony No. 5 special, but not the 4 so at all. I vaguely was hooked, but not as much as I wanted. I recalled that from No. 14 on they were really exceptional. If on the first half, I mean, the first 13 symphonies there is more striking music than expected or you remembered as purposeful, it's will be a nice idea to revisit the cycle. Nos. 15-17, 21-25, 27 are truly special to me. His mature and more wistful humour is more redolent of my likings, not to say the awesome violin and cello concertos respectively, but chamber and piano music (though I'm not a big fan of that part of his output, but that's just me).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: amw on December 06, 2020, 05:14:08 PM
For me all the best symphonies are in the first half: 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13. But there are a few symphonies that don't quite succeed overall for me but have really special and worthwhile slow movements: 11, 20, 25, 27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on December 07, 2020, 08:55:48 AM
You're taking seriously this symphonic traversal, André. Very good.



+1

I will follow with interest and dip in the box along the way. I prefer Miaskovsky in reflective mood.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on December 07, 2020, 10:48:07 AM
Yay this thread lives again! I hope you enjoy the symphonies André! Thanks to this, I'm giving No. 8 another go right now.

For my traditional end-of-year playthrough of works I've discovered this year, I'm going to be going through 3 of these, as it's impossible to condense such a big cycle in just one work. While the individual works aren't quite decided yet, I'll simply be choosing one out of each "ten" of the cycle, so one from 1-9, another from 10-19 and a third from 20-27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 09, 2020, 12:22:30 PM
Reposted:

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/EoDLPfJOPXX80UIqGRVfttycZ0g=/fit-in/600x591/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13756864-1560458036-2925.jpeg.jpg)

I count 6 recordings of the 6th symphony in the catalogue. Maybe there are more. It’s very likely Myaskovsky’s most popular work. And yet I prefer the 4th and 5th by virtue of what I believe is slightly stronger thematic material and a tighter structure. Not that there are any defects in the 6th. It’s a bit like deciding between Tchaikovsky’s 5th or 6th. The two inner movements seemed to me very successful, with a particularly spooky scherzo, at once lumbering and flighty. It calls to mind Bruckner (6th symphony) or even Malcolm Arnold (Tam O’Shanter). Svetlanov recorded the orchestra only version, eschewing the optional choral part. The Pathétique Overture that precedes the symphony on the disc is excellent. Apparently the powers that be hated it, so it was never performed again after its premiere in 1948.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 10, 2020, 05:44:52 PM
Cross-posted.

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/z55nmzweaStnp--eYGtySvv2INg=/fit-in/600x594/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-7779239-1560541840-6441.jpeg.jpg)

Contrary to custom with the symphonies by Myaskovsky, the early one here (7) is much shorter than the late one (26). The latter was composed in a difficult period for Myaskovsky, when he was under heavy pressure from the soviet authorities to write music ‘for the people’ - meaning, folklore based. Maybe that’s why I find the results largely commonplace, if not devoid of musical merit. No 7 otoh is a short but big-boned, dramatic work of great impact. I was captivated throughout. One of the best in the series.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on December 11, 2020, 02:39:03 AM
No.7 is listed as being in B minor, but there's hardly any B minor in there at all. Plenty of bitonality, especially in that haunting opening.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 12, 2020, 07:13:56 AM
Cross-posted

Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/QWjRZd30eo86z6U54e6S3AOrKDk=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-7779246-1448607440-2626.jpeg.jpg)

A mixed bag. Symphony no 8 seemed overlong to me, at least for its rather unmemorable thematic material. Expertly orchestrated to be sure, as one would expect. No 10 is its exact contrary, a one-movement, very concentrated work teeming with ideas and high in caffeine content. The effect is surprisingly modern, devoid of folk influences and acerbic in tone. Quite the jolt after the tired-sounding 8th symphony.

I’m wondering if I’m not a bit harsh on the 8th symphony. Any comments ?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on December 12, 2020, 09:04:29 AM
I often find my mind tends to wander during listenings of the 8th Symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 12, 2020, 09:33:18 AM
Cross-posted

I’m wondering if I’m not a bit harsh on the 8th symphony. Any comments ?
I like the slow movement of No.8, once described as sounding like it had been written by 'a Russian Delius of the Steppes'.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 12, 2020, 11:49:34 AM
I like the slow movement of No.8, once described as sounding like it had been written by 'a Russian Delius of the Steppes'.

Very true. I’ve relistened to the disc today (plus another time for no 10) and that slow movement does stand out. It’s not the first time that Delius comes to mind in the slow movements of Myaskovsky’s symphonies, in the writing for the winds in particular.

That 10th symphony is decidedly an event-packed affair. It’s almost lisztian/baxian.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 14, 2020, 11:34:20 AM
Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/tqLe8LMLJH9Yo4MHmbN7WOqOlt0=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-7779251-1448607827-9452.jpeg.jpg)

Must listen again to this pair. Slow movements in both cases are arrestingly beautiful.

On second listening the 9th symphony’s stature grew substantially. It’s not only the slow movement that is outstanding, but the first two as well. The first in particular has a searching, hesitating way that suggests a quest for some lost ideal. Beautiful. Only the finale (fourth movement) disappoints somewhat, as we come down from those lofty vistas to re-enter the realm of the ordinary world.

The 20th has a similarly solemn, hieratic slow movement. It is sandwiched between two spirited allegros. The last movement has a piquant folk tune as its centrepiece. It proceeds gaily to a spirited conclusion. In this particular case (and other such movements in Myaskovsky's symphonic output) it’s natural to think that the composer happily culled from the vast russian musical heritage familiar from the works of Borodine, Kalinnikkov, Balakirev, Glazunov. Sometimes he would use genuine folk tunes, sometimes he would make up his own. This is a nicely structured wok with some memorable material. The 9th though has three truly outstanding movements to its credit. A nice disc.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 14, 2020, 11:04:50 PM
I like this recording of No.8. I find Stankovsky's recordings a bit underrated. His No.6 is one of my favourite versions:

Article on the 10th Symphony.
https://www.theguardian.com/music/tomserviceblog/2014/feb/18/symphony-guide-myaskovskys-tenth-tom-service
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 15, 2020, 06:46:10 AM
Wow, that’s quite the analysis ! Fascinating reading, thank you Jeffrey ! I don’t have any of Stankovsky’s versions. They're rare and expensive. :-[
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 15, 2020, 10:26:28 AM
Wow, that’s quite the analysis ! Fascinating reading, thank you Jeffrey ! I don’t have any of Stankovsky’s versions. They're rare and expensive. :-[

Glad you enjoyed it André.
You cannot go wrong with the Svetlanov set, which is terrific. It's worth hearing Alexander Gauk's version of Symphony 17 if you get the chance. His version of the valedictory No.27 is the most moving of all and infuriatingly never released on CD. I'm sorry that Brilliant didn't include it in one of their two Gauk boxed sets.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 15, 2020, 10:44:30 AM
When I reach no 21 I’ll compare Svetlanov with the much older (and faster) Ormandy on Sony. Other than that one it’ll be Svetlanov’s show all the way!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 15, 2020, 10:51:33 AM
When I reach no 21 I’ll compare Svetlanov with the much older (and faster) Ormandy on Sony. Other than that one it’ll be Svetlanov’s show all the way!
No.21 is, I think, the most recorded of all and one of the two which I have seen live. It was dedicated to the Chicago SO and my favourite version is with Morton Gould conducting the Chicago SO, coupled with Rimsky's fine 'Antar' Symphony, with which it shares similar thematic material. On CD it only seems to be available in a Morton Gould boxed set on RCA. Don't miss the David Measham recording on Unicorn André, usually available inexpensively online. It's a most eloquent and searching version.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on December 15, 2020, 11:36:58 AM
Listening to No. 9. I wonder what it is that makes composers lose their grip on their skill and profundity during finales. You have three incredibly deep and profound movements and then a party emerges out of nowhere for no apparent reason. I might perhaps argue that No. 27 also suffers from this. You have two incredible movements, full of depth and weight, then your stereotypical major-key finale. It almost feels out of place. Lots of composers suffer from this. There's not many symphonies where the composers hold full control of their technical skills in how to carry a full, weighted symphonic argument across an entire edifice.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roy Bland on December 15, 2020, 06:10:48 PM
Listening to No. 9. I wonder what it is that makes composers lose their grip on their skill and profundity during finales. You have three incredibly deep and profound movements and then a party emerges out of nowhere for no apparent reason. I might perhaps argue that No. 27 also suffers from this. You have two incredible movements, full of depth and weight, then your stereotypical major-key finale. It almost feels out of place. Lots of composers suffer from this. There's not many symphonies where the composers hold full control of their technical skills in how to carry a full, weighted symphonic argument across an entire edifice.
I can't agree: Myasovsky wrote 27 while he was dying. IMHO the last movement is personal answer against illness.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 16, 2020, 01:22:52 AM
I can't agree: Myasovsky wrote 27 while he was dying. IMHO the last movement is personal answer against illness.
I tend to agree. For me, the finale of No.27 is a great Paean to Life, as if the dying Miaskovsky is welcoming the return of Spring after the Winter, knowing full-well that he would not be there to see it. I find it deeply moving and coherent in the context of the symphony as a whole.

There's a new recording coming soon (Petrenko/Oslo PO) coupled with Prokofiev's 6th Symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aukhawk on December 16, 2020, 04:59:12 AM
Listening to No. 9. I wonder what it is that makes composers lose their grip on their skill and profundity during finales. You have three incredibly deep and profound movements and then a party emerges out of nowhere for no apparent reason.

Music intended for the concert hall generally needs to end on a high.  == rapturous standing ovation.  == 'received well'.  (I know there are exceptions.)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 16, 2020, 05:17:14 PM
(https://img.discogs.com/Wv9L86H10yYY0o23ZIvXOa7jCaY=/fit-in/600x594/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13764073-1560652117-4495.jpeg.jpg)

Symphony no 14 didn’t register bigly. It’s a light, folk-based work in 5 movements, more of a suite maybe. Nice slow movement.

No 22 (in 3 movements) otoh is another one of these super intense, petterssonian, angst-ridden works so typical of this composer. The finale is a positive, life-affirming movement that manages to fit perfectly with the first two. It was written in 1941, just as Hitler had turned against the USSR. One of Myaskovsky’s most successful opuses, I think.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on December 16, 2020, 07:58:23 PM
Yes, the Symphony-Ballad is a formidable and cogently argued work. There are no many recordings of this one, but Svetlanov is the one to go.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on December 16, 2020, 08:26:58 PM
I need to get back to both the SQs and symphonies --- I’ve already forgot where I left off from last time. :-[
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 17, 2020, 06:09:59 AM
I solved that problem 5 years ago with these 2 simple tools:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61U7ryLlr2L._AC_SX400_.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81STFe3aoiL._AC_SL400_.jpg)


Mini post-its and a self-inking dater. They’re right next to the cd player. That’s how I know when I last listened to a work, and how many times.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on December 17, 2020, 07:28:55 AM
I solved that problem 5 years ago with these 2 simple tools:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61U7ryLlr2L._AC_SX400_.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81STFe3aoiL._AC_SL400_.jpg)


Mini post-its and a self-inking dater. They’re right next to the cd player. That’s how I know when I last listened to a work, and how many times.  :)

That is an excellent idea, but I’m not quite at that point where I feel the need to have post-it notes everywhere. ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 17, 2020, 10:32:22 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/Wv9L86H10yYY0o23ZIvXOa7jCaY=/fit-in/600x594/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13764073-1560652117-4495.jpeg.jpg)

Symphony no 14 didn’t register bigly. It’s a light, folk-based work in 5 movements, more of a suite maybe. Nice slow movement.

No 22 (in 3 movements) otoh is another one of these super intense, petterssonian, angst-ridden works so typical of this composer. The finale is a positive, life-affirming movement that manages to fit perfectly with the first two. It was written in 1941, just as Hitler had turned against the USSR. One of Myaskovsky’s most successful opuses, I think.
Titov (Northern Flowers) is also excellent in No.22. Here is a comparative review:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/may09/miaskovsky_sys.htm
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aukhawk on December 18, 2020, 04:49:50 AM
That is an excellent idea, but I’m not quite at that point where I feel the need to have post-it notes everywhere. ;)

Plus, they don't stream well.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 19, 2020, 11:59:15 AM
Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/gu7seI-NGWyNTkKlhV5JhfAJTRs=/fit-in/600x602/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-7779264-1566456026-9546.jpeg.jpg)

Second go at this disc today. The andante intro to 15:I reminds me a lot of the main theme from Rimsky’s glorious Russian Easter Overture. Not note by note, but the rythmic pattern and the chant like melody evoke the same atmosphere. Very nice. The rest of the symphony is good - particularly fine thematic material in the middle movements. A fine opus.

The last symphony gave the composer some trouble. He was ailing at the time and his mind may not have worked with its usual speed. Not that it matters one bit. I find the 27th to be one of his most inspired creations. As usual there is a strong first movement that builds steadily, a gorgeous - nay, sublime - slow movement and a slightly ordinary (soviet) finale meant to make the crowds rejoice. Myaskovsky had enough métier to cook up an unobjectionable final movement. At that juncture in a symphonic work the authorities expected a composer to wrap up things in an uplifting way. No mahlerian angst allowed. Folk tunes, march rythms, gaudy orchestration and voilà! Here’s your soviet moment of rejoicing for today.

A word about the production. The notes mention that, except for nos 3 and 22, all the recordings were made in the same hall by the same engineering crew and at roughly the same time (1991-1993). Why is it then that the sound in no 27 is so different from the others? The volume setting has to be turned way down and even then a sense of hall ambience is missing. It’s very much in your face, up close and too personal for comfort. Very strange. I wonder if other recordings of no 27 are worth seeking. I’d be willing to duplicate.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 27, 2020, 11:16:45 AM
Quote
(https://img.discogs.com/PMXAxOoIqfywvoT1V3yDFtE_3JU=/fit-in/494x500/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-5861797-1410692547-4247.jpeg.jpg)

Both symphonies were written during the War exile, when soviet authorities sent their most prominent artists in the Caucasus or Central Asia republics. Folk influences from Northern Caucasus dominate the thematic material in no 23. I found the work absolutely superb both in its choice of themes and its construction. Very soulful tunes, lament-like, filled with longing in the first two movements, life-affirming joy in the third. The 24th was written in memory of his dear friend the musicologist and publisher Derzhanovsky. It, too, is indebted to the folk material Myaskovsky heard in his caucasian exile. This last disc of the set is one of the most satisfying. Other symphonies rely on russian folk tunes, the material of which tends to be somewhat melancholy and evocative of vast spaces. By contrast the melodies in 23-24 have more lilt, even when moving slowly, and spice in their harmonies. The difference is sufficiently marked to give these a distinctive character.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 27, 2020, 05:38:43 PM
Cross-posted from the WAYL2 thread:

Quote
(https://i1.wp.com/altocd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/ALC-1042_cover.jpg?fit=430%2C430)

Omce past the symphonies there is still more Myaskovsky ! I found that the three works on this disc are much more than mere byways or chips from the workbench. Silence from 1909 is a full-blown late-romantic tone poem. The very perceptive booklet notes by JeffreyDavis mention the recently heard Isle of the Dead by Rachmaninov as well as Siegfried’s Funeral March as influences. And yet it’s pure Myaskovsky. Excellent. The Sinfonietta (1929) is a 3-movement work for string orchestra, whose many solos bring back to life the old concerto grosso model. Strong themes and a searching, beautiful slow movement. Pretty much the same can be said of the concluding Divertissement from 19 years later. Same length, same structure, same tempo relationships between movements, same strongly atmospheric central slow movement. A truly excellent disc with works spanning 40 years of the composer’s career. And, like I said, very informative and unusually well-researched program notes  :).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on December 28, 2020, 02:31:29 AM

Oh, that's nice to read!
Where did that quote come from André?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on December 28, 2020, 10:33:14 AM
From the WAYL2 thread. I forgot to mention it. Corrected ;).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on January 02, 2021, 12:17:47 AM
From the WAYL2 thread. I forgot to mention it. Corrected ;).
Thanks  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 01, 2021, 11:52:23 PM
I'd love to be able to attend this!
https://en.sgaf.ru/festival/28110
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 02, 2021, 01:13:26 AM
I'd love to be able to attend this!
https://en.sgaf.ru/festival/28110

Themed or "dialogues" is an excellent idea. I wonder if the concerts will be filmed or streamed?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 02, 2021, 01:17:16 AM
Themed or "dialogues" is an excellent idea. I wonder if the concerts will be filmed or streamed?

Hi Lol,
Here is part of the email I received about them:

'Just hope that you are well, I have been invited to a music festival celebrating Myaskovsky's 140th birthday, it looks very interesting indeed but probably I can't go simply because of covid, in Russia concerts have restarted but there aren't even any flights there.
 
I think they are going to broadcast the concerts so perhaps it will be possible to see them online, and indeed the concerts seem very interesting indeed.'
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on February 02, 2021, 07:42:09 AM
Hi Lol,
Here is part of the email I received about them:

'Just hope that you are well, I have been invited to a music festival celebrating Myaskovsky's 140th birthday, it looks very interesting indeed but probably I can't go simply because of covid, in Russia concerts have restarted but there aren't even any flights there.
 
I think they are going to broadcast the concerts so perhaps it will be possible to see them online, and indeed the concerts seem very interesting indeed.'

That sounds promising, Jeffrey. I would love to see a performance of a string quartet. I intend to listen to recordings of the symphonies grouped as the theme of each concert. With so many it can be difficult to see the wood for the trees.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 02, 2021, 08:35:21 AM
That sounds promising, Jeffrey. I would love to see a performance of a string quartet. I intend to listen to recordings of the symphonies grouped as the theme of each concert. With so many it can be difficult to see the wood for the trees.
Sounds like a good plan Lol. I was lucky that my brother and my late sister-in-law took me to a concert including Miaskovsky's 21st Symphony, for a birthday treat some years ago and I also got to see the 6th Symphony live (Jurowski) in London. A kind member of the LPO Choir invited me to a rehearsal and introduced me to the conductor - who was charming. My friend and I had to go to the pub afterwards in order to calm down!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on February 10, 2021, 05:50:49 AM
https://en.sgaf.ru/vkz

Here are some more details about the (free) live-streamed concert next month. I hope to at least be able to tune in for the one featuring the SQ No.13, 'The Kremlin at Night' and Symphony No.17.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 02, 2021, 02:32:16 PM
I fear that this will go offline soon. It is one of the recent concerts. This one featured the wonderful String Quartet No.13, the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night' and Symphony No.17. For those who don't know it 'The Kremlin at Night' is a must here (from about 1 hour and 8 minutes into the concert):
https://sgaf.ru/afisha/28089
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on April 04, 2021, 02:34:59 AM
Idk why I'm feeling the need to post about this, but I didn't really realize until now that Symphony No. 16 has two slow movements in the middle. I'd say the 3rd is the "proper" slow movement, with the weight that that implies. But the 2nd movement is far from a scherzo or any conventional dance movement. It might be considered an intermezzo as it's rather light in mood.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 05, 2021, 12:56:12 PM
Idk why I'm feeling the need to post about this, but I didn't really realize until now that Symphony No. 16 has two slow movements in the middle. I'd say the 3rd is the "proper" slow movement, with the weight that that implies. But the 2nd movement is far from a scherzo or any conventional dance movement. It might be considered an intermezzo as it's rather light in mood.
Yes, I listened to it today (Konstantin Ivanov's 1950 recording). I agree that the second movement has more of an 'intermezzo' feel to it and that the main emotional weight is carried in the funeral march (for the victims of an aircraft disaster) of the third movement. I think that it is one of the finest of Miaskovsky's slow movements (No.8 has another fine example). Ivanov takes the movement much faster than Svetlanov but it conveys just as much depth of feeling:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 26, 2021, 10:40:22 PM
Nikolai is getting quite a lot of interest on the WAYLTN thread so I thought that he deserved a 'bump up' here as well.
I've been especially enjoying revisiting this CD recently (great notes  8)). I'd forgotten how good the doom-laden early tone poem 'Silence' (1909) is, with its echoes of Rachmaninov's 'Isle of the Dead', it's also a step on the way to the epic Third Symphony of 1914. The lyrical Sinfonietta (the first of two written by Miaskovsky) is a charming and, in its central movement, deeply moving work; in fact the relationship between the soulful 'Andante' central movement and the upbeat finale reminded me, for the first time, of that between the poignant central movement and the life-affirming finale of the valedictory 27th Symphony from the end of NYM's life.

'Silence' was first performed on 31st May 1911 in Moscow. NYM came to Moscow and stayed with the conductor Konstantine Saradjev, where he met and befriended Vladimir and Ekaterina Derzhanovsky (who became the most highly respected performer of his songs). I like Ekaterina's description of the composer:

Miaskovsky came to Moscow for his performance...and stopped over with Saradjev who lived close to our place. Once I saw from the window a gentleman with a beard wearing a straw hat on his head, as if it was a jar with precious water...He appeared to be Miaskovsky whom we were waiting to see...he was moving very slowly and talking quietly, he was restrained and never smiled...Nikolai Yakovelich would rarely laugh...yet, one's first meeting with him left a delightful impression.
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 27, 2021, 04:20:06 PM
Cross-post from WAYLT:

https://www.youtube.com/v/S6eUcehCm6I
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 27, 2021, 09:48:04 PM
Cross-post from WAYLT:

https://www.youtube.com/v/S6eUcehCm6I
This is a very nice, usually inexpensive CD, from the old and usually difficult-to-get-hold-of Olympia releases, featuring IMO two of his finest works:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: JBS on April 28, 2021, 04:15:41 AM
I'm a bit confused at the moment. Are the performances in the Alto set of symphonies the same as those in the Warner set, but remastered and a different name given to the orchestra? Or is it actually a different group of recordings?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on April 28, 2021, 04:34:32 AM
I'm a bit confused at the moment. Are the performances in the Alto set of symphonies the same as those in the Warner set, but remastered and a different name given to the orchestra? Or is it actually a different group of recordings?

I had the same confusion.  I think they are the same recording and Soviet orchestras frequently changed names depending on which regime they were under at the time of release but one is better than the other - unfortunately, I forgot which one is better.  I think it was the Alto that everyone here steered me towards but just know one is preferable to the other so before buying wait till you get more solid recommendations or search this thread as it came up before.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 28, 2021, 06:17:55 AM
I had the same confusion.  I think they are the same recording and Soviet orchestras frequently changed names depending on which regime they were under at the time of release but one is better than the other - unfortunately, I forgot which one is better.  I think it was the Alto that everyone here steered me towards but just know one is preferable to the other so before buying wait till you get more solid recommendations or search this thread as it came up before.

I have the Alto set which come in a nicely presented box. The notes, unlike the CDs, are a bit of a mess in presentation but I understand an improvement on the Warner set. A Mr Per Skans, a leading authority on the composer gives valuable insight but unfortunately he passed away and our Jeffrey (vandermolen) stepped in and filled the breach. The last thing I wish to do is embarrass Jeffrey but I'm actually of the view he is the leading authority of Miaskovsky in the West. The booklet by Per Skans and Jeffrey is packed with information on each symphony but room for improvement on layout and order.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2021, 09:00:54 AM
I'm a bit confused at the moment. Are the performances in the Alto set of symphonies the same as those in the Warner set, but remastered and a different name given to the orchestra? Or is it actually a different group of recordings?
They are the same recordings Jeffrey but remastered by Paul Arden-Taylor. Svetlanov is the only conductor to have recorded the whole lot.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2021, 09:08:08 AM
I have the Alto set which come in a nicely presented box. The notes, unlike the CDs, are a bit of a mess in presentation but I understand an improvement on the Warner set. A Mr Per Skans, a leading authority on the composer gives valuable insight but unfortunately he passed away and our Jeffrey (vandermolen) stepped in and filled the breach. The last thing I wish to do is embarrass Jeffrey but I'm actually of the view he is the leading authority of Miaskovsky in the West. The booklet by Per Skans and Jeffrey is packed with information on each symphony but room for improvement on layout and order.

I'm most honoured and flattered that you should think such a thing Lol but an academic, like Gregor Tassie, who wrote the biography of Miaskovsky in English, is much more of an authority than I am. I am more of a 'CD Nutter Miaskovsky enthusiast'. This is not false modesty but many thanks for the kind thought.  :)
PS I only wrote the notes for symphonies 17, 21 and 23 but I wrote nearly all the notes for the shorter works which were, unfortunately not included in the Alto box, but available on separate individual Alto CDs. I also was very thrilled to write the notes for the recent Alto CD of Kondrashin's classic recording of the 6th Symphony (with Svetlanov's Slav Rhapsody). I also was thrilled by being in contact with the grand-niece of Miaskovsky, who lives in the USA and who helpfully provided material from her Great Uncle's letters and diaries, which I got translated by using two Russian girls at my school as slave-labour translators - although I did thank them in the relevant booklets and gave them both a copy of the CD (just what every Russian teenage girl wants). That's enough showing off for tonight  ;D
PPS Come to think of it, one advantage that I did have was that I had taught 19th and 20th Century Russian and Soviet History over many decades, so possessed a reasonably sound knowledge of the historical context in which Miaskovsky lived.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on April 28, 2021, 10:49:22 AM
You’re too modest, Jeffrey. Willy-nilly, you ARE an authority on Myaskovsky  ;).
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: JBS on April 28, 2021, 06:04:28 PM
Thanks for the answers. I have the Warner set. Now I need to figure out which box it's stored in.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2021, 08:07:53 PM
You’re too modest, Jeffrey. Willy-nilly, you ARE an authority on Myaskovsky  ;).
:)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2021, 08:15:56 PM
Thanks for the answers. I have the Warner set. Now I need to figure out which box it's stored in.
Coincidentally today I was emailed the latest Musicweb reviews which included another one for the Alto box set:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Apr/Myaskovsky-sys-ALC3141.htm

One thing to mention is that due to a mistake (Lol is right about the formatting of the booklet) the notes for four symphonies (4,5,11 and 12) were missed out of the booklet but you can down them from the 'extra pages' yellow link (typed out by me!) on the Alto website. See below:

https://altocd.com/product/alc3141/

PS One symphony which doesn't receive much discussion is Symphony 15, which is one of my favourites. There is an excellent recording conducted by Kondrashin as well as the Svetlanov one:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 28, 2021, 11:51:54 PM
I've been listening to the late 'Divertissement' Op.80 from 1948, the year in which Miaskovsky, along with Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Popov and Shebalin was condemned during the notorious Zhdanov purges. It's a much more interesting work than I realised and lasts 26 minutes; sections (the first movement's waltz) reminded me of Ovchinnikov's score for the film 'War and Peace'  - altogether a most enjoyable work:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 29, 2021, 05:17:28 AM
I've been listening to the late 'Divertissement' Op.80 from 1948, the year in which Miaskovsky, along with Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Popov and Shebalin was condemned during the notorious Zhdanov purges. It's a much more interesting work than I realised and lasts 26 minutes; sections (the first movement's waltz) reminded me of Ovchinnikov's score for the film 'War and Peace'  - altogether a most enjoyable work:
(http://)

This disc landed just yesterday.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on April 29, 2021, 06:53:52 AM
You’re too modest, Jeffrey. Willy-nilly, you ARE an authority on Myaskovsky  ;).

Exactly what I thought! Denies the charge and then presents a pretty impressive CV. ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 29, 2021, 08:58:37 AM
(* chortle *)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on April 29, 2021, 09:37:01 AM
You’re too modest, Jeffrey. Willy-nilly, you ARE an authority on Myaskovsky  ;).

I would go one step even further to say that Jeffrey is a leading authority on any Russian composer that isn't 100% mainstream.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 29, 2021, 09:52:49 AM
I would go one step even further to say that Jeffrey is a leading authority on any Russian composer that isn't 100% mainstream.  :)
HAHA  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 29, 2021, 09:55:30 AM
This disc landed just yesterday.
Excellent Karl. If I say so myself, I think it's a really nice collection of NYM's works. The Divertissement is much more interesting than I originally thought.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 29, 2021, 09:58:18 AM
Excellent Karl. If I say so myself, I think it's a really nice collection of NYM's works. The Divertissement is much more interesting than I originally thought.

I'm reserving it for First-Listen Friday, Jeffrey! 8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 29, 2021, 10:34:06 AM
I've been listening to the late 'Divertissement' Op.80 from 1948, the year in which Miaskovsky, along with Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Popov and Shebalin was condemned during the notorious Zhdanov purges. It's a much more interesting work than I realised and lasts 26 minutes; sections (the first movement's waltz) reminded me of Ovchinnikov's score for the film 'War and Peace'  - altogether a most enjoyable work:


Good notes for the CD, Jeffrey!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 29, 2021, 10:35:06 AM
I would go one step even further to say that Jeffrey is a leading authority on any Russian composer that isn't 100% mainstream.  :)

Insofar as I may judge, I think that claim runs small risk of refutation 8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on April 30, 2021, 11:48:27 PM
Good notes for the CD, Jeffrey!
Thank you Karl! Means a lot coming from you. Those notes were a bit of a labour of love. I really enjoyed doing the research and trying to find information about relatively unknown works. Also, I discovered that 'Silence' was not inspired by 'The Raven' by Edgar Allan Poe, as suggested in the Marco Polo booklet, but by an entirely different work.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 01, 2021, 08:20:52 AM
Thank you Karl! Means a lot coming from you. Those notes were a bit of a labour of love. I really enjoyed doing the research and trying to find information about relatively unknown works. Also, I discovered that 'Silence' was not inspired by 'The Raven' by Edgar Allan Poe, as suggested in the Marco Polo booklet, but by an entirely different work.


"The Raven" was a peculiar bit of speculation, on that writer's part.  It is a long time since I read Poe's fable, but I've got it right here on my Nook.

I especially noted Prokofiev and Myaskovsky playing a four-hands version, partly because of the labor the transcription must have entailed, but even more because if Prokofiev suffered any doubts of the piece's worth, I should have expected him as a friend to share those artistic misgivings with his characteristic candor (non-filtration, sometimes, on Prokofiev's part.)


Silence is every bit the stand-out work I was hoping to find.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2021, 07:25:38 AM
"The Raven" was a peculiar bit of speculation, on that writer's part.  It is a long time since I read Poe's fable, but I've got it right here on my Nook.

I especially noted Prokofiev and Myaskovsky playing a four-hands version, partly because of the labor the transcription must have entailed, but even more because if Prokofiev suffered any doubts of the piece's worth, I should have expected him as a friend to share those artistic misgivings with his characteristic candor (non-filtration, sometimes, on Prokofiev's part.)


Silence is every bit the stand-out work I was hoping to find.
I'm so glad that 'Silence' has been a hit with you Karl. I've been playing it a lot myself recently.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Tom 1960 on May 02, 2021, 07:57:03 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

I recently saw this box set at an area music shop used for $6! To be honest, I am not very familiar with his music. Convince me I was wrong to pass on this.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 02, 2021, 08:33:43 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

I recently saw this box set at an area music shop used for $6! To be honest, I am not very familiar with his music. Convince me I was wrong to pass on this.

Definitely worth so modest an investment, Tom!

https://www.youtube.com/v/bHb6JMXJW8o
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 02, 2021, 09:38:44 AM
I have all the original Olympia releases in this series - 17 discs as I recall - plus several other old Olympia releases.  BUT I've never really had a Miaskovsky light-bulb moment.  I remember liking an LP of the violin concerto wih Kogan (I think?).  So in the light of the recent forum Miaskovsky love-in I'm making him my next composer-to-be-rehabilitated!  Starting with Symphony 21 that was mentioned earlier today then perhaps No.6 which I also have in the Jarvi/DG version (and the Dudarova as well - but I find her dull in just about every disc I have - her Kalinnikov was awful!)......
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on May 02, 2021, 09:58:10 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

I recently saw this box set at an area music shop used for $6! To be honest, I am not very familiar with his music. Convince me I was wrong to pass on this.

Go back to the record store, Tom !  :D

Last November/December I listened to that set and a few other discs of his music. It’s instantly recognizable even if it doesn’t sound bold or original at first. Once his sound world is imprinted on the mind it stays there.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 02, 2021, 01:19:06 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

I recently saw this box set at an area music shop used for $6! To be honest, I am not very familiar with his music. Convince me I was wrong to pass on this.

Go back immediately and put your $6 down!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Tom 1960 on May 02, 2021, 03:46:44 PM
Go back immediately and put your $6 down!
It will be Tuesday. Hopefully it's still there! Thanks for the input fellas.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on May 02, 2021, 10:21:48 PM
I have all the original Olympia releases in this series - 17 discs as I recall - plus several other old Olympia releases.  BUT I've never really had a Miaskovsky light-bulb moment.  I remember liking an LP of the violin concerto wih Kogan (I think?).  So in the light of the recent forum Miaskovsky love-in I'm making him my next composer-to-be-rehabilitated!  Starting with Symphony 21 that was mentioned earlier today then perhaps No.6 which I also have in the Jarvi/DG version (and the Dudarova as well - but I find her dull in just about every disc I have - her Kalinnikov was awful!)......

If Kogan recorded the VC I would like to hear it. I think it more likely Grigori Feigin.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 02, 2021, 10:27:29 PM
If Kogan recorded the VC I would like to hear it. I think it more likely Grigori Feigin.

You are of course completely right.  I twitched when I wrote that thinking I was wrong....  I meant Kogan's recording of the Vainberg (as it was spelt on the original LP cover)

(https://img.discogs.com/08-FUFzdpIu1pg3ETGrQsiGv18E=/fit-in/600x607/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10670938-1502102690-3984.jpeg.jpg)

cracking disc!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2021, 10:56:41 PM
I have all the original Olympia releases in this series - 17 discs as I recall - plus several other old Olympia releases.  BUT I've never really had a Miaskovsky light-bulb moment.  I remember liking an LP of the violin concerto wih Kogan (I think?).  So in the light of the recent forum Miaskovsky love-in I'm making him my next composer-to-be-rehabilitated!  Starting with Symphony 21 that was mentioned earlier today then perhaps No.6 which I also have in the Jarvi/DG version (and the Dudarova as well - but I find her dull in just about every disc I have - her Kalinnikov was awful!)......
The Dudarova is the longest on disc. Jarvi is better, Kondrashin (Russian Disc/Alto) is best of all but the Jarvi recording allows much more detail to be heard (like the funereal drumbeats at the end of the first movement). With Miaskovsky, the music can sound rather 'academic' but these are sometimes broken through by moments of great beauty, often accompanied by an underlying sadness (trio of the Scherzo of Symphony 6 for example) which I find very moving.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 02, 2021, 10:57:40 PM
Go back immediately and put your $6 down!
Yes, sounds like an exceptional deal!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 03, 2021, 02:51:57 AM
It will be Tuesday. Hopefully it's still there! Thanks for the input fellas.

Don't walk Tom, run! 🙂
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on May 03, 2021, 04:40:11 AM
You are of course completely right.  I twitched when I wrote that thinking I was wrong....  I meant Kogan's recording of the Vainberg (as it was spelt on the original LP cover)

(https://img.discogs.com/08-FUFzdpIu1pg3ETGrQsiGv18E=/fit-in/600x607/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10670938-1502102690-3984.jpeg.jpg)

cracking disc!

Love that cover !
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Roasted Swan on May 03, 2021, 04:56:40 AM
Love that cover !

It was the memory of the cover that made me twitch!  I had a vague image of the font of the "V" for Vainberg and Violin being the same - so it couldn't really be Miaskovsky!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on May 04, 2021, 05:56:09 AM
It was the memory of the cover that made me twitch!  I had a vague image of the font of the "V" for Vainberg and Violin being the same - so it couldn't really be Miaskovsky!

In all my vinyl collecting travels I have not come across that LP. If I did I would purchase without hesitation.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Tom 1960 on May 04, 2021, 11:36:53 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

I recently saw this box set at an area music shop used for $6! To be honest, I am not very familiar with his music. Convince me I was wrong to pass on this.
A quick follow up, I was able to purchase this set today used for $6.97. It took alittle effort to find it since the store has a very large classical music section. It wasn't exactly where I expected to locate it, but with some effort I found it nearby. I thank you guys for encouraging me to buy this collection. With the price tag, I guess I can't go wrong. Now it's off to the music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 04, 2021, 11:37:59 AM
A quick follow up, I was able to purchase this set today used for $6.97. It took alittle effort to find it since the store has a very large classical music section. It wasn't exactly where I expected to locate it, but with some effort I found it nearby. I thank you guys for encouraging me to buy this collection. With the price tag, I guess I can't go wrong. Now it's off to the music.

Did you buy anything else?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 04, 2021, 11:46:09 AM
A quick follow up, I was able to purchase this set today used for $6.97. It took alittle effort to find it since the store has a very large classical music section. It wasn't exactly where I expected to locate it, but with some effort I found it nearby. I thank you guys for encouraging me to buy this collection. With the price tag, I guess I can't go wrong. Now it's off to the music.

Good news, Tom!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 04, 2021, 12:04:49 PM

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SX425_.jpg)

A quick follow up, I was able to purchase this set today used for $6.97. It took alittle effort to find it since the store has a very large classical music section. It wasn't exactly where I expected to locate it, but with some effort I found it nearby. I thank you guys for encouraging me to buy this collection. With the price tag, I guess I can't go wrong. Now it's off to the music.

Yes, good for you.
I hope that you like it now  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 04, 2021, 08:22:18 PM
A quick follow up, I was able to purchase this set today used for $6.97. It took alittle effort to find it since the store has a very large classical music section. It wasn't exactly where I expected to locate it, but with some effort I found it nearby. I thank you guys for encouraging me to buy this collection. With the price tag, I guess I can't go wrong. Now it's off to the music.
Excellent! Hope you enjoy it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 11, 2021, 12:00:17 PM
(https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=29166.0;attach=73470;image)


Prior to hearing this box set I had not heard a note of the music of Miaskovsky with the exception of one string quartet. I would sum up my first listen to the Symphonies of Miaskovsky as powerful, dramatic, tension filled and atmospheric music. I would also say that he was a terrific composer and orchestrator and that his writing for the woodwind and brass sections in particular was superb. He certainly knew his way around an orchestra. The music is very well interpreted, conducted and presented throughout by Svetlanov.
I will, invariably, return to this cycle in the future and I will want to compare future assessments of each work with my original thoughts as all of the comments were penned as I listened to each work for the first time.



I would now be very keen to follow up this odyssey with his String Quartet cycle of which I have only heard one.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: André on May 11, 2021, 12:28:51 PM
Your reviews have been very informative, Fergus !
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 11, 2021, 12:37:05 PM
Your reviews have been very informative, Fergus !

Seconded!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 11, 2021, 12:38:23 PM

I would now be very keen to follow up this odyssey with his String Quartet cycle of which I have only heard one.

I can heartily recommend the Taneyev SQ recordings of these.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 11, 2021, 12:57:51 PM
Your reviews have been very informative, Fergus !

Seconded!


Thank you both very much. I do try not to ramble on but I know that I do not always succeed  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 11, 2021, 12:58:17 PM
I can heartily recommend the Taneyev SQ recordings of these.

Thank you for that.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 11, 2021, 01:03:13 PM
Thank you for that.

In fact, the Taneyev SQ might indeed be the only complete cycle of the quartets, as far as I know.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 11, 2021, 01:18:35 PM
In fact, the Taneyev SQ might indeed be the only complete cycle of the quartets, as far as I know.

Cheers, I believe that you may be correct. Good things have been said of that cycle around here so that will do for me.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2021, 12:23:48 AM
In the UK the release date of the Petrenko/Oslo PO recording of Symphony No.27 (with Prokofiev's 6th Symphony) has been pushed back from April to 21st May:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2021, 12:29:43 AM
Just listened to this disc. I have admired Miaskovsky's music for a very long time and have all of the symphonies released so far in my collection(with quite a few duplications). I had not listened to any of them for quite a long time and had forgotten how intensely moving No. 27 actually is. When one takes account of the tragic circumstances of Miaskovsky's last two years-for the reasons you describe-the music makes even more impact. I can never understand the notion that the appreciation of music should in some way be disassociated from the context in which it was written. Here was the most respected teacher in Soviet Russia who had produced a stream of beautiful but essentially conservative works humiliated by the Communist party machine.
Within two years he was dead. To produce such a glowing and triumphal score as the twenty seventh symphony is testimony to his spirit and the power of music!
I was just looking back at the early posts in this thread and liked this one by Colin (Dundonnell) who sadly does not post here any more.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 14, 2021, 06:47:45 AM
I was just looking back at the early posts in this thread and liked this one by Colin (Dundonnell) who sadly does not post here any more.

Jeffrey, any word if you believe there is a chance he would return?

Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2021, 08:11:54 AM
Jeffrey, any word if you believe there is a chance he would return?
Sadly, I think it most unlikely. He hasn't posted here for years.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 14, 2021, 08:43:44 AM
Sadly, I think it most unlikely. He hasn't posted here for years.

That's unfortunate.  Please, do give him my regards if you are in contact with him.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 14, 2021, 08:47:32 AM
That's unfortunate.  Please, do give him my regards if you are in contact with him.  :)
OT
Will do.
We usually exchange Christmas cards and my wife and I had the pleasure of meeting him in London many years ago.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Papy Oli on May 28, 2021, 02:42:10 AM
Jeffrey !!!

Advertised in this week's Presto email :

https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times (https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on May 28, 2021, 02:47:59 AM
Jeffrey !!!

Advertised in this week's Presto email :

https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times (https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times)

That's great, but where is the book written by Jeffrey?  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 28, 2021, 09:52:15 AM
Jeffrey !!!

Advertised in this week's Presto email :

https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times (https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times)
Thanks Olivier, I'm aware of this but at £60 it's a bit expensive for now.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Dima on May 28, 2021, 01:10:15 PM
In the UK the release date of the Petrenko/Oslo PO recording of Symphony No.27 (with Prokofiev's 6th Symphony) has been pushed back from April to 21st May:
(http://)
Vasiliy Petrenko is not a bad conductor but this recording was upset for me (in my view he is young conductor who like analytic style of conducting with energetic tempos). May be you know after the summer of 2021 he will change Vladimir Jurowski in the Svetlanov's orchestra. I have listened 6 symphony of Prokofiev - very ordinary if compare with other recordings of this symphony.
Myaskovsky is played analytically in western way without russian poetry I used to. You hear only beautiful melodies but you don't feel the context of the last work and the results of life - it's a pity.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 28, 2021, 03:41:38 PM
Jeffrey !!!

Advertised in this week's Presto email :

https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times (https://www.prestomusic.com/books/products/8794580--nikolay-myaskovsky-a-composer-and-his-times)

And only $93.75!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 28, 2021, 04:54:33 PM
Thanks Olivier, I'm aware of this but at £60 it's a bit expensive for now.

Priced for acquisition by music libraries, I expect.  When things are back to normal, I'll ping my friend in the NEC library.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: JBS on May 28, 2021, 06:07:55 PM
And only $93.75!

Amazon MP has it priced at $83. Still a bit steep.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 28, 2021, 08:45:23 PM
That's great, but where is the book written by Jeffrey?  :)
Haha! Thanks  :)
If I ever get to properly retire (my 'part-time' teaching and counselling work seems to be taking up an increasing amount of my time) I have thought of writing something more substantial on NYM but there are now two large biographies in English (I helped a bit with the earlier one written by Gregor Tassie) and I'm quite happy to have written the booklet notes for half-a-dozen NYM CDS (included in the Alto boxed set as well). Also, I don't speak Russian which doesn't help!

PS I'm adding symphonies 4 and 11 (on the same CD) to my list of favourite NYM symphonies - I hadn't realised how good No.4 is.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 28, 2021, 08:55:37 PM
Priced for acquisition by music libraries, I expect.  When things are back to normal, I'll ping my friend in the NEC library.
That's a good idea Karl. I might ask my local library if they can source a copy.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on May 31, 2021, 12:33:30 PM
It's been years since I've listened to Miaskovsky's work, but I've been looking for ways to help my wife connect to classical music, so played #27 to her last night as a wind down after a busy day. Seems to have been something of a success!

I have an abiding love for lots of Russian/Soviet composers, so the lyricism and melodic accessibility of each movement is a welcome return. Thanks again to you all for a worthy reminder.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on May 31, 2021, 11:25:35 PM
It's been years since I've listened to Miaskovsky's work, but I've been looking for ways to help my wife connect to classical music, so played #27 to her last night as a wind down after a busy day. Seems to have been something of a success!

I have an abiding love for lots of Russian/Soviet composers, so the lyricism and melodic accessibility of each movement is a welcome return. Thanks again to you all for a worthy reminder.
No.27 is a great way into Miaskovsky's music - one of his finest I think. I find it sad, moving and yet inspiriting - I see the finale as a kind of paean to life from the dying composer after the most heartfelt slow movement. Which recording were you playing?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on May 31, 2021, 11:46:29 PM
It's been years since I've listened to Miaskovsky's work, but I've been looking for ways to help my wife connect to classical music, so played #27 to her last night as a wind down after a busy day. Seems to have been something of a success!

No.27 is a great way into Miaskovsky's music - one of his finest I think. I find it sad, moving and yet inspiriting - I see the finale as a kind of paean to life from the dying composer after the most heartfelt slow movement. Which recording were you playing?

I don't think that one cane be but moved by that wonderful slow movement of No. 27.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 02, 2021, 12:01:07 AM
No.27 is a great way into Miaskovsky's music - one of his finest I think. I find it sad, moving and yet inspiriting - I see the finale as a kind of paean to life from the dying composer after the most heartfelt slow movement. Which recording were you playing?

This one... it has an emotive quality that is difficult to ignore. My wife isn't the greatest fan of classical music (describing Sibelius as 'lift music' last year), but remarked at its lyricism and beauty.

I'm intending to revisit the whole cycle in the next weeks.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 02, 2021, 12:31:19 AM
My wife isn't the greatest fan of classical music (describing Sibelius as 'lift music' last year),


Ouch!  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 02, 2021, 12:49:25 AM
Ouch!  ;D

I find it quite bizarre. Our music outside of classical finds us as primary metalheads of the denser, more complex, and often dissonant type, so a difficult or challenging sound world present in many composers who don't focus obviously on melody until you hear them repeatedly, isn't something new. But Sibelius is hardly that. It is all, apparently, 'a bit like wallpaper'. As a software developer with postgrads in history and literature, she is no slouch, but it just doesn't seem to compute. Who knows?

Miaskovsky won't do any harm. I do need to poke his Quartets also... Any recommendations on best places to start, would be appreciated...
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 02, 2021, 01:56:03 AM

Miaskovsky won't do any harm. I do need to poke his Quartets also... Any recommendations on best places to start, would be appreciated...

Unfortunately not, I am afraid. I am in the same position as you. I am not familiar with the Quartets......yet  ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 02, 2021, 02:42:17 AM
I find it quite bizarre. Our music outside of classical finds us as primary metalheads of the denser, more complex, and often dissonant type, so a difficult or challenging sound world present in many composers who don't focus obviously on melody until you hear them repeatedly, isn't something new. But Sibelius is hardly that. It is all, apparently, 'a bit like wallpaper'. As a software developer with postgrads in history and literature, she is no slouch, but it just doesn't seem to compute. Who knows?

Miaskovsky won't do any harm. I do need to poke his Quartets also... Any recommendations on best places to start, would be appreciated...
Try No.13 Danny (there are several recordings). Like the 27th Symphony it has a heartfelt valedictory quality which is very characteristic. I have to admit, however, that despite being 'The World's leading authority on Miaskovsky' ( ;D) I should be more familiar with the quartets than I am.

I can relate to the 'Wife Situation' however and am used to comments here like 'MUST WE LISTEN TO THIS NOISE?' and 'IT SOUNDS LIKE WORLD WAR 3 GOING ON IN THERE!' from my wife  ::)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 02, 2021, 04:29:24 AM
Unfortunately not, I am afraid. I am in the same position as you. I am not familiar with the Quartets......yet  ;)

Hehe. My intention, exactly. I am simultaneously poking Shostakovich SQs, which I am finding more challenging. Over the years, I have enjoyed the 'easier' ones like #4 and #8 and found them to be a real joy once I have got beyond a vague grasp of them, but others are just hard work. I doubt that Miaskovsky will be as tough.

Try No.13 Danny (there are several recordings). Like the 27th Symphony it has a heartfelt valedictory quality which is very characteristic. I have to admit, however, that despite being 'The World's leading authority on Miaskovsky' ( ;D) I should be more familiar with the quartets than I am.

I can relate to the 'Wife Situation' however and am used to comments here like 'MUST WE LISTEN TO THIS NOISE?' and 'IT SOUNDS LIKE WORLD WAR 3 GOING ON IN THERE!' from my wife  ::)

Thanks, Jeffrey. I will run at #13 later today. Your status as something of an authority on Miaskovsky, however little you feel that, has been helpful in prodding my wife to listen. 'Did you know, I know the guy who...'

My wife has a favourite Basil Fawlty quotation based on Sybil's categorisation of Brahms' Third Racket which she has appropriated for everything outside of Philip Glass 1 & 4 (due to the Bowie connections), Glazunov 5, Rubbra 3, Pettersson 7 ('play that agonised one'), and Holmboe 6 ('not that again, but at least I am getting used to it now'). She was recently kind enough to buy me some lovely Sony WH-1000X M3 headphones 'to help my enjoyment'. Not so she doesn't have to share my rekindled passion for orchestral music. Honest. Particularly not because I have been listening to 'those appalling Hosokawa flute pieces that sound like the cat has got caught in the dryer, and those tuneless Rautavaara choral catastrophes'. Yeah, right.

Point is, Miaskovsky at bed time to aid sleep and distract from my ridiculous tinnitus, is acceptable. And predictable volume-wise, broadly. He is, at least, soporific.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on June 02, 2021, 04:51:24 AM
I really enjoyed this new recording.  Both works are fabulous contemporaries and beautifully performed and recorded.
(https://d1iiivw74516uk.cloudfront.net/eyJidWNrZXQiOiJwcmVzdG8tY292ZXItaW1hZ2VzIiwia2V5IjoiODg5MDg5OC4xLmpwZyIsImVkaXRzIjp7InJlc2l6ZSI6eyJ3aWR0aCI6OTAwfSwianBlZyI6eyJxdWFsaXR5Ijo2NX0sInRvRm9ybWF0IjoianBlZyJ9LCJ0aW1lc3RhbXAiOjE2MjAzMDA3Mzl9)

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8890898--prokofiev-symphony-no-6-myaskovsky-symphony-no-27
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 02, 2021, 05:44:11 AM
Hehe. My intention, exactly. I am simultaneously poking Shostakovich SQs, which I am finding more challenging. Over the years, I have enjoyed the 'easier' ones like #4 and #8 and found them to be a real joy once I have got beyond a vague grasp of them, but others are just hard work. I doubt that Miaskovsky will be as tough.

Thanks, Jeffrey. I will run at #13 later today. Your status as something of an authority on Miaskovsky, however little you feel that, has been helpful in prodding my wife to listen. 'Did you know, I know the guy who...'

My wife has a favourite Basil Fawlty quotation based on Sybil's categorisation of Brahms' Third Racket which she has appropriated for everything outside of Philip Glass 1 & 4 (due to the Bowie connections), Glazunov 5, Rubbra 3, Pettersson 7 ('play that agonised one'), and Holmboe 6 ('not that again, but at least I am getting used to it now'). She was recently kind enough to buy me some lovely Sony WH-1000X M3 headphones 'to help my enjoyment'. Not so she doesn't have to share my rekindled passion for orchestral music. Honest. Particularly not because I have been listening to 'those appalling Hosokawa flute pieces that sound like the cat has got caught in the dryer, and those tuneless Rautavaara choral catastrophes'. Yeah, right.

Point is, Miaskovsky at bed time to aid sleep and distract from my ridiculous tinnitus, is acceptable. And predictable volume-wise, broadly. He is, at least, soporific.
haha - very nice Danny  :)
Oh, Tinnitus is not so nice. My wife is an audiologist and sign-language interpreter, so I hear a lot about tinnitus. She once arranged an 'emergency hearing test' for me as I 'obviously' had a severe hearing loss as, apparently, I 'never' responded to anything that she said - but, let's not go there.  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 02, 2021, 09:24:57 AM
Hehe. My intention, exactly. I am simultaneously poking Shostakovich SQs, which I am finding more challenging. Over the years, I have enjoyed the 'easier' ones like #4 and #8 and found them to be a real joy once I have got beyond a vague grasp of them, but others are just hard work. I doubt that Miaskovsky will be as tough.


Off topic but my advice is to stick with the Shostakovich SQs; they will eventually deliver huge dividends. I consider the final three or four to be some of the best SQs ever written and equally on a par with those of Beethoven. But, hey, that is just my humble opinion  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 02, 2021, 09:40:47 AM
Off topic but my advice is to stick with the Shostakovich SQs; they will eventually deliver huge dividends. I consider the final three or four to be some of the best SQs ever written and equally on a par with those of Beethoven. But, hey, that is just my humble opinion  :)

I agree, with the Shostakovich SQs as a whole.  They are equally of importance and substance to the Beethoven SQs.

Which recordings are you familiar with, Fergus?

I love the Borodin Bovine set as I call it, and also the Fitzwilliams.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 02, 2021, 09:59:26 AM
I agree, with the Shostakovich SQs as a whole.  They are equally of importance and substance to the Beethoven SQs.

Which recordings are you familiar with, Fergus?

I love the Borodin Bovine set as I call it, and also the Fitzwilliams.

The cycles that I own are:

Borodin String Quartet
Emerson String Quartet
Fitzwilliam String Quartet
Pacifica Quartet

Each set has its own values and I really do like them all but, if I had to pick only one I would opt for the Pacifica Quartet cycle. They really attack the music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 02, 2021, 10:02:22 AM
The cycles that I own are:

Borodin String Quartet
Emerson String Quartet
Fitzwilliam String Quartet
Pacifica Quartet

Each set has its own values and I really do like them all but, if I had to pick only one I would opt for the Pacifica Quartet cycle. They really attack the music.

I have not heard this set, but have seen pretty much nothing but positive reviews.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 02, 2021, 10:04:18 AM
I have not heard this set, but have seen pretty much nothing but positive reviews.  :)

Yes, I bought it after seeing a number of people here recommending it. I was not disappointed.  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 02, 2021, 01:10:00 PM
Off topic but my advice is to stick with the Shostakovich SQs; they will eventually deliver huge dividends. I consider the final three or four to be some of the best SQs ever written and equally on a par with those of Beethoven. But, hey, that is just my humble opinion  :)

I'm fully intending to take a hard run at the DSCH SQs, but I don't expect it to be a short journey. I have those plus the Holmboe SQs set up as my more challenging impending forays at the genre.  At the moment, they feel a bit like Mark's couscous in Peep Show... tasteless misery sand that you know is good for you, but never reduces in volume, no matter how much you eat. I anticipate a more immediately rewarding return from the Miaskovsky.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 02, 2021, 06:06:58 PM
I'm fully intending to take a hard run at the DSCH SQs, but I don't expect it to be a short journey. I have those plus the Holmboe SQs set up as my more challenging impending forays at the genre.  At the moment, they feel a bit like Mark's couscous in Peep Show... tasteless misery sand that you know is good for you, but never reduces in volume, no matter how much you eat. I anticipate a more immediately rewarding return from the Miaskovsky.

Both Shostakovich’s and Holmboe’s SQs are worth your time, foxandpeng. I actually need to get back to the Holmboe SQs --- from what I’ve heard so far, they have proven rather fascinating and, more importantly, enjoyable.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 03, 2021, 12:04:28 AM
Both Shostakovich’s and Holmboe’s SQs are worth your time, foxandpeng. I actually need to get back to the Holmboe SQs --- from what I’ve heard so far, they have proven rather fascinating and, more importantly, enjoyable.

You're undoubtedly right. The few Shostakovich SQs that I now know well, are proving increasingly worth the investment of time. Holmboe, I really enjoy for his symphonies (particularly #6-8), so although challenging, his SQs will definitely return value. I keep getting derailed into music that is more 'obvious'. Not that I am suggesting that Miaskovsky is obvious, but you know what I mean. I also get far too easily distracted to musical side roads. Relm1's suggestion of the Petrenko Miaskovsky #27 above was great, but I have been listening to Prokofiev all evening and this morning as a result.

Why is there so much music?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: North Star on June 03, 2021, 05:00:17 AM
Why is there so much music?
Since you asked, 0:) the Weinberg SQ's are also very much worth investigating, he and Shostakovich had a bit of a friendly rivalry with the quartets.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81lxS0k0cOL._SL1030_.jpg)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 03, 2021, 05:09:02 AM
haha - very nice Danny  :)
Oh, Tinnitus is not so nice. My wife is an audiologist and sign-language interpreter, so I hear a lot about tinnitus. She once arranged an 'emergency hearing test' for me as I 'obviously' had a severe hearing loss as, apparently, I 'never' responded to anything that she said - but, let's not go there.  8)

That is clearly my problem also! The SQ #13 was great, btw, and even worked at night... until the opening bar of the final movement when my wife leapt about 4 feet as it opened.

Since you asked, 0:) the Weinberg SQ's are also very much worth investigating, he and Shostakovich had a bit of a friendly rivalry with the quartets.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81lxS0k0cOL._SL1030_.jpg)

Comparable style to DSCH? Likely to take even more hard work as a new listener? Happy to put them on the list :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: North Star on June 03, 2021, 05:29:23 AM
Comparable style to DSCH? Likely to take even more hard work as a new listener? Happy to put them on the list :)

That sounds about right. this abstract of a doctoral thesis on Weinberg's string quartets (https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/the-string-quartets-of-mieczyslaw-weinberg-a-critical-study(a156efef-b055-4415-8949-87791374c6bc).html) puts it pretty well, and the thesis itself was also quite helpful in listening to the music.

Quote
Weinberg's quartet cycle occupies an important place in twentieth-century music, with parallels to Shostakovich, Bartók, and other Soviet composers, including Myaskovsky, Shebalin, Levitin, and Boris Chaykovsky[...] The picture that emerges is of Weinberg's individuality and distinctive voice, manifested in a controlled experimentalism and a tendency towards extended lyricism. His affinity with better-known composers may prove an approachable entry-point for wider audiences, but many of the most striking elements in his quartet cycle are of his own invention. His quartets stand as an important contextual dimension for understanding Shostakovich's cycle, and also for appreciating the broader repertoire of Soviet chamber music.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 03, 2021, 05:36:16 AM
You're undoubtedly right. The few Shostakovich SQs that I now know well, are proving increasingly worth the investment of time. Holmboe, I really enjoy for his symphonies (particularly #6-8), so although challenging, his SQs will definitely return value. I keep getting derailed into music that is more 'obvious'. Not that I am suggesting that Miaskovsky is obvious, but you know what I mean. I also get far too easily distracted to musical side roads. Relm1's suggestion of the Petrenko Miaskovsky #27 above was great, but I have been listening to Prokofiev all evening and this morning as a result.

Why is there so much music?

There’s always something new to discover even in works that we believe to know like the backs of our hands. Why is there so much music? Well, it’s like Rachmaninov said, “Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.” We’ll never hear everything we want to hear, so why bother? Just enjoy what you’re listening to in the present and don’t worry about the future. Prokofiev is certainly a great distraction for sure. ;) I love his music and since you have been talking about SQs, you may want to check out his two SQs. They’re fabulous. I wish he wrote more of them.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 03, 2021, 09:35:11 AM
That sounds about right. this abstract of a doctoral thesis on Weinberg's string quartets (https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/the-string-quartets-of-mieczyslaw-weinberg-a-critical-study(a156efef-b055-4415-8949-87791374c6bc).html) puts it pretty well, and the thesis itself was also quite helpful in listening to the music.

That's incredibly useful, thank you. I've found this site valuable in understanding the Shostakovich...

http://www.quartets.de/compositions/ssq04.html

... so your link really hits the way I think. Greatly appreciated.

There’s always something new to discover even in works that we believe to know like the backs of our hands. Why is there so much music? Well, it’s like Rachmaninov said, “Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.” We’ll never hear everything we want to hear, so why bother? Just enjoy what you’re listening to in the present and don’t worry about the future. Prokofiev is certainly a great distraction for sure. ;) I love his music and since you have been talking about SQs, you may want to check out his two SQs. They’re fabulous. I wish he wrote more of them.

Again, with you all the way. I do find it frustrating to want to know all about THIS, when all I can manage at a time is 'this', but such is the joy of the journey, I guess. As you suggest, mastery is only ever an illusion anyway, because there is always more even in what we think we know. I've long accepted that I'll never understand music as someone trained in music will, but that's ok. Glad to be an enthusiastic amateur willing to stretch the boundaries and challenge my assumptions. It's just good to hear good music.

Prokofiev SQs on the list!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on June 03, 2021, 09:51:20 AM

Prokofiev SQs on the list!

FWIW, the Prokofiev F major string quartet (his second) might just be my absolute favourite of his works.

There has been great conversation on here, unfortunately it has come at the expense of Myaskovsky.  :D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 03, 2021, 10:02:35 AM
FWIW, the Prokofiev F major string quartet (his second) might just be my absolute favourite of his works.

There has been great conversation on here, unfortunately it has come at the expense of Myaskovsky.  :D

Let me get us back on track  :)

I've just really enjoyed Symphony 10, and thought it was great 👍. I also found this article useful.

Nikolai Myakovsky: Symphony No.10
Context

The aptly named “Father of the Soviet Symphony”, Nikolai Myakovsky, composed 27 symphonies in total. The tenth, composed between 1926-27, Myakovsky was inspired by Alexander Pushkin’s poem The Bronze Horseman. The story tells of a man whose fiancé is drowned by the 1824 River Neva flood in Saint Petersburg and the reaction of the widow, who then also perishes in the flooding. Myakovsky was also very much inspired by the illustrations of this story by Alexander Benois.

Set into one continuous movement, Symphony No.10 could be described in some ways as a symphonic poem. Pushkin’s story is represented through descriptive passages of music by Myakovsky, which takes the listener on a wild ride. Using the form of just one big movement was described as “collapsing the elements of a four-movement symphony into a densely argued single-movement for lasting little more than quarter of an hour.”

The Music

Although set into one movement and lasting between 15-20 minutes, Myakovsky calls for huge forces in the orchestra. Especially rich with brass instruments, the large-scale scoring for the Tenth was “filled with the deafening racket of four trumpets, eight horns and so on.” The symphony premiered in Moscow in April 1928 by the Orchestra Persimfans, who were actually conductor-less at the time. The complexity of Myakovsky’s music was too much for the ensemble, so the piece was left. That was until 1930, when Sergei Prokofiev persuaded Leopold Stokowski to give a US premiere in Philadelphia.

The symphony takes us through the fundamental events in Pushkin’s poem. From the opening flood scene to the two deaths and the pursuit of the statue, the music is quick to change in character to move the story along. The rumbling opening takes us into the flood scene. Marked Tumultuoso, the music grows from the bottom upwards as the exploding dissonant strings clash with the bombastic brass section.

Myakovsky heightens the tension and quickly lets it go making you feel like you’re actually present at the scene. He writes various themes using different soloists in the orchestra to represent different characters of the story. For instance, the drowned fiancé is represented by a solo violin and a soli woodwind section. Myakovsky’s use of dissonance is prevalent throughout the symphony, with his chromatic harmony constantly shifting between the different sections in the orchestra.

After the huge climax near the end of the piece, the texture begins to thin as the music begins to calm down somewhat. The last minute of the symphony is then revived by swirling winds and brass who go head to head one last time. The huge orchestral texture creates a big sound that is led by the brass and percussion. The symphony ends with a final foreboding note led by the lower brass.

Final Thoughts

Nikolai Myakovsky’s Symphony No.10 is one of his more well-known works today. Telling the tumultuous tale of two lovers, the music is dark, intense and showcases Myakovsky’s incredible orchestration skills.

https://classicalexburns.com/2020/07/07/nikolai-myakovsky-symphony-no-10-the-flood/
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 03, 2021, 11:37:16 AM
Since you asked, 0:) the Weinberg SQ's are also very much worth investigating, he and Shostakovich had a bit of a friendly rivalry with the quartets.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81lxS0k0cOL._SL1030_.jpg)

+1
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 04, 2021, 03:13:05 AM
I really enjoyed this new recording.  Both works are fabulous contemporaries and beautifully performed and recorded.
(https://d1iiivw74516uk.cloudfront.net/eyJidWNrZXQiOiJwcmVzdG8tY292ZXItaW1hZ2VzIiwia2V5IjoiODg5MDg5OC4xLmpwZyIsImVkaXRzIjp7InJlc2l6ZSI6eyJ3aWR0aCI6OTAwfSwianBlZyI6eyJxdWFsaXR5Ijo2NX0sInRvRm9ybWF0IjoianBlZyJ9LCJ0aW1lc3RhbXAiOjE2MjAzMDA3Mzl9)

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8890898--prokofiev-symphony-no-6-myaskovsky-symphony-no-27
I have to say that I was as disappointed with Petrenko's performance of Prokofiev's 6th Symphony as I was with the 5th Symphony on the earlier release. This is one of the great tragic symphonies of the 20th Century and yet Petrenko, IMO, just makes it sound rather wistful. The close-up recording doesn't help either. The important percussion passage in the second movement (one of my favourite Prokofiev moments) barely registers here and those final crashing bars also lack impact. IMO this performance can not hold a candle to earlier ones by Martinon, Mravinsky Jarvi and Litton which fully convey the tragedy of this work. I must listen to it again however. Back on topic, I thought that the performance of Miaskovsky's 27th Symphony was excellent - the best performance by far over the two discs. The opening movement is taken quite slowly in places and this conveys an extra poignancy. The recording is also excellent here - best I have heard for any recording of this symphony. Svetlanov's performance is a very fine one although, most moving of all is Alexander Gauk (never released on CD). Definitely worth acquiring for the NYM symphony and others might enjoy the Prokofiev performance more than I have.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 04, 2021, 05:37:03 AM
I have to say that I was as disappointed with Petrenko's performance of Prokofiev's 6th Symphony as I was with the 5th Symphony on the earlier release. This is one of the great tragic symphonies of the 20th Century and yet Petrenko, IMO, just makes it sound rather wistful. The close-up recording doesn't help either. The important percussion passage in the second movement (one of my favourite Prokofiev moments) barely registers here and those final crashing bars also lack impact. IMO this performance can not hold a candle to earlier ones by Martinon, Mravinsky Jarvi and Litton which fully convey the tragedy of this work. I must listen to it again however. Back on topic, I thought that the performance of Miaskovsky's 27th Symphony was excellent - the best performance by far over the two discs. The opening movement is taken quite slowly in places and this conveys an extra poignancy. The recording is also excellent here - best I have heard for any recording of this symphony. Svetlanov's performance is a very fine one although, most moving of all is Alexander Gauk (never released on CD). Definitely worth acquiring for the NYM symphony and others might enjoy the Prokofiev performance more than I have.

I find the appreciation of different perspectives, fascinating. I'm no sort of expert on any area of orchestral music, and doubt I ever will be, so quite enjoyed this Prokofiev 6. I did read Lebrecht's review, who spoke of it as 'a game changer', but I need to hear a couple of comparators to gain a better grasp in light of your wisdom.

What I did find particularly lacking in his brief review, was his take on the Miaskovsky #27 as a piece influenced by political weariness rather than its place as a valedictory in the face of terminal illness. The fact that he places it close to peak RVW was also interesting. 

https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 04, 2021, 09:44:43 AM
https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/ (https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/)

I am chilled steel to Lebrecht's perennial clickbait;  just wanted to remark that it is characeristically shallow of him to flog the dead Prokofiev > Stravinsky horse.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on June 04, 2021, 11:41:48 AM
I am chilled steel to Lebrecht's perennial clickbait;  just wanted to remark that it is characeristically shallow of him to flog the dead Prokofiev > Stravinsky horse.

Not a popular chap, then? As a novice to such things, I know no better  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 04, 2021, 12:09:21 PM
Not a popular chap, then? As a novice to such things, I know no better  :)

No worries. We're all learning.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 04, 2021, 09:38:28 PM
I find the appreciation of different perspectives, fascinating. I'm no sort of expert on any area of orchestral music, and doubt I ever will be, so quite enjoyed this Prokofiev 6. I did read Lebrecht's review, who spoke of it as 'a game changer', but I need to hear a couple of comparators to gain a better grasp in light of your wisdom.

What I did find particularly lacking in his brief review, was his take on the Miaskovsky #27 as a piece influenced by political weariness rather than its place as a valedictory in the face of terminal illness. The fact that he places it close to peak RVW was also interesting. 

https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/
I must listen to Prokofiev's 6th again, especially as others have spoken so highly of it. I was very moved, as I always am, by NYM's 27th Symphony. The booklet note writer sees the finale as a kind of satirical take on the expected soviet tub-thumping upbeat finale, but I don't see it that way at all.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on June 06, 2021, 06:08:13 AM
The booklet for the Svetlanov complete set of Myaskovsky's symphonies was ineptly and sloppily thrown together, making it difficult to find which CD contains a particular symphony. For example, there is no entry for Symphony 18 but two for Symphony 8. Anyway, I got tired of it so I made a simple table of contents (just for the symphonies) to paste inside the box:


Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on June 06, 2021, 09:04:10 AM
Must be the Warner/Erato one because the Alto/Olympia tracklisting is fine.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: BasilValentine on June 06, 2021, 01:18:26 PM
Yeah, Warner France. Are there actual liner notes in the other edition?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 06, 2021, 09:19:05 PM
Yeah, Warner France. Are there actual liner notes in the other edition?
Yes, Alto has a 36 page booklet of notes and a downloadable feature on their website for the four symphonies inadvertently left out of the booklet (see below):
http://altocd.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/ALC-3141-Extra-4-Pages.pdf
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on June 07, 2021, 06:42:41 AM
Amongst the chorus of praise for Myaskovsky’s music here, I must admit that I have issues with his style of orchestration. :-\ I often find it to be rather “dour” and “grey” without the delicious dashes of color and flair that, say, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Kabalevsky provide in their orchestration. In Myaskovsky’s music I find there to be a lot of emphasis on middle register instruments (clarinets, violas, etc.) and not enough contrast between the upper and lower registers of the orchestra. Of course, this is just a purely personal opinion and this may have been the intended expressive effect of M’s way of orchestrating. I won’t doubt that he was quite a fine melodist and had a talent for developing motives to create long-breathed symphonic statements.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 07, 2021, 08:47:53 AM
Amongst the chorus of praise for Myaskovsky’s music here, I must admit that I have issues with his style of orchestration. :-\ I often find it to be rather “dour” and “grey” without the delicious dashes of color and flair that, say, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Kabalevsky provide in their orchestration. In Myaskovsky’s music I find there to be a lot of emphasis on middle register instruments (clarinets, violas, etc.) and not enough contrast between the upper and lower registers of the orchestra. Of course, this is just a purely personal opinion and this may have been the intended expressive effect of M’s way of orchestrating. I won’t doubt that he was quite a fine melodist and had a talent for developing motives to create long-breathed symphonic statements.
I'm sure that the music critic David Nice would agree with you Kyle - as far as I can see he has nothing but negativity to express about NYM's music. Having said that, he told me that he thought highly of the opening of the 4th symphony and since my exchanges with him I have come to appreciate that work much more.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 21, 2021, 05:52:28 PM
Amongst the chorus of praise for Myaskovsky’s music here, I must admit that I have issues with his style of orchestration. :-\ I often find it to be rather “dour” and “grey” without the delicious dashes of color and flair that, say, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Kabalevsky provide in their orchestration. In Myaskovsky’s music I find there to be a lot of emphasis on middle register instruments (clarinets, violas, etc.) and not enough contrast between the upper and lower registers of the orchestra.

Kyle, I am keenly alive to your objections:  I had never bothered with Nikolai Yakovlevich's music until I picked up the Pacifica Quartet's Shostakovich cycle which included the 13th Quartet whose superb excellence frankly astonished me. I got to wondering about the symphonies, but when I listened to one on YouTube (I honestly do not recall which) I was put off by the colorlessness (an especially egregious fault in Russian orchestral music)

I have not yet pursued the early symphonies, but I have been very agreeably impressed with the later symphonies, in which the soundworld is more specific (to use a word with which Judith Shatin encouraged my efforts in Charlottesville.  Overall, I am very glad to have got over my Myaskovskophobia, and to have found several pieces which I genuinely admire and enjoy. I admit I am still cautious about the early symphonies.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 21, 2021, 06:02:19 PM
I'm sure that the music critic David Nice would agree with you Kyle - as far as I can see he has nothing but negativity to express about NYM's music.

I do like Nice's book on Prokofiev, Jeffrey. The subtitle A Biography: From Russia to the West 1891-1935 seems to suggest a subsequent volume. Do you know if we should expect one?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 21, 2021, 06:05:12 PM
I have, though, been meaning to investigate the early quartets:

https://www.youtube.com/v/csjQkFhLvio
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 21, 2021, 06:28:45 PM
I do like Nice's book on Prokofiev, Jeffrey. The subtitle A Biography: From Russia to the West 1891-1935 seems to suggest a subsequent volume. Do you know if we should expect one?

I meant to add, too, that via Harlow Robinson's Bio of Prokofiev I unwittingly absorbed the author's prejudices against a number of Prokofiev scores, as well as Myaskovsky. Later, when I listened to and immediately admired those pieces, it taught me a lesson.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 21, 2021, 06:43:42 PM
This is good!

https://www.youtube.com/v/87WeGpaI94E
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on June 21, 2021, 11:15:13 PM
I think the Myaskovsky symphonies are full of colour.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 22, 2021, 03:46:45 AM
I think the Myaskovsky symphonies are full of colour.

The orchestral colour was one of the first things that struck me when I recently heard these works for the first time.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2021, 05:42:11 AM
I think the Myaskovsky symphonies are full of colour.

The orchestral colour was one of the first things that struck me when I recently heard these works for the first time.

Gents, as I do not recall which of them provoked this impression on my part, I cannot unpack it. As with the Eleventh above, the tone poem Silence and the Cello Concerto, I find him an apt "colorist" in a number of orchestral works which I enjoy unqualifiedly. And unlike Robinson (though perhaps obliquely thanks to him) I know better than to disdain Myaskovsky for working with a pallette different to Prokofiev's, e.g. After I survey the quartets, I'll work my way through the symphonies in an orderly fashion.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 22, 2021, 07:14:53 AM
Gents, as I do not recall which of them provoked this impression on my part, I cannot unpack it. As with the Eleventh above, the tone poem Silence and the Cello Concerto, I find him an apt "colorist" in a number of orchestral works which I enjoy unqualifiedly. And unlike Robinson (though perhaps obliquely thanks to him) I know better than to disdain Myaskovsky for working with a pallette different to Prokofiev's, e.g. After I survey the quartets, I'll work my way through the symphonies in an orderly fashion.

I admire your commitment to the research, Karl  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 22, 2021, 09:03:05 AM
I do like Nice's book on Prokofiev, Jeffrey. The subtitle A Biography: From Russia to the West 1891-1935 seems to suggest a subsequent volume. Do you know if we should expect one?
I think that he's working on it Karl.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2021, 09:28:26 AM
I think that he's working on it Karl.

Groovy, thanks.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2021, 09:29:53 AM
I admire your commitment to the research, Karl  8)

It's my native curiosity plus the positive reinforcement of having found highly rewarding listening already, Fergus.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 22, 2021, 11:21:16 AM
Good for you, Karl.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2021, 11:46:40 AM
Good for you, Karl.

I also think of Jacob, wrestling with the angel: I will not let thee go except thou bless me.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 22, 2021, 12:06:17 PM
I also think of Jacob, wrestling with the angel: I will not let thee go except thou bless me.

The blessing will only come when you have completed the task  ;)  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 25, 2021, 07:13:40 PM
Cross-posted from the ‘Listening’ thread:

NP:

Myaskovsky
Symphony No. 27 in C minor, Op. 85
Russian Federation Academic SO
Svetlanov


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71G3Bruf9WL._SL1200_.jpg)

This is thrilling! While I acknowledge the criticisms of a few members here about this composer, revisiting this symphony has softened my own criticisms about the music. This rekindling of a spark may very well inspire me to plough through this set again, but, this time, I’ll take my time and try to absorb the music in a more observant fashion. I bought this reissued set on Alto as my older set on Warner had some glitches that must have been either bad transfers or defective CD pressings. This Alto set seems to have cleared up this issue as it uses the masters from Olympia.

I think I, too, have caught ‘Myaskovsky fever’ again.  0:) As for Kyle’s criticism, I don’t hear it and I certainly don’t hear it in the 27th. I hear many different splashes of color and the whole writing in the middle register is a silly assertion. I hear the high, mid and low registers perfectly fine in his music. You may want to check your audio equipment! Anyway, his opinion makes no difference, this is heartbreakingly beautiful music and I think anyone with an ear for Soviet Era composers that want to venture outside Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Weinberg et. al. would do well to pursue this music. I remember Symphonies Nos. 24 & 27 making a huge impression on me when I first heard them years ago (probably around 2008 or so). I should also give a listen to his SQs (I own the Taneyev Quartet’s set) and I’ve heard a few of them, but I don’t remember them too well. The Piano Sonatas I will also be giving a listen to as I bought the McLachlan recording on Alto (?) last year or so. I also love his Cello Concerto and Cello Sonatas. I still haven’t heard all of the orchestral works outside of the symphonies, but I have bought three discs last year that, for me, act as a continuation of the symphony set. I’ve got to hear these works, too.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 25, 2021, 07:47:47 PM
The box of the string quartets landed today.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 25, 2021, 07:53:45 PM
The box of the string quartets landed today.

Cool, Karl. Which iteration of the symphony set did you buy? The older one on Warner France or the Alto one?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 25, 2021, 10:36:19 PM
We badly need a recording of the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night'.

In the meantime here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on June 26, 2021, 01:46:59 AM
We badly need a recording of the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night'.

In the meantime here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

I have just listened to that video, Jeffrey. It is a very fine work indeed. Thank you for posting it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on June 26, 2021, 03:22:52 AM
I have just listened to that video, Jeffrey. It is a very fine work indeed. Thank you for posting it.
My pleasure Fergus. I'm surprised that it's never been recorded before. It could be usefully coupled with his other cantata 'Kirov is Amongst Us'.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 26, 2021, 12:16:11 PM
Cool, Karl. Which iteration of the symphony set did you buy? The older one on Warner France or the Alto one?

Not clear to me, John, I got it as a download. The digital booklet does read Alto.

(* additional info *)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 26, 2021, 05:40:34 PM
Not clear to me, John, I got it as a download. The digital booklet does read Alto.

(* additional info *)

Very good. Looks like you’ve got the good set then. ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 03, 2021, 12:21:03 PM
The box of the string quartets landed today.

Well, I was going to listen through the quartets before hitting the symphonies, but now that I've organized the symphony sound files all tidy, the temptation is too great, I suppose. I am plunging in with the Sixth and will work my way backwards to the First over the next few days.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 04, 2021, 10:40:37 AM
The blessing will only come when you have completed the task  ;) ;D

Okay, in support of my earlier objection, which I now formally withdraw: I'm listening to the Fifth Symphony today. I believe this was the symphony I began listening to, back when. The first movement, Allegretto amabile largely constrains itself within the middle register ambit, and the scoring for most of the movement is less colorful than in the symphonies which first won my affection, indeed, the color is markedly more restrained than in the Sixth, which was part of yesterday's listening. So, on one hand, I'll stand by the observation that the writing here is sombre compared to any of a dozen other Russian symphonies, and my guess is that I bridled at this and did not trouble to listen to the rest of the symphony (hence began listening to, earlier.) Chalk that up to my impatience at the time, which I do not seek to excuse.  Now, I understand that the sombre palette was a choice and not a limitation. Thus let my objection pass into oblivion.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on July 04, 2021, 11:55:44 AM
Okay, in support of my earlier objection, which I now formally withdraw: I'm listening to the Fifth Symphony today. I believe this was the symphony I began listening to, back when. The first movement, Allegretto amabile largely constrains itself within the middle register ambit, and the scoring for most of the movement is less colorful than in the symphonies which first won my affection, indeed, the color is markedly more restrained than in the Sixth, which was part of yesterday's listening. So, on one hand, I'll stand by the observation that the writing here is sombre compared to any of a dozen other Russian symphonies, and my guess is that I bridled at this and did not trouble to listen to the rest of the symphony (hence began listening to, earlier.) Chalk that up to my impatience at the time, which I do not seek to excuse.  Now, I understand that the sombre palette was a choice and not a limitation. Thus let my objection pass into oblivion.

If sharing your reflections as you go is ever useful, then some of us lesser mortals would value your insights 😁
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 04, 2021, 12:04:09 PM
If sharing your reflections as you go is ever useful, then some of us lesser mortals would value your insights 😁

I'll try to do my best.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: foxandpeng on July 04, 2021, 12:52:02 PM
I'll try to do my best.

I was actually being cheeky and not expecting you to take the bait, but I'd be really pleased to read your reflections, as doubtless, would others.

Thank you 🙂
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 22, 2021, 04:12:40 PM
If it should perhaps strike you as odd that quartets nos. 9-11 should be on CD1 ... I can report that with the exception of CD2 all five discs in this set are labeled CD1 ....
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 10, 2021, 10:12:28 PM
I was just reading BBC Music Magazine and was pleased to read that NYM is their featured 'Composer of the Month' in the October issue.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: OrchestralNut on August 11, 2021, 02:36:39 AM
I was just reading BBC Music Magazine and was pleased to read that NYM is their featured 'Composer of the Month' in their October issue.

Very nice, Jeffrey!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on August 11, 2021, 03:18:11 AM
This thread bump has inspired me to listen to the 5th Symphony today. I'd forgotten how melodic the opening movement is. It wouldn't be out of place in a Dvorak symphony.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 11, 2021, 08:55:34 PM
This thread bump has inspired me to listen to the 5th Symphony today. I'd forgotten how melodic the opening movement is. It wouldn't be out of place in a Dvorak symphony.
Yes, I think that's true. I rarely listen to No.5 although it's one of the more popular ones.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on August 11, 2021, 11:58:09 PM
I was just reading BBC Music Magazine and was pleased to read that NYM is their featured 'Composer of the Month' in the October issue.

Did you make any contribution, Jeffrey?
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 12, 2021, 12:04:43 AM
Did you make any contribution, Jeffrey?
Sadly not Fergus! Was unaware that he was being featured. Thanks for asking.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on August 12, 2021, 12:10:01 AM
Sadly not Fergus! Was unaware that he was being featured. Thanks for asking.

Had you done so I would have bought it.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 12, 2021, 05:50:01 AM
Had you done so I would have bought it.
Haha, sweet of you to say that Fergus! You never know, I might do an 'I know best'-type follow-up letter!  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on August 12, 2021, 06:05:22 AM
Haha, sweet of you to say that Fergus! You never know, I might do an 'I know best'-type follow-up letter!  ;D

Go for it, Jeffrey! We have every confidence in you  ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 12, 2021, 06:11:57 AM
Go for it, Jeffrey! We have every confidence in you  ;)
I'll keep you posted Fergus!  8)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on August 12, 2021, 06:15:07 AM
I'll keep you posted Fergus!  8)

As we say in Ireland, Jeffrey, good man!  :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 12, 2021, 08:26:01 AM
As we say in Ireland, Jeffrey, good man!  :)

And so say all of us!
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on August 12, 2021, 10:43:09 AM
As Gaeilge, maith an fear  :)

[In Irish, good man or well done!]
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on August 16, 2021, 06:25:38 AM
As Gaeilge, maith an fear  :)

[In Irish, good man or well done!]

I will raise a glass of the "black stuff" to that.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Maestro267 on August 17, 2021, 11:01:48 PM
Listening to Symphony No. 23 now, and parts of the opening movement remind me a lot of the opening movement of Respighi's Fountains of Rome.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on August 17, 2021, 11:55:55 PM
Listening to Symphony No. 23 now, and parts of the opening movement remind me a lot of the opening movement of Respighi's Fountains of Rome.
Interesting point - it's one of the most approachable I think.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 17, 2021, 10:26:28 AM
From WAYLTN thread:
Miaskovsky: Symphony No.17 (1936-37)
USSR Radio & TV Symphony Orchestra, Alexander Gauk.
One of NYM's greatest symphonies I think and this is a fine performance. This symphony was written at the height of the Stalinist Purges (1936-37) and yet NYM, whilst, to some extent, conforming to socialist-realist musical expectations, maintains his artistic integrity. The slow movement is one of his finest. I find the ostensibly triumphant ending to be oddly defiant and very moving:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on November 18, 2021, 02:48:12 PM
Yes, oh a majestic utterance by Myaskovsky, Jeffrey. His noble and heroic veins interweave rather well. I don't know that recording, but I don't doubt it is powerful.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on November 18, 2021, 04:33:49 PM
I think I should listen to the 24th, I've always liked this symphony. If I remember correctly, it ends in relative calm and soulfulness. Closing moments like those in works like that are very touching in my personal view.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: relm1 on November 18, 2021, 05:00:48 PM
This is just a small post to tell you all that I really enjoyed Symphony No. 16.  Very good dramatic symphonic structure.  It reminded me of Bax in a way.  Very enjoyable.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on November 18, 2021, 06:26:38 PM
This is just a small post to tell you all that I really enjoyed Symphony No. 16.  Very good dramatic symphonic structure.  It reminded me of Bax in a way.  Very enjoyable.

I remember the 3rd movement being quite special, poignant and eventually tragic. Another I need to revisit.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 18, 2021, 10:52:59 PM
16 has a wonderful funeral-march slow movement (inspired by the air disaster of the 'Maxim Gorky' aircraft). No.24 (in memory of one of NYM's friends) is one of the most deeply felt - I agree. Gauk's performance of Symphony No.17 (which I think is dedicated to the conductor) is well worth hearing, although Svetlanov's recording is fine too.
This fine three CD set, with its extraordinary cover image, features recordings of symphonies 16,17,21,22,25 and 27 by different conductors:
(http://)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on November 23, 2021, 07:46:07 AM
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one. 
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Irons on November 23, 2021, 09:10:27 AM
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one.

Very much agree with the 2nd Cello Sonata. So many symphonies, I have trouble recalling which is which although they are all different and each has special qualities.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 23, 2021, 10:53:02 AM
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one.

No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 25, 2021, 12:56:07 AM
No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.
The valedictory No.27 is very moving and definitely one of my favourites. I regret that Gauk's marvellous performance has never been released on CD.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2021, 06:58:26 AM
The valedictory No.27 is very moving and definitely one of my favourites. I regret that Gauk's marvellous performance has never been released on CD.

It's an incredibly moving and poignant work. He was dying as he was writing it much like Finzi was with his Cello Concerto.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 25, 2021, 11:08:07 AM
It's an incredibly moving and poignant work. He was dying as he was writing it much like Finzi was with his Cello Concerto.
Yes, that's very true John. Rootham's Second Symphony is, I find, unbearably moving for the same reason.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 25, 2021, 12:02:24 PM
Yes, that's very true John. Rootham's Second Symphony is, I find, unbearably moving for the same reason.

Indeed. I should revisit that Rootham symphony at some point. Too much music, so little time per usual. :)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on November 27, 2021, 06:40:41 PM
The other day I heard the 24th under Titov (Northern Flowers label) and I confirmed my admiration and liking for the first two movements. The 3rd has some nice moments, but in this performance I felt a lack of drive and excitement. It's one of my favorites along with 16-19, 21, 22, 24-27.

I need to hear a recording of the 6th that really convinces me of its qualities.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: kyjo on November 27, 2021, 10:03:54 PM
No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.

It's a fine work but hasn't quite sent me off to the "Pieces that blown you away recently" thread, at least not yet. I'm a bit pickier about my Miaskovsky than some folks. ;)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 27, 2021, 11:49:39 PM
I need to hear a recording of the 6th that really convinces me of its qualities.
Do you know this one Cesar? (picture below). It has been very effectively remastered by Paul Arden-Taylor for Alto. The performance was always great IMO but the Russian Disc release was not great sound (from 1959). It's inexpensive (with informative notes  8)). My other recommendations are Jarvi's DGG recording (fine performance and great sound but possibly absurdly expensive now) and Stankovsky's old Marco Polo recording (not transferred to Naxos). It was  the first CD release and not that well reviewed, but I like it. Svetlanov's (Olympia/Alto) is great but unfortunately it excludes the (optional) choir at the end. The more recent Kondrashin release (on Melodiya) is very good but the crucial flute passage in the trio section of the scherzo (one of my favourite moments in all music) is IMO played much too fast, sounds rushed and loses its poignancy.
Here's an old comparative review of releases on Marco Polo, Russian Disc and Olympia which might be of interest:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm
(Jarvi Review)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/nov06/Miaskovsky_6_4716552.htm
(http://)
(Alto/Kondrashin)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/May/Myaskovsky_sy6_ALC1421.htm
Here's a review of the later Kondrashin recording (written by me  ;D) in which I attempt a comparative survey. It was written before the Alto release of the older Kondrashin recording.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/may06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm
Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: aligreto on November 28, 2021, 03:04:40 AM

Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):

No-one here will complain on that score, Jeffrey  ;)
What we would like is more of the same!  ;D
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 28, 2021, 09:50:06 AM
No-one here will complain on that score, Jeffrey  ;)
What we would like is more of the same!  ;D
:)
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: Symphonic Addict on November 28, 2021, 08:20:49 PM
Do you know this one Cesar? (picture below). It has been very effectively remastered by Paul Arden-Taylor for Alto. The performance was always great IMO but the Russian Disc release was not great sound (from 1959). It's inexpensive (with informative notes  8)). My other recommendations are Jarvi's DGG recording (fine performance and great sound but possibly absurdly expensive now) and Stankovsky's old Marco Polo recording (not transferred to Naxos). It was  the first CD release and not that well reviewed, but I like it. Svetlanov's (Olympia/Alto) is great but unfortunately it excludes the (optional) choir at the end. The more recent Kondrashin release (on Melodiya) is very good but the crucial flute passage in the trio section of the scherzo (one of my favourite moments in all music) is IMO played much too fast, sounds rushed and loses its poignancy.
Here's an old comparative review of releases on Marco Polo, Russian Disc and Olympia which might be of interest:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm
(Jarvi Review)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/nov06/Miaskovsky_6_4716552.htm
(http://)
(Alto/Kondrashin)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/May/Myaskovsky_sy6_ALC1421.htm
Here's a review of the later Kondrashin recording (written by me  ;D) in which I attempt a comparative survey. It was written before the Alto release of the older Kondrashin recording.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/may06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm
Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):

Very helpful, Jeffrey. Thanks a lot. This information will allow me to decide better.
Title: Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
Post by: vandermolen on November 29, 2021, 12:27:30 AM
Very helpful, Jeffrey. Thanks a lot. This information will allow me to decide better.
My pleasure Cesar. This is a strong performance as well (great cover art from the painter Isaac Levitan: 'Eternal Rest')
(http://)