GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 04:28:06 AM

Title: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 04:28:06 AM
[ Is there really no thread for David Diamond? ]

How do you like this (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,9.msg287199.html#msg287199), Corey?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on March 17, 2009, 04:55:30 AM
One of the greatest American composers - especially for his Symphony No 3 - he sent me a lovely reply to my fan latter. Symphonies 1-4, Psalm, Kaddish and romeo and Juliet are my favourites + a great String quartet (can't remember which one).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: jowcol on March 17, 2009, 04:58:34 AM
I'll chime in-- I don't have that much of his catalog, but I really like the disc with Symphonies 2 and 4 on Naxos-- the first movement of the second is wonderfully grim.  He's certainly one I'd like to get to know better.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 04:59:34 AM
Here again is where we miss Chris (weirdears), who studied with Diamond . . . .
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Kullervo on March 17, 2009, 05:04:03 AM
Oh, how you put me on the spot! ;D

It's wonderful — very personal, unique music that is "romantic" without sounding like a throwback or like film music. The first symphony is an early work but is very assured in its orchestration and melodic writing. I can see why Schoenberg called him "the new Bruckner", because his slow movements are certainly of a rare beauty. The violin concerto is also lovely, with a very memorable theme providing the basis of the first movement and a rollicking final rondo. The gem of the disc, for me, is the tone poem The Enormous Room, which eventually builds up from quiet beginnings to a climax that is (really) breathtaking.

I'll be going through Naxos traversal of the symphonies (alas, woefully incomplete) over the next several days and will post my thoughts here.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 05:08:01 AM
Oh, how you put me on the spot! ;D

Well, you've certainly responded with grace  0:)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: ChamberNut on March 17, 2009, 05:15:04 AM
Ah yes, Diamond Dave, what energy he brought to Van Halen!   :D >:D ;)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Kullervo on March 17, 2009, 05:34:47 AM
Might as well jump (out the window)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 05:40:25 AM
Better?

(http://www.classicalarchives.com/images/cpic/pic200/drz000/z053/z05364yor2x.jpg)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: ChamberNut on March 17, 2009, 05:40:49 AM
Might as well jump (out the window)

 :D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 06:44:17 AM
I was about to say something about David Diamond but my sense of horrified outrage at the hideous sight of this virtually naked long-haired 'rock personage' had driven me away :o >:(
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 07:01:58 AM
No, wasn't sporting . . . .
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 07:36:12 AM
I deleted it.  :P
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 07:46:31 AM
I appreciate that you were funnin', Dave.

But cor, that was a revolting image  8)

Colin, come back!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: springrite on March 17, 2009, 08:00:41 AM
I have heard so many people telling me to get his string quartets. But I still haven't heard them. I only have one chamber music CD which was OK, but the symphony #2 is the one that I really really like.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 08:15:54 AM
I appreciate that you were funnin', Dave.

But cor, that was a revolting image  8)

Colin, come back!

Yes, I forget there are women on the board.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 08:16:45 AM
I deleted it.  :P

You, sir, are a gentleman :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 08:27:38 AM
You, sir, are a gentleman :)

No, sir. No, I'm not.

 ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: springrite on March 17, 2009, 08:28:53 AM
No, sir. No, I'm not.

 ;D

Come on, don't be so modest, you diamond-in-the-rough!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 08:32:15 AM
Come on, don't be so modest, you diamond-in-the-rough!

 ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 08:35:03 AM
Diamond is not the only very distinguished American composer of his generation not yet to have a thread of his own here. Roy Harris, Walter Piston, George Rochberg, Virgil Thomson, Paul Creston are all equally awaiting that great honour ;D

 I too lament the fact that after the revival in the 1990s Diamond's death seems to have led to to a (temporary, I hope) dropping-off of interest in his music. Delos did a lot for Diamond, recording the Symphonies Nos. 1-4 and No.8, the Second Violin Concerto and a number of other orchestral and concertante works together, inexplicably and (I venture to suggest) disgracefully, with the Adagio from the Symphony No.11-an almost Brucknerian slow movement which makes one yearn to hear the whole work properly! The Symphony No.5 was recorded by the Julliard Orchestra. Once again we are in debt to the enterprise of Gerard Schwarz and the Seattle SO-Schwarz may
have a difficult relationship with the orchestras he has conducted but his work on behalf of American composers is comparable to that of the late Vernon Handley and Richard Hickox in Great Britain.

I agree that Diamond was a composer of considerable substance and that the symphonic cycle of 11 symphonies is right up there with the best of American symphonies. But we really need to be able to hear Nos. 6, 7, 9, 10 and all of No.11 to be able to evaluate them properly. There is a power, freshness and melodic attractiveness, combined with a Stravinskyesque energy and a sort of Gallic sensitivity(he studied with Nadia Boulanger) in the best of Diamond which certainly appeals to me.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 08:37:00 AM
No, sir. No, I'm not.

 ;D

Ok, well, whatever.....but it was swell of you to delete the image anyway :) 'Swell'...is that the right word? ;D

(Actually...Diamond himself might have appreciated the picture.....but we won't go there ::))
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: springrite on March 17, 2009, 08:39:22 AM
Ok, well, whatever.....but it was swell of you to delete the image anyway :) 'Swell'...is that the right word? ;D

Well, let's not elongate his ego any further. ;)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 09:37:53 AM
Ok, well, whatever.....but it was swell of you to delete the image anyway :) 'Swell'...is that the right word? ;D

I await Dave's ruling as a Midwesterner.  I've never heard that expression in actual use, meself  8)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 09:40:59 AM
I await Dave's ruling as a Midwesterner.  I've never heard that expression in actual use, meself  8)

You've never heard someone say, "That's swell!" Not even on TV?  ???
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 09:43:04 AM
On TV, I didn't consider "actual use" for purposes of that post.  Never heard it said (other than, say, in reference to My Three Sons) by a living soul.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 09:45:18 AM
On TV, I didn't consider "actual use" for purposes of that post.  Never heard it said (other than, say, in reference to My Three Sons) by a living soul.

I think they said it in the '30s here in the US. :) It has just made its way to Scotland. ;)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: springrite on March 17, 2009, 09:47:43 AM
You've never heard someone say, "That's swell!" Not even on TV?  ???

Karl lives in New England, where people don't watch as much TV and when they do, what is said on TV does not really influence their lives as much... UNLESS, of course, it is said by Cliff on Cheers.

Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 09:51:19 AM
Karl lives in New England, where people don't watch as much TV...


 ::)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 17, 2009, 10:01:58 AM
Karl lives in New England, where people don't watch as much TV and when they do, what is said on TV does not really influence their lives as much... UNLESS, of course, it is said by Cliff on Cheers.

Cheers was before my time here in N.E.

(Another show I somehow never watched . . . .)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 10:05:05 AM
Cheers was before my time here in N.E.

(Another show I somehow never watched . . . .)

For the record, I'm not much of a TV-viewer myself. No! Really!!!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: ChamberNut on March 17, 2009, 10:10:52 AM
For the record, I'm not much of a TV-viewer myself. No! Really!!!

I'm not anymore either.  In fact, I've considered giving the TV up altogether.  Not sure if the better half or my stepson will let me go that far though.  ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: snyprrr on March 17, 2009, 05:34:21 PM
Isn't sym. no4 the one with the kind of "tropical" sounding first mvmt?  Very nice. It's the shorter of the two on the Naxos.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 05:53:31 PM
Please forgive me for being the cause of this thread being totally derailed by a discussion of American linguistic idiom ;D

It's just that I seem to remember from the deepest recesses of my memory a fragment of a popular song with the line which went something like "...what a swell party this is"??
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 17, 2009, 05:55:31 PM
Please forgive me for being the cause of this thread being totally derailed by a discussion of American linguistic idiom ;D

It's just that I seem to remember from the deepest recesses of my memory a fragment of a popular song with the line which went something like "...what a swell party this is"??

Apology accepted.

"Thou Swell"

From A Connecticut Yankee 1927 AND A Connecticut Yankee (Revival)
Lyrics by Lorenz Hart, music by Richard Rodgers

He:

   Babe, we are well met,
   As in a spell met,
   I lift my helmet,
   Sandy; You're just dandy.
   For just this here lad.
   You're such a fistfull.
   My eyes are mistful,
   Are you too wistful to care,
   Do say you care to say;
   "Come near lad."
   You are so graceful,
   have you wings?
   You have a face full of nice things;
   You have no speaking voice, dear,
   With ev'ry word it sings

Refrain:

   Thou swell! Thou witty!
   Thou sweet! Thou grand!
   Wouldst kiss me pretty?
   Wouldst hold my hand?
   Both thine eyes are cute too;
   What they do to me.
   Hear me holler I choose a Sweet lollapaloosa in thee.
   I'd feel so rich in a hut for two;
   Two rooms and a kitchen I'm sure would do;
   Give me just a plot of,
   Not a lot of land,
   And Thou swell! Thou Witty! Thou Grand!


She:

    Thy words are queer, Sir,
    Unto mine ear, Sir,
    Yet thou'rt a dear, Sir, to me;
    Thou could'st woo me;
    Now could'st though try, knight.
    I'd murmur "Swell", too,
    And like it well too;
    More thou wilt tell to Sandy.
    Thou art dandy;
    Now art though my knight.
    Thine arms are martial;
    Thou hast grace;
    My cheek is partial to they face;
    And if they lips grow weary,
    Mine are resting place.

Refrain:

   Thou swell! Thou witty!
   Thou sweet! Thou grand!
   Wouldst kiss me pretty?
   Wouldst hold my hand?
   Both thine eyes are cute too;
   What they do to me.
   Hear me holler I choose a Sweet lollapaloosa in thee.
   I'd feel so rich in a hut for two;
   Two rooms and a kitchen I'm sure would do;
   Give me just a plot of,
   Not a lot of land,
   And Thou swell! Thou Witty! Thou Grand!

Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 06:09:17 PM
Swell ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2009, 06:13:32 PM
(David Diamond....Please forgive me! We shall return to you!)

Found it:-

What A Swell Party This Is lyrics

Artist - Cole Porter
Album - Various Songs
Lyrics - What A Swell Party This Is





Have you heard, amoung this clan
I am called 'The forgotten man'?
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

Have you heard the story of
A boy, a girl , urequitted love?
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

What frills, what frocks!
What furs, what rocks!
What gaiety!
It's all to exquis!
That French champagne!
So good for the brain!
That bands, it's the end!
Kindly don't fall down my friend.

Have you heard? Professor Munch
Ate his wife and divorced his lunch.
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

Have you heard? The countess Krupp
Crossed the bridge when the bridge was up.
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

Have you heard that Mimsie Starr
Just got pinched in the Astor bar?
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

Have you heard that Uncle Newt
Forgot to open his parachute?
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

It's great, it's grand!
It's wonderland!
What soup, what fish!
That beef, what a dish!
That grouse, so rare!
That aged camembert!
That bab au rhum!
Will you please move over chum?

Have you heard that dear old Blanch
Got run down by an avalanche?
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

Have you heard? It's in the stars,
Next July we collide with Mars!
Well, did you evah?
What a swell party this is!

What a swellagent, elagent party this is!
 
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on March 18, 2009, 05:02:03 AM
Isn't sym. no4 the one with the kind of "tropical" sounding first mvmt?  Very nice. It's the shorter of the two on the Naxos.

Diamond and Sessions . . . must get around to actually listening to the music . . . .
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on March 18, 2009, 09:23:03 AM
Diamond and Sessions . . . must get around to actually listening to the music . . . .

You should :) Forget all this Stravinsky and get to it ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 06, 2009, 05:30:55 AM
Together with Copland, Diamond is my favourite American composer - especially symphonies 2,3 and 4, all of which are marvellous works. I feel that he should be much better known. These works are well crafted, eloquent and often moving (as in slow movement of Symphony No 3).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: karlhenning on July 06, 2009, 06:00:14 AM
Forget all this Stravinsky . . . .

Ach! Never!  :D

Together with Copland, Diamond is my favourite American composer - especially symphonies 2,3 and 4, all of which are marvellous works. I feel that he should be much better known. These works are well crafted, eloquent and often moving (as in slow movement of Symphony No 3).

Duly noted, thanks.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Elnimio on May 02, 2012, 06:36:16 AM
The dissonant language found in his symphonies 7 and 8 is quite shocking, especially compared to his earlier stuff, but damn, it makes for some thrilling, darker music.

A master of lean contrapuntal writing, this guy was. Truly talented and multifaceted composer.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on May 02, 2012, 12:52:37 PM
The dissonant language found in his symphonies 7 and 8 is quite shocking, especially compared to his earlier stuff, but damn, it makes for some thrilling, darker music.

A master of lean contrapuntal writing, this guy was. Truly talented and multifaceted composer.

It seems that these American composers Schuman, Mennin, Diamond, who knows who else progressed into a dark and gritty style for their symphonies towards the end of their lives.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 02, 2012, 02:22:04 PM
I'm glad we have a Diamond thread.

My introduction to him was on the Australian Classic FM, a truly dreadful music radio station dedicated to everything mediocre and substandard in classical music (in correspondence with me they told me that the music of Robert Simpson would have 'no appeal' to their listeners and they would never play it). However, on this one occasion they served up a treat: I was waiting for someone at a train station late at night, their train was late and went out to the car and flicked on the radio and they were playing the last movement of the SQ 3, couldn't believe it, just such wonderful, eloquent, sad but noble music. I think Classic FM were having an aberration at the time.

Marvelous composer, one of the great things about him is that he is very consistent, so, although his music gets darker and more dissonant over time, it's always recognisably Diamond straightaway. I love the symphonies (I know 3, 4, 5 and 10) and it's a crying shame we don't have a complete cycle. We do have the complete string quartets from Albany and I've got the first two volumes so far (2, 3, 8, 9, 10 and the Concerto for SQ), love them.

Just a couple of questions:

1. I know that DD was gay, and yet all the information about the String Quartet No.3 was that the slow movement was written in memory of a woman that DD lived with in Paris who suicided. What's the story, was she just a friend? Or was he bisexual? I don't care what his sexuality was, just want to know the story.
2. I downloaded the radio broadcast of the premier of the Symphony 10 from 1988 from Unsung Composers downloads, (love the way the organ becomes more and more prominent in the scherzo and the through the finale). Anyway, some other information tells me DD revised the symphony in 2000, does anyone know if these changes were major?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 07, 2012, 06:14:55 PM
Since enthusing before I have been listening to more Diamond.

I particularly liked the tone poem 'The Enormous Room', it's absolutely lovely and has an inevitable structure, although I don't what it has to do with e e cummings memoir.

Anyway, one thing that struck me was how in this work, and in other early works, Diamond's melodies and harmonies are sometimes very reminiscent of Gerald Finizi's. I know both composers liked modal melodies and harmonies, and both had a Jewish upbringing (though I don't know how that explains the resemblance). Anyway just a thought.

For another thought on Finzi/Diamond, see the Finzi thread.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on November 29, 2012, 09:43:15 PM
Together with Copland, Diamond is my favourite American composer - especially symphonies 2,3 and 4, all of which are marvellous works. I feel that he should be much better known. These works are well crafted, eloquent and often moving (as in slow movement of Symphony No 3).

Completely agree. He wrote superb music. Those slow movements are really something special. Heartbreaking and there seems to be an underlying feeling of sadness within these movements.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on December 02, 2012, 07:50:53 AM
I particularly liked the tone poem 'The Enormous Room', it's absolutely lovely and has an inevitable structure, although I don't what it has to do with e e cummings memoir.

Yes, this is a great work. From the reissued Naxos recording, I wasn't fond of his Violin Concerto No. 2 at all. I thought the violin writing was a bit lifeless. This first symphony and this work The Enormous Room were what made that recording.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 08, 2012, 02:15:11 PM
I've never understood why Diamond didn't become the National Composer.* it would be difficult to think of a C20 composer who combined such accessibility with genuine musical worth.

Take the Symphony No.2, it's a perfect wartime symphony, and if I'd been a concert goer in 1944 I'd have been tearing up and waving the stars and stripes (metaphorically), but it stands on its own feet and can be listened to as a purely abstract symphony.

It's unbelievable to me that we don't have recordings of all his symphonies, I particularly regret not having recordings of the symphonies 9-11 (I have a radio recording of the 10th, which indicates in his later symphonies he went back to a plainer style compared to his middle symphonies (as represented by 5 & 8, we don't have recordings of 6 & 7). What is intriguing is that 10 is longer than any of his other symphonies (c 50 mins). On the the principle of "you can never have enough of a good thing", I hope that when 9 and 11 are recorded they also prove to be of similar length.  :D

Thank heavens for the Potomac Quartet's complete cycle.

* Oh, wait, I get it, homophobia.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on December 08, 2012, 05:25:26 PM
I have a radio recording of No.9 (and Nos. 6 and 7) if you are interested :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: San Antone on December 08, 2012, 05:37:26 PM
He is another 20th C. composer who devoted much of his energy in the string quartet form.  There are 4 volumes performed by the Potomac Quartet and generally very good. 







Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 08, 2012, 05:39:19 PM
* Oh, and anti-Jewish sentiment.

Isn't it good that now we're at the stage where (theoretically at least) a person's sexuality and/or heritage has nothing to do with how well they get on.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on December 08, 2012, 07:39:34 PM

* Oh, wait, I get it, homophobia.

Obviously this has nothing to do with it. Copland was homosexual, and Jewish, and recognized as one of the greatest American composers. I don't know why Diamond isn't performed more. I'd love a conductor like Alan Gilbert or Andrew Litton to release a complete symphony cycle. Wouldn't that be something? It's a shame Schwarz didn't do a complete cycle. I never understood why he didn't? I mean he had support from Delos.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Dundonnell on December 09, 2012, 01:32:45 PM
Obviously this has nothing to do with it. Copland was homosexual, and Jewish, and recognized as one of the greatest American composers. I don't know why Diamond isn't performed more. I'd love a conductor like Alan Gilbert or Andrew Litton to release a complete symphony cycle. Wouldn't that be something? It's a shame Schwarz didn't do a complete cycle. I never understood why he didn't? I mean he had support from Delos.

Why don't you ask him ???
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 09, 2012, 01:41:27 PM
"Obviously this has nothing to do with it. Copland was homosexual, and Jewish, and recognized as one of the greatest American composers."

Well, I'd have thought that being homosexual and Jewish would have been a considerable handicap to acceptance in the 1950s (didn't Diamond have to live in Italy in the 50s? although this may have been more to do with his politics). Later, overt prejudice would have given way to hidden prejudice. But remember, people don't make their way in the world subject only to the judgements of the enlightened and wise, even composers have to go through life subject to the judgements of the prejudiced, petty and unwise.

Just been watching "Mad Men" on DVD and this show, said to be an accurate portrayal of its time (1960s), shows plenty of overt prejudice against gay men and people of Jewish background. (Story would have been the same, and maybe worse, in Britain or Australia at the same time, or course). Served as a reminder of how bad things were then.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 09, 2012, 04:42:35 PM
Useful webpage with analysis of the first 8 symphonies

https://www.webdepot.umontreal.ca/Usagers/belkina/MonDepotPublic/Diamond/DD.html
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Johnll on December 09, 2012, 07:19:02 PM
Clyptorhynchus my understanding is that Diamond had a bit of ego and outed  himself as a young man. All of us that want to live in the real world have to pretend to like doing things we do not want to. I do not want to wear ties and I do not want to talk about football even though the boss loves it. You may have to go along sometimes to get along- it is your choice and Diamond made a different choice than Copeland and Bernstein who were successful.
While you are crying in your beer about all this homo and Jew hate stuff allow me to ask you a question.  If I could find a Muslim Palestinian (not skirt wearing) composer of note what do you think his reception would be in Israel, America, or Australia? I believe we all know the answer but I most certainly want your response!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: San Antone on December 09, 2012, 07:23:09 PM
It is unfortunate that this thread is not being devoted to a discussion of David Diamond's music. 
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: lescamil on December 09, 2012, 07:30:28 PM
Useful webpage with analysis of the first 8 symphonies

https://www.webdepot.umontreal.ca/Usagers/belkina/MonDepotPublic/Diamond/DD.html

Huh, Alan Belkin is a friend of mine's composition teacher. This is incredibly useful to someone like me, who is still trying to figure out their opinion on Diamond's music. I still place his colleagues ahead of him at the moment, namely Schuman and Persichetti.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on December 09, 2012, 07:41:21 PM
Why don't you ask him ???

I prefer not to be laughed at. ;) :D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on December 15, 2012, 12:12:46 AM
Can't stop listening to Symphony No 3 - should be up there with those of Copland, Harris, Hanson and Schuman. It used to be the slow movement which I found so moving (still moves me greatly), but now it is the slow, deeply touching, last movement which I can't get over. In fact the whole work is wonderful. The original Delos CD is better than the Naxos reissue as it includes Diamond's fine music for 'Romeo and Juliet'. Wish we had a complete cycle of the symphonies.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: snyprrr on December 15, 2012, 08:13:25 AM
I'm glad we have a Diamond thread.

My introduction to him was on the Australian Classic FM, a truly dreadful music radio station dedicated to everything mediocre and substandard in classical music (in correspondence with me they told me that the music of Robert Simpson would have 'no appeal' to their listeners and they would never play it). However, on this one occasion they served up a treat: I was waiting for someone at a train station late at night, their train was late and went out to the car and flicked on the radio and they were playing the last movement of the SQ 3, couldn't believe it, just such wonderful, eloquent, sad but noble music. I think Classic FM were having an aberration at the time.

Marvelous composer, one of the great things about him is that he is very consistent, so, although his music gets darker and more dissonant over time, it's always recognisably Diamond straightaway. I love the symphonies (I know 3, 4, 5 and 10) and it's a crying shame we don't have a complete cycle. We do have the complete string quartets from Albany and I've got the first two volumes so far (2, 3, 8, 9, 10 and the Concerto for SQ), love them.

Just a couple of questions:

1. I know that DD was gay, and yet all the information about the String Quartet No.3 was that the slow movement was written in memory of a woman that DD lived with in Paris who suicided. What's the story, was she just a friend? Or was he bisexual? I don't care what his sexuality was, just want to know the story.
2. I downloaded the radio broadcast of the premier of the Symphony 10 from 1988 from Unsung Composers downloads, (love the way the organ becomes more and more prominent in the scherzo and the through the finale). Anyway, some other information tells me DD revised the symphony in 2000, does anyone know if these changes were major?

Which Quartets would I like first?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 15, 2012, 03:14:42 PM
DD’s quartets, like his symphonies, show an early lyrical phase, a tougher, more dissonant and harsh middle period, and a later period that combines elements of the first two.

Early 1-3, Concerto for String Quartet (a string quartet, but so called because each movement gives prominence to one of the players in turn).
Middle 4-7
Late 8-10

The third has the marvellous elegy I mentioned before as the last movement.

The quartets from 4 onwards all feature  elements such as fugue and theme and variations (influence of Beethoven).

4 is the longest, IMHO 8 is the least characterised, but they are all very good.

The Potomacs have the following disks (there are other recordings of single SQs coupled with other composers’ works):

3, 8, Concerto
2, 9, 7
1, 5, 6
4, 7

Probably the 2, 9, 7 disk gives you the best sampling. I don’t think you can get these disks physically any more, you have to download unless you buy second-hand.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: snyprrr on December 15, 2012, 04:26:34 PM
DD’s quartets, like his symphonies, show an early lyrical phase, a tougher, more dissonant and harsh middle period, and a later period that combines elements of the first two.

Early 1-3, Concerto for String Quartet (a string quartet, but so called because each movement gives prominence to one of the players in turn).
Middle 4-7
Late 8-10

The third has the marvellous elegy I mentioned before as the last movement.

The quartets from 4 onwards all feature  elements such as fugue and theme and variations (influence of Beethoven).

4 is the longest, IMHO 8 is the least characterised, but they are all very good.

The Potomacs have the following disks (there are other recordings of single SQs coupled with other composers’ works):

3, 8, Concerto
2, 9, 7
1, 5, 6
4, 7

Probably the 2, 9, 7 disk gives you the best sampling. I don’t think you can get these disks physically any more, you have to download unless you buy second-hand.

thanks!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: San Antone on December 15, 2012, 05:19:11 PM
He is another 20th C. composer who devoted much of his energy in the string quartet form.  There are 4 volumes performed by the Potomac Quartet and generally very good. 









I had posted this a week ago.  Don't know why it was ignored.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on December 17, 2012, 02:53:44 AM
Completely agree. He wrote superb music. Those slow movements are really something special. Heartbreaking and there seems to be an underlying feeling of sadness within these movements.

Have been listening to the two slow movements of Symphony No 3. I totally agree with you. The last movement is especially touching.  The work is, I think, dedicated to Diamond's parents and to me the finale conveys a sense of farewell. The fast movements have a sense of rhythmic urgency which is very compelling too (I find this also in the opening movement of Symphony No 1 - another score that I have learnt to greatly appreciate). Can't understand why Diamond is not better known. I am hoping to explore his chamber music next.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on January 07, 2013, 12:17:05 PM
When I was complaining that we don't have a recording of Symphony 11, I was forgetting that the Schwarz Delos disk #5 (the one Naxos didn't rerelease) has a performance of the Adagio from the 11th on it.

Got a second-hand copy recently and listened to it, it's a great disk, also has Rounds, Ravel Elegy, Concert piece for Orchestra and Duo for Flute and Harp. The sleeve notes tried to justify the 'bleeding chunks' approach by noting that the Adagio was self-contained and free-standing &c, but I found it wasn't. It's a wonderful movement and whets the appetite for the whole symphony, but it's much more active and searching than I thought it would be, and obviously functions as such within the symphony as a whole.

I also found online a review of the premier of the 11th in 1992 (from the New York Times), seems that the conductor, Kurt Masur, in his wisdom, cut ten minutes from the finale  :o (is that still legal?)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on February 11, 2014, 01:30:39 PM
I’ve just been listening to Diamond’s Concerto for String Quartet and orchestra (1996), courtesy of YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgjTOlQCA1Q

What an amazing work! On the face of it, it’s a very difficult combination to write for, you might think the quartet would be a tangle, get swamped by the orchestra &c, but Diamond magnificently refutes this, providing 35 minutes of contrapuntal mastery with the most thrilling textures.

He even parodies what a bad composer would do: many times when the quartet enters it enters in order, 1st violin, 2nd violin, viola, cello, in close imitation, but the quality of the writing and way the each entry develops away from the this beginning in a never ending flow of contrapuntal inventiveness belies this formulaic  entry (and the quartet enters in different ways at various other points).

There is a medium length first movement, fast, vigorous and inventive, which would be a tour de force for a young composer, but is a demonstration of incredible energy for a composer in his eighties. There is a medium length slow movement winding down to a coda of absolute calm and stillness, that you don’t want to end. The last movement is long and it looks like it’s heading for disaster with a folky rondo, but the quality of the material is outstanding and the movement holds together beautifully, again, you’re disappointed when it ends.

People complain that we don’t get modern music that is approachable, well here is it, why isn’t there a recording? (the same question could be asked for all the late symphonies of Diamond).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on October 02, 2014, 11:44:08 PM
I'm glad we have a Diamond thread.

My introduction to him was on the Australia's ABC Classic FM (http://www.abc.net.au/classic/), a truly dreadful music radio station dedicated to everything mediocre and substandard in classical music (in correspondence with me they told me that the music of Robert Simpson would have 'no appeal' to their listeners and they would never play it). However, on this one occasion they served up a treat: I was waiting for someone at a train station late at night, their train was late and went out to the car and flicked on the radio and they were playing the last movement of the SQ 3, couldn't believe it, just such wonderful, eloquent, sad but noble music. I think Classic FM were having an aberration at the time.

The first time I heard David Diamond's music was also on ABC Classic FM (http://www.abc.net.au/classic/), but it wasn't String Quartet No. 3. It was this:

David Diamond (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Diamond_(composer)) - Rounds for String Orchestra (https://www.amazon.com/American-Strings-Samuel-Elliott-Diamond/dp/B000009HUU) (1944)
https://www.youtube.com/v/3QAyE0HAB7s

I absolutely loved it, and from that moment I was a fan of his work. I bought as many CDs featuring his music as I could find. I ended up with the five discs of orchestral works on Delos (http://www.delosmusic.com/) (reissued on Naxos (http://www.naxos.com/person/David_Diamond/20948.htm)), and a few orchestral and chamber discs.

Quote
Marvelous composer, one of the great things about him is that he is very consistent, so, although his music gets darker and more dissonant over time, it's always recognisably Diamond straightaway. I love the symphonies (I know 3, 4, 5 and 10) and it's a crying shame we don't have a complete cycle. We do have the complete string quartets from Albany and I've got the first two volumes so far (2, 3, 8, 9, 10 and the Concerto for SQ), love them.

Just a couple of questions:

1. I know that DD was gay, and yet all the information about the String Quartet No.3 was that the slow movement was written in memory of a woman that DD lived with in Paris who suicided. What's the story, was she just a friend? Or was he bisexual? I don't care what his sexuality was, just want to know the story.
2. I downloaded the radio broadcast of the premier of the Symphony 10 from 1988 from Unsung Composers downloads, (love the way the organ becomes more and more prominent in the scherzo and the through the finale). Anyway, some other information tells me DD revised the symphony in 2000, does anyone know if these changes were major?

1. No idea.

2. Er, dunno.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: EigenUser on October 03, 2014, 01:30:16 AM
The first time I heard David Diamond's music was also on ABC Classic FM (http://www.abc.net.au/classic/), but it wasn't String Quartet No. 3. It was this:

David Diamond (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Diamond_(composer)) - Rounds for String Orchestra (http://www.nonesuch.com/albums/american-music-for-strings) (1944)
https://www.youtube.com/v/3QAyE0HAB7s

I absolutely loved it, and from that moment I was a fan of his work. I bought as many CDs featuring his music as I could find. I ended up with the five discs of orchestral works on Delos (http://www.delosmusic.com/) (reissued on Naxos (http://www.naxos.com/person/David_Diamond/20948.htm)), and a few orchestral and chamber discs.
I have that album! I played Rounds in my high school orchestra for our annual competition, which we won. It is some seriously fun music to play. Sadly, there were a quite a few people in orchestra who were fairly lazy (though good players otherwise) and hated the piece simply because it was difficult -- very difficult for a high school orchestra to put together in a fairly short time frame. I personally loved every minute of it and putting the whole thing together was very rewarding.

Our orchestra teacher had a friend who knew David Diamond and said that while he was very nice, he was one of the most boring people ever. Apparently he gave many lectures in music schools and was known for being extremely dry.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on October 03, 2014, 02:46:39 AM
I have that album! I played Rounds in my high school orchestra for our annual competition, which we won. It is some seriously fun music to play. Sadly, there were a quite a few people in orchestra who were fairly lazy (though good players otherwise) and hated the piece simply because it was difficult -- very difficult for a high school orchestra to put together in a fairly short time frame. I personally loved every minute of it and putting the whole thing together was very rewarding.

Our orchestra teacher had a friend who knew David Diamond and said that while he was very nice, he was one of the most boring people ever. Apparently he gave many lectures in music schools and was known for being extremely dry.

I'm currently listening to this interview, and enjoying it:

https://www.youtube.com/v/stVN81lmqFs

I'm finding him very informative.

Actually, I've just discovered that there are quite a few interviews with DD on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/v/oM1YKLIWKM8

https://www.youtube.com/v/J28DbNl5oeg

https://www.youtube.com/v/pR9N-z4OktM

https://www.youtube.com/v/MCufCmiajxU
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on October 04, 2014, 09:34:17 AM
He sent a charming, animated, reply to my fan letter ( by animated I mean that it was very lively, rather than it being in the form of an animated cartoon).
 8)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on October 04, 2014, 01:06:56 PM
I have that album! I played Rounds in my high school orchestra for our annual competition, which we won.

Excellent.

Quote
It is some seriously fun music to play. Sadly, there were a quite a few people in orchestra who were fairly lazy (though good players otherwise) and hated the piece simply because it was difficult -- very difficult for a high school orchestra to put together in a fairly short time frame. I personally loved every minute of it and putting the whole thing together was very rewarding.

It sounds like a heap of fun to play. I love those scurrying strings.

Quote
Our orchestra teacher had a friend who knew David Diamond and said that while he was very nice, he was one of the most boring people ever. Apparently he gave many lectures in music schools and was known for being extremely dry.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Rons_talking on December 29, 2014, 04:12:07 AM
I've always liked DD's early symphonies, the Third in particular. But the most emotional and moving single work of his IMO is the Adagio from String Quartet #3. I recently discovered this work. At about two minutes into the movement, when the harmony shifts to a bit more relative major it is sublime. I keep wishing he'd written just a few more quartets during the 1940s, when he was more modal--less chromatic. Not that I don't like the later works, they're marvelous; it's just that his voice is most intimate to me during the earlier period.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on December 29, 2014, 10:50:59 AM
I've always liked DD's early symphonies, the Third in particular. But the most emotional and moving single work of his IMO is the Adagio from String Quartet #3. I recently discovered this work. At about two minutes into the movement, when the harmony shifts to a bit more relative major it is sublime. I keep wishing he'd written just a few more quartets during the 1940s, when he was more modal--less chromatic. Not that I don't like the later works, they're marvelous; it's just that his voice is most intimate to me during the earlier period.

The Third is my favourite Diamond work. Deeply moving and touching - dedicated to his parents. It was the work which inspired me to write to him.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on December 29, 2014, 02:50:35 PM
I've always liked DD's early symphonies, the Third in particular. But the most emotional and moving single work of his IMO is the Adagio from String Quartet #3. I recently discovered this work. At about two minutes into the movement, when the harmony shifts to a bit more relative major it is sublime. I keep wishing he'd written just a few more quartets during the 1940s, when he was more modal--less chromatic. Not that I don't like the later works, they're marvelous; it's just that his voice is most intimate to me during the earlier period.

For anyone unfamiliar* with Diamond's String Quartet No. 3, here's a little seven-minute documentary on the work:

https://www.youtube.com/v/0fGNz4vcV0M

(*That would include me.)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Rons_talking on December 29, 2014, 06:15:06 PM
Wow! The documentary is wonderful!  I hope everyone who likes Diamond's music gives it a listen. Intensly beautiful.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 13, 2015, 03:47:10 PM
Can't stop listening to Symphony No 3 - should be up there with those of Copland, Harris, Hanson and Schuman. It used to be the slow movement which I found so moving (still moves me greatly), but now it is the slow, deeply touching, last movement which I can't get over. In fact the whole work is wonderful. The original Delos CD is better than the Naxos reissue as it includes Diamond's fine music for 'Romeo and Juliet'. Wish we had a complete cycle of the symphonies.

I love the 3rd but I can't stop listening to the 4th. I love both of these symphonies dearly.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 13, 2015, 03:53:34 PM
I've always liked DD's early symphonies, the Third in particular. But the most emotional and moving single work of his IMO is the Adagio from String Quartet #3. I recently discovered this work. At about two minutes into the movement, when the harmony shifts to a bit more relative major it is sublime. I keep wishing he'd written just a few more quartets during the 1940s, when he was more modal--less chromatic. Not that I don't like the later works, they're marvelous; it's just that his voice is most intimate to me during the earlier period.

I, too, prefer his earlier, lyrical works. It seems a lot of American symphonists went this route --- started off writing intensely melodic music and then as WWII came to an end, they started composing more turbulent music. Not all of them did this of course, but Schuman, Diamond, and Mennin certainly did.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on April 13, 2015, 11:58:50 PM
Can't stop listening to Symphony No 3 - should be up there with those of Copland, Harris, Hanson and Schuman. It used to be the slow movement which I found so moving (still moves me greatly), but now it is the slow, deeply touching, last movement which I can't get over. In fact the whole work is wonderful. The original Delos CD is better than the Naxos reissue as it includes Diamond's fine music for 'Romeo and Juliet'. Wish we had a complete cycle of the symphonies.

I have the original Delos CDs of Diamond's orchestral works (five volumes, including the one with Romeo and Juliet (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)).

If anyone's interested in any or all of them, just send me a PM.

Vol. 1 (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Sym-Concerto-Small-Orchestra/dp/B0000006XF)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%201.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Sym-Concerto-Small-Orchestra/dp/B0000006XF)


Vol. 2 (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%202.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)


Vol. 3 (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Symphony-Concerto-Enormous/dp/B0000006Y5)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%203.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Symphony-Concerto-Enormous/dp/B0000006Y5)


Vol. 4 (http://www.amazon.com/Suite-Tom-Symphony-8-Diamond/dp/B0000006YU)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%204.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Suite-Tom-Symphony-8-Diamond/dp/B0000006YU)


Vol. 5 (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Vol-5-Rounds/dp/B00000070C)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%205.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Vol-5-Rounds/dp/B00000070C)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 14, 2015, 06:03:02 AM
I have the original Delos CDs of Diamond's orchestral works (five volumes, including the one with Romeo and Juliet (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)).

If anyone's interested in any or all of them, just send me a PM.

Vol. 1 (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Sym-Concerto-Small-Orchestra/dp/B0000006XF)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%201.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Sym-Concerto-Small-Orchestra/dp/B0000006XF)


Vol. 2 (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%202.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Symphony-Kaddish-Romeo-Juliet/dp/B0000006XP)


Vol. 3 (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Symphony-Concerto-Enormous/dp/B0000006Y5)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%203.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Symphony-Concerto-Enormous/dp/B0000006Y5)


Vol. 4 (http://www.amazon.com/Suite-Tom-Symphony-8-Diamond/dp/B0000006YU)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%204.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Suite-Tom-Symphony-8-Diamond/dp/B0000006YU)


Vol. 5 (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Vol-5-Rounds/dp/B00000070C)
(http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae102/peterpowerpop/Diamond%20-%20Orchestral%20Works%20Schwarz%20Vol%205.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/David-Diamond-Vol-5-Rounds/dp/B00000070C)

I own them all. I actually own the Naxos reissues as well. The same applies to the Piston series with Schwarz.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on April 14, 2015, 06:05:10 AM
I own them all. I actually own the Naxos reissues as well. The same applies to the Piston series with Schwarz.

Me too  ::)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 14, 2015, 06:20:11 AM
Me too  ::)

8) Something of Diamond's that I don't own is his SQ cycle. This seems to be highly rated. Do you own it, Jeffrey?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: San Antone on April 14, 2015, 06:22:08 AM
8) Something of Diamond's that I don't own is his SQ cycle. This seems to be highly rated. Do you own it, Jeffrey?

Those are the only Diamond works I have, and they are worthwhile.  But the recordings are OOP as far as I know.  After checking Amazon, most (if not all) can be bought.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 14, 2015, 06:53:56 AM
Those are the only Diamond works I have, and they are worthwhile.  But the recordings are OOP as far as I know.  After checking Amazon, most (if not all) can be bought.

Very nice, David. I see they're on the Albany label.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 14, 2015, 06:54:34 AM
After checking Amazon, most (if not all) can be bought.

I just ordered 3 & 8 from Amazon DE



and this




Has anyone heard it?

Sarge
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on April 14, 2015, 07:03:28 AM
8) Something of Diamond's that I don't own is his SQ cycle. This seems to be highly rated. Do you own it, Jeffrey?

Some of the individual releases John - not sure which ones but will check.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on April 14, 2015, 12:57:25 PM
I own them all. I actually own the Naxos reissues as well. The same applies to the Piston series with Schwarz.

Me too  ::)

Splendid.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Rons_talking on April 14, 2015, 03:08:58 PM
Those are the only Diamond works I have, and they are worthwhile.  But the recordings are OOP as far as I know.  After checking Amazon, most (if not all) can be bought.


As many know, I love Diamond's music! His first three quartets (along with his "Concerto" for SQ (alone)) are in his "diatonic" style as are his first 4 Symphonies. After 1950, he composed more chromatically but still using his own lyrical style. The Potomic Quartet reconded nearly all of his quartets (the first is, I believe, withdrawn). I've downloaded several of his quartets from the PSQ collection and they are wonderful. The 3rd is his crown jewel. The 1st Violin Sonata is also lovely, as are the Rounds.

Diamond, whom Schoenberg called "another Bruckner," paying the complement of NOT teaching him serialism after Diamond requested lessons, composed such great tonal music in the 40s I was sad to see that he left the idiom after around 1950. I like non-tonal music but Diamond could do so much with just the 7 diatonic notes!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Daverz on April 14, 2015, 04:06:55 PM
I got the whole quartet cycle during an Arkivmusic Albany sale.  I'll have to "work" my way thru the cycle some day.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on April 14, 2015, 04:17:19 PM

As many know, I love Diamond's music! His first three quartets (along with his "Concerto" for SQ (alone)) are in his "diatonic" style as are his first 4 Symphonies. After 1950, he composed more chromatically but still using his own lyrical style. The Potomic Quartet reconded nearly all of his quartets (the first is, I believe, withdrawn). I've downloaded several of his quartets from the PSQ collection and they are wonderful. The 3rd is his crown jewel. The 1st Violin Sonata is also lovely, as are the Rounds.

Diamond, whom Schoenberg called "another Bruckner," paying the complement of NOT teaching him serialism after Diamond requested lessons, composed such great tonal music in the 40s I was sad to see that he left the idiom after around 1950. I like non-tonal music but Diamond could do so much with just the 7 diatonic notes!

Thanks for that anecdote about Diamond and Schoenberg. I never heard that one before. It seems many American composers started off writing more lyrical music early in their careers but after WWII, they were somehow hardened by the whole experience. Besides Diamond, Schuman and Mennin spring to mind.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 30, 2015, 04:06:44 AM
Thoroughly enjoying Symphony 4 (Bernstein). I think that Diamond, especially in symphonies 1-4 is a most endearing, inspiriting and humane composer. These works,especially symphonies 3 and 4 move me deeply. He really is one of the great American composers.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on May 30, 2015, 05:04:28 AM
Thoroughly enjoying Symphony 4 (Bernstein). I think that Diamond, especially in symphonies 1-4 is a most endearing, inspiriting and humane composer. These works,especially symphonies 3 and 4 move me deeply. He really is one of the great American composers.

I can't argue with that! :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 30, 2015, 08:35:44 AM
I can't argue with that! :)
I can always rely on you John to reply positively to my inconsequential messages. It is appreciated.  :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on May 31, 2015, 04:39:20 AM
I can always rely on you John to reply positively to my inconsequential messages. It is appreciated.  :)

 8)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on June 25, 2015, 02:46:56 PM
Have been listening to Symphony 4 over and over and over again. A wonderful work, possibly Diamond's finest, although Symphony 3 is just as good. Schwarz and Bernstein versions are both great.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on June 25, 2015, 05:25:47 PM
Have been listening to Symphony 4 over and over and over again. A wonderful work, possibly Diamond's finest, although Symphony 3 is just as good. Schwarz and Bernstein versions are both great.

Diamond's 4th is one of my favorite symphonies....ever. Such sublime beauty and it's over all over before you know it. I'm constantly thinking "I wish he would have gone on a little longer." ;D
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on June 26, 2015, 01:06:14 PM
Diamond's 4th is one of my favorite symphonies....ever. Such sublime beauty and it's over all over before you know it. I'm constantly thinking "I wish he would have gone on a little longer." ;D

Yes, me too - as a result of which I have to play it over and over again. I can hear it three times in a row during my drive to work.  :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Rons_talking on June 26, 2015, 03:32:52 PM
Diamond's 4th is one of my favorite symphonies....ever. Such sublime beauty and it's over all over before you know it. I'm constantly thinking "I wish he would have gone on a little longer." ;D

Both the 3rd and 4th have been two of my favorites from the first time I heard each of them respectively. The 4th is glorious from first to last measure. It doesn't feel as if there's any development that's not essential and the music is always propelling forward, even the Adagio. I think part of that effect is attained through the flowing use of the orchestral piano. It's well-scored all the way around. But I also love the 3rd...
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on June 26, 2015, 11:47:38 PM
Just discovered that the concerto for string quartet and orchestra (a late work from 1996, and not the concerto for solo sq) is available from youtube in a recording that is presumably a radio recording of the premiere.
Wonderful music!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on June 27, 2015, 12:04:04 AM
Both the 3rd and 4th have been two of my favorites from the first time I heard each of them respectively. The 4th is glorious from first to last measure. It doesn't feel as if there's any development that's not essential and the music is always propelling forward, even the Adagio. I think part of that effect is attained through the flowing use of the orchestral piano. It's well-scored all the way around. But I also love the 3rd...

Totally agree with you in every way. I find the very start of No.4 very moving, sad and poignant and yet the symphony ends with a kind of defiant 'triumph against the odds' finale, which is inspiriting and life affirming. I just retired yesterday from 37 years of full-time teaching and following an emotional send-off was feeling very sad. Diamond's 4th Symphony accompanied me during my car journey both ways and I have just played it again (Bernstein, although Schwarz is just as good) as I try to take-in yesterday's experience. Forgive the personal anecdote but this music has really meant a lot to me during the last few days.  :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Rons_talking on June 28, 2015, 03:01:03 PM
Totally agree with you in every way. I find the very start of No.4 very moving, sad and poignant and yet the symphony ends with a kind of defiant 'triumph against the odds' finale, which is inspiriting and life affirming. I just retired yesterday from 37 years of full-time teaching and following an emotional send-off was feeling very sad. Diamond's 4th Symphony accompanied me during my car journey both ways and I have just played it again (Bernstein, although Schwarz is just as good) as I try to take-in yesterday's experience. Forgive the personal anecdote but this music has really meant a lot to me during the last few days.  :)

Awesome! Congratulations! It was your "Diamond" Anniversary of teaching...
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on June 28, 2015, 08:52:50 PM
Awesome! Congratulations! It was your "Diamond" Anniversary of teaching...

Hehe - many thanks. Was listening to Symphony 1 yesterday which is also very fine. I,3 and 4 are my favourites, especially 3 and 4. I enjoy 2 also - it has some fine moments but does not, perhaps, hang together as well as the others. I am going back into work today to do some clearing up so will have another listen to No.2 and maybe No.8 and 'Tom'. I enjoyed the VC No.2 yesterday.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 04, 2015, 12:34:33 PM
A plug for this great CD. I love all three pieces and although I always liked the inspiriting First Symphony I have really come to appreciate the VC No.2 and, above all, 'The Enormous Room' (after E.E. Cummings), which I find to be a classic American tone poem of great melodic appeal and movingly eloquent. Don't understand why I did not appreciate it before:

Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: ZauberdrachenNr.7 on July 09, 2015, 11:03:52 AM
To commemorate David Diamond's centennial today, the NPR station of his birthplace produced this commemorative broadcast, well worth hearing.

http://interactive.wxxi.org/highlights/2015/06/diamond-anniversary
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on July 09, 2015, 04:57:07 PM
To commemorate David Diamond's centennial today, the NPR station of his birthplace produced this commemorative broadcast, well worth hearing.

http://interactive.wxxi.org/highlights/2015/06/diamond-anniversary (http://interactive.wxxi.org/highlights/2015/06/diamond-anniversary)

Splendid.

If you have trouble with that link for any reason, you can hear the broadcast directly on Soundcloud:

https://soundcloud.com/wxxi/a-diamond-anniversary-special (https://soundcloud.com/wxxi/a-diamond-anniversary-special)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 11, 2015, 10:09:45 PM
Splendid.

If you have trouble with that link for any reason, you can hear the broadcast directly on Soundcloud:

https://soundcloud.com/wxxi/a-diamond-anniversary-special (https://soundcloud.com/wxxi/a-diamond-anniversary-special)

I hope that BBC Radio 3, Gramophone magazine and BBC Music acknowledge it too. Have written to the latter but they will probably ignore it.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 20, 2015, 08:42:57 AM
So, has anyone heard the Sonatina for accordion?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on March 31, 2018, 06:35:42 PM
Good news for Diamond fans, Naxos are announcing a recording of the Symphony No.6 (a world premiere) in a release scheduled for 1 May.

The recording is a recent one from 2015, so let's hope it's the beginning of series recording all the hitherto unrecorded symphonies of the sparkling master David (7, 9, 10, 11 to go + many other works).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on March 31, 2018, 10:43:11 PM
Good news for Diamond fans, Naxos are announcing a recording of the Symphony No.6 (a world premiere) in a release scheduled for 1 May.

The recording is a recent one from 2015, so let's hope it's the beginning of series recording all the hitherto unrecorded symphonies of the sparkling master David (7, 9, 10, 11 to go + many other works).

How exciting! Thanks very much for the info. Yes, those 'missing' symphonies are big gaps in the catalogue.
Have ordered the Naxos disc. I see that Symphony 6 is coupled with Romeo and Juliet which is a lovely score.


Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: dhibbard on April 08, 2018, 06:27:32 AM
There is a new Naxos CD coming soon  (May) with new recordings. 
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: dhibbard on April 08, 2018, 06:33:53 AM
How exciting! Thanks very much for the info. Yes, those 'missing' symphonies are big gaps in the catalogue.
Have ordered the Naxos disc. I see that Symphony 6 is coupled with Romeo and Juliet which is a lovely score.



perhaps this might be the start of using University student orchestras to bring about recordings of unsung composers.....  they work for free.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on April 26, 2018, 08:53:48 AM
A plug for this great CD. I love all three pieces and although I always liked the inspiriting First Symphony I have really come to appreciate the VC No.2 and, above all, 'The Enormous Room' (after E.E. Cummings), which I find to be a classic American tone poem of great melodic appeal and movingly eloquent. Don't understand why I did not appreciate it before:


Back to listening to this great symphony.
I don't really understand why Diamond is not up there with Copland and Harris.
I find his music moving, eloquent and of wide potential popular appeal.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: lescamil on April 26, 2018, 04:34:29 PM
We really need a modern recording of David Diamond's piano sonata. There's an old recording of it by Rosalyn Tureck but it is nigh on unlistenable with the amount of hiss and age that is apparent in the recording. I think it's a great work that uses some very interesting textures (including a fugue at the end).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on April 26, 2018, 08:20:47 PM
We really need a modern recording of David Diamond's piano sonata. There's an old recording of it by Rosalyn Tureck but it is nigh on unlistenable with the amount of hiss and age that is apparent in the recording. I think it's a great work that uses some very interesting textures (including a fugue at the end).

Thank you for the recommendation. I must investigate this work. I know little of Diamond's chamber music.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Jaakko Keskinen on April 27, 2018, 08:25:37 AM
Diamond is a rather new composer to me but I like very much his Timon of Athens.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on April 29, 2018, 12:18:00 AM
Diamond is a rather new composer to me but I like very much his Timon of Athens.

Never heard of it! But it sounds good:

https://youtu.be/7LBX1Mi6zFQ
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2018, 12:03:43 AM
I'm glad that I bought the new Naxos CD. But, I'm sorry to say, that's for 'Rounds' which I appreciated more than ever before and the lyrical and, at the end, poignant music for 'Romeo and Juliet'. Symphony No.6 however, is, for me at least, a difficult nut to crack. It bears no resemblance as far as I'm concerned to the tuneful symphonies 1-4, all of which I love. No.6 sounds to me like the work of a different composer and brought to mind a quote from Vaughan Williams about 'arid note-spinning'. I will try again with Symphony 6 and hope that others appreciate it more than I have.

Added later:

I'm on my fourth listening to Symphony 6 now and like it a bit more. It reminds me a bit of one of Copland's more modernist works.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 12, 2018, 03:07:47 PM
My new Naxos disk is still on the way to Oz so I can’t comment on this recording. However the Symphonies 6-8 are very different from 1-5, much more modernist. (There are so-so radio recordings of symphonies 6, 7, 9 and 10, and 8 has been recorded). Symphony no. 9 is a more lyrical symphony with a baritone which sets some of the sonnets of Michaelangelo. Symphony no.10 represents a new departure, a massive, sort of Brucknian sound that isn’t like either the early symphonies or the middle ones. [Also in the 90s Diamond wrote a Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (not to be confused with the Concerto for (solo) String Quartet of the 30s), which is in a different style again, neo-baroque, there’s a recording of the premiere of that work on YouTube, go listen. The soloist are the Julliard String Quartet, (I don’t think they are known for playing substandard works)].

The Symphony no.11, by all accounts of the premiere in 1992, was similarly Brucknerian, so much so that the conductor, Kurt Masur, took it upon himself to cut 10 minutes out! Only the adagio of this work has been recorded (uncut) and it is very fine, so it’s frustrating that 11 hasn’t recorded yet, or that a recording of the premiere isn’t available for the bits that Masur was good enough to leave for us.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2018, 10:16:46 PM
My new Naxos disk is still on the way to Oz so I can’t comment on this recording. However the Symphonies 6-8 are very different from 1-5, much more modernist. (There are so-so radio recordings of symphonies 6, 7, 9 and 10, and 8 has been recorded). Symphony no. 9 is a more lyrical symphony with a baritone which sets some of the sonnets of Michaelangelo. Symphony no.10 represents a new departure, a massive, sort of Brucknian sound that isn’t like either the early symphonies or the middle ones. [Also in the 90s Diamond wrote a Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (not to be confused with the Concerto for (solo) String Quartet of the 30s), which is in a different style again, neo-baroque, there’s a recording of the premiere of that work on YouTube, go listen. The soloist are the Julliard String Quartet, (I don’t think they are known for playing substandard works)].

The Symphony no.11, by all accounts of the premiere in 1992, was similarly Brucknerian, so much so that the conductor, Kurt Masur, took it upon himself to cut 10 minutes out! Only the adagio of this work has been recorded (uncut) and it is very fine, so it’s frustrating that 11 hasn’t recorded yet, or that a recording of the premiere isn’t available for the bits that Masur was good enough to leave for us.
Yes, I'd also like to hear the complete Symphony 11 but suspect that  symphonies 1 to 4 will always remain my favourites.
I've heard No.6 at least four times now and doubt that I'll be returning to it very often, as is the case, for example, with the symphonies 5 and 6 of Braga Santos which I find much less enjoyable than the earlier ones.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 21, 2018, 06:01:08 PM
Just been listening to the new Naxos disk and it's a 5 star recording. The feel of the ensble for Rounds and R & J is intimate, just perfect for the music.
So great to hear a modern recording of 6, the continuity of the early phase Diamond is still there even if the aural soothing isn't! (Seriously don't be put off, it's quite crunchy but miles away from avant garde).
Seriously good performances.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 21, 2018, 08:34:23 PM
Just been listening to the new Naxos disk and it's a 5 star recording. The feel of the ensble for Rounds and R & J is intimate, just perfect for the music.
So great to hear a modern recording of 6, the continuity of the early phase Diamond is still there even if the aural soothing isn't! (Seriously don't be put off, it's quite crunchy but miles away from avant garde).
Seriously good performances.

Ok I'll have another go with Symphony 6. I thought that Rounds was great and always loved Romeo and Juliet but did not respond very positively to Symphony 6 which to me sounded so different from symphonies 1 - 4 and not very memorable.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 22, 2018, 01:55:18 AM
Just been listening to the new Naxos disk and it's a 5 star recording. The feel of the ensble for Rounds and R & J is intimate, just perfect for the music.
So great to hear a modern recording of 6, the continuity of the early phase Diamond is still there even if the aural soothing isn't! (Seriously don't be put off, it's quite crunchy but miles away from avant garde).
Seriously good performances.

You say avant-garde like it’s a bad thing  8)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on May 25, 2018, 06:16:07 AM
I've just realised what a fine work 'The Enormous Room' (1948) is. A kind of fifteen minute symphonic-Fantasia based on a work by e e Cummings.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 18, 2018, 12:01:54 PM
The Enormous Room (1948) remains one of my favourite scores by Diamond. I find it powerful, brooding and moving.
A classic American Tone Poem which should be much better known.

Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 22, 2020, 12:28:48 PM
I thought that I'd wake up this thread after a two year hibernation. I've been listening to the marvellous Symphony No.3, which I rank alongside those by Copland, Harris, Schuman and Hanson as great third symphonies. I found Diamond's obituary on the Guardian website. The encounter with Rodzinski made me laugh:
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/jun/17/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries
(http://)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on July 22, 2020, 04:10:49 PM
I thought that I'd wake up this thread after a two year hibernation. I've been listening to the marvellous Symphony No.3, which I rank alongside those by Copland, Harris, Schuman and Hanson as great third symphonies. I found Diamond's obituary on the Guardian website. The encounter with Rodzinski made me laugh:
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/jun/17/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries
(http://)

That’s an amusing anecdote about Diamond punching Rodziński on the nose. :P
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: T. D. on July 22, 2020, 04:50:20 PM
I read that article a couple of months ago when I was exploring the string quartets. Got the impression Diamond was rather a "difficult personality" and wondered whether that hindered his career (e. g. performances / exposure) in any way.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 22, 2020, 08:25:34 PM
I read that article a couple of months ago when I was exploring the string quartets. Got the impression Diamond was rather a "difficult personality" and wondered whether that hindered his career (e. g. performances / exposure) in any way.
Yes, you may be right as his music (especially symphonies 1-4 IMO) deserves to be much better known. I rank Diamond very highly amongst American composers and actually amongst composers generally. That Third Symphony is, to me, very special. I need to explore his string quartets more.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on July 23, 2020, 05:39:31 AM
Yes, you may be right as his music (especially symphonies 1-4 IMO) deserves to be much better known. I rank Diamond very highly amongst American composers and actually amongst composers generally. That Third Symphony is, to me, very special. I need to explore his string quartets more.

To the bolded text, a ginormous YES!!! A great SQ cycle.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 23, 2020, 11:37:22 AM
The first time I heard David Diamond's music was also on ABC Classic FM (http://www.abc.net.au/classic/), but it wasn't String Quartet No. 3. It was this:

David Diamond (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Diamond_(composer)) - Rounds for String Orchestra (http://www.nonesuch.com/albums/american-music-for-strings) (1944)
https://www.youtube.com/v/3QAyE0HAB7s

I absolutely loved it, and from that moment I was a fan of his work. I bought as many CDs featuring his music as I could find. I ended up with the five discs of orchestral works on Delos (http://www.delosmusic.com/) (reissued on Naxos (http://www.naxos.com/person/David_Diamond/20948.htm)), and a few orchestral and chamber discs.

1. No idea.

2. Er, dunno.

I'd been thinking that I had this CD, but then wondered whether or not I was hallucinating that as I couldn't find it.  Bingo!  It was slightly mis-shelved (and in an area which is hard for me to see to begin with).  I suspect that I found it used.  Mine is an ArkivMusic reissue and though I've ordered other things from them in the past, I don't remember ordering this one.  Will put it on a bit later.   :) I know that I could listen to it here, but I'd rather listen to it through my stereo system.

PD

EDIT:  By the way, I tried someone's link to Alan Belkin's website and was redirected to his new one.  I couldn't find anything there re David Diamond's symphonies or music in general, but perhaps I wasn't looking in the correct area?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Peter Power Pop on July 28, 2020, 03:22:02 PM
I'd been thinking that I had this CD (https://www.amazon.com/American-Strings-Samuel-Elliott-Diamond/dp/B000009HUU), but then wondered whether or not I was hallucinating that as I couldn't find it. Bingo! It was slightly mis-shelved (and in an area which is hard for me to see to begin with). I suspect that I found it used. Mine is an ArkivMusic reissue and though I've ordered other things from them in the past, I don't remember ordering this one. Will put it on a bit later. :) I know that I could listen to it here, but I'd rather listen to it through my stereo system.

PD

EDIT: By the way, I tried someone's link to Alan Belkin's website and was redirected to his new one. I couldn't find anything there re David Diamond's symphonies or music in general, but perhaps I wasn't looking in the correct area?

I searched for "Alan Belkin David Diamond" and this PDF was the result:

http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf (http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf)

It's titled "The Symphonies Of David Diamond: A Listener's Guide".
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: André on July 28, 2020, 03:46:40 PM
I searched for "Alan Belkin David Diamond" and this PDF was the result:

http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf (http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf)

It's titled "The Symphonies Of David Diamond: A Listener's Guide".

That’s great, Peter ! A good occasion to air these recordings after a few years, but this time I’ll follow the guide !
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on July 28, 2020, 05:59:24 PM
That’s great, Peter ! A good occasion to air these recordings after a few years, but this time I’ll follow the guide !
+1 have been listening, with much pleasure, to symphonies 1 and 3 as well as to the eloquent and poignant score for 'Romeo and Juliet'.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 29, 2020, 07:27:22 AM
I searched for "Alan Belkin David Diamond" and this PDF was the result:

http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf (http://alanbelkinmusic.com/Diamond/Diamond.pdf)

It's titled "The Symphonies Of David Diamond: A Listener's Guide".
Thanks Peter; I did end up finding it later by googling it, but I appreciate the heads up!  :)

PD
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 01, 2020, 09:32:06 AM
Just listened to his "Rounds for String Orchestra" which I enjoyed and put me in a good mood.  In the liner notes on the CD, they include the composer's own notes about the work:

"Rounds for String Orchestra was commissioned by Dmitri Mitropoulos and composed in June and July, 1944, in New York City; the instrumentation was completed at Rhinebeck, New York.  Almost all of the new music Mitropoulos had been performing at this time was of the twelve-note school and he was undergoing depressions and doubts as to the quality of general melancholia in this music.  I had pointed out to Mitropoulos that many of these contemporary composers had suffered much in their transition from middle-Europe to the United States.  'But you have suffered much too, in your way.  Write me a happy work.  These are distressing times, most of the difficult music I play is distressing.  Make me happy.'

And I suspect that he did.   :)

The above quotes are from the Nonesuch CD NON 79002

PD
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 01, 2020, 01:04:34 PM
Just listened to his "Rounds for String Orchestra" which I enjoyed and put me in a good mood.  In the liner notes on the CD, they include the composer's own notes about the work:

"Rounds for String Orchestra was commissioned by Dmitri Mitropoulos and composed in June and July, 1944, in New York City; the instrumentation was completed at Rhinebeck, New York.  Almost all of the new music Mitropoulos had been performing at this time was of the twelve-note school and he was undergoing depressions and doubts as to the quality of general melancholia in this music.  I had pointed out to Mitropoulos that many of these contemporary composers had suffered much in their transition from middle-Europe to the United States.  'But you have suffered much too, in your way.  Write me a happy work.  These are distressing times, most of the difficult music I play is distressing.  Make me happy.'

And I suspect that he did.   :)

The above quotes are from the Nonesuch CD NON 79002

PD
Interesting anecdote PD.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: foxandpeng on August 20, 2021, 01:41:01 AM
Revisiting David Diamond symphonies over the last couple of days, after reading Jeffrey's WAYLT post, reminds me just how fine this music is. In recent months, if asked about my favourite American composer, I would be puzzling over great names like Hovhaness, Hanson, Barber, Schuman, Glass (I know) and more recently, Pavlova and Aaron Kernis, but David Diamond really is up near pole position - certainly as a symphonist.

Shout out on the first 4 symphonies particularly, but the stylistic shift in the later symphonies (recorded and via YT) doesn't have a dud amongst them either.

I do wish I had more ears. So much music.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on August 20, 2021, 12:13:07 PM
Reading through the latest entries in this thread I was interested in the person who said they heard Rounds on ABC Classic FM. I assume this is the poor excuse for a classical music channel we have in Australia which dedicates itself to forgettable contemporary pieces, schmalz, hackneyed “classics”, crossover music, single movements of multi-movement works &c.

However, as with our friend above, it did put me on to Diamond. About 15 years ago I had an engagement one evening and my wife had another one. I arranged to pick her up after mine had finished. I arrived outside the venue in the late evening and the event was obviously still going so I reluctantly turned the radio on to Classics FM hoping for some Mozart or something. What I tuned into was the beginning of the last movement of the Diamond String Quartet no.3. This is an 11 minute searing elegy for a friend of Diamond who suicided. My hair was standing on end, I had no idea of the composer, but I knew whoever they were they were amongst the greats of music. I heard the announcement at the end and then shortly afterwards my wife showed up but I could barely speak.

The next day, being a Saturday, went round to the one classical CD shop in Canberra (Abels in Manuka, which closed about 12 years ago) and bought up various Diamond disks. :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: deprofundis on August 20, 2021, 09:06:25 PM
i JUST WOKE UP,i listen now to  Spanish Renaissance Music on DECCA label Gold Series, what an awesome LP from 1960, there are obscur name or first put to LP classical composers, it'S a delight, here a resume of composer y'all find this list impressive:Martin DE Rivaflecha (Josquin inspired composer), Cristobel DE Morales, Alonso Mundera, Luis Milan, Mateo Flecha, Diego Ortiz, Nicolas Gombert,Antonio DE Cabezon..

AWESOME-O!!!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 20, 2021, 10:48:44 PM
Reading through the latest entries in this thread I was interested in the person who said they heard Rounds on ABC Classic FM. I assume this is the poor excuse for a classical music channel we have in Australia which dedicates itself to forgettable contemporary pieces, schmalz, hackneyed “classics”, crossover music, single movements of multi-movement works &c.

However, as with our friend above, it did put me on to Diamond. About 15 years ago I had an engagement one evening and my wife had another one. I arranged to pick her up after mine had finished. I arrived outside the venue in the late evening and the event was obviously still going so I reluctantly turned the radio on to Classics FM hoping for some Mozart or something. What I tuned into was the beginning of the last movement of the Diamond String Quartet no.3. This is an 11 minute searing elegy for a friend of Diamond who suicided. My hair was standing on end, I had no idea of the composer, but I knew whoever they were they were amongst the greats of music. I heard the announcement at the end and then shortly afterwards my wife showed up but I could barely speak.

The next day, being a Saturday, went round to the one classical CD shop in Canberra (Abels in Manuka, which closed about 12 years ago) and bought up various Diamond disks. :)
Interesting story - I have always believed Diamond to be a very significant composer whose music deserves greater exposure.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 21, 2021, 05:13:42 AM
The SQs and Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 are my go-to Diamond works, but I also loved a good bit else that I’ve heard from him like Rounds for example.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on August 21, 2021, 05:20:12 PM
Reading through the latest entries in this thread I was interested in the person who said they heard Rounds on ABC Classic FM. I assume this is the poor excuse for a classical music channel we have in Australia which dedicates itself to forgettable contemporary pieces, schmalz, hackneyed “classics”, crossover music, single movements of multi-movement works &c.

However, as with our friend above, it did put me on to Diamond. About 15 years ago I had an engagement one evening and my wife had another one. I arranged to pick her up after mine had finished. I arrived outside the venue in the late evening and the event was obviously still going so I reluctantly turned the radio on to Classics FM hoping for some Mozart or something. What I tuned into was the beginning of the last movement of the Diamond String Quartet no.3. This is an 11 minute searing elegy for a friend of Diamond who suicided. My hair was standing on end, I had no idea of the composer, but I knew whoever they were they were amongst the greats of music. I heard the announcement at the end and then shortly afterwards my wife showed up but I could barely speak.

The next day, being a Saturday, went round to the one classical CD shop in Canberra (Abels in Manuka, which closed about 12 years ago) and bought up various Diamond disks. :)

Diamond's Rounds must be a staple of classical radio. I heard it on an NPR station while driving down the east coast, from Connecticut to Maryland, and was immediately struck by it. The next day I started looking for the CD, which was out of print, by then.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on August 21, 2021, 10:55:46 PM
Diamond's Rounds must be a staple of classical radio. I heard it on an NPR station while driving down the east coast, from Connecticut to Maryland, and was immediately struck by it. The next day I started looking for the CD, which was out of print, by then.
It does seem to have become a staple, I have counted about eight recordings that are either available or were in the catalogue in the last decade. It is that rare thing: a popular piece of music which is also a very good piece of music.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 25, 2021, 08:19:20 AM
I thought that I'd wake up this thread after a two year hibernation. I've been listening to the marvellous Symphony No.3, which I rank alongside those by Copland, Harris, Schuman and Hanson as great third symphonies. I found Diamond's obituary on the Guardian website. The encounter with Rodzinski made me laugh:
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/jun/17/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries
(http://)
Would love to hear this CD.  As you might recall, I'm a big fan of Mr. Starker and the cello overall.  :)  How did you find the other works Jeffrey?

PD
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 25, 2021, 09:15:03 AM
Would love to hear this CD.  As you might recall, I'm a big fan of Mr. Starker and the cello overall.  :)  How did you find the other works Jeffrey?

PD

OK PD - my favourites are symphonies 3,4,1,2 in that order (they are all great) + the music for Romeo and Juliet and the 'Enormous Room'. Diamond himself (in response to my unsolicited fan-mail) told me that I should listen to this last work (after the poet e e cummings). I told Diamond how much I loved his 3rd Symphony (I still do) and he responded that he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young (29/30). I was really moved to receive such a letter from him as I knew that he had a reputation for being a bit of an irascible character.

This is my favourite Diamond CD:
(http://)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 25, 2021, 09:27:30 AM
OK PD - my favourites are symphonies 3,4,1,2 in that order (they are all great) + the music for Romeo and Juliet and the 'Enormous Room'. Diamond himself (in response to my unsolicited fan-mail) told me that I should listen to this last work (after the poet e e cummings). I told Diamond how much I loved his 3rd Symphony (I still do) and he responded that he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young (29/30). I was really moved to receive such a letter from him as I knew that he had a reputation for being a bit of an irascible character.

This is my favourite Diamond CD:
(http://)
Great story Jeffrey!  How did you find the cello work itself Jeffrey?

PD
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 25, 2021, 09:50:12 AM
Great story Jeffrey!  How did you find the cello work itself Jeffrey?

PD

Oh, sorry PD - you were asking about the 'Kaddish for Cello and Orchestra' which I found to be a darkly moving and eloquent work (rather in the spirit of Bloch's 'Schelomo' or 'Voice in the Wilderness').
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 25, 2021, 09:52:59 AM
Oh, sorry PD - you were asking about the 'Kaddish for Cello and Orchestra' which I found to be a darkly moving and eloquent work (rather in the spirit of Bloch's 'Schelomo' or 'Voice in the Wilderness').
Thanks for your thoughts.  :)

PD
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on August 25, 2021, 12:12:29 PM
I’ve always been struck by the similarities between Kaddish and the first movement of Finzi’s Cello Concerto. In the former case of course Diamond is using traditional synagogue type material, but the similarity between the two works suggests that Finzi is too. I wrote to Stephen Banfield pointing out that the first movement of the Cello Concerto undermines to some extent Banfield’s ‘Finzi suppressed his Jewish heritage and could only be a minor composer’ thesis. He promised to listen to the two works.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 26, 2021, 03:36:09 AM
I’ve always been struck by the similarities between Kaddish and the first movement of Finzi’s Cello Concerto. In the former case of course Diamond is using traditional synagogue type material, but the similarity between the two works suggests that Finzi is too. I wrote to Stephen Banfield pointing out that the first movement of the Cello Concerto undermines to some extent Banfield’s ‘Finzi suppressed his Jewish heritage and could only be a minor composer’ thesis. He promised to listen to the two works.
A very interesting point about Finzi's Jewish heritage. I think he was of the same family as that featured in the film 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis'.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: T. D. on August 26, 2021, 05:14:05 AM
OK PD - my favourites are symphonies 3,4,1,2 in that order (they are all great) + the music for Romeo and Juliet and the 'Enormous Room'. Diamond himself (in response to my unsolicited fan-mail) told me that I should listen to this last work (after the poet e e cummings). I told Diamond how much I loved his 3rd Symphony (I still do) and he responded that he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young (29/30). I was really moved to receive such a letter from him as I knew that he had a reputation for being a bit of an irascible character.

This is my favourite Diamond CD:
(http://)

Thanks for the anecdote. Nice to read this, as I'd also gotten a strong impression of irascibility.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 26, 2021, 05:47:37 AM
Thanks for the anecdote. Nice to read this, as I'd also gotten a strong impression of irascibility.
My pleasure!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: foxandpeng on August 27, 2021, 02:31:13 AM
OK PD - my favourites are symphonies 3,4,1,2 in that order (they are all great) + the music for Romeo and Juliet and the 'Enormous Room'. Diamond himself (in response to my unsolicited fan-mail) told me that I should listen to this last work (after the poet e e cummings). I told Diamond how much I loved his 3rd Symphony (I still do) and he responded that he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young (29/30). I was really moved to receive such a letter from him as I knew that he had a reputation for being a bit of an irascible character.

This is my favourite Diamond CD:
(http://)

Again, this for me is my go to version, except repacked to Naxos. I entirely concur with the opinion of the master (Jeffrey, of course). Agreed on the order of favourite symphonies also, although the later numbers are pushing for a place also, starting with #6 and #5. String quartets are excellent, but my only exposure is via the Potomac Quartet.

Interesting self-confidence bordering on arrogance, it seems... 'he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young'.

Diamond is undoubtedly a diamond.

*coughs*
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2021, 10:54:08 AM
Again, this for me is my go to version, except repacked to Naxos. I entirely concur with the opinion of the master (Jeffrey, of course). Agreed on the order of favourite symphonies also, although the later numbers are pushing for a place also, starting with #6 and #5. String quartets are excellent, but my only exposure is via the Potomac Quartet.

Interesting self-confidence bordering on arrogance, it seems... 'he was proud that he possesses the know-how to compose such a work when he was very young'.

Diamond is undoubtedly a diamond.

*coughs*
I dug out my letter from DD. I see that he encouraged me to listen to the 'TOM' music and not 'The Enormous Room' as I originally thought. Am not sure that the letter will be legible but I can easily transcribe it:
(http://)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: foxandpeng on August 27, 2021, 02:39:16 PM
I dug out my letter from DD. I see that he encouraged me to listen to the 'TOM' music and not 'The Enormous Room' as I originally thought. Am not sure that the letter will be legible but I can easily transcribe it:
(http://)

I revise my opinion. What a lovely letter!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2021, 09:29:53 PM
I revise my opinion. What a lovely letter!
Yes, it's very charming Danny. I was delighted to receive it.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on August 28, 2021, 01:35:00 AM
I dug out my letter from DD. I see that he encouraged me to listen to the 'TOM' music and not 'The Enormous Room' as I originally thought. Am not sure that the letter will be legible but I can easily transcribe it:
(http://)

I wonder how many fan letters David Diamond received. Maybe your letter to David Diamond was framed over the desk in Dave's study and now has a place of honor in the David Diamond archive. :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 28, 2021, 06:41:25 AM
I dug out my letter from DD. I see that he encouraged me to listen to the 'TOM' music and not 'The Enormous Room' as I originally thought. Am not sure that the letter will be legible but I can easily transcribe it:
(http://)

This is great, Jeffrey. I’m thinking of writing a letter to Aho and telling him how much I love his music.

Edit: I see Aho is a FB user, so I just sent him a private message. My only hope is he reads it. I’m not worried about a response as I know he’s a rather busy man.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 28, 2021, 01:04:51 PM
I wonder how many fan letters David Diamond received. Maybe your letter to David Diamond was framed over the desk in Dave's study and now has a place of honor in the David Diamond archive. :)
Haha - I like to think so!
 :)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 28, 2021, 01:09:20 PM
This is great, Jeffrey. I’m thinking of writing a letter to Aho and telling him how much I love his music.

Edit: I see Aho is a FB user, so I just sent him a private message. My only hope is he reads it. I’m not worried about a response as I know he’s a rather busy man.
Thanks John - I hope that you get a response. Over the years I have occasionally written to composers whose music has meant a lot to me. I had particularly nice replies from Vagn Holmboe, William Alwyn and, most of all, the Irish composer John Kinsella. More recently I had some nice email exchanges with the British composer Robin Walker and the Norwegian composer Stale Kleiberg (composer of the fine 'Bell Reef' Symphony).
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on August 28, 2021, 01:25:25 PM
Haha - I like to think so!
 :)

At one point my brother sent a letter to his hero, Fernando Previtali, and got a cordial reply by mail. It was a different time. The barrier to communication was rather high so anyone who took the trouble seemed to merit a reply.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on August 28, 2021, 01:27:13 PM
In any case, based on the discussion and my enjoyment if his Rounds for String Orchestra, I'm intrigued enough to have ordered a used copy of Schwarz' recording of the 3rd symphony (used, from a charity shop's amazon marketplace store). Hoping I'll find time to actually listen to it.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 28, 2021, 09:26:20 PM
In any case, based on the discussion and my enjoyment if his Rounds for String Orchestra, I'm intrigued enough to have ordered a used copy of Schwarz' recording of the 3rd symphony (used, from a charity shop's amazon marketplace store). Hoping I'll find time to actually listen to it.
I hope you enjoy it. Was it the Delos or Naxos manifestation? The Delos includes the lovely (IMO) suite from Romeo and Juliet.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 28, 2021, 09:34:23 PM
At one point my brother sent a letter to his hero, Fernando Previtali, and got a cordial reply by mail. It was a different time. The barrier to communication was rather high so anyone who took the trouble seemed to merit a reply.
OT
That's an interesting and valid point. I forgot to mention that I received two very nice cards, towards the end of his long life, from Richard (Tony) Arnell. I was so glad that he lived to see works like his wonderful and epic Third Symphony finally recorded after decades and decades of neglect. Arnell, at a very advanced age, was by then in the Musician's Benevolent Care Home and I initially contacted the care home to see if they felt that Mr Arnell would welcome such a communication and when they responded positively I wrote to tell him how much I loved his Third Symphony (then the only one recorded I think). He sent me two charming cards back, heaping praise on the conductor Martin Yates, and telling me how pleased he was that I thought so highly of his symphony.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on August 29, 2021, 12:11:11 AM
I hope you enjoy it. Was it the Delos or Naxos manifestation? The Delos includes the lovely (IMO) suite from Romeo and Juliet.

The Delos. I will probably pick up a used copy of the Delos release including the second and forth symphonies. As you mentioned, Naxos managed to make the couplings less attractive when the rereleased the material.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 29, 2021, 12:18:43 AM
The Delos. I will probably pick up a used copy of the Delos release including the second and forth symphonies. As you mentioned, Naxos managed to make the couplings less attractive when the rereleased the material.
Excellent Arthur - that's the version to get. I think that Naxos were not allowed to reissue the entire Delos recording. The CD with symphonies 2 and 4 on is excellent. More recently I have come to greatly appreciate the 1st Symphony, which I shall be playing again in a minute.

I agree with this review:
https://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-9253/
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 29, 2021, 06:44:20 AM
Thanks John - I hope that you get a response. Over the years I have occasionally written to composers whose music has meant a lot to me. I had particularly nice replies from Vagn Holmboe, William Alwyn and, most of all, the Irish composer John Kinsella. More recently I had some nice email exchanges with the British composer Robin Walker and the Norwegian composer Stale Kleiberg (composer of the fine 'Bell Reef' Symphony).

Very cool, Jeffrey. I’d actually would have loved to have met Alwyn just so I can tell him that I love Lyra Angelica. :) But I think he’s seriously an underrated British composer and is often overshadowed by Walton and Britten for example.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 29, 2021, 10:03:45 AM
Very cool, Jeffrey. I’d actually would have loved to have met Alwyn just so I can tell him that I love Lyra Angelica. :) But I think he’s seriously an underrated British composer and is often overshadowed by Walton and Britten for example.
Yes, you're right John. I was moved to write to him after I heard him conduct his Symphony No.5 on the radio c. 1980. He sent a very nice reply.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 29, 2021, 11:11:44 AM
Yes, you're right John. I was moved to write to him after I heard him conduct his Symphony No.5 on the radio c. 1980. He sent a very nice reply.

Great to read, Jeffrey. Here’s a bit of an off-topic question: if you could sit down for 30 minutes with any British composer who would it be and why?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 29, 2021, 09:18:46 PM
Great to read, Jeffrey. Here’s a bit of an off-topic question: if you could sit down for 30 minutes with any British composer who would it be and why?
Would have to be VW I think John because I've loved his music since I was 17 and it has had more impact on me than that of any other composer.
Also, Richard Arnell seemed to be a very interesting character - maybe we could discuss his eight marriages!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on August 29, 2021, 11:11:22 PM
Also, Richard Arnell seemed to be a very interesting character - maybe we could discuss his eight marriages!
He probably couldn’t remember all of them, or want to!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Irons on August 30, 2021, 12:04:01 AM
He probably couldn’t remember all of them, or want to!

He kept coming back for more so something appealed or maybe just fussy. Didn't Arnell live in America for a spell?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 30, 2021, 07:19:39 AM
Would have to be VW I think John because I've loved his music since I was 17 and it has had more impact on me than that of any other composer.
Also, Richard Arnell seemed to be a very interesting character - maybe we could discuss his eight marriages!

Vaughan Williams would certainly be interesting to talk to for sure. My own choice would be Walton. He just seemed to be a cordial, well-spoken man and I’d love to pick his mind about works like his Symphony No. 1 and Belshazzar’s Feast for example.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on August 30, 2021, 07:26:44 AM
Vaughan Williams would certainly be interesting to talk to for sure. My own choice would be Walton. He just seemed to be a cordial, well-spoken man and I’d love to pick his mind about works like his Symphony No. 1 and Belshazzar’s Feast for example.
An interesting choice John - I'd like to have spoken to Walton as well.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: krummholz on August 31, 2021, 04:17:00 PM
In my case, I would definitely choose Robert Simpson. We'd probably end up talking about astronomy instead of music!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 31, 2021, 06:38:50 PM
In my case, I would definitely choose Robert Simpson. We'd probably end up talking about astronomy instead of music!

Just don’t mention Sibelius to him. Apparently, he doesn’t think much of him and prefers to ramble on and on about Nielsen. I love both composers, but I think he has some kind of axe to grind against Sibelius that I find odd.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: calyptorhynchus on August 31, 2021, 08:38:09 PM
Just don’t mention Sibelius to him. Apparently, he doesn’t think much of him and prefers to ramble on and on about Nielsen. I love both composers, but I think he has some kind of axe to grind against Sibelius that I find odd.

That's not my understanding, Simpson had series on BBC Radio 3 talking about both Nielsen and Sibelius and his book on Nielsen as a whole appendix where he compares the two composers, to neither's disadvantage.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Mirror Image on August 31, 2021, 09:13:59 PM
That's not my understanding, Simpson had series on BBC Radio 3 talking about both Nielsen and Sibelius and his book on Nielsen as a whole appendix where he compares the two composers, to neither's disadvantage.

Ah, good to read. Another case of simply misremembering what someone actually said.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Irons on August 31, 2021, 10:35:31 PM
My choice would be Constant Lambert as he would have the most interesting things to say on other composers (Music Ho). Also he would buy me a beer or two. :P
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Irons on August 31, 2021, 10:37:05 PM
OT
That's an interesting and valid point. I forgot to mention that I received two very nice cards, towards the end of his long life, from Richard (Tony) Arnell. I was so glad that he lived to see works like his wonderful and epic Third Symphony finally recorded after decades and decades of neglect. Arnell, at a very advanced age, was by then in the Musician's Benevolent Care Home and I initially contacted the care home to see if they felt that Mr Arnell would welcome such a communication and when they responded positively I wrote to tell him how much I loved his Third Symphony (then the only one recorded I think). He sent me two charming cards back, heaping praise on the conductor Martin Yates, and telling me how pleased he was that I thought so highly of his symphony.

Missed this, Jeffrey. How interesting.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 01, 2021, 03:57:56 AM
My choice would be Constant Lambert as he would have the most interesting things to say on other composers (Music Ho). Also he would buy me a beer or two. :P
An interesting choice - I'm sure that his son Kit (manager of 'The Who') would be interesting to talk to. I could also talk to Constant about cats!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 01, 2021, 04:01:03 AM
Missed this, Jeffrey. How interesting.
Thanks Lol. If I remember correctly the Care Home offered to put me through to him directly but I thought that this might be something of an imposition, so I wrote to him instead.

By the way, Constant and Kit Lambert are buried (or their ashes are) in Brompton Cemetery, down the road from where I grew up.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Irons on September 01, 2021, 06:16:44 AM
Thanks Lol. If I remember correctly the Care Home offered to put me through to him directly but I thought that this might be something of an imposition, so I wrote to him instead.

By the way, Constant and Kit Lambert are buried (or their ashes are) in Brompton Cemetery, down the road from where I grew up.

Father and son together is good.

I have a thing about cemeteries Jeffrey, they are so peaceful and with sense of the past and our forbearers. As weird as it sounds due to being cut of from our family because of Covid my wife and I found ourselves on last Christmas morning strolling around Leatherhead Cemetery looking for the grave of Lydia Mordkovitch. Didn't find it, but the surroundings matched my wife's mood!
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 01, 2021, 10:53:37 AM
Father and son together is good.

I have a thing about cemeteries Jeffrey, they are so peaceful and with sense of the past and our forbearers. As weird as it sounds due to being cut of from our family because of Covid my wife and I found ourselves on last Christmas morning strolling around Leatherhead Cemetery looking for the grave of Lydia Mordkovitch. Didn't find it, but the surroundings matched my wife's mood!
OT
This might interested you Lol:
https://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/brompton-cemetery/explore-brompton-cemetery/constant-lambert
I love the painting of Constant Lambert by Christopher Wood.
When I lived in Earl's Court I would often walk through Brompton Cemetery - a number of famous people are buried there.
Another image of CL with his beautiful wife:
(http://)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Maestro267 on September 02, 2021, 05:27:29 AM
Has Constant Lambert invaded David Diamond's thread or?
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Irons on September 02, 2021, 05:38:59 AM
OT
This might interested you Lol:
https://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/brompton-cemetery/explore-brompton-cemetery/constant-lambert
I love the painting of Constant Lambert by Christopher Wood.
When I lived in Earl's Court I would often walk through Brompton Cemetery - a number of famous people are buried there.
Another image of CL with his beautiful wife:
(http://)

Blimey, Margot Fonteyn got around, didn't she!

Apologies to Maestro and David Diamond.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 02, 2021, 09:08:28 PM
Has Constant Lambert invaded David Diamond's thread or?
Good point. My apologies.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on September 15, 2021, 05:12:38 AM
Just finished my first listen to David Diamond's third symphony. A convulsively energetic first movement, a ghostly slow movement with considerable dissonance and sensuality, an energetic scherzo, followed by a return to the mood of the second movement, with a slow finale that ends quietly.

A satisfying work; I think the second movement was my favorite part. The ending left me a little puzzled. Schwarz's recording is well done, perhaps the slow movements were a bit more tentative than I would have preferred.

Given the quality an accessibility of this music, I'm surprised Diamond isn't better represented on record.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 15, 2021, 07:14:28 AM
Just finished my first listen to David Diamond's third symphony. A convulsively energetic first movement, a ghostly slow movement with considerable dissonance and sensuality, an energetic scherzo, followed by a return to the mood of the second movement, with a slow finale that ends quietly.

A satisfying work; I think the second movement was my favorite part. The ending left me a little puzzled. Schwarz's recording is well done, perhaps the slow movements were a bit more tentative than I would have preferred.

Given the quality an accessibility of this music, I'm surprised Diamond isn't better represented on record.
Yes, I'm surprised that it's the only recording. I rank it as one of the Great American 3rd Symphonies, alongside those by Roy Harris, Copland, William Schuman, Paul Creston and Howard Hanson. If you don't know them have a listen to symphonies 1,2 and 4 which are all great IMO.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: Spotted Horses on September 15, 2021, 07:38:44 AM
Yes, I'm surprised that it's the only recording. I rank it as one of the Great American 3rd Symphonies, alongside those by Roy Harris, Copland, William Schuman, Paul Creston and Howard Hanson. If you don't know them have a listen to symphonies 1,2 and 4 which are all great IMO.

Yes, I have the Schwarz recordings of 2 and 4. Seems like Delos' Diamond cycle ran out of steam. There is a Berstein recording of the 4th symphony, and I am curious to hear that.
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on September 15, 2021, 10:46:52 AM
Yes, I have the Schwarz recordings of 2 and 4. Seems like Delos' Diamond cycle ran out of steam. There is a Berstein recording of the 4th symphony, and I am curious to hear that.
The Bernstein 'American Masters' CD is probably my favourite recording in the entire series as it also features the best version of Roy Harris's Third Symphony (better than the DGG remake) as well as Diamond's 4th Symphony. Diamond's First Symphony is a favourite of mine as well.
(http://)
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 16, 2021, 02:13:07 PM
Some may yet remember the GMG'er weirdears (Chris Forbes, who was a student of Diamond's.

I've just learnt of Chris's piece Threnody Variations for Orchestra 2, in memoriam David Diamond ... a fabulous piece, I think:

https://www.youtube.com/v/nEiPGM304XE
Title: Re: The Diamond Mine
Post by: vandermolen on October 17, 2021, 11:14:29 PM
Some may yet remember the GMG'er weirdears (Chris Forbes, who was a student of Diamond's.

I've just learnt of Chris's piece Threnody Variations for Orchestra 2, in memoriam David Diamond ... a fabulous piece, I think:

https://www.youtube.com/v/nEiPGM304XE
I remember weirdears (great name!) and the Threnody 2 sounds very good - interesting that he was taught by DD.