GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => General Classical Music Discussion => Topic started by: James on May 25, 2012, 03:30:28 PM

Title: 21st century classical music
Post by: James on May 25, 2012, 03:30:28 PM
Ok ..

Its 2012, we're 12 years into it .. the early part a century can be fruitful times if we look hard enough in our crowded, diverse world; the world of "classical" composition as it is in this century is also very diverse and all over the place .. so let's try to come up with 21st century compositions that we've either heard ourselves, like and would recommend to others OR perhaps read major "buzz" about  (i.e. positive acclaim, esteemed awards, big audience draws etc.) that would be worth exploring. Maybe some of our younger members will be much more in tune with what's going on? Who knows ..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/21st-century_classical_music
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 25, 2012, 04:42:37 PM
My favorite piece written in the 21st century is David Lang's Little Match Girl Passion,

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51yfCZXGBYL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Here's a live excerpt performed by Theatre of Voices. There's more percussion parts later in the piece. I really encourage all to check it out.

http://www.youtube.com/v/lH-giL7c7Ts
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on May 25, 2012, 06:08:11 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/NN8xk7xTWLg

Also an excerpt from a live show, one I saw myself live when it was newer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on May 25, 2012, 06:53:17 PM
I'm a keen listener of all things Lindberg, Salonen, and Saariaho. But I also keep up with what Arvo Part, John Adams, and a few others are doing. A composer lately that has interested me is Anders Hillborg. Keep an eye on this composer. He's going places IMHO. Norgard, Birtwistle, and Ades have also composed some fascinating work in this century so far.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philoctetes3 on May 25, 2012, 07:15:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/NN8xk7xTWLg

That's fantastic stuff, I have an entire thread dedicated to my adoration of the 21st century. It's easily my favorite time period for classical music. If I was going to ease someone in though, I'd start with something relatively soft, and tell them to listen to Part's 4th Symphony, and then depending on how adventurous they want to be, I could go in any variety of directions. The disc below is probably my most listened to, as  of recent.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 26, 2012, 02:16:31 AM
That's fantastic stuff, I have an entire thread dedicated to my adoration of the 21st century. It's easily my favorite time period for classical music. If I was going to ease someone in though, I'd start with something relatively soft, and tell them to listen to Part's 4th Symphony, and then depending on how adventurous they want to be, I could go in any variety of directions. The disc below is probably my most listened to, as  of recent.



Great stuff, Philo. Have you heard these great discs from Gordon?

(http://img.tapatalk.com/4c61fab9-bc24-cf58.jpg)
(http://img.tapatalk.com/4c61fab9-bbff-0a83.jpg)


Another of my favorite contemporary composers is Pascal Dusapin, I've been hooked on his opera Perelà, uomo di fumo (Perelà, man of smoke)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on May 26, 2012, 03:35:17 AM
Great composers for me are Birtwistle, Sciarrino and de Raaff. These composers belong to the very large ones to me. Maybe also Aperghis, I just discovered this composer. I like Vivier also very much (haven't listened to much of his work however). I consider Pécou as a great composer as well. After them come Ligeti and Donatoni. I need to listen to Saariaho still, the fragments I heared sound interesting to me.

Other composers, I checked out allmost all of them, are less interesting to me. I recheck some of them now and then however. German composers are too strange to me. Their work is good (Stockhausen, Lachenmann, Rihm), but I just don't like to listen to it.

I don't like the spectralism of Murail and Grisey at all. Negative tensions I feel by this music. Pécou is a spectralist I like.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: DieNacht on May 26, 2012, 05:06:50 AM
Silvestrov, Nørgård, Saariaho, Gubajdulina, Georgy Dorokhov, Pärt and Carter are among the most recent composers I try to follow a bit.
My interest in Unsuk Chin, Toshio Hosokawa and Charles Wuorinen is probably going to get greater; would also like to hear more from Jan Klusak, Tristan Murail and Wilhelm Killmayer, for instance.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philoctetes3 on May 26, 2012, 06:42:26 AM
Great stuff, Philo. Have you heard these great discs from Gordon?

I've not, but thanks for putting them on my radar.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on May 26, 2012, 10:19:27 AM
Some other grand and old(ish) people still working in this century (including some recently deceased):

Pierre Henry
Francis Dhomont
Eliane Radigue
Yasunao Tone
Robert Ashley
Christian Wolff
Mary Anne Amacher
Luc Ferrari
Henri Chopin

And some (very few) other, younger grand people (in no order):

Michele Bokanowski
Beatriz Ferreyra
Caroline Bauckholts
Ludger Bruemmer
Otomo Yoshihide
Lionel Marchetti
Jerome Noetinger
Simon Steen-Andersen
Gerard Eckert
Barry Truax
Hildegard Westerkamp
Elio Martusciello
Francisco Lopez
Heiner Goebbels
Zbigniew Karkowski
Mark Andre (not sure if this is who James was referring to--if so, never mind!)
Martin Tetreault
Robin Hayward
Diana Simpson Salazar
Natasha Barrett
Ricardo Mandolini

Fun times to be in!

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on May 26, 2012, 11:25:36 AM
Michael.

And that's the guy. Mark Andre. A new favorite of mine to be sure.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on May 26, 2012, 02:52:25 PM
Lachenmann has written several works this century. As consistent as Elliott Carter, though not quite as prolific.

Sakura-Variationen for saxophone, percussion and piano (2000)
3. Streichquartett "Grido", string quartet (2001)
Schreiben for orchestra (2003)
Double (Grido II) for string orchestra (2004)
Concertini for large ensemble (2005)
...got lost..., music for soprano and piano (2008)
Berliner Kirschblüten, an arrangement with three variations on a Japanese folksong for alto saxophone, piano and percussion (2008) - a continuation of the Sakura-Variationen on the Japanese folksong "Sakura", an adjacent work
Concerto for 8 Horns and Orchestra (2010–11), for Musica Viva Munich

Nico Muhly is probably the youngest very well-known contemporary composer (30 years old). He's the only major composer I can think of whose entire output is in the 2000s. I haven't heard anything from him that I like yet, though.



Here's this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_21st-century_classical_composers
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Lethevich on May 27, 2012, 12:39:25 PM
Krzysztof Penderecki

Double Concerto for Violin, Viola and Orchestra (2012)

I didn't know about this. I want~
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on May 27, 2012, 06:35:08 PM
Continuing the 21st century survey .. which includes some of the most polarizing composers of art music
in the last 50 years or so, in their later periods of creativity .. 3 Americans ..

Philip Glass .. (partial list below)
In the Penal Colony (2000; voice & string quartet)
Galileo Galilei (2001; opera)
Symphonies 6-11 (2002-2011)
Concerto for 2 Timpanists & orchestra (2000)
Piano Concerto Nos. 1 & 2 (2000, 2004)
Harpsichord Concerto (2002)
The Hours (2002; commercial film score)
Orion (2004; Philip Glass Ensemble)
Waiting for the Barbarians (2005; opera)
The Passion of Ramakrishna (2006; orchestra, soloists, chorus)
Songs & Poems for solo cello (2005-2007)
Book of Longing (2007; song cycle with Leonard Cohen)
Appomattox (2007; opera)
Violin Concerto No. 2 "The American Four Seasons" (2009-2010)
The Perfect American (2011; opera about the death of Walt Disney, premiere 2013)


Steve Reich
Dance Patterns (2002)
Cello Counterpoint (2003)
You Are (Variations) (2004)
Variations for Vibes, Pianos, Strings (2005)
Daniel Variations (2006)
Double Sextet (2007) Pulitzer Prize for Music
2x5 for 2 drum sets, 2 pianos, 4 electric guitars, 2 bass guitars (2008)
Mallet Quartet for 2 marimbas, 2 vibraphones or 4 marimbas (or solo percussion & tape) (2009)
WTC 9/11 for string quartet & tape (2010)


John Adams
(2001) Nancy's Fancy
(2001) Guide to Strange Places
(2001) American Berserk
(2002) On the Transmigration of Souls (Pulitzer Prize for Music)
(2003) My Father Knew Charles Ives
(2003) The Dharma at Big Sur
(2005) Doctor Atomic
(2007) Doctor Atomic Symphony
(2007) Son of Chamber Symphony
(2007) Fellow Traveler
(2008) String Quartet
(2009) City Noir
(2010) Absolute Jest




Nooo!! :o NO! :o! NOOOOO!!! :o

We're doomed! :'(


However, the rest of the old guard (everyone cool who's still alive) all seem to have been trying to write Masterpieces of late. Hey, I just don't trust anyone born after 1957,... right? 8) (I say it's 1962-3, but, just take a look at the wiki...a precipitous decline in awesome Composers seems to happen right after the Finnish explosion of the late '50s)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on May 27, 2012, 09:06:55 PM
Depends on how you define "awesome," I guess. (A lot of younger composers strike me with awe.)

But has it occurred to you that you may just be seeing a bit of how history and looking backwards works? Would you have thought Bartok was "awesome" if you'd first heard of him in 1932? (Think of all the awesome work he did after 1932, too. So there's that, too. Someone born in 1980 is only 32. And not everyone gets started as early as Mozart or Schubert--or, fortunately, gets cut off as soon.)

In any event, looking at wiki is questionable. Wiki is in the same "too recent to tell" quandary you find yourself in, which quandary you would not find yourself in were you to just get out there and listen to some music! Plenty of stuff going on now that's worth hearing by composers born since 1957. More than plenty.

The only precipitous decline, I'd venture to guess, is in the number of awesome young composers you'd be likely to find in wiki.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: val on May 28, 2012, 12:06:29 AM
Two suggestions:

Wolfgang Rihm: Fetzen, for string Quartet

Hugues Dufourt:   Le Cyprés Blanc for viola and orchestra
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: UB on May 28, 2012, 11:14:27 AM
An interesting source of music of this century and late 20th century is here. (http://www.composers21.com/?) It usually not up to date and there are a number of composers that the keepers of the site do not seem to think important but what is there is usually accurate.

Also almost every day there is one or more pieces of contemporary music on the web. I usually check in with  comptradio  (http://www.comptradio.blogspot.com/) to see what is available. Often there are world premieres by both unknown and well known composers that will either never get to commercial recordings or if they do it could be many months or years.

One good thing about young composers (35-40)is that most of them have excellent websites often with either full pieces or extended sound clips to listen to. Their sites can usually be found by searching, but some take a lot of digging. Of course also as mentioned here, there are often full works on YouTube. So if anyone wants to explore music of this century, there is plenty to hear.

Finally one of my favorite composers born after 1970  Bruno Mantovani. (http://www.brunomantovani.com/home.html) I will let his music speak for itself...you will either like it or you will not.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Szykneij on May 28, 2012, 04:59:34 PM
Finally one of my favorite composers born after 1970  Bruno Mantovani. (http://www.brunomantovani.com/home.html) I will let his music speak for itself...you will either like it or you will not.

Nothing like the Mantovani records my aunt used to listen to ...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on May 28, 2012, 05:03:44 PM
What is up with these Scandinavian composers born between late 40s and late 50s? Lindberg, Salonen, Ruders, Saariaho...man...what a list.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on May 28, 2012, 08:53:05 PM
What is up with these Scandinavian composers born between late 40s and late 50s? Lindberg, Salonen, Ruders, Saariaho...man...what a list.

And if you replace Ruders with Aho, they're all Finnish.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on May 28, 2012, 08:59:08 PM
And if you replace Ruders with Aho, they're all Finnish.

Haven't heard any Aho yet. Waiting on BIS to release an Aho box set.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: DieNacht on May 29, 2012, 08:41:00 AM
Interesting surveys your are giving here, thanks James.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on May 30, 2012, 06:06:46 AM
Depends on how you define "awesome," I guess. (A lot of younger composers strike me with awe.)

But has it occurred to you that you may just be seeing a bit of how history and looking backwards works? Would you have thought Bartok was "awesome" if you'd first heard of him in 1932? (Think of all the awesome work he did after 1932, too. So there's that, too. Someone born in 1980 is only 32. And not everyone gets started as early as Mozart or Schubert--or, fortunately, gets cut off as soon.)

In any event, looking at wiki is questionable. Wiki is in the same "too recent to tell" quandary you find yourself in, which quandary you would not find yourself in were you to just get out there and listen to some music! Plenty of stuff going on now that's worth hearing by composers born since 1957. More than plenty.

The only precipitous decline, I'd venture to guess, is in the number of awesome young composers you'd be likely to find in wiki.

...but... but...


I guess I'm just bitter.

I don't need new Composers. I will allow the older Composers (the ones James is listing) to continue composing, as they can be 'grandfather claused' into my view of things. Seriously, just look at those long lists... who has time for anyone under 60 when these guys are pumping out so much stuff? Add Lachenmann, Sciarrino, and all the other famous names we know,... how can anyone have time to listen to...

ok, I'm just being a dick now,... hold on...


ok, better now...


I just don't think I can trust the MIND of young people. If they got their first memories after 1984, I just don't (probably) trust their worldview, and so, I will be wondering if this a 'Green' Symphony, or 'Holocaust' Symphony, or whatnot. I just blankly believe that the younger set is totally indoctrinated into a political thinking, and so, I won't even bother to listening to anyone's 'Violin Sonata', or what not.

What are the subjects of their Operas? What programmic affectations do they cultivate? I'm MUCH more interested in young Composers' politics than hearing ANYTHING.... ANYTHING...

I can't WAIT for the electricity to run out!!

There is a GLUT of... we've had, what? 600 years of Masterpieces?,... I don't even want to KNOW what qualifies as a Masterpiece today. Frankly, until every last 'famous', 'nameable' Composer born before 1957 dies, I will not even care...


I sit here thinking about things I'd like to Compose. Hmmm... a solo flute piece? C'mon, really? A Violin Concerto?...I mean, what? Can't I find EVERY single thing I could possibly ever want, within the years 1946-1996?

Just like I've heard too much academic serialism from US University Composers during the '70s,... I 'act' like I've heard everything anyone's doing... I NEED to be impressed... I just won't turn on the radio just to hear 'music'...

oy... I'm quite bitter this morning... forgive me....


ok... all these younger Composers... they get ONE PIECE, one chance with me... haha, and not only that, it had better get me within the first minute or it's to the boiler room... NO!!, I WILL NOT automatically 'respect' you because you decided to be a Composer...


Oh, and another thing... WHO are these youngsters who want to be Composers anyhow? I assume most are rich Jewish kids from NYC... yea, I know, that's a horrible attitude to have, but who but the rich kids are even going to have the money to go to  University or whatever? I don't care to have ANYONE in this current world dictate ANY music to me. We have been to the Individualist's Heaven (the era of High Modernism 1959-79),... and now it's being destroyed (can't we all just get along?)... the only Composer I want to hear from is someone from Gaza

nevermind


All of a sudden I want to say, I HATE MUSIC!! >:D


DIE DIE DIE


ok, I feel a little better... like I said, just feeling a bit bitter today...


So, why isn't this Post music? I DECLARE it so,... why is it not so? Why don't I just publish this Post, and challenge people to 'play' it? That's the kind of bitter attitude I get when I fantasize about what a University Composition teacher must be like...


ok, perhaps I'm getting politics and music confused (how can that BE??)... oy, I just get these thoughts of Janet Napolitano giving an award for most Statist Composer...

Maybe I've got Rzewski on the brain... and he annooooooooooooooooooys me big time.


I feel like the thing to do creatively is to OFFEND... the 'Holocaust Revisionist' Symphony... the 'Dream Act' Symphony... the 'I Wanna Marry My Dog' Symphony...the 'You Go Grrrl' Symphony... the 'Sub Prime' Symphony... the 'Fat' Symphony...

THERE!!, that's it... the 'Fat' Symphony, Dedicated to the 600,000,000!! Now I score it for 6 tubas and one violin... oh, and a reciter reciting some 'progressive' bs...

no?, not offensive enough?

How about the 'Torture' Symphony? I would string up actors around the stage, and they would be beaten IN TIME!!, so that we hear a moan there, a shriek here,... dedicated to Our Troops...

how bout the 'US Soldiers Safe-Guarding the Production of Opiates' Symphony?

the 'US Congress is Owned by Tel-Aviv' Symphony?


grrrr....music >:D,... pah... fffft...


I'm gonna go with Stockhausen and declare that 9/11 was the greatest work of Art perpetrated on the world.

Or, Adorno,... how can there be poetry after the holocaust?...


ahhhhhh :o


ahhhhhh :o

ahhhhhh :o


did I mention is was feeling bitter?



Just find me something from 1977-79 and I'll go away...


The world doesn't deserve music today.


...I'm comin' Elizabeth...


Does the devil make music out of the entrails of his victims?


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on May 30, 2012, 06:09:56 AM
Dum transisset I–IV for string quartet (2007)

Now THAT's some incredible stuff! On YT


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 30, 2012, 06:19:25 AM
I don't need new Composers.

Thank you, I'm sure.

There is a GLUT of... we've had, what? 600 years of Masterpieces?

Surely, more good art can only be a good thing?

Surely, that not all art says the same thing in the same ways, can only be a good thing?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: springrite on May 30, 2012, 06:23:20 AM
Haven't heard any Aho yet. Waiting on BIS to release an Aho box set.

Instead of waiting for that better deal, I dare you to buy them individually. I dare you.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on May 30, 2012, 06:24:38 AM
Instead of waiting for that better deal, I dare you to buy them individually. I dare you.

Haha...I've made it this long without Aho. I can wait until a box set is released. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: springrite on May 30, 2012, 06:25:48 AM
Haha...I've made it this long without Aho. I can wait until a box set is released. :)
They won't because he is still composing new symphonies.  :P
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on May 30, 2012, 06:29:29 AM
They won't because he is still composing new symphonies.  :P

I have no luck. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 30, 2012, 06:37:21 AM
As Varèse said (and Zappa often quoted): The present-day composer refuses to die.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: springrite on May 30, 2012, 06:39:20 AM
I have no luck. :)

As Varèse said (and Zappa often quoted): The present-day composer refuses to die.

And I want him to live long enough to out-compose Segerstam in number of symphonies composed!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on May 30, 2012, 08:42:05 AM
An anonymous quote from an anonymous blog just doesn't quite do the old convincing thing. Not for me, anyway. Who asked this question? Who answered it? Are either of them (if it's two different people) worth listening to? (I.e., do they know enough about contemporary music to be authoritative? (Are Turnage and Lindberg representative?))

The most sensible answer to "After Stockhausen, Cage, Scelsi, Xenakis - what can actually come?" is "All the things that actually have come."

As for snyprrr's bitterness, I actually find that to be unconvincing as well. You're bitter about the putative qualities of music that you report as not listening to? There's a sensible solution to that situation as well. Listen to it. (And do it without lamenting that it's not like x, y, or z from the past. Let it be itself. Fair's fair. I'll wager you're never bitter that Varese doesn't sound like Brahms. Or that Brahms doesn't sound like Berlioz....)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 30, 2012, 08:58:42 AM
As for snyprrr's bitterness, I actually find that to be unconvincing as well.

Yup. Is snypsss bitter? Wait fifteen minutes . . . .
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 01, 2012, 06:50:40 AM
An anonymous quote from an anonymous blog just doesn't quite do the old convincing thing. Not for me, anyway. Who asked this question? Who answered it? Are either of them (if it's two different people) worth listening to? (I.e., do they know enough about contemporary music to be authoritative? (Are Turnage and Lindberg representative?))

The most sensible answer to "After Stockhausen, Cage, Scelsi, Xenakis - what can actually come?" is "All the things that actually have come."

As for snyprrr's bitterness, I actually find that to be unconvincing as well. You're bitter about the putative qualities of music that you report as not listening to? There's a sensible solution to that situation as well. Listen to it. (And do it without lamenting that it's not like x, y, or z from the past. Let it be itself. Fair's fair. I'll wager you're never bitter that Varese doesn't sound like Brahms. Or that Brahms doesn't sound like Berlioz....)

You know I just can't get over that 'scratched' cd on Tzadik. They 'scratched' a cd and then asked me to pay $20 for it (Tzadik was full price back in the day).

I suppose it gets me that I don't hear ANY criticism from you about anything, making me wonder if you go with Cage and say that anything our ears hear must be beautiful Art? I mean, doesn't ANYONE suck? And, sucking IS important!

I feel like I want to kidnap you a la 'Alex' in A Clockwork Orange, and MAKE you listen to the most horrible crap until you... well, I don't know what would happen, but, I can guarantee, if you started LIKING it, I'd make you listen to Metal Machine Music till you beg for Lady Gaga!! :-*

WWLD?

I'm going to start asking the question: What Would Liszt Do?

What would he do if had to listen to an evening of Eve Beglarian, the 'balloon' lady? And so forth...

I'd like to hear what the Masters of the past,... go ahead, bring Varese on,... you think he'd like?... I'm sorry, I guess everything I've heard on the 'Only the New' Thread...


I used to be one of those 'Music Is God' people, until I realized there is more to life than one's own personal grail. Music is just a tool, like a bullet, and, it CAN be used for evil!!! I get the impression certain people believe that no evil can come from ANY music, but surely I can concoct a 'Subliminal' Symphony for nefarious purposes??

Ah, I argue in vain.


I mean, the stuff James puts up here (Saunders, Romitelli, Ferneyhough) is what I'm going to call 'normal' music from the late 80s, early '90s. I think, generally, all the Living Composers I love have something to do with 1989-93...

I mean, even my faaaaaaaaavorite Composer, Xenakis, kinda started to suck in the end (the reason doesn't matter). Carter??? Do I really want to plow through his 1001 Compositions that he's written since he turned 90+??

Boulez??? Ay ay ay... take a Viagra and finish something, you blowhard!!

Dutilleaux(sic)??? I'm not going to say anything bad about him, he seems humble enough.

H. Owen Reed??? Yes, I think he's still alive.



Just to wrap up the Morning Rant: I declare that most of the Living Composers of the High Modernism, the ones who came to prominence around the year 1971, and still out there TRYING to impress me,... Ferneyhough et al... they're still quietly working the outer limits. I don't even consider them when we talk about these subjects. I guess I automatically append this 70s generation to the Stockhausen-Nono-Boulez-Xenakis-Ligeti generation. I consider Ferneyhough et al to be a part of THAT era, even though these living ones are... still living.


Someone just seems to be acting like Composition classes all around the world aren't filled with the same post-9/11, indoctrinated youth (especially here,... wait,... how many PUBLIC school children go on to become Composers??) as all the other disciplines?

Please, someguy, just throw me a bone and show me some examples of stuff that SUCKS. If 'nothing' sucks, then, can 'anything' be Great?

I WANT to hear condemnation. I want you to personally hold up some young aspiring Composer and tell them to their face that the don't have 'IT'!! 'It' shouldn't be so 'common' that everyone should be able to get it. 'It' SHOULD be aloof.

I DEMAND 'Greatness'!! I will NOT be subjected to EVERY students' pathetic attempt to describe things for which they have no internal greatness to do so.

Are we acting as if there IS no glut??


I'm just going to flat out reply to the Brahms/Le Sacre thing, that 2013 is by NO MEANS 1913!! Surely you know what I mean.

I mean, shall we just go ahead and let the machines Composer for us now??


The only interest in music in the 21st Century will be, How Can 'We' Use Music to Control the People? Music has be used to long simply for people's enjoyment, when the leaders of the world should be 'using' music for their own ends.


WHAT music is being played for the prisoners at Guantanamo?? Hmm??


I would LOVE to see Music used to dismantle this UN/IMF/WTO world!!


Let's see if Music really DOES have the Power to do ANYTHING world changing. Now would be the time.


tap tap tap

tap tap tap








Frankly, I think I'm making lots of great points,... it's just that they may be well hidden! ;) 8)


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 01, 2012, 07:16:07 AM
Ah, I argue in vain.

If so, the realization is wisdom.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 01, 2012, 08:29:31 AM
It's not so difficult as you make it out to be snyprrr.

I tend to avoid making negative comments simply because anything I fault will be something someone else likes and why rain on their party? My tastes and predilections are only the end all and be all for myself. And even there, why they change from time to time.

If I talk, I praise. If there's something I dislike, I mostly just shut up.

Mostly.

Otherwise, I do not demand greatness as you do. OK. We are different. What I demand, from myself, is attentive and sympathetic listening. I don't demand or expect or desire (to the best of my abilities) anything from the composers. Why? They've already done their job if I can hear their music. That is, they've written some music. That's what composers do. They have nothing else to do, no meeting me halfway or trying to impress me or whatever silliness that I've heard other listeners demand from them.

They've done their job. Now it's my turn. And if I fail, then I tend to shut up about my failure, that's all. I like talking (and hearing) about successes.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 02, 2012, 09:51:08 AM
It's not so difficult as you make it out to be snyprrr.

I tend to avoid making negative comments simply because anything I fault will be something someone else likes and why rain on their party? My tastes and predilections are only the end all and be all for myself. And even there, why they change from time to time.

If I talk, I praise. If there's something I dislike, I mostly just shut up.

Mostly.

Otherwise, I do not demand greatness as you do. OK. We are different. What I demand, from myself, is attentive and sympathetic listening. I don't demand or expect or desire (to the best of my abilities) anything from the composers. Why? They've already done their job if I can hear their music. That is, they've written some music. That's what composers do. They have nothing else to do, no meeting me halfway or trying to impress me or whatever silliness that I've heard other listeners demand from them.

They've done their job. Now it's my turn. And if I fail, then I tend to shut up about my failure, that's all. I like talking (and hearing) about successes.

AHHHHH!!!! :o

I'm going to take a nap; I can't type with my hands shaking like this!! Please be prepared to soothe me by explaining how most, if not all, Composers are not on the taxpayer dime. You did mention the word 'job'.

Uncontrollable shaking... Is it the left side? or right side? that stiffens up during a...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Leon on June 04, 2012, 06:01:36 AM
Cross-posted from the Listening thread-

Lera Auerbach : 24 Preludes for Violin and Piano
Vadim Gluzman, Angela Yoffe



Some near-21st Century music (1999) that is very nice.  The piece has been described as "riveting and spellbinding" and "fabulously spectral work, haunting in its ominous use of bleak lyricism, relentless in its hypnotic attraction, and thoroughly inventive in its somber mood and design" - but don't that scare you away. 

For anyone suspicious of "new music" this work might act as a good entry point.  But that is not to say that it is not extremely well-written and somewhat (to use an over-used word for new music) demanding; it is - but it is also accessible.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: UB on June 04, 2012, 07:51:56 AM
Glad you brought up Auerbach. She is certainly accessible. She was born in Russia but moved to the US in 1991 at the age of 18. She is multi-talented as she not only writes music but also is a talented pianist and a published writer.

Although I rather liked exploring her music, I can not say that she is among top 20 living composers on my list but she probably would be in a list of my top 10 composers born in 1970 or later. I think it will be interesting to see what she is writing in 5 or 10 years. I found her more interesting and original when she writes for solo or smaller groups but some of her shorter music for orchestra seem to me to have enough to say that it does not sound tired before it ends.

She wrote 24 preludes for piano which she then used as a basis for those 24 preludes for violin and piano you mention above. But my favorite version is written for cello and piano. I think they are a good place to start with her music. My other suggestions are her 2006 Serenade for a Melancholic Sea and her Russian Requiem.

As with many of the younger composers she has a very good interactive website  (http://www.leraauerbach.com/) where you can listen to complete recordings of 75% or so of her music to see if what you like and if you would like to hear more.If you do not know this composer I suggest you give her a try and report back what you found that you liked or didn’t like.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 04, 2012, 12:11:05 PM
An active, award-winning, commission-busy Spaniard ..

Alberto Posadas
Versa est in luctum (2002) for 4 instruments & electronics
Snefru (2002) for accordion & electronics
Liturgia Fractal (2003–2007) for string quartet
Nebmaat (2004) for ensemble
Anamorfosis (2006) for ensemble
Cripsis (2007) for ensemble
Nebmaat (2008) for quintet
Oscuro abismo de llanto y de ternura (2009) for ensemble
Glossopoeia (2009) for 3 dancers, 4 musicians, video, electronics




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Posadas

(http://www.kairos-music.com/composer/photos/posadas.jpg)

(more to come)


I have that SQ disc. He sounds a lot like his teacher Guerrero. There is also Jesus Rueda, whose SQs are also on Kairos (also recorded by the Arditti in an impossible to find set) but not available in the US yet. I find the whole Guerrero influence quite a grimy affair,... it's not really attractive to me in any real way, and his students seem to have taken him literally. It's kind of like Xenakis, but as if only one aspect were focused on and microscope-d. I haven't bought a Modern SQ since, and would end up getting the Lachenmann if I did.

I'm pretty sure I can sniff out good VS bad when it comes to SQs. I'd love to just hear some SQ stuff from everyone who wants to be considered. I'll admit I was pleasantly surprised by Ades'.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on June 04, 2012, 12:19:26 PM
People, try Robin de Raaff:



Listened to the Concerto for Orchestra some time ago. Very impressive. This is a great composer. The other two works are also fine. Need to listen to his opera again soon.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4105/5070548527_fd35113a9f.jpg)

Henk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jimmosk on June 04, 2012, 09:16:08 PM
I would be remiss in my responsibilities were I not to include...

George Crumb
Unto the Hills (American Songbook III) for soprano, percussion quartet and piano (2001)
Eine Kleine Mitternachtmusik for solo piano (2002)
The River of Life (American Songbook I) for soprano, percussion quartet and piano (2003)
A Journey Beyond Time (American Songbook II) for soprano, percussion quartet and piano (2003)
Otherworldly Resonances for two pianos (2003)
The Winds of Destiny (American Songbook IV) for soprano, percussion quartet and piano (2004)
Voices from a Forgotten World (American Songbook V) for soprano, baritone, percussion quartet and piano (2007)
The Ghosts of Alhambra (Spanish Songbook I) for baritone, guitar and percussion (2008)
Voices from the Morning of the Earth (American Songbook VI) for soprano, baritone, percussion quartet and piano (2008)
Sun and Shadow (Spanish Songbook II) for soprano and amplified piano (2009)
Voices from the Heartland (American Songbook VII) for soprano, baritone, percussion quartet and piano (2010)


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Leon on June 05, 2012, 03:46:36 AM
Hans Abrahamsen

Schnee has been mentioned , but there are some other very interesting works for traditional ensembles: string quartet, wind quintet, piano trio (horn).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51qPnslfZDL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Abrahamsen.gif)

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 10:39:22 AM
James, you bring up classical training in a recent post. I was not thinking about training when I made my list. And I don't think about training when I listen to music. But I've been thinking about training since reading your post. The list I made was made by a person who is a classically trained listener. That is, once I first heard "classical" music, around age 9, I was hooked and have listened to little else since then. So what you've got there is a list of some of the people I listen to as a classically trained listener.

I listen to other things, it's true. I very much like King Crimson, for instance. And Primus. But I wouldn't mention either in a "classical" thread, except like this. Nurse With Wound, yeah. Dr. Nerve, sure. (That's Nick Didkovsky, a "classically" trained violinist.)

Of course, there's also that word in the subject line. It's an increasingly problematic and troublesome word. I spend the bulk of my time listening to, writing about, and talking with practitioners of contemporary music. The word "classical" doesn't come up very often. It's just not a useful term any more among the people I hang out with. I mentioned it once to Michele Bokanowski, and she said, incredulous, "You consider what I'm doing to be 'classical music'?" At the time (2006?) I said "Yes." I would say "No" today.

But that's not because I don't think her music is serious or artistic or valuable. It's all of those things. It's more that over the past six years of attending contemporary music festivals all over the world and talking to the people who create the music and who perform it, I've become increasingly uncomfortable with the label.

It's not the end all and be all of labels, after all. It was first used in 1810, just by the way (not getting into English until the mid twenties), after the era we now call "classical" was pretty much over. That is, Mozart and Haydn and Beethoven and Hummel and Gluck and hundreds of others managed to write tons of music that is now called "classical" without benefit of that defining term. (Just as Vivaldi and Bach and hundreds of people in between managed to write tons of music without ever having the word "baroque" to guide them, or the word "classical," either.)

I guess what counts for inclusion on any list I make is whether I think they're doing "art" or doing "entertainment." And I'm probably wrong.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on June 05, 2012, 12:20:33 PM
James, you bring up classical training in a recent post. I was not thinking about training when I made my list. And I don't think about training when I listen to music. But I've been thinking about training since reading your post. The list I made was made by a person who is a classically trained listener. That is, once I first heard "classical" music, around age 9, I was hooked and have listened to little else since then. So what you've got there is a list of some of the people I listen to as a classically trained listener.

That is not training. Training is studying composition or an instrument at a conservatory, or with a private teacher. Not saying whether it is necessary for understanding music, just saying what training means. Studying music by listening is of course a way of studying the music, which, although invaluable, isn't the same as studying the scores or learning to play the pieces. Not saying that listening is better or worse than reading/playing, just saying that all three are different and help understanding different aspects of the music.


...continue...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 12:57:14 PM
North,

I've done all that other stuff, too.

Guy
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on June 05, 2012, 02:52:59 PM
Can't I find EVERY single thing I could possibly ever want, within the years 1946-1996?
Sometimes you don't know you need something until after you discover it.


Oh, and another thing... WHO are these youngsters who want to be Composers anyhow? I assume most are rich Jewish kids from NYC... yea, I know, that's a horrible attitude to have, but who but the rich kids are even going to have the money to go to  University or whatever?
Well, nowadays, music education isn't needed as much, because of the internet. Anyone can teach themselves how to compose, though of course, the only ones who will be successful will be the ones who are self-critical.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 02:54:12 PM
In other words, take my ball and go home?

Well, at least I won't have to keep seeing the wrong name, Jim. ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Leon on June 05, 2012, 03:05:45 PM
Funny; the two guys who are appear to be the most interested in 21st century music can't seem to get along ...

 :D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 06:27:22 PM
It's Wagner and Brahms all over again! ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2012, 07:41:47 PM
I want to take 'someguy's point about being more positive. I know that being mad doesn't do anything other than soften up my bowels; I still take issue with the whole 'Composers don't have to do anything else' line, but, I'm trying to be peaceful THIS week, so I have absolutely no fight in me for making points,...

I just don't want tax dollars going to some...ewww :P... Composer!! (ok, that's just ONE Rant :-* ;D)


I wonder if I'm one of those people like in the Westerns when the 'Old' West types can't keep up with the 'New' World, such as the auto... Wild Bunch... where I just like would throw this whole Thread away for Hindemith, or something.

I guess I never hear 'someguy' champion the mostly recently deceased generation of the High Modernists, of whom Carter and Boulez and Dutilleux are the very last, though I'm sure that just like me (Xenakis) and James (Stockhausen), he has his favorites.

I can't even fake an argument, haha ;)!

Me personally, I just can't see myself needing all this new music year after year, hundreds and hundreds,... I mean, I just got into a Liszt phase!,... by the time I get back here I could have missed the next big thing. I mean, seriously, if Lachenmann starts sounding like Mahler, I'm out! >:D


Speaking of the Next Big Thing,... when was the last time we had that? Gorecki? :-\

Oh, I'm 'trying' to be positive. ('Do, or do not. There is no try.')
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 08:32:22 PM
I just don't want tax dollars going to some...ewww :P... Composer!! (ok, that's just ONE Rant :-* ;D)
But one man's "ewww composer" is another man's "wow! composer." So who gets to decide?

And your tax dollars go to all sorts of different things. Better that they go to bullets to kill kids halfway around the world, maybe? (I.e., there are lots of much more rant-worthy topics than ewww composers getting a miniscule fraction of your tax money.

Anyway, most composers I know pay their bills by teaching and by selling CDs and by concerts. It's not a lot, but they get by. You were thinking that they got huge grants of hundreds of thousands of dollars from government grants? This only happens in their dreams.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on June 05, 2012, 08:50:42 PM
North,

I've done all that other stuff, too.

Guy
Cool. Not that this really surprises. I just read your post as saying that you considered mere listening as training.

Karlo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 05, 2012, 09:44:29 PM
Well, I certainly do not consider listening to be "mere"! :o
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on June 05, 2012, 09:47:29 PM
Well, I certainly do not consider listening to be "mere"! :o
Yeah, bad word perhaps - but 'only listening' would have an entirely different meaning.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 06, 2012, 06:11:17 AM
But one man's "ewww composer" is another man's "wow! composer." So who gets to decide?

And your tax dollars go to all sorts of different things. Better that they go to bullets to kill kids halfway around the world, maybe? (I.e., there are lots of much more rant-worthy topics than ewww composers getting a miniscule fraction of your tax money.

Anyway, most composers I know pay their bills by teaching and by selling CDs and by concerts. It's not a lot, but they get by. You were thinking that they got huge grants of hundreds of thousands of dollars from government grants? This only happens in their dreams.

Yes I was!!!!!


ok, if you say so,... frankly, yes, there are other topics, such as using the US military to safeguard heroin production,...


I guess,... I just read that we are at our most polarized (as Americans) right now. When you ask, Who gets to decide?, that certainly IS the question isn't it?

I guess that when a 'Cute Kitty Video' can become just as famous as a 'New Music Video', then maybe the playing field has been slightly leveled?

I suppose I just react to... c'mon guys, aren't most Composers today flaming libtards?? I mean, can't I HEAR the politics in music by now??

Oh, maybe I just NEED to keep arguing,... I know my 'cause' is lost.

I declare, I have 'New' Music by Cristobal Halffter, written in 2007. Used to be that NO Classical Music was famous until after the death of the Composer

UNCLE!!

UNCLE!!

I'd LOVE to meet some of these Composers-in-Training. I just can't see where wanting to be a Composer TODAY is any kind of noble thing. Rather, I'd like to see students more concerned with the music of the last 100 years, and maybe we need them more to be Custodians!! rather than more post-Post Modern's who think there IS anything left to say.

I still declare There is Nothing New Under the Sun. The technology

I'm done. :-[ :-[ :-[
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Leon on June 06, 2012, 06:36:34 AM
I'm done. :-[ :-[ :-[

If only this were true ...

 :o
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on June 06, 2012, 06:50:41 AM
Yea good luck getting anywhere doing just that ..
The only problem of not going to school is that you probably won't have connections for people to actually perform your music.

I taught myself guitar and how to compose through books and the internet. For composing, the vast majority of your study will come from studying scores. The other sources will come from music theory books (I'd say only around 10 or so are really necessary, though it all depends).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 06, 2012, 06:53:50 AM
Oh, maybe I just NEED to keep arguing,... I know my 'cause' is lost.

(* munches popcorn *)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Leon on June 06, 2012, 07:36:33 AM
Formal music/composition training is very valuable and can, depending on the teacher, be a crucial process for a student finding his/her voice and learning the craft of musical composition.  However, there have been some composers who learned their craft in another fashion.  I am thinking here of Harry Partch, John Luther Adams (who despite earning a B.A. in music got most of his training through alternative methods), and others who did not follow the traditional path.

There are no rules.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: UB on June 06, 2012, 08:33:48 AM
(* munches popcorn *)

Pass some my way Karl...but haven't we sat through this drama many times before?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 06, 2012, 10:14:32 AM
OH damn it all!!

I just spilled my drink all over my lap.

What a mess.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on June 06, 2012, 03:16:54 PM
Paul Schoenfield, born in Detroit, MI in 1947. Here is an excerpt from his website, paulschoenfield.org

Paul Schoenfield, a man whose music is widely performed and continues to draw an ever-expanding group of devoted fans, is among those all-too-rare composers whose work combines exuberance and seriousness, familiarity and originality, lightness and depth. His work is inspired by the whole range of musical experience; popular styles both American and foreign, vernacular and folk traditions, and the 'normal' historical traditions of cultivated music making, often treated with sly twists.

I find a lot of influence from Jazz and even Klezmer music in Schoenfield's compositions. Most of his output seems to be from the 80s and 90s, I think these two Naxos discs contain the only recorded music from Schoenfield from the 21st Century.

Camp Songs (2001)
Refractions (2006)
Ghetto Songs (2008)





Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on June 10, 2012, 10:31:38 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/KPQWnmNXJsI

2004 - Unsuk Chin
"Concerto for Violin and Orchestra"

Dec. 3, 2003

(http://grawemeyer.org/images/music_composition_images/previous/chin.jpg/image_mini)

Composer Unsuk Chin's “Concerto for Violin and Orchestra” has won the 2004 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition.

Premiered in Berlin in January 2002 by violinist Viviane Hagner and the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester conducted by Kent Nagano, the 25-minute concerto has been described as “a synthesis of glittering orchestration, rarefied sonorities, volatility of expression, musical puzzles and unexpected turns.” Written in four movements, the work is influenced by both Western and Eastern traditions and blends aspects of older and more contemporary classical forms. An extremely demanding violin solo complements rather than competes with the orchestral material.

The concerto already has been performed by the Seoul Philharmonic and the Finnish Radio Symphony. The BBC Symphony Orchestra will perform the concerto in London in February, and the concerto's U.S. premiere is in view. The work is dedicated to Robin and Steve Kim.

About Unsuk Chin
Unsuk Chin's music crosses many boundaries.

Chin, winner of the 2004 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition for her “Concerto for Violin and Orchestra,” is known for the diversity of her music. Her works include music for voice, tape, electronics, solo piano, ensembles of every size as well as orchestra.

Chin, 42, began her musical career as a child in her native Seoul, Korea. She attended the Seoul National University, where she studied composition under Sukhi Kang. She appeared as pianist at the Pan Music Festivals and in 1984 her work “Gestalten” (“Figures”) was selected for the ISCM World Music Days in Canada and for UNESCO's Rostrum for Composers.

In 1985 she moved to Hamburg, Germany, and studied composition with 1986 Grawemeyer winner György Ligeti. She has lived in Berlin since 1988 and most recently served as composer-in-residence with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester, which commissioned the “Violin Concerto”.

Chin began receiving international acclaim in 1991 with the premiere of “Acrostic Wordplay” for soprano and ensemble, a work that has been performed in 13 countries. Her music is now conducted by leading figures including Kent Nagano, George Benjamin and Sir Simon Rattle.

Her first purely orchestral piece, “santika Ekatala” (1993), won first prize in a Japanese competition and was performed twice in October 1993 by the Metropolitan Orchestra of Tokyo. Her 1998 work “Xi,” for ensemble and electronics, commissioned by the Ensemble InterContemporain, won the Bourges Electroacoustic Music Prize.

Her Grawemeyer-winning work was premiered in Berlin in January 2002 by soloist Viviane Hagner and the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester conducted by Kent Nagano. The concerto has been performed by the Seoul Philharmonic and the Finnish Radio Symphony. The BBC Symphony Orchestra will perform the concerto in London in February.

Her most recent work, “Double Concerto” for piano, percussion and ensemble, received its world premiere by the Ensemble InterContemporain last winter in Paris.

Chin has two major composition projects on the horizon. A new work for voices and ensemble has been co-commissioned by the London Sinfonietta, Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group, St Pölten Festival (Austria), and the Ensemble InterContemporain (Paris), for premiere in 2005. A stage work for the Los Angeles Opera is planned for premiere in the 2005/06 season.

She has composed works for the Ensemble InterContemporain, the Gaudeamus Foundation, the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, the Inventionen Festival in Berlin, the BBC, West German Radio, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the Gothenburg Symphony, the Danish National Radio Symphony, the Oslo Philharmonic, and the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester in Berlin.

For more information on Unsuk Chin and her music, visit her website: www.boosey.com/chin


She's bloody attractive, that's for sure. Will check out some of her music. Her physics makes me curious.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: not edward on June 10, 2012, 10:48:34 AM
I'm curious as to what Walter Zimmermann's been up to of late. Ian Pace had a good piano music collection out on Metier, and Mode had a couple of discs of chamber music, but I've not seen any new recordings in a while. I found his style, allying the influence of German folk music with that of '40s Cage, distinctly appealing.

Also, Georg Friedrich Haas seems to be quite productive at present. I've liked pretty much everything he's done, and I imagine the advocacy of Alex Ross and others of in vain (perhaps the closest spectralist analogue to Reich's Music for 18 Musicians, and available on Kairos) and the 3rd quartet can't have hurt his profile.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: UB on June 10, 2012, 11:26:11 AM
About a week ago I recorded AFUGAPE for flute, oboe, clarinet, violin, viola and cello by Zimmerman. It was written in 2010 and except for being only about 10 minutes long it could easily be mistaken for a work by Feldman.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on June 11, 2012, 08:30:29 AM
Formal music/composition training is very valuable and can, depending on the teacher, be a crucial process for a student finding his/her voice and learning the craft of musical composition.  However, there have been some composers who learned their craft in another fashion.  I am thinking here of Harry Partch, John Luther Adams (who despite earning a B.A. in music got most of his training through alternative methods), and others who did not follow the traditional path.

There are no rules.

 :)
Takemitsu is another one. Some people need expensive universities, some don't.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 11, 2012, 08:43:01 AM
In music, just as in so many other spheres of Life: There's more ways into the woods than one.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on June 12, 2012, 03:18:05 PM
Michael Nyman (b.1944) http://www.michaelnyman.com/
2000 – Facing Goya (opera; libretto by Victoria Hardie)
2001 – a dance he little thinks of (orchestra)
2003 – Violin Concerto (violin and orchestra)
2003 – Man and Boy: Dada (opera; libretto by Michael Hastings)
2005 – Love Counts (opera; libretto by Michael Hastings)
2006 – gdm for Marimba and Orchestra (concerto)
2006 – Acts of Beauty' (song cycle)
2007 – A Handshake in the Dark (choral piece with orchestra)
2007 – Interlude in C (expansion of a theme from The Libertine for Accent07 touring ensemble)
2007 – Eight Lust Songs song cycle
2008 – Yamamoto Perpetuo for Solo Flute (arranged by Andy Findon)
2009 – Sparkie: Cage and Beyond opera with Carsten Nicolai
2009 – The Musicologist Scores (band)
2010 – 2Graves
2010 – Vertov Sounds



A few in here that I've really fell in love in,  Eight Lust Songs, song cycle 2007 and Vertov Sounds 2010


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 13, 2012, 06:13:42 AM
this Thread is the best thing on here now
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on June 13, 2012, 07:35:11 AM
this Thread is the best thing on here now

This has been a very interesting and informative thread. Kudos to James for all the info he's poured into it. Some things in here have definitely grabbed my attention.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on June 16, 2012, 06:43:58 PM
If you want to have a career as a serious composer, it helps to have experienced teachers, a focused/structured approach, and some sort-of testing/guidance .. doesn't matter who you are. No one can operate & learn in a vacuum. This doesn't always mean a conventional route, but you have to start somewhere with people 'in the know', the earlier the better.
Oh well, I guess I'll never amount to ever being an accomplished composer, since I wasn't born rich.
Doesn't matter, I suppose. After I finish my orchestral work, I'll barely have time to write anything for many more years to come, anyways.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 16, 2012, 08:01:47 PM
NMC is delighted to launch its Debut Discs project on 11 June ..

 ... which was created, with the generous help of funders, to support emerging British composers, giving them an international platform for their work.
 
The first three releases in the series focus on the following composers:
Huw Watkins
Dai Fujikura
Sam Hayden
 
and future releases will include works by Helen Grime, Joseph Phibbs, Ben Foskett, Richard Causton and Charlotte Bray. We are also delighted to have the ambassadorial support of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies and a fantastic collaboration with BA (Hons) Graphic Design students at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design.
 
Visit our Debut Discs mini-site for more information about the series and the collaboration with the design students at Central Saint Martins.
 
In the videos below, Dai Fujikura talks about his love of horror movie soundtracks and being a rebellious child; Huw Watkins tells us about his musical family and the advantages of being a composer-pianist and Sam Hayden explains his transition from rock musician and trumpeter to composer and talks about his admiration for mentor Jonathan Harvey and the artists he works with.

http://www.youtube.com/v/-I4N7K0wDRo

http://www.youtube.com/v/Yi0IEqcDpoo

http://www.youtube.com/v/npERQn-A8Ps

[...]

Debut Discs ambassador Sir Peter Maxwell Davies talks about the
current social climate and its impact on emerging composers ...


http://www.youtube.com/v/ppQ_lcHYlOI

"An opportunity like this that NMC gives to these very, very deserving and talented composers is, not only for me but for all of us, a chance to learn, a chance to come in to contact with something which is vibrant and alive ... they really do feel that it is a hell of a job to break through and to get anybody to take any notice of them and I'm very moved and very touched that this wonderful opportunity is presented to these young people to get their work out there" - Peter Maxwell Davies

"There's no card, business card, better than a compact disc for a composer. It doesn't half impress people and they get a long way on it ... these composers they will get more performances, more commissions, more recognition just by having that disc" - Peter Maxwell Davies

"From having to pay back money for their education, to having to earn money for whatever reason, when they don't get the grants that they used to get they don't get the scholarships that they used to get to study. These things have made it very, very tough for a lot young musicians, particularly young composers. And I'd just like to say one thing which I think is very, very serious; coming from my background, had I been born much later and been going into the Royal Academy or to university now and I would have had to have borrowed money in order to do that, my parents would have said "no, it is immoral to borrow money, you never do it". And I wouldn't have had the education ... people like John Ogdon, Harrison Birtwistle, Elgar Howarth, and I wouldn't have had a look in" - Peter Maxwell Davies

"This idea of working with art students, I think it’s wonderful, I know when I was a student I learned so much from art, architecture students particularly when I was studying in Italy.  And also I think these days at the RA for instance they have chance to work with cinema with ballet with modern dance. I think this cross-fertilization is absolutely essential it always happened in the past, these days people seem to live in little artistic compartments unless you give them a push and shove them together and I think that’s very bad and very dangerous; and so this aspect of cross-fertilization between the arts, hooray for that. - Peter Maxwell Davies

http://www.nmcrec.co.uk/debut-discs







What? Those are not real Composer names!! Whatever happened to REAL Composer names,... real oomph! sounding names like Beethoven, Castiglioni, Vaughn-Williams (ok, V-W may not have oomph, but it has nobility)?

I mean,... Curtis Curtis-Smith?? Really??

'Hank Rossman'

I mean, what kind of a Composer name is that? C'mon.

We NEED good Composer names people!! I personally could only use my real name if I hyphenated between my middle and last names, like Vaughn-Williams: that way, my two relatively inconsequential names merge into one pretty super Composer name. I would definitely have a great 'Vaughn-Williams' name as a Composer.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 16, 2012, 10:53:13 PM
It's Vaughan.

And are you seriously telling me that Curtis Curtis-Smith has less ooomph than Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 17, 2012, 08:06:14 AM
It's Vaughan.

And are you seriously telling me that Curtis Curtis-Smith has less ooomph than Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf?

Knocking the 'Dorf? :o :o :o

That IS funny though! :P


I am convinced in the 'Eschenbach Theory',... that this is perhaps the perfect Composer moniker. Lena Aurbach (is that right?) comes close to a legitimate Composer Name, Ades, mm, not so much, but, I guess it's no worse than 'Chopin'.

Where is Michaelarchangelini?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 17, 2012, 08:08:23 AM
Well, I just popped full price for a certain BRAND NEW Kairos disc. Admittedly, it's not a 'new' Composer, just one of the ones we already like. But, just the fact that I slavishly paid full price... must,... it MUST say soooomething?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 18, 2012, 02:16:47 PM

Hmmm ..

Lachenmann .. ?
Ferneyhough . ?

[...]

Nono?
Rihm ..

..


'Notice of refund from Paypal'

ARRRGH!!

Oh well, it's $20 now. It was the Aperghis. I could argue this whole Topic on the fact that I slavishly and obediently bought it as soon as I saw it,... but, hmm, apparently it was too good to be true,... and no, I had ALREADY lost the Ebay auction, haha!

But, check it out,... it appears to be a great addition to the catalogue. Sincerely, after MOST of the stuff on the 'Only New' Thread, and the arguing back and forth, I would certainly, sight unseen (I won't listen to the samples,... I DEMAND purity in my listening experience!), attempt to shove this cd down everyone's throat.

Obviously, there's no other Living Composer that has done that to me for a while. Why him? I don't know. I guess I 'expect' things, and expect to get them.

whoops, gotta go...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 19, 2012, 05:52:36 AM
Oh .. it must be the one I already have, but only managed to listen to once. :P

With SEESAW and Teeter-Totter? (not the sax & viola disc),... I do believe this one is spankin' new
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on June 20, 2012, 05:30:54 AM


I don't have the new one .. I have the sax one, which I really must listen to again.

The CLEMENS GADENSTÄTTER (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=320&l=deu#320) just landed yesterday.  8)


Check out the first piece on the sax album (for viola & 4sax). Tell me what you think of the 'surprise' towards the end. I thought this was one of the best examples of what happens here.

btw- thanks for clearing up,... I wasn't going to spend $23 on that if you had a review, but, of course, now I HAVE to,... oy!! I think it could be the best Aperghis album to date, having two of his largest ensemble works. $23 IS a lot, though. >:D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on September 16, 2012, 12:09:52 PM

The CLEMENS GADENSTÄTTER (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=320&l=deu#320) just landed yesterday.  8)


Just listened to this again after almost a year since the first time. Did nothing to me.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on September 16, 2012, 08:09:46 PM
Just listened to this again after almost a year since the first time. Did nothing to me.

Wasn't it supposed to be 'happy' music? ???

HAPPY MUSIC?? >:D

We'll have NONE of that thank you. ::)tap tap tap...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on September 17, 2012, 04:24:42 AM
Wasn't it supposed to be 'happy' music? ???

HAPPY MUSIC?? >:D

We'll have NONE of that thank you. ::)tap tap tap...

Yes, it's supposed to be happy, easy and accessible. I can only think of a word: superficial.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on September 19, 2012, 02:14:51 AM
Oh that's what it's 'supposed to be' .. right.

You are right--I should have written "claims to be" instead. Quoting the composer, "I try very seriously to write unserious music".
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 08, 2013, 04:59:56 AM
I had posted this in another thread but wanted to put it here as well.  I had forgotten about this thread, it is probably the best place to post about new music.

I just listened to a fantastic work from 2003 by Michael Gatonska (http://michaelgatonska.com/) from a CD called First Takes.  The work was "Transformation of the Hummingbird"

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61DbT3Mw04L._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

I also discovered another interesting composer, Allen Brings, whose music can be found on this site: New Music Online (http://library.newmusicusa.org/allenbrings)

This site seems to be connected to New Music Box and it also sponsors a 24-hour streaming radio site called Counterstream Radio (http://www.counterstreamradio.org/).

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 08, 2013, 05:07:07 AM
A good introduction recording to an interesting composer: Lucia Ronchetti (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=654) ~ Portrait

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 08, 2013, 10:53:26 AM
Gadenstätter (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=124&l=deu#124): Comic Sense (Concerto for Piano and Keyboard solo and ensemble)



Interesting work.  I don't think the title is irrelevant.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2013, 05:22:54 AM
Aribert Reimann : Cantus, for clarinet and orchestra (2006) | Jörg Widmann

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51%2B2flhjYjL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

Aribert Reimann (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aribert_Reimann) (born 4 March 1936 in Berlin) is a German composer, pianist and accompanist, known especially for his literary operas. His version of Shakespeare's King Lear, the opera Lear, was written at the suggestion of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau who sang the title role.  His commissioned work, Cantus for Clarinet and Orchestra, dedicated to the clarinetist and composer Jörg Widmann, was premiered on January 13, 2006, in the WDR's Large Broadcasting Hall in Cologne, Germany, in the presence of the composer, who claims the work was inspired by Claude Debussy's compositions for clarinet.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2013, 05:36:02 AM
Lisa Lim : Ochred string, for oboe, viola, violoncello, double bass (2008)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513UFV6YjbL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

Liza Lim (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liza_Lim) (born 30 August 1966 in Perth, Western Australia) is an Australian composer.

Lim writes concert music (chamber and orchestral works) as well as music theatre and has collaborated with artists on a number of installation and video projects. Her work reflects her interests in Asian ritual culture, the aesthetics of Aboriginal art and shows the influence of non-Western music performance practice.  Since 1986, Lim has worked extensively with members of the ELISION Ensemble; she is married to Daryl Buckley, its artistic director. In 2005, Lim was appointed the composer-in-residence with the Sydney Symphony for two years. Among other works, the orchestra commissioned—jointly with the radio station Bayerischer Rundfunk—her work The Compass; in its premiere performance on 23 August 2006 at the Sydney Opera House it was conducted by Alexander Briger, William Barton played the didgeridoo.

The work, Ochred String, was commissioned by Bayerischer Rundfunk with funds provided by Ian Potter Cultural Trust.. Commissioned for the Musica Viva Festival 2008, Munich.  First performance: by Stefan Schilli, Nimrod Guez, Sebastian Klinger, Philipp Stubenrauch — 10 Feb 08. Musica Viva Festival, Munich.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2013, 05:57:42 AM
James Dillon : La Navette (2001)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5109%2BGtrsfL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

From the BBC Proms (http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_prom_review.php?id=8453)

Quote
James Dillon’s La navette (2001) for its 26 minutes (longer than the 20 suggested) engrossed the listener in its hallucinatory effects. Scored for a large but not extravagant orchestra, Dillon enthrals with his fastidiously worked textures and timbres and the densely weaved yet luminous soundworld. This slow if varied (and logically organised) processional – recalling such immortal ‘moderns’ as Birtwistle’s The Triumph of Time, Boulez’s Rituel and Stockhausen’s Trans (and maybe too George Lopez’s Landscape with Martydom, which Michael Gielen has recorded) – extends a lot of information to the open-eared and alert listener, all of which fits microscopically into a large expanse of inexorable growth and rhythmic automata. In this pristinely executed performance (antiphonal violins serving a new work just as revealingly as the nineteenth-century ones, Dillon's writing for them sometimes Baroque in figuration), La navette (shuttle) moved like clockwork and fitted together transparently. The composer embraced the conductor for a job well done and certainly worth doing.

James Dillon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Dillon_(composer)), born October 29, 1950 in Glasgow, Scotland, is a Scottish composer often regarded as belonging to the New Complexity school. Dillon studied art and design, linguistics, piano, acoustics, Indian rhythm, mathematics and computer music, but is self-taught in composition.

Honors include first prize in the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival in 1978, the Kranichsteiner music prize at Darmstadt in 1982,[1] and three Royal Philharmonic Society composition awards; most recently for his Fourth String Quartet. Dillon taught at Darmstadt from 1982–92, and has been a guest lecturer and composer at various institutions around the world. He has taught at the University of Minnesota School of Music in Minneapolis, Minnesota since 2007.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on January 14, 2013, 11:38:17 AM
Gadenstätter (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=124&l=deu#124): Comic Sense (Concerto for Piano and Keyboard solo and ensemble)



Interesting work.  I don't think the title is irrelevant.

Thanks for this. Of the many interesting things you posted in this thread, this is the one that I would like to hear first. Last year the JACK Quartet played the world premiere of Gadenstätter's String Quartet No. 1, and I thought it was a remarkable debut in the genre.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 14, 2013, 04:07:02 PM
Thanks for this. Of the many interesting things you posted in this thread, this is the one that I would like to hear first. Last year the JACK Quartet played the world premiere of Gadenstätter's String Quartet No. 1, and I thought it was a remarkable debut in the genre.

--Bruce

I made a couple of comments about my listening experience of that work a few months ago. I didn't find it at all engaging, but rather bland and superficial.

EDIT: I see it was on this same thread, and just 10-15 replies ago (!).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2013, 05:40:18 PM
I made a couple of comments about my listening experience of that work a few months ago. I didn't find it at all engaging, but rather bland and superficial.

EDIT: I see it was on this same thread, and just 10-15 replies ago (!).

That is why I said I didn't think the title was irrelevant.   ;)  But, I wouldn't say the work was a failure.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2013, 06:28:00 PM
This is probably not news for New Yorkers, but for those of us out in the hinterlands, I consider this a real find:

WQXR Q2: Living Music, Living Composers (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/series/q2/)

Right now I'm streaming Duo for Violin and Piano, R. Murray Schafer Duo Concertante.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2013, 08:51:10 AM
YANN ROBIN - Vulcano . Art of Metal I+IIII (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=631&l=deu#631)

(http://www.kairos-music.com/aduploads/631.01.ma,cover-klein.jpg)

Quote
The major pieces of the record, Art of Metal I and Art of Metal III, both belong to a cycle devoted to the metal contrabass clarinet. The cycle’s connecting thread, the driving idea, is a metaphorical approach to what metal brings to mind, this alloy often synonymous with strength, power, solidity, energy, brilliance, shine… The instrument itself is totally made of metal; Selmer designed a special metal mouthpiece for the piece to replace what is usually made of ebonite. The sound of both pieces is full of explosive moments and phrases of furious virtuosity. “Vulcano”, a piece for ensemble, fits perfectly in those metallic soundscapes of the “Art of Metal” pieces. Inspired by ancient myths on Vulcanos and the volcanos themselves the piece is about buried and erupting powers. Different definable volcanic states and volcanic activities – from lava flows to earthquakes - stimulate the imagination and provide directions, trajectories, for what can be done with sound.

I am listening to it right now and finding it rather intriguing.  I had not heard anything by this composer until now, and am not even sure how much else has been recorded.  But judging from this issue, more investigation would be worthwhile.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2013, 10:55:46 AM
Anne LeBaron (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_LeBaron) (1953) : Sacred Theory of the Earth

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Q4H1V1VDL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Telluris Theoria Sacra (1990)
Devil in the Belfry (1993)
Sachamama (1995)
Solar Music (1997)

David Rosenboom (conductor); Amy Porter (flute/piccolo) Ted Gurch (clarinet/bass clarinet); Christopher Pulgram(violin) Paul Murphy (viola); Brad Ritchie (cello); Michael Cebulski & John Lawless (percussion); Anne LeBaron (harp); Paula Peace(piano)

(CRI Recordings) 865, November 2000 Release

She has another release (http://www.moderecords.com/catalog/030lebaron.html) on Mode Records:
Quote
Composer/harpist Anne LeBaron has had an interesting career in both classical and jazz genres. As a Fulbright scholar, she studied with Gyorgy Ligeti. Her active career as a harpist has led to collaborations with Derek Bailey and Anthony Braxton, and her own Anne LeBaron Quintet in the jazz fields as well as solo and chamber works, including a recent commission for a Double-Harp Concerto.

A description of Anne LeBaron's sound world can best be told by the composer herself: "These works respond to diverse stimuli in my life, ranging from the sounds of frogs, birds, and preachers--the sonic geography of the American South--to the writings of Artaud and the vocal and dramatic art of Korea and Japan."

Some of her music is very tuneful and tonal, while other works exhibit more complex and atonal organization.  An interesting find.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2013, 12:19:43 PM
Chaya Czernowin (http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/featured/chaya-czernowin/) (1957)

(http://www.schott-music.com/shop/resources/682633.jpg)

Quote
Chaya Czernowin was born on 7 December 1957 in Haifa and was brought up in Israel. She commenced studies in composition at the Rubin Academy in Tel Aviv and from the age of 25 has lived in Germany, Japan, the USA and Austria. Thanks to her teachers Abel Ehrlich, Dieter Schnebel, Brian Ferneyhough and Roger Reynolds and also a series of scholarships and prizes, she was able to devote herself intensely to the development of her musical language. Czernowin’s compositions have been performed at more than fourty festivals throughout the world including the 20th Century Music Festival in Mexico, at the Wien Modern in Vienna, the Asia Pacific Triennial in Australia and in Huddersfield. She has been in great demand as a teacher due to her profound knowledge of experimental contemporary music. She taught composition at the Yoshiro Irino Institute in Tokyo in 1993/94 and at the International Summer Courses for New Music in Darmstadt between 1990 and 1998. She was professor for composition at the University of California San Diego from 1997 to 2006 and taught at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna from 2006 to 2009. She received invitations to attend as a guest professor in Göteborg and Seoul. She has been the director of the International Summer Academy for young Composers in Schloss Solitude near Stuttgart since 2003 and was appointed professor for composition at the University of Harvard in 2009.



Quote
Shifting Gravity is a collection of works that combines the three sections of Anea Crystal with the compositions Sheva and Sahaf. The second part of the CD consists of the cycle Winter Songs III for 10 instrumentalists and electronics. Wergo s recording shows a different side of Czernowin, who, up to now, has been appreciated mainly for her stage works, in particular for the music theatre play Pnima ... Ins Innere or her adaptation of Mozart s Zaïde / Adama. The instrumental works heard here were all created after the music-theatre plays, and focus on metaphysical themes of paralysis, adherence and proliferation.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 16, 2013, 05:23:51 AM
Richard Barrett (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Barrett_(composer)) (born 7 November 1959) is a British composer.



Quote
Barrett was born in Swansea, Wales. He began to study music seriously only after graduating in genetics and microbiology at University College London in 1980 (Warnaby 2001). From then until 1983 he took private lessons with Peter Wiegold. There followed fruitful encounters at the 1984 Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik with Brian Ferneyhough and Hans-Joachim Hespos. In the 1980s he became associated with the so-called New Complexity group of British composers because of the intricate notation of his scores. However, he is equally active in free improvisation, most often in the electronic duo FURT with Paul Obermayer, formed in 1986, and a voice/electronics duo with Ute Wassermann since 1999, but also since 2003 as a member of the Evan Parker Electro-Acoustic Ensemble. Since 1990 about half of his compositions have been written for the ELISION Ensemble, most notably the extended works Opening of the Mouth, DARK MATTER and CONSTRUCTION. In 2005 he and Obermayer formed the electroacoustic octet fORCH.

Many of Barrett's works are grouped into series, and have extra-musical associations—particularly with the writers Samuel Beckett and Paul Celan, but also the Chilean painter Roberto Matta, and ideas from physics, mythology, astrology and philosophy (in the texts of DARK MATTER). Barrett's compositional techniques, which derive equally and indistinguishably from serial, stochastic and intuitive methods, have since the mid-1980s made extensive use of computer programs he has developed himself (Warnaby 2001). He regards free improvisation as a method of composition rather than as a different or opposed kind of musical activity (Gilmore 2009). He has often been politically outspoken (Whittall 2005), and in 1990 joined the Socialist Workers Party (Britain). While no longer an active member he remains aligned with revolutionary socialism (Lenz 2005).

His codex series of compositions explores diverse ways of using composed frameworks as a point of departure for improvisation, particularly with larger groups, while the fOKT series extrapolates some of FURT's characteristic forms of texture and coordination into the octet context of the fORCH ensemble. The results of these more experimental and collaborative projects have exerted an increasing influence on Barrett's other compositional work, which remains mostly fully notated, although several compositions (for example transmission, Blattwerk and adrift) alternate between precise scoring and free improvisation for part or all of their duration. However, these different strategies are used in order to maximise the musical potential of the whole, rather than drawing attention to the distinction between improvisational and notational methods of composition—as Barrett himself puts it (2009): "As a listener I generally prefer to concentrate on what music is doing rather than how it was done".

I share that sentiment.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on January 16, 2013, 11:08:16 AM
Just watched this:

http://www.youtube.com/v/5pNo0PoP3sg

Good opera, and very disturbing.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 11:05:13 AM
Josef Bardanashvili (http://www.composers21.com/compdocs/bardanaj.htm)  (b. 1948, Batumi). Georgian composer, now resident in Israel, of stage, orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal, and piano works that have been performed throughout Europe and in the USA.

Mr. Bardanashvili studied with Aleksandr Shaverzashvili at the Music Academy in Tbilisi, where he graduated with a DMus in composition in 1975.

Among his honors are the title of Honored Artist of Georgia (1988), the Paliashvili Award (1997), the ACUM Composer of the Year Prize (1998), the Margalit Prize (1999, for Dybbuk [incidental music]), the Award of the Israeli Prime Minister (2000), and the ACUM Mifal Khaim Prize for Life Achievement (2002).

Listening right now to his work for full orchestra. With What Do We Light? from the Tel Aviv 2007: Israeli Philharmonic Anniversary Concert set

(http://a1.mzstatic.com/us/r1000/003/Music/4a/fc/f8/mzi.ccyritdz.170x170-75.jpg)

His music is tonal with some aspects reaching outside that system and he appears to be interested in the use of folk or ethnic material from Georgia (Eastern Europe).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 11:21:30 AM
Amos Elkana (http://www.amoselkana.com/) (1967)

Quote
Amos Elkana was born in Boston but grew up in Jerusalem. At the age of 15, he picked up the electric guitar and began to study music which soon became his primary occupation in life. In 1987, aged 20, he returned to Boston to study jazz guitar at the Berklee College of Music and composition at the The New England Conservatory of Music. In 1990, he moved to Paris where he studied composition with Michele Reverdy. He also took composition classes with Erik Norby in Copenhagen, and with Paul-Heinz Dittrich and Edison Denisov in Berlin. In 2007 Elkana received his MFA in music/sound from Bard College, New York. While at Bard, he focused on electronic music and took lessons with Pauline Oliveros, David Behrman, Richard Teitelbaum, George Lewis, Maryanne Amacher and Larry Polansky among others.

Elkana's music is a bit different from most Israeli composers who seem to prefer to work with folk melodies, etc., in a generally tonal environment.  His music is more in the soundworld of Ligeti and he has received the endorsement of Israel's grandfather of serialism, Josef Tal.

I am listening right now to a work for orchestra, Tru'a included in the compilation Perspectives 2



Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on January 17, 2013, 11:27:06 AM
Chaya Czernowin (http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/featured/chaya-czernowin/) (1957)

(http://www.schott-music.com/shop/resources/682633.jpg)



Funny. Sciarrino is classic. She's not.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on January 17, 2013, 11:29:45 AM
Amos Elkana (http://www.amoselkana.com/) (1967)

Elkana's music is a bit different from most Israeli composers who seem to prefer to work with folk melodies, etc., in a generally tonal environment.  His music is more in the soundworld of Ligeti and he has received the endorsement of Israel's grandfather of serialism, Josef Tal.

I am listening right now to a work for orchestra, Tru'a included in the compilation Perspectives 2



Looks interesting, though too progressive for my taste.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on January 17, 2013, 11:34:25 AM
Funny. Sciarrino is classic. She's not.

 ??? Don't know what this means...

I just discovered Czernowin's music about a year ago, and it's pretty demanding, uncompromising stuff. Her opera, Pnima...ins Innere, is like nothing else I've seen. And thanks for reminding me of that Richard Barrett Dark Matters, which I intended to get - until I forgot about it!

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 11:46:07 AM
??? Don't know what this means...

I just discovered Czernowin's music about a year ago, and it's pretty demanding, uncompromising stuff. Her opera, Pnima...ins Innere, is like nothing else I've seen. And thanks for reminding me of that Richard Barrett Dark Matters, which I intended to get - until I forgot about it!

--Bruce

Thanks.  I sometimes feel like a tree falling in the forest.

 ;)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on January 17, 2013, 11:53:54 AM
Thanks.  I sometimes feel like a tree falling in the forest.

 ;)

 ;D I am definitely in the camp of those here who (at the moment, for better or worse) read much more than post. And I know there are generally other fans of the composers you mention - they are probably as time-strapped as I am...

So even though we may not be able to reply in great detail, some of us are reading!

--Bruce

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 11:55:05 AM
I've found these Israeli composers from a really nice website called The Living Composers Project (http://www.composers21.com/).  It is organzed by country, and since Israel is an interest of mine, I thought to start there, plus Israel has a manageable list, whereas some countries, e.g. the USA, have such enormous lists it will take some time to drill down into them.

One more name before I go, Erel Paz (http://www.musicpaz.com/) - is another Israeli composer working in a more rigorous style than what one normally finds from this country's composers.

His website (http://www.musicpaz.com/) has a radio stream of his music (http://www.musicpaz.com/musicpaz_radio.htm).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 11:57:33 AM
;D I am definitely in the camp of those here who (at the moment, for better or worse) read much more than post. And I know there are generally other fans of the composers you mention - they are probably as time-strapped as I am...

So even though we may not be able to reply in great detail, some of us are reading!

--Bruce

Oh, I understand.    :D     I enjoy finding and posting about new composers.  It is its own reward.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 17, 2013, 03:02:51 PM
I've found these Israeli composers from a really nice website called The Living Composers Project (http://www.composers21.com/).  It is organzed by country, and since Israel is an interest of mine, I thought to start there, plus Israel has a manageable list, whereas some countries, e.g. the USA, have such enormous lists it will take some time to drill down into them.

One more name before I go, Erel Paz (http://www.musicpaz.com/) - is another Israeli composer working in a more rigorous style than what one normally finds from this country's composers.

His website (http://www.musicpaz.com/) has a radio stream of his music (http://www.musicpaz.com/musicpaz_radio.htm).

here's another radio station that may interest you - http://www.halas.am/#/about/ (http://www.halas.am/#/about/) (it autoplays whatever's currently on, you can turn it off if you don't like it)

there's alot of hard-to-find experimental and avant-garde music, very little of it traditionally classical; you can search by genre. all the programs can be downloaded as MP3s if you're so inclined.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on January 17, 2013, 03:10:19 PM
Funny. Sciarrino is classic. She's not.

I don't mean it personal, but as a composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 17, 2013, 04:11:27 PM
here's another radio station that may interest you - http://www.halas.am/#/about/ (http://www.halas.am/#/about/) (it autoplays whatever's currently on, you can turn it off if you don't like it)

there's alot of hard-to-find experimental and avant-garde music, very little of it traditionally classical; you can search by genre. all the programs can be downloaded as MP3s if you're so inclined.

Nice.  Thanks.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on January 17, 2013, 09:27:28 PM
Not "classic", but "classical" I meant. I'm no native english speaker you know.

Bruce, still listening to all that crap?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 18, 2013, 11:23:06 AM
How cool is this?  A Composer A Day (http://composerscircle.com/)

BENJAMIN SCHEUER

Quote
The music of German composer Benjamin Scheuer is often characterized by theatrical and humoristic elements. Toys and all kinds of sounds from everyday life are blended with traditional and contemporary techniques and are used for formal experiments often implying the technique of collage. He loves to travel and tries to visit international festivals and courses as much as he can. In 2012 his studies with Wolfgang Rihm in Karlsruhe, several collaborations with musicians in Holland, his fellowship at the Tanglewood Music Center,a stay in the French Abbey Royaumont and the first workshops of a new music theatre project in Aldeburgh, UK, have been important experiences for him.

http://www.youtube.com/v/i2P0VZycKbo#!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on January 18, 2013, 11:33:16 AM
Bruce, still listening to all that crap?

Yep!   8)

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on January 18, 2013, 11:35:12 AM
How cool is this?  A Composer A Day (http://composerscircle.com/)

BENJAMIN SCHEUER

http://www.youtube.com/v/i2P0VZycKbo#!

Very cool indeed - and that Scheuer piece is great (at least, as I'm listening to it now). Thanks much!

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: ibanezmonster on January 18, 2013, 12:33:36 PM
How cool is this?  A Composer A Day (http://composerscircle.com/)

BENJAMIN SCHEUER

http://www.youtube.com/v/i2P0VZycKbo#!
Nice! Thanks for that.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 18, 2013, 04:16:16 PM
How cool is this?  A Composer A Day (http://composerscircle.com/)

BENJAMIN SCHEUER

http://www.youtube.com/v/i2P0VZycKbo#!

Not intended to be confrontational.  I cannot read a score and am not particularly musically sophisticated.  How is this piece notated? Is there a side bar in the score drop some rocks in a tray or breath through a PA horn?
The piece s has some interest to my ears, particularly as it progresses, but I do wonder. If you put a piece of paper in front of him and told him to write a SQ in which he was only allowed to bow and pluck the strings could he do it? If he can why not?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 20, 2013, 09:57:06 AM
Thomas Blomenkamp (https://neos-music.com/?language=english&page=output.php%3Fcontent%3DKuenstler/Blomenkamp_Thomas.php) has been a freelance composer and pianist since completing his studies in 1982. He lives with his wife, the soprano Dorothee Wohlgemuth, and their children Leah and Aaron near his native city of Düsseldorf.

Born in 1955, Blomenkamp decided to pursue a musical career after winning prizes in chamber music from Germany’s youth competition “Jugend musiziert” and completing his A-levels. He took a performance degree in piano with Herbert Drechsel and David Levine at the Robert Schumann Institute, Düsseldorf, and degree in composition with Jürg Baur at Cologne University of Music; he also attended master classes in piano and chamber music with Ditta Pasztory-Bartók, Rudolf Buchbinder, Andor Foldes, Sandor Végh, Rainer Kussmaul, William Pleeth and the Amadeus Quartet.

Blomenkamp: "Fünf Stücke für großes Orchester"

https://www.youtube.com/v/KGQkDKKrexg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 20, 2013, 11:01:17 AM
SSU-YU HUANG (http://library.newmusicusa.org/SsuYuHuang)

Ssu-Yu Huang, a native of Taiwan, enjoys an active career in contemporary music. Her works, covering a wide range of music with bold and delicate genre, are popular among professional musicians and orchestras in Taiwan as well as other parts of the world. German conductor maestro Günther Herbig praised her orchestral work of a modern and complex style, presenting her own characters and creativity. In recent years Ssu-Yu's works have proliferated and been performed in Europe, Asia and America. Her prominent work such as "Red Moon" for symphony won the first "Call For Score" of the National Symphony Orchestra of Taiwan in 2010, and was selected as part of the required repertoire of the Günther Herbig's International Conducting Workshop at the Taipei National Concert Hall in 2010. "Wind City Symphony Poem" and "Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto," for wind orchestra were invited to perform in the International Band Festivals, with the latter performed in the 2011 World Band Festival, recorded and distributed by Mark Custom Recording. "A Dream of Red Mansions" for trio and "A Stroke" for quintet were selected by the Asian Composers' League and performed in Yokohama, Japan and Manila, the Philippines, receiving high acclaim. "Meditation" for guitar solo was selected by Spanish guitarist Marcelo de la Puebla for a Puentes album with music published by Marc Reift Edition. Ssu-Yu was born in 1970, studied piano at the age of six. She began her study of composition in 1987, while she attended the Tainan Woman’s College of Arts and Technology majoring in electronic organ and piano.

Red Moon

https://www.youtube.com/v/ABXx5AJD3Ok
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on January 20, 2013, 12:26:45 PM
If you put a piece of paper in front of him and told him to write a SQ in which he was only allowed to bow and pluck the strings could he do it?
Wrong question.

Why would anyone put a piece of paper in front of him and tell him to write an SQ in which only bowing and plucking are allowed?

(There's nothing particularly sacred or valuable about bowing and plucking, is there?)

Anyway sanantonio, this discovery of yours gets my vote for the best discovery of the [any time period, here].
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 20, 2013, 02:15:54 PM
Why would anyone put a piece of paper in front of him and tell him to write an SQ in which only bowing and plucking are allowed?

A commission?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: PaulSC on January 20, 2013, 02:55:17 PM
He also serves who only bows and plucks…
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 20, 2013, 03:52:31 PM
Wrong question.

Why would anyone put a piece of paper in front of him and tell him to write an SQ in which only bowing and plucking are allowed?

(There's nothing particularly sacred or valuable about bowing and plucking, is there?)

Anyway sanantonio, this discovery of yours gets my vote for the best discovery of the [any time period, here].

It should be blinding obvious even to you! String instruments are classical music and rocks dropped in a tray and breathing into a PA horn are not unless you "think" I cannot no satisfaction is classical music. DUH ! someguy
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 20, 2013, 04:13:46 PM
A commission?
[/quote
The piece in question is not bad but the instrumentation is an affront. Even if I had the money for a commission I would not do it until he proved he could demonstrate he can compose without resorting to titillating our so sophisticated listeners with his drop a rock in tray or PA horn weirdo stuff.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 20, 2013, 04:48:51 PM
Jeffrey Holmes (http://www.holmescomposer.com/)

String Quartet No. 2 ‘Kirurgi’: III. Fantasy (https://soundcloud.com/jeffrey-holmes-9/3-fantasy#new-timed-comment-at-260881)

Piano Trio "Oscularum Infame" (https://soundcloud.com/jeffrey-holmes-9/piano-trio-oscularum-infame)

Quote
The music of composer Jeffrey Holmes has been called “Captivating…haunting and slightly disorienting” by the Los Angeles Times, “Drifting…ethereal” by the San Francisco Classical Voice, and “Interesting and musically arresting, music to be really heard and deserving of reflection” by the Society of Composers, INC. As a traditionalist, he composes music for acoustic orchestral instruments, using standard notational methods; as a formalist, he works within a complex and unique diatonic, chromatic, and microtonal language; as a transcendentalist, he combines the inherent abstraction of sound with a greater meaning and possibility of interpretation through the use of lyricism and overt expression.

His music has been performed at festivals such as the Darmstadt Ferienkurs für Neue Musik (Germany), La Pietra Forum for New Music (Florence, Italy), at “Microfest” (2003, 2005, and 2011) and both the “HEAR NOW” and “What’s Next?” festivals (Los Angeles), and in venues including Carnegie Hall (New York), the Historic Dvorak Museum (Prague, Czech Republic), and the Chapelle historique de Bon-Pasteur (Montreal, Canada). He has received commissions and performances from groups including the Penderecki String Quartet, Bass-baritone Nicholas Isherwood (Germany), ECCE (East Coast Contemporary Ensemble), “Duo Resonances” – France (Frédérique Luzy and Pierre Bibault), Piano Spheres, the Eclipse String Quartet, Trio Terroir, California Institute of the Arts Orchestra, USC Thornton Symphony, Xtet, Inauthentica, the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet, and others.

He holds a doctorate in music composition from the University of Southern California, and has studied with composers such as Georg Friedrich Haas, Donald Crockett and Stephen Hartke. Currently, he is Assistant Professor of Composition and Theory at Chapman University. His music is published by Edition Svitzer (Copenhagen, Denmark), Doberman-Yppan (Quebec, Canada), and J.W. Pepper (USA), and has been recorded on the Sono Luminus label, distributed worldwide by Naxos.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 20, 2013, 04:49:38 PM
Even if I had the money for a commission I would not do it

Your prerogative... And irrelevant.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 20, 2013, 04:58:07 PM
Anthony Donofrio (http://www.donofrio-music.com/)

Twitch for Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Violin, Violoncello, and Marimba (https://soundcloud.com/anthonydonofrio/anthony-donofrio-twitch#new-timed-comment-at-615482)
University of Iowa Center for New Music; David Gompper, conductor

Quote
Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, Anthony Donofrio completed the Ph.D. in Music Composition at the University of Iowa. He is very interested in fusing the compositional techniques found in literature and painting with his own approach to composing music. Along with Morton Feldman, Elliott Carter, and Stuart Saunders Smith, he cites Mark Rothko, David Foster Wallace, and Italo Calvino as his primary artistic influences. As a result of these influences, Anthony has taken an interest in creating half concert and full concert-length pieces, such as the 30-minute III for Saxophone, Piano, and Percussion, which will be premiered in April of 2013. Currently, Anthony teaches at Kent State University, giving courses in Music Theory, Post-Tonal Music, American Music, and is also the Director for the Kent State New Music Ensemble.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 20, 2013, 05:54:56 PM
Your prerogative... And irrelevant.
Its possible some just need to be titillated. But I understand you fancy yourself a composer please tell us how YOU would notate dropping some rocks in a tray or breathing into a PA horn.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 20, 2013, 07:10:11 PM
Marcos Balter (http://www.marcosbalter.com/bio.html)

Chambers (String Quartet) (https://soundcloud.com/spektralquartet/marcos-balter-chambers-live)
~ SpektralQuartet (https://soundcloud.com/spektralquartet)

Quote
A live recording of our "re-premiere" of Marcos Balter's "Chambers." This piece was written for us and premiered in the spring of 2011, and since then Marcos made some significant revisions to the piece.

Marcos writes about this piece:

"“Chambers” is a three-part snapshot of my compositional personality. The first movement focuses on attentive listening, immersing oneself into seemingly static textures that in return gradually unveil their many complexities and hidden hyperactivity, primarily through timbre. The second movement in centered at around the role of spatial and temporal organization of musical ideas as well as at the physical and contextual questioning of music repetition. The third movement both summarizes the two previous movements and adds to them other elements dear to me: virtual polyphony (the illusion of a bigger instrumental force), internal and external counterpoint, stylistic plurality at the service of the music material, and close structuring of transitions and proportions. "
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 21, 2013, 04:40:35 AM
But I understand you fancy yourself a composer please tell us how YOU would notate dropping some rocks in a tray or breathing into a PA horn.

Notation possibilities are quite diverse. It could be written down as a simple text directing the "gesture" as a single event, or as a set of more fine-grained events with higher levels of detail. It really depends on what are the intentions of the composer. A lot has been written about notation, particularly that covering extended playing and performing techniques, but the best way to go about it is still to look at the actual scores and see for yourself how composers have solved the challenge of specifying what they want.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 21, 2013, 05:26:22 AM
Ioannis Papaspyrou (http://www.reverbnation.com/ioannispapaspyrou?profile_view_source=header_icon_nav) is a native Greek professional musician, performer, composer and arranger. He has received his Bachelor’s in Music Composition and is currently studying towards his Master’s degree at Georgia State University with Dr N. J. Demos. His piece “Mysterioso Agitato” was finalist at the 2011 “Soli fan tutti” composition competition at Darmstadt, Germany.

Mysterioso Agitato for flute, clarinet in A, viola & piano (https://soundcloud.com/ioannis-papaspyrou/ioannis-papaspyrou-mysterioso)
Members of the Soli Fan Tutti Ensemble, Darmstadt, Germany

(http://composerscircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Ioannis-Papaspyrou-225x300.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 21, 2013, 06:17:06 AM
AMERICAN MASTERS FOR THE 21ST
SOCIETY FOR NEW MUSIC



This 5-CD collection is excellent.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 21, 2013, 08:53:41 AM
Gerhard Stäbler (http://www.gerhard-staebler.de/eng/index.html) ... Warnung mit Liebeslied

http://www.youtube.com/v/8ykYxeA_Oc0

Quote
The "Cornelius Cardew Memorial Prize" (1982) was the first in a series of awards, prizes, commissions and scholarships he received as a composer. From the onset of his career until today, Gerhard Stäbler has not only been active as a composer, but he was also involved in political and organizational arenas. The New Music festival "Aktive Musik" was initiated by Stäbler, who also served as the artistic director of the 1995 World Music Days of the ISCM in the Ruhr Valley. A third vital point of his activities lies in teaching: during workshops and seminars Stäbler has worked with many young international composers.

He was composer-in-residence and visiting professor throughout North and South America as well as in the Middle and Far East. Stäblers music often transcends the conventional framework (and therefore the audience's expectations), be it through the use of gestures or movement in space, through lighting and olfactory stimulation, or an active integration of the audience - it is very important to him to stimulate the imagination, to sensitize the ears and other perceptory organs towards unexpected perceptoral and thought processes. This is also the origin of his interest in the interaction between composition and improvisation, which feeds off of the unique tension between performers during the pre-formed yet open musical moment - as to be seen in the graphical score Red on black (1986). By the same token his music is always characterized by extremely contemplated development, and contains elaborate constructs that don't impede the direct musical statement.

Especially since the 1990's Stäbler has created Work-"groups" that shed a musical light on different aspects of a thematic complex (e.g. the compositions surrounding CassandraComplex). In some cases works that stand autonomously can be performed simultaneously. Stäbler repeatedly causes the listener to critically reflect upon the music, without his music having to be overtly political: the shriek of a crow is musically interpreted in it's possible implications (in old myths or as harbinger of doom) in Karas.Krähen (1994/95). The music doesn't just exploit its own symbolism, but always points towards our individual actions in this world we live in.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 21, 2013, 02:53:57 PM
Notation possibilities are quite diverse. It could be written down as a simple text directing the "gesture" as a single event, or as a set of more fine-grained events with higher levels of detail. It really depends on what are the intentions of the composer. A lot has been written about notation, particularly that covering extended playing and performing techniques, but the best way to go about it is still to look at the actual scores and see for yourself how composers have solved the challenge of specifying what they want.
Unfortunately I cannot read a score and the question one of curiosity more than anything else. I appreciate your response!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 21, 2013, 05:07:19 PM
Unfortunately I cannot read a score and the question one of curiosity more than anything else. I appreciate your response!

Not all scores are unreadable--particularly since "text scores" and "graphical scores" came to the fore. Just check the following--it is the full score for Stockhausen's Richtige Dauern, from his Aus den Sieben Tagen cycle:

http://www.sonoloco.com/rev/stockhausen/14.html#Anchor%201 (http://www.sonoloco.com/rev/stockhausen/14.html#Anchor%201)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 21, 2013, 11:54:47 PM
a piece by Benedict Mason called felt | ebb | thus | brink | here | array | telling, a bit over an hour long, for spatial ensemble using various sound sources

the CD may actually be out of print—it's not listed on col legno's website, and most retailers seem to be out of stock—but for the curious, audio can be found through sites of questionable legality :s
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 22, 2013, 04:54:17 AM
a piece by Benedict Mason called felt | ebb | thus | brink | here | array | telling, a bit over an hour long, for spatial ensemble using various sound sources

the CD may actually be out of print—it's not listed on col legno's website, and most retailers seem to be out of stock—but for the curious, audio can be found through sites of questionable legality :s

I haven't heard the work you mention but there are some recordings of his music on Spotify.  This for example:



I am listening to his String Quartet right now. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 22, 2013, 06:21:00 AM
Vykintas Baltakas (http://www.i-n-t-o.de/en/komp-vykintas-baltakas.html)

COMMENTUM for violoncello and piano (2011) (https://soundcloud.com/vykintas-baltakas/commentum-for-violoncello-and)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 22, 2013, 06:47:24 AM
I haven't heard the work you mention but there are some recordings of his music on Spotify.  This for example:



I am listening to his String Quartet right now.
yes, that's the CD that first got me interested in Mason's music as a matter of fact

Currently - Ars magna lucis et umbrae - transmission IV from Richard Barrett's Dark Matter. i haven't really found the time to sit down and listen to this entire album as a cycle (as it was meant to, i imagine) but each individual part i've heard has been quite impressive.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on January 22, 2013, 02:56:02 PM
Not all scores are unreadable--particularly since "text scores" and "graphical scores" came to the fore. Just check the following--it is the full score for Stockhausen's Richtige Dauern, from his Aus den Sieben Tagen cycle:

http://www.sonoloco.com/rev/stockhausen/14.html#Anchor%201 (http://www.sonoloco.com/rev/stockhausen/14.html#Anchor%201)
Thanks for the reply. You are right I can read this score and in essence I think it says improvise. I discovered I have a small piece of Aus den Sieben Tagen "arranged" for piano. I am not entirely clear how you arrange a piece that is improvised but that is a rhetorical question for me to ponder. I am still trying to make up my mind about experimental music, but but this point some of the music makes more sense than the talk.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2013, 05:43:36 AM
Yohanan Chendler (http://http:www.yohananchendler.com) is an Israeli composer and violinist, his chamber, solo and vocal works have been performed in prestigious festivals and venues in Israel, France, Spain, Italy, Austria, Germany, Japan and the US. He received his Bachelors degree in music theory and composition from the Jerusalem Academy of Music where he studied with Mark Kopytman. He also studied composition with George Tsontakis at the Aspen Music Festival and with Azio Corghi at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena. Chendler has recently received his Ph.D in composition from Brandeis University. An avid new music player, Chendler is based in Boston where he frequently performs and teaches regularly.

Romancero for clarinet, piano and percussion (https://soundcloud.com/yohananchendler/romancero#new-timed-comment-at-386474)
Marco Ortolani, clarinet; Daniel De Simone, piano; Maurizio Ben Omar, percussion
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2013, 06:07:33 AM
 Luiz E. Castelões (https://soundcloud.com/lecasteloes). Professor of Theory, Analysis, and Aural Skills (Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora). Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition, Boston University; M.M., B.M. in Composition, Universidade do Rio de Janeiro. Studies with: T. Improta (jazz piano); L. Bustani, E. Caldi, M. A. de Mendonça (classical piano); J. Fineberg, T. Antoniou, R. Cornell, Lukas Foss, R. Tacuchian (composition); V. D. Leite, J. Buskirk (electroacoustic music); Thomas Peattie (musicology); and P. Ramaswamy (South Indian Carnatic music). He has won prizes, fellowships and scholarships from the following institutions: Fulbright, Boston University, Funarte (Brazilian Contemporary Music Biennial), CAPES, FAPERJ, CNPq, UNIRIO, PUC/RJ, and "Festival Primeiro Plano." He has worked as a teacher, score engraver, pianist, and supervisor for such institutions as Exemplarr Worldwide Limited, Boston University School of Music, Boston University Music Library, and Sofitel Rio Palace.

"Estudo Sirene" (v. 2012), para orquestra de cordas (https://soundcloud.com/lecasteloes/estudo-sirene-v-2012-para)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2013, 06:47:30 AM
roland dahinden (http://www.roland-dahinden.ch/web/notes.html) | composer – performer
Quote
My compositional work consists of three categories: concert works, sound installations and sound sculptures.

The concert works (with or without live electronic) were written with a view to concert performance, staged in a platform-auditorium scenario or similar. I conceived the idea of a “sound-space-process” (German: klangraumprozess), which makes use of the possibilities opened up by live electronics, in my search for a concert setting that emphasises the live character of a performance (and cannot be reproduced at home by the listener using a stereo panorama). In addition, some compositions that do not use live electronics were conceived. The concert works belong to the genre of chamber music, but the sound-space-processes lead to the unfolding of an orchestral sonority.

The sound installations were created for specific physical spaces and were conceived as verbal concepts. The installations are largely the result of collaborations with visual artists.

The sound sculpture develops as a meeting of the first two categories, where this meeting takes place with a shift in time and/or space. The observation that lies behind this idea is that the perceiver puts together a physical structure or object in the memory as a sum of side elevations (views) in perspective and, thus, that the recognition of a sculpture is an achievement of the memory. A concert work or a series of concert works are added to the sound installation. Thus, the audience do not hear the installation and the concert work simultaneously in the same space, but rather they have to weave together the sounds in the memory to form a sculpture.

http://www.youtube.com/v/4Qs5crT98Rg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2013, 10:35:30 AM
Michal Rataj (http://www.michalrataj.com/michalratajcom/bio_eng.html)

Spectral Shapes (https://soundcloud.com/audiotong/spectral-shapes)

Michal Rataj composes mainly electroacoustic and chamber or orchestral instrumental music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: not edward on January 23, 2013, 03:38:09 PM
I haven't heard the work you mention but there are some recordings of his music on Spotify.  This for example:



I am listening to his String Quartet right now.
Though a good disc, I'd want to add the caveat that these are early pieces and to me sound like what Mason was at the time--a very talented student of Ligeti's. His later music has pushed off in directions further away from the mainstream (and often towards 'sound art', whatever that is).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2013, 05:52:36 PM
Though a good disc, I'd want to add the caveat that these are early pieces and to me sound like what Mason was at the time--a very talented student of Ligeti's. His later music has pushed off in directions further away from the mainstream (and often towards 'sound art', whatever that is).

Noted.  In reading about him I did discover that his newer work is more as you describe.   I found a couple of clips on Youtube. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 24, 2013, 08:09:45 AM
His name already came up in this thread but I thought to post about him again:

Walter Zimmermann (http://www.moderecords.com/profiles/walterzimmermann.html)

(b. April 15, 1949, Schwabach, Mittelfranken).

German composer of stage, orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal, piano, and electro-acoustic works that have been successfully performed and recorded across Europe.

Prof. Zimmermann learned piano, violin and oboe at an early age and began composing at age twelve. He attended the Fürth Gymnasium, where he studied piano with Ernst Gröschel. From 1968-70, he was pianist in the Ars Nova ensemble in Nuremberg and studied composition with Werner Heider. From 1970-73, he studied with Mauricio Kagel (at the Kölner Kurse für Neue Musik) and at the Institute of Sonology in Utrecht (with O.E. Laske) and the Jaap Kunst Center of Ethnology in Amsterdam.

In 1974, Zimmermann began his stay in the USA, first in Hamilton, New York to study computer music, and then around the States to have conversations with 23 American composers (which were published in the book Desert Plants). In 1976, he recorded folk music in the Siva Oasis, in a ghetto in Pittsburgh, an Indian reservation in Montana, and in the Fürth hinterlands. In 1977, he opened his Beginner Studios in Cologne and gave regular concerts of new music until 1984. In 1992, he and Stefan Schädler organized the Anarchic Harmony Festival in Frankfurt to honor John Cage on his 80th birthday.

He has received numerous awards, including the Förderpreis from the city of Cologne (1980), First Prize at Ensemblia in Mönchengladbach (1981), a scholarship to stay at the Villa Massimo in Rome (1987), the distinguished Prix Italia for his Die Blinden (1988), and the Schneider-Schott Preis (1989).

He has taught composition at the Liège Conservatoire (1980-84) and in Karlsruhe (1990-92) and has been Professor für Komposition at the Hochschule der Künste in Berlin since 1993; he has also lectured at Darmstadt (1982, 1984) and at the Royal Conservatory in Den Haag (1988). He has written the books Desert Plants (1976), Insel Musik (1981) and Morton Feldman Essays (1985).

http://www.youtube.com/v/-XYuny08Zvc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 24, 2013, 08:29:21 AM
rite now:
Alexander Khubeev - Carmina urbana
https://soundcloud.com/khubeev (https://soundcloud.com/khubeev)

there seems to be a sort of Russian... informal group thing... of composers emerging; this dude (Gaudeamus nominated, etc, etc) is probably one of the higher-profile ones
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 24, 2013, 09:49:28 AM
Four Costa Rican Composers

Mario Alfagüell (http://composers21.com/compdocs/alfaguellm.htm) (b. 1948, San José). Costa Rican composer of mostly orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal, and piano works that have been performed in the Americas, Europe and elsewhere.

Prof. Alfagüell studied composition and piano at the Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica from 1966–76. He then had post-graduate studies in composition with Brian Ferneyhough and Klaus Huber at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg im Breisgau from 1976–80.

https://www.youtube.com/v/I85ZAZxZmts

Eddie Mora Bermúdez (http://composers21.com/compdocs/morae.htm) (b. 1965, San José). Costa Rican composer of mostly orchestral and chamber works that have been performed in the Americas and Europe; he is also active as a violinist.

Prof. Mora studied composition with William Porras at the Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica in 1980–81, where he later studied composition with Benjamín Gutiérrez in 1997 and Luis Diego Herra in 2003–04. He also studied violin with Maya Glizarova and Olga Voitova at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow from 1983–92 and had private composition lessons with Yuri Vorontsov in Moscow in 2000 and 2003 and in San José in 2001.

https://www.youtube.com/v/QdWmCkr66fo

Mauricio Pauly (http://www.mauriciopauly.com/) is a Costa Rican composer and electric bass player based in the UK. He is co-director and founder of the Distractfold Ensemble and of the Altavoz Composers. He performs with the Manchester-based trio, A Greater Horror and teaches at the Royal Northern College of Music.

https://www.youtube.com/v/AJLvy7RYlbk

Federico Reuben (http://ranchonotorious.org/blosxom.cgi/federico_reuben), born Costa Rica (1978) was trained as a pianist since the age of 9. He studied political science for two years at Universidad de Costa Rica, before leaving for the United States in 1999 to study composition with Lawrence Moss at the University of Maryland. In September 2002 he moved to The Netherlands to continue his studies at The Royal Conservatoire, The Hague. He earned a Bachelors (2003) and Masters (2006) degree in composition from this institution, where he studied with Louis Andriessen, Richard Ayres, Gilius van Bergeijk and Martijn Padding. Currently, he is pursuing a PhD in Music Composition and Technology at Brunel University's School of Arts, London, United Kingdom. His supervisors are Richard Barrett and Christopher Fox and his research focuses on Derivative Music and Plunderphonic strategies. He received courses and workshops tutored by composers including Steve Reich, Jonathan Harvey, Clarence Barlow, Marco Stroppa and Michael Jarrell. He also attended a one-year intensive course in Music Technology at The Institute of Sonology, The Netherlands.

https://www.youtube.com/v/u_lp4QtPNMI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 24, 2013, 01:46:18 PM
Isabel Mundry (http://www.kairos-music.com/composer/bios/MundryBio.html)

Born 1963 in Schlüchtern, Germany. Studied composition, music and art history, as well as philosophy, in Berlin and Frankfurt-am-Main. 1992 to 1994 resident in Paris, initially as scholarship holder of the Cité des Arts, later participating in a one year computer science and composition course at IRCAM. Isabel Mundry lived in Vienna from 1994 to 1996 as a freelance composer. She then taught at the Berliner Kirchenmusikschule and the Hochschule der Künste in Berlin. In 1996 she was appointed professor for music theory and composition at the Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts. Since 2003 she has held the post of professor for composition at the Zurich School of Music, Drama and Dance. During the academic year 2002/03 she was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Berlin. Isabel Mundry has also lectured at the Darmstadt Vacation Courses for New Music (1989-2002) and also at the Akiyoshidai Festival in Japan (1997). She has given master classes at Copenhagen’s Royal Academy of Music (2002) and in Tbilisi (2007).

Isabel Mundry has received numerous prizes, among them the Boris Blacher Prize for Composition, the Busoni Composition Prize, the Kranichsteiner Music Prize and the Siemens Award. Her musical theatre composition, “Ein Atemzug – die Odyssee”, received the 2006 critics prize for the best world premiere. Isabel Mundry has been Composer in Residence at the Tong Yong Festival (Korea, 2001), the Lucerne Festival (2003) and the Mannheim National Theater (2004/05). During the 2007/08 season she will hold that position at the Saxon State Opera in Dresden. Her works are published by Breitkopf & Härtel.

~ Sandschleifen

http://www.youtube.com/v/6heizInekko
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 24, 2013, 07:18:26 PM
Rebecca Saunders (b.1967) (http://www.edition-peters.com/composer/Saunders-Rebecca)

Rebecca Saunders was born in London in 1967. She studied music,majoring in performance (violin) and composition, at EdinburghUniversity, and studying composition from1991-1994 with Wolfgang Rihmat the Karlsruhe Music College in Germany. From 1994-1997 she held thePremier Scholarship at the Edinburgh University for a PhD inComposition with Nigel Osborne.

She has received various composition prizes including the Ernst vonSiemens Förderpreis, the ARD and BMW AG musica viva Prize, the PaulHindemith Prize, the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Award forChamber Music in 2008 and the GEMA Deutscher Musikautorenpreis forInstrumental Music 2010. In 2009 she became a member of the BerlinAcademy of Arts, and was the Capel-Compositeur at the StaatskapelleDresden for the 2009/2010 season. She was tutor at the DarmstadtFerienkurse in 2010.

Rebecca Saunders has expanded her spectrum of musical genre since 2003: chroma (2003-2010) divides up to twenty chamber groups and sound sources throughout the performing space. The characteristics of the architectural space define the formal juxtaposition of the various chamber music groups, whereby each solo or group is like a protagonist in a form of pure instrumental theatre. inside out, music for a choreographed installation, was her first work for the stage and was created in collaboration with Sasha Waltz in 2003.

Later works, such as Stirrings Still I and II, and most recently murmurs from 2009, are quiet and fragile collage compositions in which Saunders continues to address her fascination with the separation of the musicians in the performing space.

"Molly's Song 3 - Shades of Crimson [For three instruments] (https://soundcloud.com/krater-ensemble/krater-ensemble-rebecca)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 25, 2013, 04:50:32 AM
Christophe Bertrand (http://www.christophebertrand.fr/en/bio.html)

Christophe BERTRAND was born on 1981. After obtaining first prizes in piano and chamber music at the Strasbourg National Conservatory (C.N.R.) (where he studied with Laurent CABASSO, Michèle RENOUL, Armand ANGSTER), he performs and records with Ensemble Accroche Note ou l'Ensemble In Extremis (which he co-founded). With them, he collaborated with composers such as Ivan FEDELE, Pascal DUSAPIN, Michael JARRELL, Mark ANDRE, Wolfgang RIHM, etc.

He began studying composition since 1996 with Ivan FEDELE at the C.N.R. de Strasbourg, and obtained in 2000 his composition diploma unanimously with honours. During that same year, the Musica Festival dedicated a concert to him, and he attended the Cursus annuel de composition et d'informatique musicale (2000-2001) at the IRCAM, where he worked among others with Philippe HUREL, Tristan MURAIL, Brian FERNEYHOUGH, et Jonathan HARVEY.

His compositions, conducted among others by Pierre BOULEZ, Jonathan NOTT, Hannu LINTU, Marc ALBRECHT, Pascal ROPHÉ, Guillaume BOURGOGNE, have been performed by prestigious ensembles and soloists :

Ensemble Intercontemporain, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio-France, Quatuor Arditti, Accroche Note, Ensemble Court-Circuit, Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg, Ensemble Aleph, Lucerne Festival Academy Orchestra, Ensemble Intégrales, Divertimento Ensemble, Ensemble Musicatreize, Quatuor Mandelring, Avanti!, entre autres ; Garth KNOX, Irvine ARDITTI, Hidéki NAGANO, Juliette HUREL, Jean-Marie COTTET, Jérôme COMTE, Claire-Marie LE GUAY, Marc COPPEY, Jan MICHIELS, Ilya GRINGOLTS, Sébastien VICHARD, Ferenc VIZI, etc.

http://www.youtube.com/v/Ldr9f0OLldE

Yet (2002)
20 musicians (10')
Commissioned by Ensemble Intercontemporain To Pascal DUSAPIN
World premiere : 29/09/2002 - Strasbourg, Musica Festival - Ensemble Intercontemporain ; dir : Jonathan Nott
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 25, 2013, 08:51:59 AM
Rebecca Saunders (b.1967) (http://www.edition-peters.com/composer/Saunders-Rebecca)

Rebecca Saunders was born in London in 1967. She studied music,majoring in performance (violin) and composition, at EdinburghUniversity, and studying composition from1991-1994 with Wolfgang Rihmat the Karlsruhe Music College in Germany. From 1994-1997 she held thePremier Scholarship at the Edinburgh University for a PhD inComposition with Nigel Osborne.

She has received various composition prizes including the Ernst vonSiemens Förderpreis, the ARD and BMW AG musica viva Prize, the PaulHindemith Prize, the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Award forChamber Music in 2008 and the GEMA Deutscher Musikautorenpreis forInstrumental Music 2010. In 2009 she became a member of the BerlinAcademy of Arts, and was the Capel-Compositeur at the StaatskapelleDresden for the 2009/2010 season. She was tutor at the DarmstadtFerienkurse in 2010.

Rebecca Saunders has expanded her spectrum of musical genre since 2003: chroma (2003-2010) divides up to twenty chamber groups and sound sources throughout the performing space. The characteristics of the architectural space define the formal juxtaposition of the various chamber music groups, whereby each solo or group is like a protagonist in a form of pure instrumental theatre. inside out, music for a choreographed installation, was her first work for the stage and was created in collaboration with Sasha Waltz in 2003.

Later works, such as Stirrings Still I and II, and most recently murmurs from 2009, are quiet and fragile collage compositions in which Saunders continues to address her fascination with the separation of the musicians in the performing space.

"Molly's Song 3 - Shades of Crimson [For three instruments] (https://soundcloud.com/krater-ensemble/krater-ensemble-rebecca)
i heart Rebecca Saunders. one of the most engaging voices of the post-Lachenmann tradition imo.

now: Salvatore Sciarrino - Come vengono prodotti gli incantesimi (http://avantgardeproject.conus.info/mirror/agp73/index.htm (http://avantgardeproject.conus.info/mirror/agp73/index.htm)) although i don't know if it's 21st century. really good stuff though.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 25, 2013, 10:52:28 AM
now: Salvatore Sciarrino - Come vengono prodotti gli incantesimi (http://avantgardeproject.conus.info/mirror/agp73/index.htm (http://avantgardeproject.conus.info/mirror/agp73/index.htm)) although i don't know if it's 21st century. really good stuff though.

It is part of his Fabbrica degli incantesimi, a suite of works for solo flute he composed between 1977 and 1989. The recording on Col Legno with Roberto Fabbriciani is absolutely wonderful. It was the first set of recordings that really got me into Sciarrino.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on January 25, 2013, 02:26:40 PM
It is part of his Fabbrica degli incantesimi, a suite of works for solo flute he composed between 1977 and 1989. The recording on Col Legno with Roberto Fabbriciani is absolutely wonderful. It was the first set of recordings that really got me into Sciarrino.


thanks 4 info.

i actually have a lot of those pieces from different recordings, didn't realise they were supposed to be a set

currently: Brice Pauset, Symphony No. 5 "Die Tänzerin"
or maybe it's Die Tänzerin "Symphony No. 5"
i didn't even know he wrote symphonies honestly

from the Donaueschinger Musiktage 2008 set on NEOS
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 03, 2013, 08:42:53 AM
Montalbetti: "Orchesographie"

http://www.youtube.com/v/ABVVemrHzkU&feature=em-subs_digest
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on February 03, 2013, 02:54:18 PM
recently acquired 10 or 12 of the movements from Stockhausen's last cycle, Klang

made room on my ipod for listening for the airplane flight day after tomorrow
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Octave on February 05, 2013, 10:49:51 PM
I'm interested in getting a hardcopy of of Richard Barrett's OPENING OF THE MOUTH (Australian Broadcasting Corp., reissued 2008), but I notice that the usual outlet I order from (delivery to USA) have the disc at ~$30.  Offhand, does anyone know a distributor with a lower price?  It doesn't even seem to be OOP.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 06, 2013, 09:24:24 AM
Robert A. Baker (http://robertabaker.netl) is a composer, pianist, researcher, conductor and teacher, and holds a Ph.D. and M.Mus. in composition (McGill, 2009 and 2004) where his principal teachers were John Rea and Jean Lesage, a B.Mus. in theory ( Toronto, 1993) and an A.R.C.T. in Piano Performance from the Royal Conservatory of Music (Toronto, 1993). Founder and director of Baltimore’s NEWPRISM ensemble (http://www.newprismensemble.com/), Robert has taught various music courses at Salisbury and Towson Universities, and currently is on faculty at Anne Arundel Community College, MD.

Valence III for oboe, cello and percussion (https://soundcloud.com/robert-a-baker/valence-iii-for-oboe-cello-and#new-timed-comment-at-342813)
Howard Niblock, oboe; Miyoko Grine-Fisher, cello; Alexy Rolfe, percussion
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 06, 2013, 09:37:36 AM
Judah E. Adashi (http://www.judahadashi.com/bio.html)(b. 1975) has been honored with awards, grants and commissions from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the ASCAP and BMI Foundations, Meet the Composer, the American Composers Forum and the Aspen Music Festival, as well as three residencies at the Yaddo artist colony.

The Harp Gives Forth Murmurous Music (2005) (https://soundcloud.com/jadashi/songsofkabir_2)
Flute and Guitar

Dr. Adashi’s principal composition teachers have been Nicholas Maw and John Harbison. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Yale University, and master’s and doctoral degrees from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 07, 2013, 10:25:17 AM
David Philip Hefti - String Quartet no.1 - Ph(r)asen

http://www.youtube.com/v/8_mObKdYnaQ

NEWS FROM THE NEOS SITE:
Quote
Hefti’s compositional work takes its cue from external references: his 1st string quartet Ph(r)asen (2007) not only follows two outstanding examples of the genre – Robert Schumann’s string quartet op. 41 no. 1 and Leos Janáceks 2nd string quartet „Intimate Letters“ –, it puts selected text passages from the correspondence of the composers with their lovers to music. The texts noted in the score are, to be sure, not to be recited, but are supposed to inspire the performer. This double presence of old models, musical and semantic-biographical, makes the quartet into music about music. And it is meta-music in a further sense, too: its title questions the technical aspects of music-making on string instruments. In this case the term “Phasen” also means the distribution of the actions of the left and right hands, their shifting and uncoupling – a particular challenge for the performer!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 10, 2013, 10:07:37 AM
Jorge García del Valle Méndez (https://soundcloud.com/jorgegadelvalle) (1966*) grew up in Spain, where he studied bassoon and composition. Since 1996 he lives in Dresden, Germany and studied at the Hochschule für Musik Dresden: composition and electronic music.

His compositions are worldwide premiered and broadcasted since 1993. He frequently receives commissions from various international institutions. Through electronic music he became interested in digital analysis and sound processing, which he has applied to his theoretical works as well as his musical compositions. He has also researched into digital analysis in Bassoon multi-phonics and their sound possibilities in the application to contemporary music.

In 2005 and 2012 he was scholarship holder of the "Kulturstiftung Sachsen". Prices: Salvatore Martirano Memorial Composition Award Competition of the University of Illinois (USA), 4th Composition Award of the Sächsischer Musikrat (Germany) both 2006. 5th Composition Award of the Sächsischer Musikrat (Germany) in 2007.

After Dark (https://soundcloud.com/jorgegadelvalle/after-dark) for clarinet, violin, viola, violoncello and piano (2008).  Composed after Haruki Murakami's book "After Dark".
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 10, 2013, 08:23:24 PM
Daan Janssens (http://www.daanjanssens.be/) - (Paysages ‒ études) IV

http://www.youtube.com/v/Q7M6tWJeH68&feature=em-subs_digest&list=TLwit-1oDlGW0

Quote
born in Bruges in 1983, and had violin, piano, music theory, composition and many more courses at the Bruges music academy. From 2002 till 2007, I studied composition at the Ghent Conservatory with Frank Nuyts, and attended, among others, lessons of Godfried-Willem Raes (improvisation) and Filip Rathé (analyses and beyond). I had master classes with Peter Eötvös and Luca Francesconi, and I visited different composition courses, such as the Darmstädter Ferienkurse, were I attended seminars of Marco Stroppa, Vykintas Baltakas, Isabel Mundry, Mark Andre and many more. In 2009, I could work with the Neue Vocalsolisten and Bruno Mantovani during Acanthes (Metz, France). Further, I attended conducting lessons/seminars with Ensemble Modern, Johannes Kalitzke, Marco Angius and Lucas Vis.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 11, 2013, 01:48:15 PM
Gabriel Iranyi (http://www.gabrieliranyi.de/)

Quartett for Flute, Violin., Cello and Piano (2012)

http://www.youtube.com/v/dzREQ7TPKok
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 13, 2013, 09:14:56 AM
Nicholas S. Omiccioli (https://soundcloud.com/nicholas-omiccioli) (b. 1982) is currently a preparing future faculty fellow at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and production coordinator of newEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble. His works have been performed throughout the United States, Canada, Italy, Austria, Lithuania, Thailand, New Zealand, and China by ensembles such as the Jasper String Quartet, Curious Chamber Players, DuoSolo, Ensemble Platypus, le Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, l’Orchestre de la francophonie, Society for New Music, Brave New Works, Contemporaneous, Wild Rumpus New Music Collective, Kansas City Chorale, and the Simon Carrington Chamber Singers.

reach (2011.12) string quartet (quintet version) (https://soundcloud.com/nicholas-omiccioli/reach-2011-12-string-quartet)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on February 13, 2013, 08:50:25 PM
I haven't heard the work you mention but there are some recordings of his music on Spotify.  This for example:



I am listening to his String Quartet right now.

I've enjoyed that SQ quite a bit. It's a very cheerful jaunt, a train ride across country, in a very pleasant Complex language.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 14, 2013, 01:38:17 PM
Malin Bång (http://www.malinbang.com/biography.html)

In Malin Bång's compositions she develops the idea that the main component in music is movement and energy. She defines her musical material according to their amount of friction to create a spectrum of actions ranging from the barely audible to the harsh and obstinate. In her work she often incorporates sound objects to explore a rich sound world and to suggest that a musical content can be shaped by anything valuable to the artistic purpose.

Revival in Relievo (https://soundcloud.com/curious-chamber-players/malin-b-ng-revival-in-relievo)
Curious Chamber Players
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Cato on February 15, 2013, 07:32:42 AM
Possibly others here have heard of these composers and this label:

http://www.col-legno.com/en/catalog/ (http://www.col-legno.com/en/catalog/)

e.g.



or






Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 15, 2013, 09:01:01 AM
Possibly others here have heard of these composers and this label:

http://www.col-legno.com/en/catalog/ (http://www.col-legno.com/en/catalog/)

e.g.



or






I know of and really like the label Col Legno; they have a good catalog for new music.  Spotify has these three recordings, as well as, a few others by Lampson.  I am listening to the first one you have pictured right now.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on February 15, 2013, 12:05:24 PM
I know of and really like the label Col Legno; they have a good catalog for new music.  Spotify has these three recordings, as well as, a few others by Lampson.  I am listening to the first one you have pictured right now.
for contemporary stuff, Col Legno is matched by very few. Maybe NEOS. Can't think of many other labels with selections as wide and as interesting though.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on February 15, 2013, 03:48:44 PM
for contemporary stuff, Col Legno is matched by very few. Maybe NEOS. Can't think of many other labels with selections as wide and as interesting though.

Kairos? Mode? Stradivarius? Accord and Montaigne in the 1990s? Col Legno is one of my favorites, and Neos is becoming a very good one too.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 21, 2013, 06:30:48 PM
À chacun sa miniature (http://www.quatuorbozzini.ca/cat.e/cqb_1113.php)

(http://www.electrocd.com/res/image.php/couv/cqb_1113.jpg?width=160&forceresize=1)

A vibrant portrait of the state of the art in Canadian new music.

With its collection qb, the Bozzini Quartet (http://www.quatuorbozzini.ca/) gives life to the diverse aesthetics of our time. The music in this collection forms a continuous line: without imposing an aesthetic stance, these discs follow a deep yet ineffable continuity of purpose. Each disc is a window, an opening into a singular world: the soul of a place, a common artistic language, or the distinct vision of an artist. The thirteenth volume of the collection presents a 31-part mosaic which is both portrait and landscape: a vibrant portrait of the state of the art of Canadian new music, and at the same time an undulating landscape of 31 paths, at once divergent, overlapping, merging, opposing.

One of the composers featured on this recording is Taylor Brook (http://taylorbrookmusic.com/).

Here's another of his works.

https://www.youtube.com/v/ypy0dhcxM0o
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 24, 2013, 05:05:09 AM
JOANNA WOZNY (http://www.klangforum.at/index.php?idcatside=641&lang=2)

Wozny: "Archipel" 1/2
http://www.youtube.com/v/j6wREXeFZ_g

Wozny: "Archipel" 2/2
http://www.youtube.com/v/DwAxsbPLX8w

Joanna Wozny was born in 1973 in Zabrze (Poland) and currently lives in Graz. She studied philosophy at the Silesian University at Katowice (Poland) and composition with Gerd Kühr and Beat Furrer (University for Music, Graz) as well as with Younghi Pagh-Paan.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 26, 2013, 08:58:31 AM
Ivan Eröd (http://www.ivan-eroed.at/de/start.htm) ~ Viola Concerto: I.

http://www.youtube.com/v/i6MI8nqVj8M

Viola Concerto: II.

http://www.youtube.com/v/tOjM8IR1Rg0

Quote
My composing was never determined by ideology or by what was just fashion. I appreciate the craft high and do not stop to learn from the great masters of the past. And I believe that the source of inspiration lies deep within us. My music is as varied as the world, with occasional cheerful or playful, as I think it is necessary nowadays, other times it is very serious, especially if the text requires it, they can also "raised" (many be on the use of the word smile), but our soul is longing for the transcendent.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on February 26, 2013, 10:00:31 AM
Kairos? Mode? Stradivarius? Accord and Montaigne in the 1990s? Col Legno is one of my favorites, and Neos is becoming a very good one too.
Pogus.
sub rosa
erstwhile
Wergo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 26, 2013, 12:17:52 PM
Hey, Atlantans!

My friend, and excellent fellow composer, Mark Gresham has written a piano trio whose première will be Sunday, 3 March.  I'll scare up the deets . . . it would be cracking if any of you might attend the event!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 26, 2013, 01:10:46 PM
Hey, Atlantans!

My friend, and excellent fellow composer, Mark Gresham has written a piano trio whose première will be Sunday, 3 March.  I'll scare up the deets . . . it would be cracking if any of you might attend the event!



Edit:  Found it. (http://www.atlantacomposers.com/2013/02/riverside-chamber-players-to-premiere.html)

Quite a hike for me, but I'm gonna try. Sounds like a great program.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on February 26, 2013, 06:25:36 PM
Hey, Atlantans!

My friend, and excellent fellow composer, Mark Gresham has written a piano trio whose première will be Sunday, 3 March.  I'll scare up the deets . . . it would be cracking if any of you might attend the event!

I could almost walk there and I am going unless her majesty objects. Well this would be only the second time out this year for me. GSMoeller be a little wary of Google maps as my first search put it a long way off of Holcomb Bride which is round the corner from me.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 27, 2013, 08:11:40 AM
Frances White (http://rosewhitemusic.com/about-frances-white/)

Her CD In the Library of Dreams came out in 2012 and is well worth hearing.  It is on Spotify but I can't find a track from it to post, however, here is another of her works:

Frances White | Centre Bridge (Dark River)

http://www.youtube.com/v/mw-s9-3v8aw

Quote
Frances White composes instrumental and electronic music. She is particularly known for her works combining live instruments and computer-generated electronic sound spaces. She studied composition at the University of Maryland, Brooklyn College, and Princeton University. She has received awards, honors, grants and commissions from organizations such as Prix Ars Electronica (Linz, Austria), the Institut International de Musique Electroacoustique de Bourges (France), the International Computer Music Association, Hungarian Radio, ASCAP, the Bang on a Can Festival, the Other Minds Festival, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, The Dale Warland Singers, the American Music Center, The Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, and The Guggenheim Foundation. She has received resident artist fellowships from The MacDowell Colony and The Djerassi Resident Artists Program. In 2007, Mode Records released Centre Bridge, a CD devoted to her electroacoustic works. Ms. White’s music has also appeared on CD on the Wergo, Centaur, Nonsequitur, Harmonia Mundi, and Bridge labels. Ms. White’s music was featured as part of the soundtrack of Gus Van Sant’s award-winning films Elephant and Paranoid Park.

Ms. White studies the shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute), and finds that the traditional music of this instrument informs and influences her work as a composer. Much of Ms. White’s music is inspired by her love of nature, and her electronic works frequently include natural sound recorded around where she lives, in central New Jersey.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on February 27, 2013, 08:18:10 AM
Been enjoying the music of Evan Johnson lately.

https://soundcloud.com/evan-johnson-17

Music isn't quite like anyone else's although i'm reminded at various points of Cage, Barrett and his near-contemporary Cassidy—worth a listen if those names don't strike fear into your soul. i have a feeling he's going to do important things to come.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 27, 2013, 08:22:02 AM

Edit:  Found it. (http://www.atlantacomposers.com/2013/02/riverside-chamber-players-to-premiere.html)

Quite a hike for me, but I'm gonna try. Sounds like a great program.

I could almost walk there and I am going unless her majesty objects. Well this would be only the second time out this year for me. GSMoeller be a little wary of Google maps as my first search put it a long way off of Holcomb Bride which is round the corner from me.

Cool, gents! Obviously I've not heard this piece yet, but I read a recent piece of Mark's in MS., and I expect musical excellence.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 01, 2013, 05:36:44 AM
Agata Zubel (http://www.zubel.pl/)

Shades of Ice, by Agata Zubel (https://soundcloud.com/london_sinfonietta/zubel-mixmaster02-1)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 05, 2013, 07:41:46 AM
Martin Smolka ... Semplice (2006) - Part II

http://www.youtube.com/v/06pNqvUMKxg

Metaphorically speaking, Smolka's music oscillates round two poles: 1) Cracked, buoyant conviviality, music of a hobbling orchestrion, symptomatic civilisation sounds, a folk or brass band playing, preferably, out off tune; 2) Melancholic memories, aching desire, the nostalgic echo of the sounds of Point 1. Corresponding to this is the usual structuring strategy of Smolka's compositions: they almost invariably form juxtapositions of inwardly homogeneous and sharply contrasting form segments, which through their opposition (slow – fast, joyous – sad, tumultuous – gentle, etc.) actually correspond to the "sonata" categories: the main theme – the secondary theme. Smolka, however, frequently works with jarring, film-like, cuts, evolutionism is suppressed, seams admitted, dynamic and textural differences foregrounded, with repetition being the basic principle.

The essentially emotional tone of Smolka's compositions also relates to the application of micro-intervals serving the composer, on the one hand, to evoke real sounds, on the other, to "detune" traditional harmonic and melodic formations – the motivation for this fundamentally subversive seizure of the inherited material is further amplification or re-awakening of its emotional potential (e.g. Solitudo for ensemble). In the late 90s Smolka focused his attention on this very "recycling" of elements of traditional music deformed in micro-interval terms and arranged in the collage manner (Remix, Redream, Reflight for orchestra or Blue Bells or Bell Blues for orchestra, awarded by the Foundation Prince Pierre de Monaco). Moreover, over the past decade or so Smolka has taken a keen interest in vocal music, especially that for chorus (Poema de balcones for chorus, Psalmus 114 for chorus and orchestra, etc.).

His website. (http://www.martinsmolka.com/en/index.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on March 05, 2013, 07:45:12 AM
Agata Zubel (http://www.zubel.pl/)

Shades of Ice, by Agata Zubel (https://soundcloud.com/london_sinfonietta/zubel-mixmaster02-1)

How did you like this? (I haven't heard it yet.) I had the great pleasure of meeting her last year, when Klangforum Wien did a world premiere by her at the Austrian Cultural Forum.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 05, 2013, 07:50:19 AM
How did you like this? (I haven't heard it yet.) I had the great pleasure of meeting her last year, when Klangforum Wien did a world premiere by her at the Austrian Cultural Forum.

--Bruce

I think she is a very exciting composer (and singer).  That piece is a good example of her work, but I could not find a clip of the string quartet  that I actually prefer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 05, 2013, 11:34:44 AM
Levon Chaushyan (http://www.composers21.com/compdocs/chaushyanl.htm) (b. May 10, 1946, Yerevan). Armenian composer of orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal, and piano works that have been performed in Asia, Europe and North America.

Prof. Chaushyan is the son of the cellist Alexander Chaushyan (b. 1917 – d. 1991) and he began composing in 1957. He studied composition with Edward Mirzoyan and piano with Georgy Sarajyan at the Yerevan Komitas State Conservatory, where he graduated in 1969 and where he had post-graduate studies in composition with Edward Mirzoyan from 1969–72.

Piano Sonata nr.3 ("Pictures without an Exhibition")
Hayk MELIKYAN, piano

http://www.youtube.com/v/5rJRc34QAOI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 12, 2013, 05:15:37 AM
Arthur Levering (http://www.arthurlevering.com/) has received many awards for his work including the Rome Prize, the Heckscher Foundation Composition Prize, the Lee Ettelson Composer’s Award, commissions from the Fromm Foundation and the Barlow Endowment, as well as fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. His compositions have been performed by various ensembles including the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the New Juilliard Ensemble, the Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble, the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Boston Musica Viva, Sequitur, Voices of Change, NewEar, Lontano, the League of Composers/ISCM, Musica d’Oggi, and the Rascher Saxophone Quartet. Compact disks of his work include School of Velocity, CRI CD 812, 1999/NWCR812, 2007 (“the best debut album by an American composer I’ve heard this year”—Robert Carl, Fanfare, July/August, 1999), and Still Raining, Still Dreaming, New World CD NW 80662-2, 2008.

Tesserae (2002)

http://www.youtube.com/v/u18No5Cm0xQ
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: not edward on March 12, 2013, 06:34:50 AM
It seems like Hans Abrahamsen has thoroughly recovered from his barren period in the late 1980s and 1990s. Since the massive ensemble piece Schnee several hours' worth of new pieces and arrangements have shown up, including two string quartets, a large piece for soprano and orchestra and a partially-neo-Baroque double concerto for violin, piano and strings that continues the wintry soundworld of Schnee.

Recent(ish) works on Youtube: the piano concerto (from 2000); some miniatures for accordion and string quintet (2005); the complete Schnee (2008); the UK premiere of 2009's chamber orchestra piece Wald.

http://www.youtube.com/v/FdX1zDqczs8 http://www.youtube.com/v/i5WGcfTekEo
http://www.youtube.com/v/uVP1pP2wXR4 http://www.youtube.com/v/NYfzFI0dgeU

Some pieces from the '70s and '80s: Winternacht (1978); Marchenbilder (1984); Lied in Fall (1987) -- very obviously the same composer.

http://www.youtube.com/v/FF_hAB85xco http://www.youtube.com/v/QoRLAFXPbbE http://www.youtube.com/v/p1J1f5m0mL8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 15, 2013, 05:03:56 AM
Wolfgang Mitterer (http://www.wolfgangmitterer.com/en/upcoming)- Music for Checking E-mails: “…giving the illusion of depth” (Col Legno, 2009)

(http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l5z0n3W9Re1qzi4j0o1_r2_500.jpg)

A GMG thread on this composer. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?topic=16082.0)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 20, 2013, 09:59:05 AM
René Wohlhauser (http://www.renewohlhauser.com/)

New CD from Neos comes out March 23rd:

The Marakra Cycle

(https://neos-music.com/images/covers-240/NEOS_11308_Wohlhauser_Marakra.jpg)

Something from YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/v/jdB0-jQ7k54&list=PL738231384D69B792
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 25, 2013, 05:01:38 AM
Ruaidhri Mannion (http://www.mannioncomposer.com/page3.htm) - Broken Flames and Little Wind

http://www.youtube.com/v/a01Z7oHvd3g&feature=em-subs_digest

Ruaidhri Mannion (b.1985) is an Irish composer living in London. As a musician he is fascinated by the entrancing and transcendental properties of sound, music and the act of listening. Drawing on wide range of influences, both musical and extra-musical, his work often combines live instruments and electronics to explore concepts of intuition, deep-listening and theatre.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 25, 2013, 05:03:09 AM
Sometimes abbreviated to Broken ... Wind, I hope not?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 25, 2013, 05:03:43 AM
Sometimes abbreviated to Broken ... Wind, I hope not?

 :D

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 28, 2013, 04:57:54 AM
5:4 (http://5against4.com/2013/03/26/james-dillon-string-quartets-no-5-world-premiere-no-6-uk-premiere/) has a blog article featuring two string quartets by James Dillon, Nos. 5 & 6.   No. 5 was actually the second of the two to be completed, although begun for the Arditti Quartet's 30th anniversary, it was not finished until the 35th anniversary.  The 6th was written in the meantime.  Each work is approximately 15 minutes in duration and there are FLAC downloads available of each from the blog.

The two works are significantly different and well worth learning.  No. 6 is performed by the Quatuor Diotima in this YouTube clip.


http://www.youtube.com/v/pjl7WlTQDyY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 29, 2013, 05:11:29 AM
DAVID FROOM (http://davidfroom.com/index.html)

Turn of Events for alto saxophone and piano (https://soundcloud.com/dfroom/turn-of-events)

David Froom’s music has been performed extensively throughout the United States by major orchestras, ensembles, and soloists, including, among many others, the Louisville, Seattle, Utah, and Chesapeake Symphony Orchestras, The United States Marine and Navy Bands, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the 21st Century Consort, Boston Musica Viva, the New York New Music Ensemble, the Haydn Trio Eisenstadt, the Aurelia Quartet, and violinist Curtis Macomber. His music is available on CD on the Bridge, Navona, New Dimensions, Delos, Arabesque, Capriccio, Centaur, Sonora, Crystal, Opus 3, and West Point Academy labels, and is published by American Composers Edition. Among the many organizations that have bestowed honors on him are the American Academy of Arts and Letters (Academy Award, Ives Scholarship), the Guggenheim, Fromm, Koussevitzky, and Barlow Foundations, the Kennedy Center (first prize in the Friedheim Awards), the National Endowment for the Arts, The Music Teachers National Association (MTNA-Shepherd Distinguished Composer for 2006), and the state of Maryland (four Individual Artist Awards). He had a Fulbright grant for study at Cambridge University, and fellowships to the Tanglewood Music Festival, the Wellesley Composers Conference, and the MacDowell Colony. His biography is included in Groves.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 03, 2013, 07:57:31 AM
David Dzubay (http://pronovamusic.com/bio.html) was born in 1964 in Minneapolis and raised in Portland, Oregon by his parents, architect Dale Dzubay and educator Edith Dzubay. Returning to the midwest for school, he earned a D.M. in Composition at Indiana University in 1991. Additional study was undertaken as a Koussevitzky Fellow in Composition at the Tanglewood Music Center (1990), at the June in Buffalo Festival, and as co-principal trumpet of the National Repertory Orchestra in Colorado (1988, 1989). His principal teachers were Donald Erb, Frederick Fox, Eugene O'Brien, Lukas Foss, Oliver Knussen, Allan Dean and Bernard Adelstein.

Producing For A While (http://pronovamusic.com/notes/pfaw.html)
(2012) for soprano and ensemble
text: Julie Choffel
instrumentation:
1*12*1/1111/2pc,hp,pn/2111 + soprano, 2-3 "producers"
duration: 8 minutes
premiere:
Indiana University New Music Ensemble, November 29, 2012
Lindsey McLennan (sop.), David Dzubay (cond.)

http://www.youtube.com/v/Ku8R2QlEhfA
Quote
Program Note:
I encountered the poetry of Julie Choffel while working on a project for Voices Up: New Music for New Poetry, a concert at Fordham University - Lincoln Center Campus. Her new book, The Hello Delay, published in March, 2012, won Fordham's annual Poetry Out Loud contest. Choosing three of these poems, I composed a set for soprano, violin and cello. The curiously ambiguous Producing For A While is the third song in the set, and here finds a new home as a work for my favorite sinfonietta, the IU New Music Ensemble.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on April 03, 2013, 08:01:33 PM
Martin Smolka ... Semplice (2006) - Part II

http://www.youtube.com/v/06pNqvUMKxg

Metaphorically speaking, Smolka's music oscillates round two poles: 1) Cracked, buoyant conviviality, music of a hobbling orchestrion, symptomatic civilisation sounds, a folk or brass band playing, preferably, out off tune; 2) Melancholic memories, aching desire, the nostalgic echo of the sounds of Point 1. Corresponding to this is the usual structuring strategy of Smolka's compositions: they almost invariably form juxtapositions of inwardly homogeneous and sharply contrasting form segments, which through their opposition (slow – fast, joyous – sad, tumultuous – gentle, etc.) actually correspond to the "sonata" categories: the main theme – the secondary theme. Smolka, however, frequently works with jarring, film-like, cuts, evolutionism is suppressed, seams admitted, dynamic and textural differences foregrounded, with repetition being the basic principle.

The essentially emotional tone of Smolka's compositions also relates to the application of micro-intervals serving the composer, on the one hand, to evoke real sounds, on the other, to "detune" traditional harmonic and melodic formations – the motivation for this fundamentally subversive seizure of the inherited material is further amplification or re-awakening of its emotional potential (e.g. Solitudo for ensemble). In the late 90s Smolka focused his attention on this very "recycling" of elements of traditional music deformed in micro-interval terms and arranged in the collage manner (Remix, Redream, Reflight for orchestra or Blue Bells or Bell Blues for orchestra, awarded by the Foundation Prince Pierre de Monaco). Moreover, over the past decade or so Smolka has taken a keen interest in vocal music, especially that for chorus (Poema de balcones for chorus, Psalmus 114 for chorus and orchestra, etc.).

His website. (http://www.martinsmolka.com/en/index.html)
If you say so. This stuff is way over my little nogin and then we got that emotional stuff going on. I do not understand!.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 04, 2013, 04:07:55 AM
If you say so. This stuff is way over my little nogin and then we got that emotional stuff going on. I do not understand!.

I did not write that blurb, it came from either his website or a bio made available by his publisher. 

I find it is better to listen to the music rather than get bogged down by how the composer describes his work.  Much like an "artist statement" at a gallery or museum show, they are a necessary evil but (IMO) do not add anything to simply experiencing the art.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 05, 2013, 05:11:46 AM
CAROLINE LOUISE MILLER (http://carolinelouisemiller.com/index.html)

Tarantella Carbine for violoncello and electronics (http://soundcloud.com/caroline_louise/tarantella-carbine)
Jon Carbin, violoncello

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 05, 2013, 05:29:15 AM
I find it is better to listen to the music rather than get bogged down by how the composer describes his work.

Much to be said for this approach.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 05, 2013, 05:51:38 AM
This (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,92.msg708916.html#msg708916) fits the bill, though it won't be everyone's money.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on April 05, 2013, 05:57:36 AM
Logically, that approach does indeed make good sense.

The bogging down, however, near as I've been able to tell, happens prior to the actual contact with the art. That's a thing I'm not sure there's any solution to. How does one convince someone who has already decided, but who is convinced that their decision followed some contact, that the art is really fine, just fine?

Near as I've been able to tell, it's impossible.

Historically, that seems to have been the case as well, too. The bogging down as a historical phenomenon, so far as it can be documented in the evolution of programming and in contemporary reactions, preceded the earliest examples of the 20th century avant garde popularly believed to have been responsible for the alienation of audiences world-wide.

Preceded.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 05, 2013, 06:43:40 AM
Logically, that approach does indeed make good sense.

The bogging down, however, near as I've been able to tell, happens prior to the actual contact with the art. That's a thing I'm not sure there's any solution to. How does one convince someone who has already decided, but who is convinced that their decision followed some contact, that the art is really fine, just fine?

Near as I've been able to tell, it's impossible.

Historically, that seems to have been the case as well, too. The bogging down as a historical phenomenon, so far as it can be documented in the evolution of programming and in contemporary reactions, preceded the earliest examples of the 20th century avant garde popularly believed to have been responsible for the alienation of audiences world-wide.

Preceded.

I don't worry about that.

All I am doing with this thread is putting some composers and works in front of the members of this forum.  How they respond is not really my concern.  Some (A few? One?) will hear something they like, others (most?) will ignore the information altogether, and still others will make snarky comments.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 05, 2013, 06:55:42 AM
And my first thought was, how the music itself may appeal to the listener, where clunky (or, worse, vapid) verbiage about the music can be off-putting.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on May 02, 2013, 03:18:38 AM
Joshua Marquez (http://www.joshuamarquez.com/) (b. 1990) is a Filipino-American composer, conductor, and classical guitarist.

Quote
As a composer, Joshua is interested in writing for both large and chamber ensembles of varying instrumentation.  He is currently working on his Masters thesis - a piece combining songs of the humpback whale with a chamber ensemble (electronics, Bb clarinet, 4 off-stage sopranos, violin, violoncello, and piano).  In doing so, he hopes to create an environment for the "whale" (recordings controlled through live manipulation) and the chamber ensemble to interact in a more versatile way than in previous compositions.  The goal of this project is to take the listener into the "world of the whale" and create a line of communication between the ensemble performers and the "whale" (laptop performer).  For this project, Joshua is working with Dr. Alejandro Rutty, Dr. Patricia Gray, and the Dr. Roger Payne Sound Archive. 

a frayed, jute whipping knot for reed quintet (2012)
Akropolis Reed Quintet: Tim Gocklin, Oboe; Kari Dion, Clarinet; Matt Landry, Saxophone; Andrew Koeppe, Bass Clarinet; Ryan Reynolds, Bassoon

http://www.youtube.com/v/f22h6r6h7zE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 05, 2013, 03:12:18 AM
Ivan Moody, Nocturne of Light, Pt 1:

http://www.youtube.com/v/IqybBqVhwyw
Quote from: Ivan Moody
Nocturne of Light was written specifically for Paul Barnes and the Chiara Quartet. Dr Barnes had asked me for a work that would be impregnated with the spirit of Byzantine chant, a requirement with which I was more than happy to comply, given that so much of my work takes its inspiration in Byzantine Orthodox music, poetry and theology.

I had, in addition, long wanted to write a Nocturne, and here I had an opportunity to write a Nocturne for Christ - the “three days' space” between His burial and his Resurection. To that end, the principal thematic material of the work is the communion chant for Holy Saturday, “Exigerthi os o ypnon”, “As One Who has slept”, speaking of the ineffable mystery of the “sleeping” God and His arising. Almost all the other material of the work derives from this chant, which is heard near the beginning of the piece, following an introductory passage, in the piano, divided into three segments. Thereafter the music deals with, as it were, human reflection on this momentous event, exploring grief, anger and, always, hope.

In the Orthodox icon of the Resurrection, Christ is depicted as trampling down the gates of Hades, while He frees Adam and Eve. Near the bottom of the icon, one can see the shattered locks and keys, and I have endeavoured to suggest this by means of a very short section which makes use of pizzicato strings and the pianist playing inside the piano. Thereafter there is an unstoppable build-up to the joy of the Resurrection, symbolized specifically by the use of another chant, “Christos anesti”, “Christ is risen”. This is also used in combination with the first chant, resulting in a whirlwind of celebratory joy and light.

Nocturne of Light represents, then, the three days' space in the tomb both from a ceremonial and a human, affective, point of view. I wanted to portray awe and shock and bewilderment and then joy, but still without it having always the composer's ego as the driving force. It is present of course, because Christianity uniquely values the human individual, but, and even though this is not liturgical music and I have no reason or need to make comparisons with icon painters and their rigorous discipline, something of that is still there, and the music therefore has a ritual, ceremonial dimension as well as a human one.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on May 09, 2013, 12:44:55 PM
A 21st century composer writing orchestral music in the Jean Sibelius school?  Meet Steven R. Gerber (http://stevengerber.com/).

Symphony #1 (1st movement)
Russian Philharmonic Orchestra; Thomas Sanderling, conductor

http://www.youtube.com/v/VyW_j0-NiJ0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on May 09, 2013, 02:05:07 PM
Ivan Moody, Nocturne of Light, Pt 1:

http://www.youtube.com/v/IqybBqVhwyw

I agree that this work reminds me of being in a tomb.   :-[
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on May 24, 2013, 12:36:05 AM
I've had a good look through this topic on recent music but I think it's better if I don't reply... S
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on June 20, 2013, 02:56:16 PM
Nina C. Young - Memento Mori - JACK Quartet

https://www.youtube.com/v/mKNyNFHfNIk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on June 20, 2013, 04:11:36 PM
Nina C. Young - Memento Mori - JACK Quartet

https://www.youtube.com/v/mKNyNFHfNIk

This is a nice piece with musical interest but it is is still so dark and foreboding. This is part of life but it is not all. Texan can you find me a piece of “serious” c20/c21 music that celerbrates the happiness and joy I think we want for ourselves?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on June 20, 2013, 05:23:51 PM
I once played one of my favorite electroacoustic pieces for some friends. Michèle Bokanowski's L'ètoile absinthe.

The response? Dark!

Well. It surprised me. And when I mentioned it to Michèle next time I saw her, she said "Dark? That's the bright one!"

So rather than supply a piece that celebrates happiness and joy--or at least that I identify as so doing--I think I'd rather work on that whole "dark/happiness" thing. Regardless of its putative subject matter, a piece that impresses you or that pleases you has impressed you or pleased you. Done. Listening to Dvořák's Noonday Witch always makes me happy, for instance. I find the music to be pleasing. The subject matter, however?

Gross!!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on June 20, 2013, 05:52:33 PM
I once played one of my favorite electroacoustic pieces for some friends. Michèle Bokanowski's L'ètoile absinthe.

The response? Dark!

Well. It surprised me. And when I mentioned it to Michèle next time I saw her, she said "Dark? That's the bright one!"

So rather than supply a piece that celebrates happiness and joy--or at least that I identify as so doing--I think I'd rather work on that whole "dark/happiness" thing. Regardless of it's putative subject matter, a piece that impresses you or that pleases you has impressed you or pleased you. Done. Listening to Dvořák's Noonday Witch always makes me happy, for instance. I find the music to be pleasing. The subject matter, however?

Gross!!

Personal insult removed by Knight.....we don't need that kind of comment.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on June 21, 2013, 06:16:37 AM
Helen Grime | Three Whistler Miniatures: 1 ~ Claremont Trio

https://www.youtube.com/v/u7itwUVmW_Q
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on June 21, 2013, 09:07:17 AM
ROBERT CARL (http://uhaweb.hartford.edu/carl/) | Excerpts of his music and interview ~
https://www.youtube.com/v/QeS70eJdU2g

Article by Robert Carl ~ Eight Waves a Composer Will Ride in This Century (http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/eight-waves-a-composer-will-ride-in-this-century/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: HIPster on June 21, 2013, 02:03:50 PM
Cross-posting from the Classical Listening thread:



A very interesting release.

Like a sort of Baroque Eighth Blackbird album. . .
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on June 25, 2013, 08:42:53 AM
Amy Williams (http://www.societyofcomposers.org/members/AmyWilliams/) ~

http://www.youtube.com/v/BPm4fTLQh4Y





Crossings
by Amy Williams
(Albany)

Performers:
JACK Quartet
Amy Williams
Jeffrey Jacob
The Bugallo-Williams Piano Duo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on June 30, 2013, 03:23:41 AM
Robert McClure (http://robertwmcclure.com/Composer/Home.html)

Cyprus (https://soundcloud.com/rob-mcclure/sets/cyprus)

Also, on his blog (http://robertwmcclure.weebly.com/) he features music from the 20th-21st century that he thinks is noteworthy in a series of posts he calls "Top Fifty".
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 23, 2013, 05:20:57 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/LAnGxFgRCvs
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 23, 2013, 10:29:01 PM
A 21st century composer writing orchestral music in the Jean Sibelius school?  Meet Steven R. Gerber (http://stevengerber.com/).

Hmmm. I missed this earlier.

Yes, Steven is alive today (far as I know), but the symphony in question (no. 1) is from 1989. And last I checked, 1989 is not the 21st century by any metric.

It's strange how the rejection of perfectly ordinary and delightful new music has developed into a cottage industry of retro-music in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Some composers in the 19th century, after the anti-modernist reaction had gotten going pretty strong, did try to write like it was 1777, but concert audiences weren't having any new music, whether new as in new or new as in just recent.

Nowadays, concert audiences will go ape-shit over pastiche. That's a serious sea-change, and not into something rich either but certainly into something strange. A 21st century composer in the Jean Sibelius school? To me that sounds creepy and disgusting. But not to many other people.

Imagine a composer in 1813 writing in the school of Vivaldi. If anyone then had tried that on, they would have been laughed off the stage. And once off, they would have had to suffer unspeakable humiliations involving rotting vegetables and circus freaks. In 2013, however, composers can build successful careers from that kind of tat and be honored and admired citizens in their communities.

Incroyable.

Love the cover art to the Igoa, though. I've got that to comfort me in my pain, and no one can take that away from me!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: The new erato on July 23, 2013, 10:34:12 PM
Imagine a composer in 1813 writing in the school of Vivaldi. If anyone then had tried that on, they would have been laughed off the stage. And once off, they would have had to suffer unspeakable humiliations involving rotting vegetables and circus freaks. In 2013, however, composers can build successful careers from that kind of tat and be honored and admired citizens in their communities.

But that is because music and artists plays a decidedly different role in todays society then it did then, as you surely are aware.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pencils on July 24, 2013, 03:56:11 AM
Is this the place to mention Jacob ter Veldhuis without getting rocks thrown at you?  I will try not to call him Jacob TV $:)

His Rainbow Concerto is simply beautiful, and I am enjoying the postmodern foolery of some of his compositions.

Either that, or Johan de Meij? Symphony 4 just completed...  ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 24, 2013, 03:59:22 AM
This is the place to mention music written since 2000.  You won't get rocks thrown at you by anyone other than "someguy" who pounced on my inadvertent post about a work written in 1989.

My bad.

 ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kyjo on July 24, 2013, 04:12:08 AM
Two of the most beautiful orchestral works composed in the 21st century:

Joep Franssens (1955-): Grace for Orchestra (2008):
Part 1: http://youtu.be/Y5QSEuHS108 (http://youtu.be/Y5QSEuHS108)
Part 2: http://youtu.be/RaN5NHRNdFY (http://youtu.be/RaN5NHRNdFY)

Imants Kalnins (1941-): Symphony no. 6 for chorus and orchestra (2001): http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/4305 (http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/4305)

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 24, 2013, 07:55:07 AM
But that is because music and artists plays a decidedly different role in todays society then it did then, as you surely are aware.
This is a contrary position to mine in what way? (I believe that you are just restating my point here. Differently than I would state it, but it seems to be the same point.)

As for rock throwing, this is the internet, so at least it's all virtual.

And the throwing back at me has been virtually noted.

Funny how expressing certain opinions gets classified as "rock throwing" while personal attacks of the putative thrower are considered perfectly fine. Things that make you go "hmmmm."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 24, 2013, 08:34:58 AM
This is a contrary position to mine in what way? (I believe that you are just restating my point here. Differently than I would state it, but it seems to be the same point.)

As for rock throwing, this is the internet, so at least it's all virtual.

And the throwing back at me has been virtually noted.

Funny how expressing certain opinions gets classified as "rock throwing" while personal attacks of the putative thrower are considered perfectly fine. Things that make you go "hmmmm."

I must have missed the personal attack on you.

One of the things I like about the 21st (and 20th) century is the freedom composers have for expression.  There is no dominant style; composers are free to use whatever method they wish, or combine them in any form they wish.  I consider this a good thing.  To me, it is good that there are living composers writing music that might, on the surface, sound like Sibelius - but I also think it good that other composers are writing music that is breaking absolutely new ground in the 21st century, very far from Sibelius's soundscape - and it's good there's all those composers in between and beyond.  Basically I'm a "more is more" kind of listener.

I refuse to judge any composer on their choice of method(s), and find myself responding to their music based on how it strikes my ears.  I also try to ignore the various partisan camps and their rants as to why composers X, Y and Z are writing music that is not worth hearing.

Now, something on topic:

Lucas Fagin: "Arquetipo" (2007)

http://www.youtube.com/v/FGX77ERPcJg

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pencils on July 24, 2013, 10:39:42 AM

As for rock throwing, this is the internet, so at least it's all virtual.


No offence intended  :D .... certainly not in the direction of anyone here ... I am just aware that my appreciation for JacobTV (Blast! Did it again!) isn't necessarily shared in lots of places in 'Classical Music Land'. I think he is a little populist for some people  ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 24, 2013, 10:43:12 AM
We want our JTV!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pencils on July 24, 2013, 10:56:19 AM
(http://www.jacobterveldhuis.com/images/JacobTV_Box1_cover.jpg)

I am a real sucker for this. Not only the Rainbow, but the Tallahatchie AND the Goldrush. Still working with the Paradiso, I have to confess.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on July 24, 2013, 01:41:25 PM
Nowadays, concert audiences will go ape-shit over pastiche.

That's not quite true. Pastiche composers do enjoy short-term popularity similar to that enjoyed by popular musicians but it is usually the groundbreakers who survive in the long term. Throughout the 19th century there were dozens of popular composers who wrote instructive sonatinas and salon pieces in a style not far removed from the Classic masters, whereas Wagner was considered taxing, ultramodern and unlikely to be of lasting importance. Only towards the end of his life was he recognised and even then it was by a small "cult" of wealthy elites and intelligentsia. The most popular composer of the day was probably Johann Strauss II whose music anyway possesses a certain timelessness due to what one might call its harmonic neutrality.

Quote
Imagine a composer in 1813 writing in the school of Vivaldi.

In the nineteenth century the style of 1713 (more specifically Bach and Handel) and mastery thereof carried prestigious connotations. Hence all the fugues in Beethoven, the entire career of Mendelssohn and similar repercussions as far forward as Reger. Of course no one would set out to write a piece that sounded exactly like Vivaldi, but hardly anyone sets out to write a piece that sounds exactly like Sibelius either (except musicologists trying to reconstruct a lost Sibelius symphony or something)

As well, for quite a long time following the death of Palestrina composers writing music for official Catholic usage were expected to compose in more or less the same style (or even a significantly simplified style).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 24, 2013, 04:52:18 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/2FVxQLrRysw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on July 24, 2013, 06:13:51 PM
I've been digging the music of Radulescu lately. I really enjoy his style. Very poetic. The link below leads to his second piano sonata.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4izgfNDN7Nk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 26, 2013, 07:15:05 AM
sanantonio, I apologize for getting to this so long after the fact. (That's twice now for me on this thread. One more and I'm out.

One of the things I like about the 21st (and 20th) century is the freedom composers have for expression.  There is no dominant style; composers are free to use whatever method they wish, or combine them in any form they wish.  I consider this a good thing.
On the surface, this sounds very attractive. It is very much how I feel about things. In actual fact, however, I don't think everything is equally valuable.

Nor, come to think of it, that "expression" is all it's cracked up to be.

In 2013, there are indeed many styles and many methods. Some of them are recent. Some of them are retrograde. The retrograde ones are not so good. Here's how I see it. There are innovative composers. These are the ones with the fresh ideas, the unprecedented ideas. They are the leaders. There are consolidater composers. These might not be able to come up with innovations, but they can immediately recognize the value of the innovations and use them in their work. Both of these are fine.

Then there are composers who reject the new, who are disgusted by the innovations of their own time, preferring the innovations (and consolidations) of earlier times. These are what might be termed the nostalgia composers. These composers appeal very strongly to listeners who have also rejected the innovations and consolidations of the present. No surprise. In this world, everything is familiar. Everything is from the past, so of course it's well-known. It's shapes and sounds have already been vetted, as it were, and are comfortable and easy.

In practice, so far as I can see, most people who celebrate the diversity and freedom of the 20th and 21st centuries to this extent--"composers are free to use whatever method they wish"--are really only celebrating the freedom of certain composers who are free to please them by writing comfortable music that they already know, even before they hear it. (Lowell Liebermann just did this very thing last Saturday in Portland, with his "new" piece Four Seasons.) And that is some genuine partisanship, if you please.

To me, it is a bad thing "that there are living composers writing music that might, on the surface, sound like Sibelius." That is, I want my living composers to live in the present, not in the past. I too am a "more is more" kind of listener. And the proof of that is in my collection, which includes Monteverdi and Mumma, Vivaldi and Varese, Bach and Boerman, Haydn and Hodgkinson, for example. I just don't see that a composer living and working in 2013 who is writing as if it were 1931 as contributing to that more. That composer is simply reproducing a part of the more that has already been done, and done quite a lot better, by someone who was alive and working in 1931.

I certainly do not reject the sounds of 1931 or 1831 or 1731. But someone in 2013 who is freely working with the methods from those times is not adding anything to the stock of worthwhile work in the world. That person is simply going over the same ground that's already been gone over. If I want to hear Brahmsian melodies and textures, I simply listen to some music by Brahms. I do not want someone contemporary with myself to offer me regurgitated Brahms. I've got genuine Brahms to satisfy any Brahmsian cravings I might have.

In short, I do not think that "methods" are neutral things, nor that they are equally valuable. I do not think that creating genuine art is a matter, simply, of using "methods." And I am a little bit suspicious of "based on how it strikes my ears" as that could be just as prejudicial and partisan as anything else. (Your ears, like mine, are connected to a mind that has prejudices and preferences and partisanship and perhaps several other p words as well. One exception: no pair of ears is pure.)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: The new erato on July 26, 2013, 07:21:05 AM
I certainly do not reject the sounds of 1931 or 1831 or 1731. But someone in 2013 who is freely working with the methods from those times is not adding anything to the stock of worthwhile work in the world. That person is simply going over the same ground that's already been gone over. If I want to hear Brahmsian melodies and textures, I simply listen to some music by Brahms. I do not want someone contemporary with myself to offer me regurgitated Brahms. I've got genuine Brahms to satisfy any Brahmsian cravings I might have.
But working from a perspective of having to do things that haven't been done before, with the accumulating weight of all that's done before, from a larger and larger artistic community working from the same perspective; where does that lead? Not that I wouldn't like to agree, but I see inevitably this will lead to a situation where the public will have no chance to absorb the new; and new music being more and more a goal in itself (instead of something that should involve the receiving end)?

Edit: Much of the greatest music I know was born (I'm only guessing here) from a will to communicate with an audience. Of course, that may be done withe different levels of skill, originality, expertise and invention. But when the overriding motive becomes "to do something differently" doesn't that have implications? And where does that lead?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 26, 2013, 08:15:58 AM
In practice, so far as I can see, most people who celebrate the diversity and freedom of the 20th and 21st centuries to this extent--"composers are free to use whatever method they wish"--are really only celebrating the freedom of certain composers who are free to please them by writing comfortable music that they already know, even before they hear it. (Lowell Liebermann just did this very thing last Saturday in Portland, with his "new" piece Four Seasons.) And that is some genuine partisanship, if you please.

I can't speak for anyone else, but that does not describe me.  I don't much care for a Sibeliusian style, even from him.

To me, it is a bad thing "that there are living composers writing music that might, on the surface, sound like Sibelius." That is, I want my living composers to live in the present, not in the past. I too am a "more is more" kind of listener.

While I stop short of saying it is "bad" for a composer to work in a style which might sound like Sibelius, I do not gravitate to those kinds of works.  But, then again, the kinds of works I do gravitate to could be accused of using a older style as well.   For example, I enjoy the music of Charles Wuorinen, whose style is drawn, by and large, from approximately 50 years ago.  However, his compositions are extremely well-written and provide plenty of satisfaction when I listen to them.   He is by no means the only one, or the only kind of music - just one example. 

The "present" can cover a lot of ground, IMO.  For many people the Sibelius sound is still current and "in the present" since so much of the music around us, e.g. film scores, is in that style. 

In short, I do not think that "methods" are neutral things, nor that they are equally valuable. I do not think that creating genuine art is a matter, simply, of using "methods." And I am a little bit suspicious of "based on how it strikes my ears" as that could be just as prejudicial and partisan as anything else. (Your ears, like mine, are connected to a mind that has prejudices and preferences and partisanship and perhaps several other p words as well. One exception: no pair of ears is pure.)

I do consider methods neutral.  But they are not relevant, IMO, to anyone other than the composer, and often not that very important to them either.  Of course I realize my ears, as are everyone's, are biased, and I'm okay with that.  Which is why I try not to make value judgments about other people's preferences.

For me, 21st century classical music is that which is written after 2000.  No styles or methods barred.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 26, 2013, 08:45:34 AM
Much of the greatest music I know was born (I'm only guessing here) from a will to communicate with an audience.
I suppose that the impulse to make music, great or not, comes from a variety of places, including the will to communicate with an audience place.

One must be very careful when talking about motivations, however, even if one has the composer's own words about what he or she intended. That is, I do not think that one can know that a composer's overriding motive is "to do something differently."

Having said that, I'm going to carelessly say that I don't think the point is really to do something differently; it is to do a different thing. It is to bring to life a new thing, a something that was not a something until that composer made it. And I do not think, as a practical matter, that that implies that there won't be communication with an audience. Every human is connected somehow with other humans. Part of what makes up a human is the quality of sociability. I would think it would be practically impossible for any individual human to make something that no other human could possibly like.

Every composer communicates with an audience. Might not be the audience you're in, but what of that? The audience you're in is not the only audience that exists. I attend upwards of three hundred concerts a year. I have never been to one where I was the only audience member. The ones--it's possible they exist--where only the composer attended are ones I would not know about. Are at least ones I would not have attended. Logically. :)

No, I don't think the communication thing is at all separate. I think communication is natural and inevitable, no matter what else is going on. And always will be. I have seen it frequently concluded by auditors that have not understood what was being said that therefore nothing was being communicated. But that is a hasty and invalid conclusion.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 26, 2013, 09:08:20 AM
I can't speak for anyone else, but that does not describe me.  I don't much care for a Sibeliusian style, even from him.
I am aware of that, and I apologize for failing to work that into my post. I wanted to, but I didn't succeed in doing it. I should have tried harder.

Wourinen doesn't thrill me much, but I would consider him a consolidator, not a nostalgia composer. Though that's a close one!

The "present" can cover a lot of ground, IMO.  For many people the Sibelius sound is still current and "in the present" since so much of the music around us, e.g. film scores, is in that style.
For many listeners, the Sibelius sound is still current. But for many listeners, even Schoenberg is too modern. There may be no excuse for that (I don't think there is), but it's understandable. For a professional, however, a working composer, Sibelius should not be current at all in any way. There's certainly no excuse for a professional to not be current in her field. And the only way I that I can understand the contribution of a Gerber is to conclude that he operates by a combination of cynicism and cupidity. I may be wrong. I'm just saying that that's how I can make sense of what he does.

I do consider methods neutral.
As I read this just now, I realized that it's not so much that I think methods are not neutral as it is that I think that "methods," in their time, they are not really methods, are they? The techniques of a time are the embodiment of the thoughts and feelings and ideas of that time. Only after their time is past do they become "methods," and I'd say that once a living idea has become a method, it is dead and that using methods is just a handy way to create what I have already elsewhere referred to as zombie music. It's dead, but it's sort of alive in a really creepy and even dangerous way.

I don't care for zombies, but some of my best friends are necrophiles. I guess that makes me a live and let live kinda guy, but not a live and allow to be resuscitated kinda guy.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on July 26, 2013, 10:01:06 AM
I guess I was using the word "method" to describe a composer's process. 

Interesting discussion, someguy.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on July 26, 2013, 01:54:16 PM
Agreed. I've enjoyed our conversation very much as well!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on July 26, 2013, 04:06:52 PM
If I want to hear Brahmsian melodies and textures, I simply listen to some music by Brahms. I do not want someone contemporary with myself to offer me regurgitated Brahms. I've got genuine Brahms to satisfy any Brahmsian cravings I might have.

i'm not sure why this is the one thing i chose to respond to from this quite interesting discussion, but ok.

Composers and musicians (as opposed to record collectors) don't necessarily work like that. Part of that is due to the nature of the musical memory training every composer must undergo as part of their craft. If you are a composer with a passion for Brahms, perhaps the first time you heard a Brahms symphony was a revelatory experience. The second, fifth, tenth time you heard it it was still fresh and with more to discover under the surface. But eventually (probably within 15-20 listenings or so) you will know the symphony. You can call up to mind any given passage from the symphony at will, plunk out large portions of it on the piano (or whatever your instrument may be) and have more or less every twist and turn of the music memorised. A GMG member may of course be satisfied to then acquire fifty recordings of the symphony and argue with his friends over which interpretation is best, but composers are unlikely to own more than one or two recordings of a given piece, and when they listen to those recordings their mind's ear will supply their own interpretation of the symphony rather than that of whatever conductor happens to be credited on the case. What you want is the thrill of discovery back—a new Brahms symphony, one you've never heard before, perhaps one not coloured by hundreds of historical interpretations or one that solves structural problems posed by a Brahms symphony you already know. You want Brahms's Fifth.

From here there are a couple of ways things tend to go. If you are a composer in touch with the times you may write a large orchestral work, or a lengthy piece for ensemble, or similar under a title along the lines of "Homage to Brahms" and write more or less in the contemporary vernacular, trying to replicate the passions and drama of Brahms in a musical language whose edge is not blunted by the familiar, comfortable surface prettiness of tonal music—but quite possibly working in actual Brahms quotes or bits of pastiche and feeling a secret thrill down your spine every time the orchestra lands on a major triad. (Sometimes I wonder if the Pessons and Adèses and Rihms of the world have secret vaults full of style copies they were inspired to write and immediately felt ashamed of.) If you are a composer who dislikes or feels alienated from the music of your time, who feels music history stopped with Schoenberg and picked up again on the silver screen with Korngold, you have no problem sitting down and writing a symphony in as close to the style of Brahms as you are capable of, but for some reason it will inevitably come out sounding like John Williams instead and you will feel vaguely disappointed. If you are a musicologist or Robin Holloway you will spend months immersed in research and then emerge with a few scraps of Brahms manuscripts from which to "reconstruct" a putative symphony, and the result may even sound very much like a Brahms symphony, or at least a symphony by Friedrich Gernsheim or Robert Fuchs or some other highly talented but less inspired contemporary of Brahms.

If you're an innovator? I think it's unlikely for an innovator to ever be in that position. Due to the nature of where most genuinely new music comes from, modern innovators may have never heard Brahms or have no interest in his music. They may develop strong emotional connections to composers/artists who died recently enough that their influence is still filtering through, but music from Palestrina to Prokofiev is unlikely to be on their list of interests and may even all sound more or less the same. But that's mostly conjecture based on one person's limited experience of modern music.

What allows composers to develop these kinds of connections with music that has been "obsolete" for more than a century is exactly what you said: "I've got genuine Brahms to satisfy any Brahmsian cravings I might have." The existence of recorded music and the fact that major classical music organisations limit themselves to standard repertoire makes much standard repertoire music more "contemporary" than a lot of more recent music that simply doesn't get played or recorded as much. A newly released record is much more likely to be Brahms than any living composer of equal stature. Most of the music someone who has undergone classical training will listen to is by people who are dead, simply because of availability and people sticking with what they know. I don't think there's any cynicism or "writing down" involved in the work of someone who wants to write Brahms's Fifth—just that "classical listeners" and "classical composers" come from the same demographic pool and therefore share a lot of the same preferences. If you want something different, look for different audiences, with different demographics.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on July 28, 2013, 04:44:15 PM
If James will permit me to borrow a clap of his thunder, here is one from Stockhausen that is very fine and not at all morose. In the next few days I will post a few more C21s that are not afraid of sunshine. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy1h0MTJBoE&list=PL5D97B133EFC005D3
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on July 28, 2013, 07:49:04 PM
Hey John .. if you enjoy that one, then there is plenty more in his canon that should be to your liking. For instance, the beautiful sub-cycle (within KLANG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klang_(Stockhausen))) of 7 intimate and wonderful trios, all based on the material of the 3 versions of this very piece you find attractive. And believe me, there are rewards for accepting his challenges. Initially his music DOES require more from the listener, and that's kind of the point. So there is a level of procovation but it doesn't seek to alienate people. Music that is immediately accessible has a pretty limited and surface-level breadth of communicative capacity. This music SHOULD make us examine our pre-conceived notions. And maybe when we do, it will resonate with us the way other music can't. This is certainly the case for me, and this music does indeed have a following for just this reason. And Stockhausen morose? Hardly ever especially compared to others of his generation .. there is plenty of LIGHT.

I have enjoyed early Stockhausen for a couple of years but only two weeks ago I decided I wanted to hear some of his later works.  MOG has spoiled me and I am very reluctant buy pieces I have not heard and Stockhausen’s label is not available on MOG. I had a pretty negative view of you tube and but I have discovered dependent on the actual video it can be pretty decent.
 
Long story short Stockhausen seems to me be one of those c20 composers that are REAL. It may take me some time to get up to speed with Stockhausen but I am looking forward to the journey. Thanks for the encouragement!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on August 02, 2013, 05:34:14 PM
This thread seems to have gone asleep and I hope on one was waiting for me.  I wanted to mention Jorg Widmann a German clarinetist/composer , a student of Rihm. Like Rihm he is comfortable  composing in a variety of styles, but I do not sense much else in common.  The things I am familiar with are not on You Tube, and I have never heard the pieces below, but it gives some sense of who Jorg is.
This first piece is a clarinet sonata. Jorg at his best is playful although it is often subtle. Maybe because I have just become acquainted with it, and in that aspect only, it calls to mind Michaels Reise.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvXG9m6JI6k

The next piece, on the light/dark scale, is partly cloudy.  Perhaps it contains a touch of fantasy but is not playful.  If you do not know what a amonica is, like me, it is a glass acoustical instrument
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2psVd3Kj0V8

The third piece is called a string quartet. It more aptly might be described as variations on a folk tune and is bizarrely playful. Give a couple of minutes. What I find most interesting about it is he would write this 10 years ago, when he was just beginning to be recognized, because it is not at all what you would expect from a serious c21 composer.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3qqA5MaceQ

This last piece is what you might expect from some serious c12 composers. It uses the piano as a percussion instrument including the keyboard occasionally. To my knowledge it is his only "ground-breaker". I have posted a link for the curious.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_9HZkersN4&list=PLF8B5F884E256DFAB

Jorg is a confident bright young man with a spark of life and humanity to him.  I have enjoyed some of his music, and while he is not great yet, he has many years to develop his compositional legs.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 04, 2013, 05:49:46 AM
Billone ~ Legno.Edre II "Edre" (2003)

https://www.youtube.com/v/0W3r4HKiYZM

Solo bassoon.

Pierluigi Billone ~ Δίκη Wall (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/v/LT2NtL7ZiNY

Percussion + ensemble.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 04, 2013, 05:56:13 AM
This thread seems to have gone asleep and I hope on one was waiting for me.  I wanted to mention Jorg Widmann a German clarinetist/composer , a student of Rihm. Like Rihm he is comfortable  composing in a variety of styles, but I do not sense much else in common.  The things I am familiar with are not on You Tube, and I have never heard the pieces below, but it gives some sense of who Jorg is.
This first piece is a clarinet sonata. Jorg at his best is playful although it is often subtle. Maybe because I have just become acquainted with it, and in that aspect only, it calls to mind Michaels Reise.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvXG9m6JI6k

The next piece, on the light/dark scale, is partly cloudy.  Perhaps it contains a touch of fantasy but is not playful.  If you do not know what a amonica is, like me, it is a glass acoustical instrument
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2psVd3Kj0V8

The third piece is called a string quartet. It more aptly might be described as variations on a folk tune and is bizarrely playful. Give a couple of minutes. What I find most interesting about it is he would write this 10 years ago, when he was just beginning to be recognized, because it is not at all what you would expect from a serious c21 composer.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3qqA5MaceQ

This last piece is what you might expect from some serious c12 composers. It uses the piano as a percussion instrument including the keyboard occasionally. To my knowledge it is his only "ground-breaker". I have posted a link for the curious.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_9HZkersN4&list=PLF8B5F884E256DFAB

Jorg is a confident bright young man with a spark of life and humanity to him.  I have enjoyed some of his music, and while he is not great yet, he has many years to develop his compositional legs.

Good post.

Jörg Widmann ... Zweites Labyrinth

https://www.youtube.com/v/7De-2dsWN0I
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 07, 2013, 06:19:31 AM
Jeremy Howard Beck: The Trombone's Champion (http://composersforum.org/discover/articles/jeremy-howard-beck-trombone%E2%80%99s-champion)

It’s hardly uncommon for a composer to devote a sizable chunk of their careers to composing for a particular instrument. Consider the droves of composers who wrote almost exclusively for violin, piano, guitar or, in the case of Berio, Cathy Berberian, who was arguably a timbre all to herself.
 
2012 Jerome Fund awardee Jeremy Howard Beck composes for the trombone. Not exclusively, but certainly with zeal. A lifelong trombonist, Beck fervently extols the compositional virtues of brass instruments in general, claiming them to be much maligned and undeservedly overlooked by composers.

Unsurprisingly then, a cheerfully symbiotic relationship of sorts has sprung up between the young composer and acclaimed New York-based trombone quartet, The Guidonian Hand. Beck has composed for the quartet before, a microtonal tour de force entitled Awakening that delves into the struggle between power, powerlessness and the fight for social justice. In composing the piece, Beck set out to prove that four trombones could be every bit as expressive as the ubiquitous string quartet. “The feelings and ideas expressed in that work could not, I feel, be expressed by any other instrument,” he says. “The music required joy and outrage, raw physical power and monumental, totemic grandeur, in equal measure.”


http://www.youtube.com/v/9J1mfe3C6K0


Another work, electronic -

Could Have NOISE mix 6 17 (https://soundcloud.com/jeremyhowardbeck/could-have-noise-mix-6-17)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 08, 2013, 07:47:45 AM
Daniel Powers (http://www.danielpowers.info/)

In 1995, Daniel Powers was named composer in residence with the Terre Haute Symphony Orchestra. He has been a member of the orchestra since 1986, and also served as its librarian for 19 years.

Since becoming composer in residence, Powers has written several major works and many arrangements for the orchestra. Works include  Sinfonietta, played on the children’s concert in April 1997; Concerto for piano and orchestra, which was premiered in March 1998, with the composer’s wife, Martha Krasnican, as soloist; and Tower Music, premiered in March 2001. Another new work, The Starry Messenger, was commissioned to commemorate the Terre Haute Symphony’s 75th season, in September 2001, and has since been recorded by the Prague Radio Symphony on the ERM CD Masterworks of the New Era, Vol. 12. In April 2005, a second piano concerto, again featuring Martha Krasnican, was premiered. Recent works include Overture to the Season and Concerto Piccolo, a short work for piccolo solo and orchestra, featuring Kate Prouty, the orchestra’s piccolo player. November will see the premiere of a Viola Concerto.

Powers was born in 1960, and began composing at an early age. He took his first formal lessons, with Rudi Martinus Van Dijk, then the composer in residence with the Fort Wayne Philharmonic, in 1973. He received a Bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College in 1982 and a Master’s from Indiana University in 1987. His composition teachers included Joseph Wood, Fred Fox, Earle Brown, and Harvey Sollberger. He also studied viola with Georges Janzer.

http://www.youtube.com/v/BwMjg1Gbc7Q
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kaergaard on August 08, 2013, 08:04:50 AM
Lots of them I can think of and play and enjoy. How about Hans Werner Henze? or Peter Eøtvøs_ two of my favourites. Oh yes, of course Osvaldo Golijov!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 08, 2013, 03:22:22 PM
Steven Stucky ~ Symphony (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/v/WfPRltoWa_8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 08, 2013, 05:18:43 PM
Starting next week I'll be posting a bunch. It's a bit distressing how small this topic is, comparatively.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 08, 2013, 06:44:09 PM
Pierluigi Billone ~ Δίκη Wall (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/v/LT2NtL7ZiNY

Percussion + ensemble.

Glad to see Billone get some air time - what do you think of his music? I was in the audience for this performance by the Talea Ensemble, and at least on first hearing, I enjoyed much of Δίκη Wall but it seemed just a wee bit too long. That said, I do like his work overall; he is one of those brave explorers who seem to be able to conjure up new timbres from familiar instruments.

Steven Stucky ~ Symphony (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/v/WfPRltoWa_8

And the NY Phil just did this a few months ago - quite an attractively constructed piece.

Lots of them I can think of and play and enjoy. How about Hans Werner Henze? or Peter Eøtvøs_ two of my favourites. Oh yes, of course Osvaldo Golijov!

Hey, a rare kaergaard sighting!  0:) Nice to see you around here...

Starting next week I'll be posting a bunch. It's a bit distressing how small this topic is, comparatively.

Excellent. PS, there are many of us who check in with this thread more often than it might appear, and lurk more than post.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 08, 2013, 07:14:47 PM
PS, below, more Pierluigi Billone, an excerpt from his Mani.Mono for solo spring drum (2009), written for Alex Lipowski of the Talea Ensemble. I can't quite articulate why I find this piece so fascinating - perhaps its the unexpected sonorities created by the instrument (which I don't recall ever hearing before). Another interesting listen: Mani.De Leonardis (2004), for four automobile springs and glass.

http://www.youtube.com/v/mfjgn6gtQrM

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 03:38:38 AM
A new voice

ROBERT SEABACK (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://robertseaback.blogspot.com&usd=2&usg=ALhdy2-3ZHu50IHUsvCikDFJa10BDLj0LA)

Robert Seaback is a guitarist and composer focused on the composition of electroacoustic music that combines traditional instruments with precomposed electronic sound. He holds a B.S. in Music Technology from Northeastern University, an M.A. in Composition from Mills College, and is currently a Ph.D. Fellow at the University of Florida under the instruction of Paul Koonce and James Paul Sain. Seaback’s electroacoustic work has been presented internationally, and in 2011, he was awarded First Prize in the ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Commission Competition.

LISTEN: sequence (bloom) for digital playback (http://soundcloud.com/rseaback/sequence-bloom)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 03:51:10 AM
PS, below, more Pierluigi Billone, an excerpt from his Mani.Mono for solo spring drum (2009), written for Alex Lipowski of the Talea Ensemble. I can't quite articulate why I find this piece so fascinating - perhaps its the unexpected sonorities created by the instrument (which I don't recall ever hearing before). Another interesting listen: Mani.De Leonardis (2004), for four automobile springs and glass.

http://www.youtube.com/v/mfjgn6gtQrM

--Bruce

Great piece!  I don't know anything about the instrument but it sounds as if it is electronically amplified.

I am interested in Billoni's music, his work which seems to be celebrating sound for its own sake, is something I very much appreciate.  The Italian avant garde has interested me going back to Maderno, and the group including Nono, Dallapiccola, Berio, and others of that period, and more recently, with Sciarinno and Scelsi.  The younger generation of composers continue the music with great success in most cases, IMO.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 04:36:40 AM
Another Italian composer I like -

Ivan Fedele ~ Arcipelago Möbius

https://www.youtube.com/v/rVNjtxWBVmk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 05:32:04 AM
Salvatore Sciarrino ~ String Quartet no.8 (2008)

http://www.youtube.com/v/SgfTObtVAQ8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 09, 2013, 05:50:17 AM
Great piece!  I don't know anything about the instrument but it sounds as if it is electronically amplified.

I am interested in Billoni's music, his work which seems to be celebrating sound for its own sake, is something I very much appreciate.  The Italian avant garde has interested me going back to Maderno, and the group including Nono, Dallapiccola, Berio, and others of that period, and more recently, with Sciarinno and Scelsi.  The younger generation of composers continue the music with great success in most cases, IMO.

Unfortunately that amplified effect is probably due to the recording, valuable as it is to have. (At the concert, there weren't any electronics that I could see, anyway.)

And yes, so many of these younger Italian composers are so interesting! The Talea players also introduced me to the work of Fausto Romitelli, a great revelation from the last few years. Here's a 4-minute video, apparently excerpts from several pieces - I wish they had posted a little more info - from their recording session at EMPAC/Renssalaer last year for the album below (which is terrific, by the way).

http://vimeo.com/49399829



--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 05:58:49 AM
Unfortunately that amplified effect is probably due to the recording, valuable as it is to have. (At the concert, there weren't any electronics that I could see, anyway.)

And yes, so many of these younger Italian composers are so interesting! The Talea players also introduced me to the work of Fausto Romitelli, a great revelation from the last few years. Here's a 4-minute video, apparently excerpts from several pieces - I wish they had posted a little more info - from their recording session at EMPAC/Renssalaer last year for the album below (which is terrific, by the way).

http://vimeo.com/49399829



--Bruce

There a few more clips in YouTube of Romitelli - I agree many younger Italians doing some fascinating music.

http://www.youtube.com/v/LmxzJQhNvlg

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 09, 2013, 06:10:23 AM
Salvatore Sciarrino ~ String Quartet no.8 (2008)

http://www.youtube.com/v/SgfTObtVAQ8

And thanks for posting that - Sciarrino is one of my favorite living composers.

Whoa, that Romitelli clip you just posted is wild! Haven't read any notes on the piece, but there appears to be a little Strauss Alpine Symphony reference - which of course disintegrates into something else entirely.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kaergaard on August 09, 2013, 07:58:02 AM
Thank you, Brewsky! Not rare today because there is this outrageously beautiful, innovative Dane I want you to watch and listen to:

http://www.dacapo-records.dk/img/album/x385/2.110406.jpg

Pelle's DVD is on PAL only; try it on your PC, you'll like it! Not too many classical music composers shown on a DVD dancing to his own compositions.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 09, 2013, 08:42:13 AM

Excellent. PS, there are many of us who check in with this thread more often than it might appear, and lurk more than post.

--Bruce
Speaking as an irregular 'lurker', I just love it when I find posted a piece of 21st century music I can appreciate - means a wait sometimes, but well worth it.
Latest example; Steven Stucky...most grateful for 'discovering' him. Thank you to all who post !
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kyjo on August 09, 2013, 09:10:52 AM
Speaking as an irregular 'lurker', I just love it when I find posted a piece of 21st century music I can appreciate - means a wait sometimes, but well worth it.
Latest example; Steven Stucky...most grateful for 'discovering' him. Thank you to all who post !

Ah Clive, good to see you here! I agree, Stucky is one of America's most talented living composers. I love his post-impressionist style! Clive, have you heard Imants Kalnins' Symphony no. 6 (available on classical-music-online.net) or Joep Franssens' Grace for orchestra (available on YT)? I consider these to be the most beautiful compositions of this century :) I'm not usually one to be moved to tears by music, but I came pretty close to doing so in both of these compositions. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 09, 2013, 09:37:41 AM
Joshua Fineberg

Joshua Fineberg has worked with many leading composers in the United States and France, including: George Crumb, Jacob Druckman, Robert Hall Lewis, Philippe Manoury, and André Boucourechliev. In 1991, he moved to Paris and studied with Tristan Murail. The following year he was selected by the Ensemble InterContemporain reading panel for the course in composition and musical technologies. In the Fall of 1997, he returned to the US to pursue a doctorate in musical composition at Columbia University, which he completed in May 1999. After teaching at Columbia for a year, he went to Harvard University where he served as the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humainities until 2007. In 2007 he joined the faculty of the Boston University School of Music and became the director of their electronic music studio.

Broken Symmetries for 5 players (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xF4wrA4-Jdk)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on August 09, 2013, 11:07:22 AM
Thank you for posting those;  most of them interesting listens, all of them first listens not only to the works involved but also the composers (most of them I've not heard of before, as best I can remember).  The two that I'm inclined to return for repeat listenings were the Stuckey and Powers (this should be no surprise if you take into account my listening habits and tastes).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on August 09, 2013, 11:27:49 AM
There a few more clips in YouTube of Romitelli - I agree many younger Italians doing some fascinating music.

 :)

This was quite enjoyable, thanks for posting more Romitelli - I've heard Professor Bad Trip before, thanks to Bruce. What the heck, I'll listen to it now again.
http://www.youtube.com/v/20gECBNfiIo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 10, 2013, 02:33:49 AM
Ah Clive, good to see you here! I agree, Stucky is one of America's most talented living composers. I love his post-impressionist style! Clive, have you heard Imants Kalnins' Symphony no. 6 (available on classical-music-online.net) or Joep Franssens' Grace for orchestra (available on YT)? I consider these to be the most beautiful compositions of this century :) I'm not usually one to be moved to tears by music, but I came pretty close to doing so in both of these compositions. :)
Mr. Kyjo, delightful to hear from you as always - yes, Franssens is a surprise favourite; assumed when first hearing of him that he'd be as inaccessible (to me !) as, say, Louis Andriessen, but love listening to virtually anything of his( Grace is on as I write). Likewise Kalnins...would love to get his entire output; can that be done, do you suppose ?
When mentioning Stucky, should also have said that Daniel Powers' work was very approachable for a non-expert.
Thanks to all for this thread. It challenges the assumptions of the many of us who love music but know nothing of it that anything 'modern' will be altogether too much like hard work.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kyjo on August 10, 2013, 04:34:33 AM
Likewise Kalnins...would love to get his entire output; can that be done, do you suppose ?

Well, his Symphonies 4-6, the Oratorio Morning, as well as two shorter pieces, can be found on classical-music-online.net. I'm afraid that's all that's available; a shame since Kalnins is a really talented composer!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 11, 2013, 02:41:23 PM
Rozalie Hirs's Roseherte (2008) for symphony orchestra and electronic sounds:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0F1_aMRpCQ

An almost purely structuralist composer she makes use of electronics to shape and bend her compositional forms. The electronics encompass as it were, serving not only as the exoskeleton to the piece, but also acting as a more constituent blending into the overall whole. I'd say there were shades of Messiaen in there, but her music also has links to the spectral school while also being informed by her academic endeavors. All of this makes her music something to behold. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 11, 2013, 06:02:51 PM
Victor Smolski's The Heretic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqK4Hg-OWxI

Definitely something I think MN Dave, Greg, and Andy would enjoy. It's a conceptual piece composed by a heavy metal guitarist, so there are a lot of intricacies that are normally missed otherwise i regards to 'normal' heavy metal music. Honestly, I can't think of anything other than Andy's disc that come close to this in conception, maybe Branca.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on August 12, 2013, 03:15:20 AM
Victor Smolski's The Heretic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqK4Hg-OWxI

Definitely something I think MN Dave, Greg, and Andy would enjoy. It's a conceptual piece composed by a heavy metal guitarist, so there are a lot of intricacies that are normally missed otherwise i regards to 'normal' heavy metal music. Honestly, I can't think of anything other than Andy's disc that come close to this in conception, maybe Branca.
Cool!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on August 12, 2013, 03:33:24 AM
A depressing thread. I know work by some of these names and I'll telling you by extension that virtually without question that all the music mentioned here is drivel or of very limited artistic value, and won't in the least merit a footnote in posterity's charting of the decline of art music.

How's that for an ingratiating post? Feel free to ignore it and swim on through these polluted waters into the night.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on August 12, 2013, 03:38:16 AM
A depressing thread. I know work by some of these names and I'll telling you by extension that virtually without question that all the music mentioned here is drivel or of very limited artistic value, and won't in the least merit a footnote in posterity's charting of the decline of art music.

How's that for an ingratiating post? Feel free to ignore it and swim on through these polluted waters into the night.
It's wonderful logic - similarly I can tell you that the late 18th & early 19th century produced almost nothing of great value, based on Hummel & Ditters von Dittersdorf's music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 12, 2013, 03:45:29 AM
It's wonderful logic - similarly I can tell you that the late 18th & early 19th century produced almost nothing of great value, based on Hummel & Ditters von Dittersdorf's music.

Please don't encourage him.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 12, 2013, 03:48:24 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/i5WGcfTekEo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 12, 2013, 03:57:38 AM
Kyle Bobby Dunn (born February 27, 1986 in Ontario) is a composer, arranger, and live performer of modern and neo-classical based drone music. He has performed in live and exclusive outdoor settings, including Banff National Park, since 2000 and has released music on various international recording labels.

His work has been described as "compositions that are patience incarnate" and "encourage an emotional response even as its seemingly infinite, creeping swirl and hum threatens to numb. A difficult feat."

The austere, tempered tonal shifts featured in many of his compositions subtly echo the work of minimalist forerunners like Morton Feldman and LaMonte Young. At the same time Dunn occasionally intersperses quaint, almost chamberal touches which evoke more traditionally classical sources.

https://www.youtube.com/v/0p2yZ1ZNWe0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on August 12, 2013, 07:37:06 AM
It's wonderful logic - similarly I can tell you that the late 18th & early 19th century produced almost nothing of great value, based on Hummel & Ditters von Dittersdorf's music.

Hey!  I like Hummel!

Please don't encourage him.

Let's just say that with Sean,  I've finally found a use for the 'ignore' function on this board.

Kyle Bobby Dunn (born February 27, 1986 in Ontario) is a composer, arranger, and live performer of modern and neo-classical based drone music. He has performed in live and exclusive outdoor settings, including Banff National Park, since 2000 and has released music on various international recording labels.


I didn't know that the CIA had in house composers!

[Sorry, could not resist.  But I've never heard the term "drone music" before, and promise to listen later today.]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 12, 2013, 07:51:43 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/_Gz8b4zHNlQ

THOMAS C. LANG (http://thomaslangmusic.com/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on August 12, 2013, 10:00:10 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/i5WGcfTekEo

Well done!

Mr. Dunn's contribution, I am afraid,  simply seemed to pointlessly and endlessly drone on.  (Pun not really intended, but I can't think of a better word to use.)

Now listening to the Lang, which seems to be in the same category as the Abrahamsen. (I don't remember first names--is this the Lang who wrote Little Matchbox Girl?)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 12, 2013, 10:08:20 AM
Well done!

Mr. Dunn's contribution, I am afraid,  simply seemed to pointlessly and endlessly drone on.  (Pun not really intended, but I can't think of a better word to use.)

Now listening to the Lang, which seems to be in the same category as the Abrahamsen. (I don't remember first names--is this the Lang who wrote Little Matchbox Girl?)

I'm glad you are finding some things enjoyable.  I do not think this is that Lang, at least there is nothing with that title among his list of works found on his website.  Drone music is not for everyone, I happen to enjoy it and find it, when well done, very enjoyable in a quiet, meditative kind of way.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 12, 2013, 10:14:26 AM
Have you had to play a part that is a drone?  ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 12, 2013, 10:29:31 AM
Have you had to play a part that is a drone?  ;)

As a bass player I have played "drone-like" parts; fulfilling the role of the ostinato element, along with the drums, can be very rewarding with the right group of musicians.  But this kind of music is best done using electronic means. IMO.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on August 12, 2013, 10:30:23 AM
Hey!  I like Hummel!

Let's just say that with Sean,  I've finally found a use for the 'ignore' function on this board.
Yes, I'm sorry I used Hummel, but couldn't think of a name of someone less significant then.
That idea is definitely not a bad one, but I do like to have a laugh now and then.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 12, 2013, 04:08:15 PM
Some great music. Thanks for the posts.

Merlijn Twaalfhoven's The Air We Breathe:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opoNcm2V-V0

A piece that uses everyday sounds and the voice. The only composer I can think of that has gone this route is Meredith Monk, but this is definitely something different. It's much more conceptual and may even be classified as a sound installation. There is a mix of professional and the average joe in the creation of this piece. Truly unique.

Jerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate's Taloowa' Chipota:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKB4eZkstos

One of the few Native Americans who composes within the classical vein. Making use of that tradition and his own culture is the creation of these touching songs. Split into two parts, essentially. The first part is based on a text written by the composer informed by his original language, and the second part breaks down language into its components, much like Monk would have. Might just bring some tears to your eyes.

Hannes Taljaard's Wiegeliedjies Boek 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Y9OXjY_Yhg

This was written for piano, voice, clarinet, and the bassoon. That combination alone makes it worth at least a looking at. This is far more traditional than the other two pieces being placed within the lieder tradition. Although, I would say that Schoenberg's school is where this music was drawn from.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on August 12, 2013, 05:50:41 PM
It's wonderful logic - similarly I can tell you that the late 18th & early 19th century produced almost nothing of great value, based on Hummel & Ditters von Dittersdorf's music.

That's very harsh on Hummel and Dittersdorf.

But at that time there were indeed greater composers above them.

Unlike today.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 12, 2013, 06:02:46 PM
This was quite enjoyable, thanks for posting more Romitelli - I've heard Professor Bad Trip before, thanks to Bruce. What the heck, I'll listen to it now again.
http://www.youtube.com/v/20gECBNfiIo

It's really quite an extraordinary piece. I was interested to learn that it is precisely notated, even in moments when one might think the musicians are improvising. The range of sonorities Romitelli conjures up is striking.

Meanwhile, I just found out about this tasty-looking recording of The Nameless City (1997, so technically, late 20th century) for strings and bells.



--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on August 12, 2013, 06:12:38 PM
A Romitelli I'd never even heard of.

Bruce, you are now officially my hero.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 12, 2013, 06:21:53 PM
A Romitelli I'd never even heard of.

Bruce, you are now officially my hero.

Awww...I'm just another explorer like you and many others here. (But thanks for the compliment.  8))

I had never heard of it, either. Found it when searching for a cover shot of the Talea Ensemble's Anamorphosis.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 13, 2013, 03:46:26 AM
Separations: a lament (https://soundcloud.com/scottblasco/separations-a-lament)

Scott Blasco (http://scottblasco.com/) is a composer, percussionist, and guitarist. Degrees in music composition and theology, currently a composition and music theory instructor at Washington State University.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 13, 2013, 04:03:46 AM
Canticle (https://soundcloud.com/bigcomposer/canticle)

Mike McFerron (http://www.bigcomposer.com/) is professor of music and composer-in-residence at Lewis University and he is founder and co-director of Electronic Music Midwest (http://www.emmfestival.org).

In Latin, this 5.1 surround work for voice and fixed media was composed in 2006.

Translation
Set me as a seal upon your heart,
as a seal upon your arm;
For love is as strong as death,
Ambition as harsh as hell:
its flames are a blazing fire.
Deep waters cannot extinguish love,
Nor rivers sweep it away.
If a man should give all the substance of his house for love,
he shall despise it as nothing.


This recording features mezzo soprano, Bethany Worrell.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 13, 2013, 05:52:30 PM
Arlene Sierra's Surrounded Ground:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPbK2XbqCa4

Sadly this is only a sample, but I think it's the longest clip she has on Youtube. Some very interesting interplays and the passing of the melody amongst a variety of instruments, with a really amazing piano grounding it all. Heavy dissonant qualities, mixed with varied dynamics and tempos makes for something that will definitely leave you wanting more.

Friedrich Heinrich Kern's Anima:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovNSvaHhZgU

The primary instrument is a komungo combined with a polyphonous voices, off stage, reading a poem. Has an insect like quality, and this piece is not for everyone, as it also picks up on the drone like quality of an insect, seemingly through electronic means, but I'm unsure if that is the cause of it or the instrument, as I don't know much about it. It's a really interesting sound.

Aleksandra Vrebalov's Hold me Neighbor, in this Storm:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0qncrcyBWA

This is the selection that is the most out there. Informed by the conflicts in the Balkans, it combines wild dissonance with bells, voices, and the Muslim call to prayer. It is all of these elements though that make the piece worth a listen. It is an extremely complex piece, layered deep and thick. My ears have heard quite a bit but nothing like this. Truly lovely and wonderful.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 14, 2013, 04:26:13 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/DArLGg7AoYc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 14, 2013, 04:19:25 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/xrtEnPfrQws
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 14, 2013, 04:39:30 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/xYw5hfzH1KM
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 14, 2013, 05:44:17 PM
Always excited to click on this topic:

Carsten Bo Eriksen's Songs Without Words - Chapter 8:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6wP1gm6Ny8

Has a fairly traditional melody which is backed up by much wondrous repetitiveness from the backing instruments. The performers are also something else. I don't know if this is meant to be seen, but this should be seen rather than simply heard. Interesting textures throughout with really good dynamics. It also might be catchy enough to get stuck in your head.

Alexandra Fol's Dawn. Lake. Glistening Light. :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMUDXzh03bo

A truly interesting duo of a harp and a percussionist. Good use of overtones and undertones. Sounds a bit like angelic music of the spheres. Good use of sustainment. Good interplay between the instruments. I really enjoyed the harp's consistency. It's pieces like this that leave me awe struck when it comes to composition. How did they come to think of music in this way is the question I always come away with. And I appreciate their vision where mine is clearly lacking, but my ears can, will, and shall surely follow.

Peng-Peng Gong's Piano Concerto No. 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGGR9tpk3zg

Extremely traditional, hints of Shostakovich and Prokofiev. It's a very good work, but if you're here for something adventurous this is not it.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 15, 2013, 02:32:46 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/xrtEnPfrQws
Thanks so much for intro. to Moulijn - some other fine pieces on YT !
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 03:49:08 AM
Thanks so much for intro. to Moulijn - some other fine pieces on YT !

A worthwhile composer.  His music is not the most adventurous but also is not shallow.  a discovery for me as well.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 03:52:07 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/uRCYNy88JRA
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 07:23:15 AM
Liza Lim (http://lizalimcomposer.wordpress.com/) is an interesting composer, I may have already posted about her work - but here is a somewhat recent composition.

http://www.youtube.com/v/oiezf8IMLoA

Also, a page of more videos HERE (http://lizalimcomposer.wordpress.com/videos/).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 15, 2013, 08:22:22 AM
Liza Lim (http://lizalimcomposer.wordpress.com/) is an interesting composer, I may have already posted about her work - but here is a somewhat recent composition.

http://www.youtube.com/v/oiezf8IMLoA

Also, a page of more videos HERE (http://lizalimcomposer.wordpress.com/videos/).

Absolutely love her. Lots of extended technique in her works. So scrumptious.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 09:38:47 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/83qVMMMXhtA&feature=youtu.be

Anna Korsun (http://annakorsun.com/)
Bamberg, Germany

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 10:17:35 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/a0Pcydv0MuI

Juste Janulyte (http://www.janulyte.info/en/about/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 03:06:08 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/fUFvPr52hAY

Chaya Czernowin (http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/featured/38323/)

Maim, a major piece in Ms. Czernowin’s œuvre, is a large scale, 50-minute orchestral tryptch with 5 soloists. The 5 soloists are include regular interpreters of her music: Rico Gubler, tubax (a hybrid of a saxophone & tuba); Peter Veale, oboe & musette; John Mark Harris, piano & harpsichord; Seth Josel, guitars; Mary Oliver, viola.

Maim, “water” in Hebrew, is the metaphor which dominates the piece. Elementary forms of water appear throughout Maim, musically translated. Scattered droplets — articulated as points — close Maim zarim, maim gnuvim; the same droplets begin Mei Mecha’a, but this time, perhaps, condensed. Condensation, indeed, is meant in almost a literal sense here: where at the end of Maim zarim, maim gnuvim these are truly heard as liquid points, in their re-articulation at the beginning of Mei Mecha’a, they are in a state between that and one seemingly gaseous, or at least cloud-like, even if whether vapor is condensing into liquid, or vice versa, remains unclear. Those same points begin to crystallize into solid form in their rapid, meccanico repetition, which dominates the centre of The Memory of Water. But this is not a romantic tone poem. The motion between its states follows a logic which is anything but that of water itself.

Maim springs from the thought that only a small part of human communication lies in words. Most comes through gestures, timbre, tempo, and the world’s great problems result from the overvaluation of words. Influenced by the huge media coverage of the Middle East, Chaya Czernowin has composed a sensitive piece which sounds out the possibilities of music against the background of a newly understood communication.

Following its Berlin premier in March 2007 at the prestigious MaerzMusik Festival, the critic John Warnaby said: “…“Maim” is probably her finest achievement to date. …the product of a remarkable sonic imagination. The solo instrumental quintet and ‘live’ electronics create a delicate tapestry of sound, but equally the orchestra is deployed with considerable power when necessary.”
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 15, 2013, 05:41:27 PM
Just great stuff. Best thread, in regards to music, on this forum.

Koka Nikoladze's Starshine:

First, an interesting trio of guitar, violin, and percussionist (rather multi-instrumentalist). Good use of extended techniques intermingled with melodious music. Some really good harmonies and tones. Lovely balancing between the three. The percussion was especially exceptional. The sounds created were right up my alley. This is definitely something for the more experimental crowd.

Ursula Mamlok's Concerto for Oboe and Chamber Orchestra:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7yqaL24tXU

A piece that sounds informed by Schoenberg's camp. The oboe part seems quite virtuoistic. Light, bright, and airy with some very cool percussion interplay. A lot of passing around notes amongst the players makes for a very enjoyable affair all around. Not very traditional, but come one, give it a shot, it's the oboe.   
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 15, 2013, 05:56:09 PM
Just great stuff. Best thread, in regards to music, on this forum.

Koka Nikoladze's Starshine:

First, an interesting trio of guitar, violin, and percussionist (rather multi-instrumentalist). Good use of extended techniques intermingled with melodious music. Some really good harmonies and tones. Lovely balancing between the three. The percussion was especially exceptional. The sounds created were right up my alley. This is definitely something for the more experimental crowd.

Ursula Mamlok's Concerto for Oboe and Chamber Orchestra:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7yqaL24tXU

A piece that sounds informed by Schoenberg's camp. The oboe part seems quite virtuoistic. Light, bright, and airy with some very cool percussion interplay. A lot of passing around notes amongst the players makes for a very enjoyable affair all around. Not very traditional, but come one, give it a shot, it's the oboe.

Here's the first clip - very nice, btw

https://www.youtube.com/v/MbWnFfSziME
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 16, 2013, 03:52:30 AM
immer (https://soundcloud.com/ianvine/immer)

Ian Vine (http://www.ianvine.com/index.html)

Ian Vine studied at the Royal Northern College of Music with Anthony Gilbert and, later, privately with Simon Holt. Between 1999 and 2004 he was Tutor in Electro-Acoustic Music at the RNCM, and also taught for a time at The University of Manchester. From 2002-2007 he was a participant in the inaugural Blue Touch Paper scheme with the London Sinfonietta, producing three works for the ensemble.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 16, 2013, 04:04:57 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/imtNF6ftsdM

Jennifer Walshe (http://www.milker.org/personnel/walshe/walshe_bio.html)

“The sounds I am interested in include those that we hear all the time but are normally considered flawed or redundant: twigs snapping in a burning fire, paper tearing, breathing, instrumental sounds that aren’t considered ‘beautiful’ in standard terms. I think these sounds have their own beauty in the way that pebbles on a beach or graffiti can have.”
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 16, 2013, 04:23:42 AM
Panayiotis Kokoras (http://www.panayiotiskokoras.com/)

Crama [fl cl pno vln vla vc] (https://soundcloud.com/pkokoras/crama)

Panayiotis Kokoras studied composition with Yannis Ioannides, Henri Kergomard, and classical guitar with Evangelos Asimakopoulos in Athens, Greece. In 1999 he moved to England for postgraduate study at the University of York where he completed his MA and PhD in composition with Tony Myatt. His works have been commissioned by institutes and festivals such as the Fromm Music Foundation (Harvard), IRCAM (France), MATA (New York), Gaudeamus (Netherlands), ZKM (Germany), IMEB (France), Siemens Musikstiftung (Germany) and have been performed in over 400 concerts around the world. His compositions have received 51 distinctions and prizes in international competitions, and have been selected by juries in more than 130 international calls for scores. He is founding member of the Hellenic Electroacoustic Music Composers Association (HELMCA) and from 2004 to 2012 he was board member and president. Kokoras’ sound compositions develop functional classification and matching sound systems written on what he calls Holophonic Musical Texture. As an educator, Kokoras has taught at the Technological and Educational Institute of Crete, and, the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece). Since fall 2012 he has been appointed Assistant Professor at the University of North Texas.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 16, 2013, 06:26:12 AM
Christophe BERTRAND (http://www.christophebertrand.fr/en/bio.html) (1981-2010).

After obtaining first prizes in piano and chamber music at the Strasbourg National Conservatory (C.N.R.) (where he studied with Laurent CABASSO, Michèle RENOUL, Armand ANGSTER), he performs and records with Ensemble Accroche Note ou l'Ensemble In Extremis (which he co-founded). With them, he collaborated with composers such as Ivan FEDELE, Pascal DUSAPIN, Michael JARRELL, Mark ANDRE, Wolfgang RIHM, etc.

http://www.youtube.com/v/mvqwNXJJjU4

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 16, 2013, 10:20:26 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/_Mv4lYUPw8I

Kati Agócs (http://www.agocsmusic.com/)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 18, 2013, 05:37:44 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/YYfqLISFan4

Javier Torres Maldonado (http://www.torresmaldonado.net/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 18, 2013, 04:56:14 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/egIfaIsbKQA

Since Brass nor Stone (2008)

Alexander Goehr (http://www.theguardian.com/music/tomserviceblog/2013/apr/01/contemporary-music-guide-alexander-goehr)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 19, 2013, 04:25:14 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/MKpHiEymhU0



https://www.youtube.com/v/eQhpMhz5wRw



https://www.youtube.com/v/pqFGzBUqoRQ


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 19, 2013, 05:33:29 AM
A piece for prepared piano, NOT by John Cage ~ Lyric Suite (2008) by Kathryn Woodard

http://www.youtube.com/v/ez2wT7V2fVA

Kathryn Woodard (http://www.kathrynwoodard.com/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 19, 2013, 07:07:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/XkbkjvSAPd4

Paul Méfano (http://brahms.ircam.fr/composers/composer/2256/) ~ Jades (2003)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 20, 2013, 03:37:18 AM
Luca Belcastro (http://www.lucabelcastro.it/curriculum.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/ssAxPcBQCtU

... as in a dream - (2005) ... 11' 00"
voice, alto flute and 5 players (bass clarinet, violin, cello, percussion and piano)

(from "The Tempest" by William Shakespeare)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 20, 2013, 06:41:47 AM
Alfio Fazio (http://www.composers21.com/compdocs/fazioa.htm)

http://www.youtube.com/v/vb4BIWsfsdE

Sonata, vibraphone, marimba, (2006)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on August 20, 2013, 07:25:04 PM
Erling Wold's Uksus:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_5XRBgJiVM

Classified as a quasi neo-buffa chamber opera. That seems fitting enough. The music is interesting and definitely gives off a comic vibe. The singers/actors are pretty fantastic, as well, and they play well with the stage and set. Being chamber it's quite parsed down, and I'd compare the music and style as a combination of expressionism, Offenbach, and Berg.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 22, 2013, 03:47:31 AM
Reena Esmail (https://yalemusic.digication.com/reenaesmail/Bio)

Jhula Jhule (https://soundcloud.com/reenaesmail/jhula-jhule)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 22, 2013, 04:46:06 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/hBCMup9GvKA

Davide Anzaghi (http://www.davideanzaghi.com/sito_english/bio.htm)

FramEnsemble (http://www.youtube.com/user/FramEnsemble/videos)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 22, 2013, 06:46:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/LAAQLFknrgQ

Eunho Chang (http://changeunho.com/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 22, 2013, 03:22:19 PM
MaCu - Sketch #2 (rough mix - w.i.p.) (https://soundcloud.com/macu/macu-sketch-2-rough-mix-w-i-p)

Susanne Hafenscher (http://macu1.wordpress.com/)
Austria
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 22, 2013, 03:31:48 PM
Penumbra for two bass clarinets, ensemble and electronics (https://soundcloud.com/ana-maria-avram/ana-maria-avram-penumbra-for)

Ana-Maria Avram (https://soundcloud.com/ana-maria-avram-composer-2)
Bucharest, Romania

Married to Iancu Dumitrescu (http://hyperspectral.99k.org/Iancudumitrescu/Welcome.html)

Liminal Involvement (https://soundcloud.com/ana-maria-avram/iancu-dumitrescu-liminal)

Two very exciting composers from Romania.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 06:16:58 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/y4asMz_EVzg

Latest piano piece by Boulez, 2005.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 06:50:17 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/MjRbdhp9Ef8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 08:11:33 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/WcHXbAcXwDk

Hugues Dufourt (http://www.kairos-music.com/composer/bios/DufourtBio.html) (1943- )
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 08:32:47 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/cIKRB4RE2zc

Alwynne Pritchard (http://www.alwynnepritchard.co.uk/biog.asp)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 10:55:51 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/AVrGyeCOU1A

Michael Jarrell (http://www.michaeljarrell.com/index.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 23, 2013, 11:11:39 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/BaKpsSV7PKo

Luis Naón (http://www.luis-naon.com/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 25, 2013, 04:42:19 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/qUYmtD96WrM

Giovanni Albini (http://www.albini.biz/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on August 25, 2013, 01:36:24 PM
Here's the first clip - very nice, btw

https://www.youtube.com/v/MbWnFfSziME
Lovely! :D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 26, 2013, 05:58:49 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/tabBHAxKs80

Juan Arroyo (http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Arroyo) - Sikus-Arka/Ira, 2010
for recorder ensemble, Paetzold recorder ensemble and live electronics

Siku means pan flute in Aymara language. This instrument of South American origin has inspired the writing of the piece in the form and in the modes of sound production. The piece consists of three parts: Arka, interlude and Ira, referring to the two parts of the pan flute. Arka is the feminine side of the instrument with 6 or 8 holes of play and Ira the male side with 7 holes of play Siku can be played two ways, the way of the city with the notes played by a musician, or how interdependent countryside with two musicians who each only half notes, and that answer. This technique requires less breath (useful at high altitudes), more synchronization between the two interpreters and causes a stereophonic effect.

In referring to parts of Siku, this piece was written for two flutes sextets (a sextet of flute recorder and a flute sextet Paetzold). The set is divided by 4 groups and each group consists of three musicians, three microphones and a speaker.

Following a research about the sound of flutes and Siku I am still fascinated by the amount of sounds made by filtering the resulting position of the mouth or the intensity of breath. So I decided to continue the same approach with electro, with the use of different filters that act on the white noise generated in the computer and the capture of Dynamics flutes. This filtering allows me to get a curtain that often masks the sound of flutes. and thus be able to imagine a world hidden far away, full of sound or simply unknown forsake submerged in the unconscious distance and only allows me to dream.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 26, 2013, 07:10:13 AM
Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf (http://www.claussteffenmahnkopf.de/main.php?Param_Lang=E)

http://www.youtube.com/v/hvlWDGmNgYc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 26, 2013, 07:37:38 AM
Man-Ching Donald Yu (http://www.manchingdonaldyu.com/biography.htm)

http://www.youtube.com/v/wb3lbF9dx6s
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 26, 2013, 08:26:55 AM
Gilad Hochman (http://www.giladhochman.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/rtRLdbvNJXU
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 26, 2013, 11:16:37 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/WdFOYM2s6PI

Iancu Dumitrescu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iancu_Dumitrescu)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 28, 2013, 04:07:03 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/PtVGRepNftA

Miguel Farías (http://miguelfarias.free.fr/English/Bio.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 28, 2013, 04:41:36 PM
Clara Iannotta Website (http://claraiannotta.com/)

"3 sur 5" II mvt, for accordion and 2 percussionists (2012-2013) Audio Clip (https://soundcloud.com/claraiannotta/clara-iannotta-3-sur-5-ii-mvt)

Ensemble pieces Audio Clip (https://soundcloud.com/claraiannotta/sets/ensemble-pieces)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 29, 2013, 03:53:17 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/DwCdgXTFPLA

Rand Steiger (http://rand.info/rands/text/bio.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 29, 2013, 06:22:03 AM
Nicole Lizée (http://www.nicolelizee.com/) (1973), Canada   

http://www.youtube.com/v/onv2ZRsZ9P0

And another work:

White Label Experiment (https://soundcloud.com/soundstreams/white-label-experiment-by-nicole-lizee)

Composed to celebrate what would have been the hundredth birthday of avant-garde pioneer John Cage, this work pays homage to the ideas and philosophies embodied in his music and his words. Cage was famed for integrating non-traditional instruments into his work and for coaxing unconventional sounds from traditional ones; accordingly, Lizée—herself noted for incorporating turntables and other electronic devices into the concert-music setting—here makes extensive use of various objets trouvés (including typewriters and vinyl records on portable turntables struck with mallets) as percussion instruments, regardless of their original purpose.

The idea of “preparing” instruments, one of Cage’s most significant contributions to modern music, is reflected here in alterations made to the surfaces of vinyl records, generating new patterns and melodies by creating new paths for the stylus. Lizée has described this piece as a kind of dance party for Cage: “a re-imagining of a rave.”

This work was premiered on March 2, 2012 at the 'So Percussion' concert presented at Koerner Hall in Toronto (Canada).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 29, 2013, 08:22:16 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/JfhhD4O4Zpg

Gary Kulesha (http://www.garykulesha.com/) (b. 1954)
Sonata for Bassoon and Piano (2011)
Matthew Nickel, bassoon and Mariah Mlynarek, piano
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on August 29, 2013, 08:30:08 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/DwCdgXTFPLA

Rand Steiger (http://rand.info/rands/text/bio.html)

I was at the first performance of this piece, by the Talea Ensemble, and liked it quite a bit.

http://www.seenandheard-international.com/2011/04/21/the-talea-ensemble-at-merkin-concert-hall/

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 29, 2013, 08:48:44 AM
I was at the first performance of this piece, by the Talea Ensemble, and liked it quite a bit.

http://www.seenandheard-international.com/2011/04/21/the-talea-ensemble-at-merkin-concert-hall/

--Bruce

Very cool, thanks.  I am often envious of the opportunities you have for hearing new music.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 29, 2013, 09:23:48 AM
SoundMakers (http://www.soundmakers.ca/soundstreams-commissions?page=1)

Listen to and learn about music Soundstreams (http://www.soundstreams.ca/home?cookieCheck=true) has commissioned over the past 30 years. Search by composer or composition name, ensemble type, year composed or choose a work based on your mood. Click the title of the work to read more information about the composition and its composer.

Pretty nice site for new music.  Most of the composers are from Canada, naturally, but there are many composers from other countries as well.

Worth checking out.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 03:19:55 AM
Dave Wishart (http://www.davidwishartmusic.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/-htu27QGJF0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 03:35:37 AM
Analia Llugdar (https://soundcloud.com/analia-llugdar) (born 1972) is an Argentine composer who came to Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1999. She has won several music competitions, including first prize in the chamber music category of the CBC Radio National Competition for Young Composers, the Jeunesses Musicales du Canada Award, the Grand Prix of the Canada Council for the Arts, and the 2008 Jules Léger Prize for New Chamber Music.

https://www.youtube.com/v/5KfJp6MqDbc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 04:18:42 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/Ug7habCJrkk

Alessandro Perini (http://www.alessandroperini.com/Alessandro_Perini/Home.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 06:10:29 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/NbxbQdzj198

Benedict Mason (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benedict_Mason)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 08:48:19 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/sHbZv3VW7U4

Mateusz Ryczek (http://mateuszryczek.com/) ~ "Infrasymfonia" (2010) for large orchestra.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 30, 2013, 09:51:07 AM
Dai Fujikura (http://www.daifujikura.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/LimYhhgrDoE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 31, 2013, 05:07:14 PM
Kim B Ashton
Website (http://kimbashton.wordpress.com/about/)

AXIAL
Hares, spring, dawn, flutterings, haze, territory. Axial is concerned with cycles or circumambulations in which delicate murmurings are interleaved with excursions into more vigorous ground. Written for Lontano, the ensemble comprises 2 flutes, 2 clarinets, harp, percussion, and string quintet.
Recently released on Lontano Ensemble's 'London New Voices' CD

Listen (https://soundcloud.com/user3996103/axial)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on August 31, 2013, 05:35:47 PM
Aaron Holloway-Nahum
London, Britain (UK)
Website (http://www.aaronhollowaynahum.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/h0T3EA_ZUIc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 01, 2013, 03:35:17 AM
Dale Perkins
Leeds, Britain (UK)
Website (http://www.daleperkins.co.uk/)

Dale Perkins, the Head of Postgraduate Studies and Research Centre / Leeds College of Music, writes sonic art or electronic music, here is an example of his work:

Axe (2010) (https://soundcloud.com/cuckooborough/axe)

Axe is composed from unprocessed, but amplified guitar materials that include ‘clicks’, ‘thumps’ and ‘bangs’. It is the first work that falls under the project title, Taking Down Trees, and is influenced by the popular composition technique/style: ‘mashup’. Axe, however, is not a work that plunders previously released audio/music to generate structure. Structure is built from the original electric guitar materials, which are processed and organised into ambient, glitch, heavy metal and dance groove combinations before culminating into a tapestry of popular music references. Very little of the arrangement has been produced by traditional sequencing methods, but rather the materials are sustained for long durations and rhythms are produced using side-chain gating techniques (all source materials were performed by David Lawrie.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 01, 2013, 04:59:06 AM
Thomas Bjørnseth
Gvarv, Norway
Website (http://www.atonality.net/)

Listen (https://soundcloud.com/atonalitydotnet/5-palette-for-ten-timbres): Palette for ten timbres
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 01, 2013, 05:36:40 AM
Luke Styles
London, Britain (UK)
Website (http://www.lukestyles.com/) | Listen (https://soundcloud.com/luke-styles/stride)

Entr'acte, a silent film by René Clair from 1924 embodies the Dadaism and Absurdism in the air at the time. This new score makes subtle reference to Erik Satie, the composer of the films original music, but attempts to look at the film afresh. Images have an aesthetic flow without subservience to narrative. The subjectivity of the images and the lack of dialogue/text, allows an immense space for a musical dialectic to take place. Motives and harmony are set in motion to create a new context and framing of the images, propelling both towards their hectic conclusion, whilst still adhering to the dada/absurdist spirit of the film.

Premiered as part of Modern Silence at Kings Place, Monday, 12 December 2011 - 8:00pm / Hall Two

http://www.youtube.com/v/ZbeEnAaR38o
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 02, 2013, 04:17:18 AM
Gleb Kanasevich
is a clarinetist composer, currently based between Boston, MA and Baltimore, MD. He is currently working on recording his second album “Refractions Vol. 2,” featuring his original music, alongside works for clarinet and electronics by Ken Ueno, Nathan Davis, Brendon Randall-Myers and Alican Camci.

Website (http://www.glebkanasevich.com/) | Listen (https://soundcloud.com/gleb-kanasevich/romanze-per-me-2013)

A virtuosic suite for solo guitar in nine sections.

Alexander Milovanov - guitar.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 03, 2013, 04:01:31 AM
Oscar Bianchi (http://www.oscarbianchi.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/40fqhTAu78I

Anahata Concerto, performed by Klangforum Wien, Enno Poppe conductor. 14 february 2009, Helmut List Hall - Gratz. ORF
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 03, 2013, 04:28:14 AM
Huw Watkins (http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/az/63120/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/5FoOdRa9KIU
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 03, 2013, 05:41:08 AM
Costin Miereacnu

Miereanu studied from 1960 to 1966 at the Music Academy of Bucharest with Alfred Mendelsohn, Dan Constantinescu, and Lazar Octavian Cosma, and later at the École des Hautes Études et Sciences Sociales, at the Schola Cantorum, and at the University of Paris VIII, where he was awarded first prizes in writing, analysis, music history, esthetics, orchestration, and composition) and earned a Doctor of Letters and a Doctor of Musical Semiotics. Between 1967 and 1969 he was a student of Karlheinz Stockhausen, György Ligeti, and Ehrhard Karkoschka at the Internationale Ferienkurse für neue Musik in Darmstadt (Cosma 2001). In 1977 he became a French citizen. Since 1981 he has been Professor of Philosophy, Aesthetics, and the Science of Art at the Sorbonne.

Miereanu evolved his compositional style featuring a sensuous sonic fabric by combining of Satie's techniques with an abstraction of Romanian traditional music (Cosma 2001). Many of his complex and often virtuoso works include visual componentsMiereanu has composed aleatoric works and works in the style of Musique concrète for orchester and chamber orchestra, often with the employment of tape-recording equipment, as well as works for the theatre. He was awarded the prize of the European Cultural Foundation 1967, the Prix Enescu (1974), and the Prix de la Partition Pédagogique of the French Composers’ Association (SACEM).

L'Ombre double (https://soundcloud.com/romaniannewmusic2/costin-miereanu-lombre-double)

L'Ombre double, "Fifth Voyage of Winter" (2007) for saxophone, viola and electronics | Trio PROmoZICA (Daniel Kientzy, Cornelia Petroiu, Reina Portuondo)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 03, 2013, 06:37:58 AM
Adrian Borza (http://muzicieni.cimec.ro/Adrian-Borza-en.html)

http://www.youtube.com/v/kvAv60t_5pY

The origin point of the sound used in the sonic texture was a graphic image. Computer-aided, I translated the visual characteristics (shape, brightness, color) into the sound characteristics (pitch, length, volume, stereophonic image), which is the sound morphogenesis.

This is a live mix using Max/MSP.

Music: Adrian Borza - Dusk (2007)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 04, 2013, 08:31:51 AM
Joan Arnau Pàmies (http://www.joanarnaupamies.com/)

[14(a/c)_∞p] for viola, cello and percussion, performed by New Morse Code (http://newmorsecode.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/PYzHP3n1Mkc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 04, 2013, 08:45:11 AM
Shai Cohen (http://mashav.com/sha/) (b. 1968)

Second Sight for quintet, performed by Mika Hary (vocal 1), Naama Levy (vocal 2), Zeev Schnapp (cello), Amit Lorber (vibraphone), Shai Cohen (piano), Neta Aloni (accordion) and Valery Lipets (bass)

http://www.youtube.com/v/81O4OCpK5b0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 04, 2013, 10:07:07 AM
Jason Eckardt (http://www.ensemble21.com/eckardt/home.html)
(b. 1971)

A way [tracing] for solo cello, part one from his "Undersong"; played by dedicatee Fred Sherry.

http://www.youtube.com/v/I_D1PwWPOy4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 04, 2013, 10:14:38 AM
Kaija Saariaho (http://www.saariaho.org/‎)
(b. 1952)

http://www.youtube.com/v/uoDk4pXMNlM


"Cendres" for flute, cello and piano
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 08, 2013, 04:12:31 PM
Charlotte Bray (http://charlottebray.co.uk/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/neTU8Gie0yA
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 09, 2013, 03:38:19 AM
Per this (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22200.msg739230.html#msg739230), you can hear some of Mark Gresham's Mortal Coils on his website (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCwQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.markgresham.com%2Fmusic.html&ei=08AtUpCvJM-kyAHo-YDQBA&usg=AFQjCNHBRUEeGWYzjh2-nPQGgqiGE47OnA&sig2=W6Jy2CaVnJsGsu2-8N5VgA).
 
(Fair disclosure: Mark is a friend, and my publisher.  The piece kicks butt, all the same.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 09, 2013, 04:15:25 AM
Per this (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22200.msg739230.html#msg739230), you can hear some of Mark Gresham's Mortal Coils on his website (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCwQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.markgresham.com%2Fmusic.html&ei=08AtUpCvJM-kyAHo-YDQBA&usg=AFQjCNHBRUEeGWYzjh2-nPQGgqiGE47OnA&sig2=W6Jy2CaVnJsGsu2-8N5VgA).
 
(Fair disclosure: Mark is a friend, and my publisher.  The piece kicks butt, all the same.)

Nice work, thanks for the post - although (and I do not mean to convey any disrespect) his music sounds too polite to be characterized as "kicking butt". 

Well written, all the works I heard, and I left his player going for about 20 minutes.  I much preferred the instrumental things to the choral pieces, which were a bit too churchy for my taste.  He has what struck me as a Brahms feel to his chamber music - impressive stuff.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 09, 2013, 04:25:14 AM
Thanks, I appreciate your remarks!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 09, 2013, 07:03:53 AM
Robert Phillips (http://robertphillipsmusic.com/)
(b. 1981)

http://www.youtube.com/v/pl4E6TXO7R0


Aur (Hebrew: אור, English: Light) for string quartet and electronics, played by the JACK Quartet

[Note: usually the Hebrew word for light is transliterated as "Or".]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 09, 2013, 07:27:31 AM
Hèctor Parra (http://www.ffn.ub.edu/jmparra/hector/)
(b. 1976)

http://www.youtube.com/v/pazYpCzxEGM

 "Knotted Fields" for piano trio, played by Ensemble Recherche
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 10, 2013, 04:50:14 AM
Work by Brian Ferneyhough from 2012

https://www.youtube.com/v/xANR6U5CLG8

 flute, oboe, clarinet, violin, viola, cello
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 10, 2013, 08:47:40 AM
Darija Andovska (http://www.composers21.com/compdocs/andovskaa.htm)
(*1979)

http://www.youtube.com/v/MvXFjOa0NBM


Calipso, per flauto, clarinetto basso, pianoforte e percussioni (2003)
-- Icarus Ensemble diretto da Marco Pedrazzini
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 10, 2013, 09:42:18 AM
Darija Andovska (http://www.composers21.com/compdocs/andovskaa.htm)
(*1979)

http://www.youtube.com/v/MvXFjOa0NBM


Calipso, per flauto, clarinetto basso, pianoforte e percussioni (2003)
-- Icarus Ensemble diretto da Marco Pedrazzini

That's a unique instrumentation that completely works. Great atmosphere.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 10, 2013, 05:35:07 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/3y0DLOKsQOc

Michael Kaulkin (http://www.michaelkaulkin.com/)

Composed in the first half of 2009, Michael Kaulkin's City Walks is a 12-minute piece for string quartet in one movement.

0:00 "Tranquillo", a plaintive cello solo
4:40 "Andante Affabile", a lyrical, sauntering theme
5:50 "Misterioso"
7:52 "Semplice Affetuoso", a tender little melody turns melodramatic
9:45 "Presto Capriccioso", an adrenaline-soaked coda
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: dyn on September 10, 2013, 08:39:46 PM
Robert Phillips (http://robertphillipsmusic.com/)
(b. 1981)

http://www.youtube.com/v/pl4E6TXO7R0


Aur (Hebrew: אור, English: Light) for string quartet and electronics, played by the JACK Quartet

[Note: usually the Hebrew word for light is transliterated as "Or".]

There's more Phillips on soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/rphillips-1). I think Shindō no su is my favourite of the things i've heard. He seems to have a knack for presenting things that ought to be familiar yet somehow aren't, similar to Feldman (although their music is otherwise very different).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 11, 2013, 08:29:51 AM
Leaha Maria Villarreal (http://www.leahamaria.com/ABOUT.html)

http://www.youtube.com/v/C-roAvowTbY

The Warmth of Other Suns
Composer: Leaha Maria Villarreal
Violin and Electronics: Andie Springer
World Premiere

Season 1 | Remembrance: Inaugural Concert on March 15, 2012
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music: New York, NY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 11, 2013, 10:16:51 AM
Samir Odeh-Tamimi (http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/az/samir-odeh-tamimi/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/n5tW_oG-ewg&feature=player_detailpage

Jabsurr (2009) für Violoncello und Klavier (Dirk Wietheger, violoncelle / Ulrich Löffler, piano)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 11, 2013, 11:20:51 AM
Alex Mincek (http://www.alexmincek.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/1esJ64FJv7U

Pendulum III (2009) for alto saxophone and piano (Eliot Gattegno, alto saxophone / Eric Wubbels, piano).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 11, 2013, 04:07:34 PM
Joanna Wozny (http://www.klangforum.at/index.php?lang=2&idcatside=641)

https://www.youtube.com/v/dsaTx3PcdG0

"as in a mirror, darkly" (2010) for ensemble

Klangforum Wien
Enno Poppe, conductor

Quote
as in a mirror, darkly
The tangible structure and sound form of my work has changed continually in recent years. Besides tranquil pieces in which the material moves in a circular course, there are works in which the complexity of the sounds and their combinations were taken that much further so that clearly more complicated polyphonic and rhythmical textures evolved.

In my new piece for Klangforum Wien I am concerned amongst other things with the aspect of “pollution” such as sometimes occurs on (old) films through dust particles and scratches or that appears if one is looking through scratched glass. In this context, two things were important for me: first the random emergence of these impurities/contaminations (they are not inherent, but so to speak arise); and second the possibility of focusing on this accidental appearance by projecting it into a more or less empty space.

My composition focuses on this random appearance in the form of selective incidents which, distributed seemingly aimlessly, float without connection in space whilst the music itself is as if frozen.
~ Joanna Wozny
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 11, 2013, 05:23:29 PM
Hanspeter Kyburz (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=134&l=deu#134)

https://www.youtube.com/v/gjgX2RqL5cI

~ Diptychon 1997

... Orchestration
2 ensembles each: 1.1(ca).2(cl[Eb].bcl); 1(cbn)/1111/2perc/­hp/pf/str(1.1.1.1.1).

(A tad before the turn of the century, but he is worth hearing and there's not much later than Malstrom, 1998, at this time.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 12, 2013, 01:42:09 AM
I really like this piece, which incorporates traditional musical elements from Uzbekistan, where composer Victor Khandamian (https://soundcloud.com/victorkhandamian) was born - a trio for nay, percussion, and violoncello.

http://www.youtube.com/v/VTLvfmLpkGE

The Omnibus Ensemble: Batir Dosimbetov, nay; Alibek Kabdurakhmanov, percussion; Dilya Tishaeva, violoncello
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 12, 2013, 03:55:50 AM
Fantastic young Israeli composer, TALIA AMAR (http://www.taliaamar.com/) - earned her B.M. in 2012 in composition with honors under the guidance of Prof. Mark Kopytman, Dr. Ari Ben-Shabetai and Prof. Yinam Leef at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. At the same time, she was a piano student at the Buchman-Mehta School of Music with Emanuel Krasovsky. She is currently studying for her M.M. at the Mannes College of Music in NYC with Prof. Mario Davidovsky in composition and Victor Rosenbaum in piano.

This (https://soundcloud.com/user209840430/talia-amar-when-a-dream) is a clip from soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/user209840430) of her work, When a Dream becomes Reality… for Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, Piano, performed by the Meitar Ensemble conducted by Yoval Zorn.

An accomplished pianist, we well as composer, here she performs one of her works for piano ~

https://www.youtube.com/v/GxFZxrSQnco
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 15, 2013, 05:50:30 PM
Alexandra Karastoyanova - Hermentin (http://www.youtube.com/user/galechri/videos)

http://www.youtube.com/v/OG3X7bmEzwY

ÖENM Salzburg, Dir. Johannes Kalitzke
Auftrag des Festivals Aspekte Salzburg 2012
Awarded with "outstading artist award Musik 2013"

Very interesting composer, but I cannot find out anything about her other than some YouTube clips.  The link under her name will take you to her YouTube channel.

[Edit: I managed to find some biographical information on the Musica Austria (http://www.musicaustria.at/node/17184) site: Austrian composer and pianist Russian-Bulgarian descent (born 1968 in Moscow) studied composition (Boguslaw Schaeffer) and piano (Dimo Dimov, Boyan Vodenitcharov, Alfons Kontarsky) at the Salzburg Mozarteum and at the State Music Academy in Sofia. Collaboration with John Kalitzke David Bowlin, Oswald Sallaberger, Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra, ÖENM, Pazardjik Symphony Orchestra, ICE / USA, Da Capo Chamber Players include world premieres including the Violin Concerto "mahogany" in the CARNEGIE Hall (2007), in the Chamber Series of Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Merkin Concert Hall, Columbia College, Villa Massimo, and ad Quad-Cities/USA, Sound Ways / St.Petersburg including "Aaron Copland" Stipendiantin in one of America's most prestigious residences - MacDowell Colony (2006). Orders including WDR, ORF, Salzburg aspects, ensemble xx. century. CD releases include ORF Edition Zeitton 2012 PERFORMANCES Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra Works (selection) mahogany. Concerto for Violin and Streichorhester (2007) On behalf of the Bulgarian Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra UA 2007 David Bowlin, BVCO, Dir Stefan Linev, Carnegie Hall, New York.

And a badly translated quote from the composer, "the characteristics of my music is determined by a stylistic diversity that is one hand characterized by back-references to music of the past while having elements of traditional musical cultures, both united in the musical language of the present. For all content and structural aspects of the emotional perception and action is paramount."]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 16, 2013, 06:56:23 AM
Çınar Timur (https://soundcloud.com/cinartimur) "stream of guiltness" for flute and english horn, played by Jagoda Pietrusiak and Witold Wróbel

http://www.youtube.com/v/gZMIMnaxy74
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 16, 2013, 07:42:59 AM
Umberto Bombardelli (http://www.umbertobombardelli.info/) (b. 1954) "Three Star(e)s in the Sky" for clarinet, flute and piano; played by Raffaele Bertolini, Tito Ciccarese and Luca Arnaldo Colombo

http://www.youtube.com/v/XDObWxy3RHY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 16, 2013, 08:20:43 AM
Adam Stansbie (http://adamstansbie.com/) is an electroacoustic (acousmatic) composer. His music has been performed around the world and won numerous international awards. Adam is currently a lecturer in Music Technology at The University of Sheffield.

Escapade (https://soundcloud.com/usss/escapade-adam-stansbie-usss)

Escapade was composed using tiny fragments of sound. At the start of the piece, the individual fragments are not perceived. Instead, they are so densely packed that they (perceptually) fuse into much larger structures; one hears the source recordings, which are largely, but not entirely, orchestral. As the piece progresses, the individual fragments become increasingly prominent; they no longer fuse into larger structures and are subsequently perceived as discrete units or entities. In this respect, Escapade was inspired by pointillistic painting – a technique in which small, distinct points of colour are used to form a larger image.

Escapade received First Prize in the Third International Competition of Electroacoustic Composition and Visual Music, Destellos Foundation, Argentina, 2010 and was a finalist Finalist in the VIII International Competition for Composers “Città di Udine”, Italy 2010.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 16, 2013, 05:40:33 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/1kvXsItxYNM

Emily Howard (http://www.emilyhoward.com/) - Calculus of the Central Nervous System

Proms 2012 - City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Andris Nelsons (conductor).

There's about two and a half minutes of talking with the composer, then the music starts - well worth hearing.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 17, 2013, 01:33:24 AM
Claudia Molitor (http://www.claudiamolitor.org/) ...

http://www.youtube.com/v/rXPfMu3Mmf0&feature=c4-overview&list=UUOg0mUnx6LFHW8a5hP1jCpw

Untitled 40 [desk-life] (2008)

London Sinfonietta / Conductor: David Porcelijn
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 17, 2013, 08:22:36 AM
Vykintas Baltakas (http://www.baltakas.net/biography/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/f1SzS-IK7KM

Saxordionphonics

for saxophone, accordion and orchestra
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 17, 2013, 04:16:01 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/gUdF4NGLung

Jean-Paul Dessy (http://www.moderecords.com/profiles/jeanpaul_dessy.html)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 18, 2013, 01:45:46 AM
Francesca Verunelli (http://www.francescaverunelli.net/bio/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/_d6tiv51Kwg

Play (2010)
for ensemble and electronics
Ensemble Intercontemporain (recorded live at Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris 2010)
Susanna Mälkki, conductor
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 18, 2013, 08:31:40 AM
Justina Repeckaite (http://www.justinarepeckaite.eu/)

Chartres (https://soundcloud.com/justina-repeckaite/chartres)  for chamber orchestra, from her soundcloud page.  St. Christopher’s Chamber Orchestra; K. Variakojis, conductor.

Justina Repeckaite was pursuing career in both visual arts and music, however she decided to concentrate on composition and studied at Lithuanian Music and Theatre Academy and Conservatoire of Paris. She is a singer of both contemporary and medieval music improvisation. Her great interest in the medieval culture leads her musical pursuits to geometrical and mathematical concepts. Justina’s peace Chartres for string orchestra become recommended work at the 60th edition of the International Rostrum of Composers in 2013.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on September 20, 2013, 07:37:07 AM
Wanted to give you a big thank you, sanatonio. I appreciate all of this wonderful music. Thanks again.  8)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on September 21, 2013, 04:29:48 AM
Adam's a really fine composer. I first met him a number of years ago at Bourges (when there still was a festival there), the same year Diane Simpson (now Salazar) was there.

Both doing very different but very interesting things.

Adam's colleague at the university where he teaches, Felipe Otondo, is also really cool.

Reviews of albums by Adam and Felipe are on the first page of Asymmetry Music Magazine as it currently is.

And one of Emmanuelle Gibello's album, too, which is a lot of fun.

http://asymmetrymusicmagazine.com/

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: NorthNYMark on September 21, 2013, 09:02:44 AM
Just wanted to add a note of thanks to sanantonio for keeping this thread going.  It will take me quite a bit of time to digest everything (or even a small percentage of what's been shared here), but I couldn't ask for a more interesting introduction to contemporary musical currents.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 21, 2013, 11:23:52 AM
My first contribution to this thread, which is a great thread BTW.
Caroline Shaw's a cappella piece "Partita in 8 Voices"   This is a piece I recently purchased through iTunes and have absolutely been spellbound by it. Here is the first and second of four movements.


Mvt. I - Allemande

http://www.youtube.com/v/2mukrVsKqTs

Mvt. II - Sarabande

http://www.youtube.com/v/-aJF5uoU7fI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 22, 2013, 06:16:41 AM
Bent Sørensen (http://www.musicsalesclassical.com/composer/short-bio/1480)

https://www.youtube.com/v/G-le0bGKWZo

~ Phantasmagoria for piano trio (2007)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 22, 2013, 06:29:45 AM
My first contribution to this thread, which is a great thread BTW.
Caroline Shaw's a cappella piece "Partita in 8 Voices"   This is a piece I recently purchased through iTunes and have absolutely been spellbound by it. Here is the first and second of four movements.


Mvt. I - Allemande

http://www.youtube.com/v/2mukrVsKqTs

Mvt. II - Sarabande

http://www.youtube.com/v/-aJF5uoU7fI

A very interesting work, and a composer to follow up on.  Thanks, Greg!

Adam's a really fine composer. I first met him a number of years ago at Bourges (when there still was a festival there), the same year Diane Simpson (now Salazar) was there.

Both doing very different but very interesting things.

Adam's colleague at the university where he teaches, Felipe Otondo, is also really cool.

Reviews of albums by Adam and Felipe are on the first page of Asymmetry Music Magazine as it currently is.

And one of Emmanuelle Gibello's album, too, which is a lot of fun.

http://asymmetrymusicmagazine.com/

I just discovered asymmetry magazine - it is a good source for new composers and their music.

Just wanted to add a note of thanks to sanantonio for keeping this thread going.  It will take me quite a bit of time to digest everything (or even a small percentage of what's been shared here), but I couldn't ask for a more interesting introduction to contemporary musical currents.

Wanted to give you a big thank you, sanatonio. I appreciate all of this wonderful music. Thanks again.  8)

It is thanks enough that others are finding some new music here that they enjoy.  With my posts, I am trying to create a new music log, for reference, I guess for along as this forum exists, so that I and others can return here and delve through the posts and find some new music.  I am a big believer in listening to new music being written, there is a large amount of music available that spans the gamut from tonal to near-noise being done by composers of all ages.  We are living in interesting times!

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 22, 2013, 10:16:33 AM
Ching-Wen Chao (http://zhuanti.ccom.edu.cn/old/musicacoustica2008/enyyj/200810220053.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/YtcCrr6Bqp0

 ... Departure Tracings (2000) for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano, and percussion (The California EAR Unit).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 22, 2013, 05:51:02 PM
Simone Movio (https://soundcloud.com/simonemovio) (b. 1978)

https://www.youtube.com/v/abqtN1Z9Kvs

"Zahir Ia" for string quartet, played by the Szymanowski Quartet.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 23, 2013, 07:22:02 AM
Nicolás Kliwadenko (http://nicolaskliwadenko.blogspot.com) (b. 1986)

http://www.youtube.com/v/wnRCljOhEA0

"UtopX" for flute, contrabass flute, guitar, violin, viola, cello and electronics
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 23, 2013, 07:49:54 AM
Nicolás Kliwadenko (http://nicolaskliwadenko.blogspot.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/ngX_zclA070

 - Autopista Sur (2011) - audio digital
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 24, 2013, 01:40:42 AM
Jacob Wooden (http://www.jacobwooden.com/)
A graduate of Indiana Univeristy’s Jacobs School of Music, his works have been performed around the United States and abroad, including “Three John Donne Love Songs” for Baritone, Harp, and String Quartet, and a setting of George Meredith’s “Winter Heavens” for SATB chorus.

La Danse for Basson and Horn
Ariel Detwiler, Bassoon; Sam Crocker, Horn

http://www.youtube.com/v/A_Zu_yd5YxQ#t=152
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 24, 2013, 05:56:55 AM
Nicolas Tzortzis (http://www.nicolastzortzis.org/)
(b. 1978)

http://www.youtube.com/v/P_en-FRk9WU

Court métrage for seven musicians, played by the dissonArt ensemble
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 24, 2013, 05:38:26 PM
Thomas Lauck (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lauck)

https://www.youtube.com/v/5Sa4ewXDQyA

"Fragment" (2000) for chamber orchestra. Sinfonieorchester Basel, Leitung Bernhard Wulff. Image is "№ 234" by Oleg Berezytski.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 25, 2013, 07:56:05 AM
Zeynep Gedizlioğlu (http://www.evs-musikstiftung.ch/en/composers-prizes/composers-prize-winners-2012/zeynep-gedizlioglu/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/Fy8631j2yiY

... Yol - Der Weg (2005) für Klarinette, Vibraphon, Violine, Violoncello und Klavier (Anton Hollich, Klarinette / Jochen Schorer, Vibraphon / Catherina Lendle, Violine / Gabriele Maiguashca, Violoncello / Julia Vogelsänger, Klavier / Leitung: Frank Düpree).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 25, 2013, 08:06:30 AM
Georg Kröll (http://www.georg-kroell.de/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/P6H07BaJQmw&feature=c4-overview&list=UUOg0mUnx6LFHW8a5hP1jCpw

... Wie Gebirg, das hochaufwogend...(2001) für Viola, Violine und Violoncello (ensemble recherche: Melise Mellinger, Violine / Barbara Maurer, Viola / Lucas Fels, Violoncello).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 25, 2013, 08:16:05 AM
Luke Bedford (http://www.universaledition.com/Luke-Bedford/composers-and-works/composer/3982)

http://www.youtube.com/v/UeCmmyQ8hkA

 - Wonderful Two-Headed Nightingale (2011) for violine solo, viola solo and 15 players

Jonathan Morton (violine)
Lawrence Power (viola)

The Scottish Ensemble

Quote
Luke Bedford was born in 1978 and studied composition at the Royal College of Music.

Bedford's piece was inspired by a story of two conjoined twins in the 19th century who became singers, saving themselves from a lifetime of slavery or freak shows through their musical talent.

The soloists seem at times to be 'joined at the hip' but at other times to be locked in a power struggle.

The harmony/struggle between 2 string soloists is a little remniscent of George Benjamin's Viola, Viola. However this is neither a duet like Benjamin's work, nor is it a double concerto like Mozart's.

The soloists open without accompaniment and orchestral colour is added gradually and stepwise, to give an increasing depth of sound as the work builds up.

Juliet Williams
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 25, 2013, 09:09:51 AM
Kenji Sakai (http://kenjisakai.net/engbio)

http://www.youtube.com/v/ZEgRBxO5t0w

 - Osmosis I (2011)  for Flute, Clarinette, Horn, Violin and Cello.  Homage to Gérard Grisey.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 28, 2013, 04:14:17 PM
Brett Dean (http://www.boosey.com/composer/brett+dean) (b. 1961)

https://www.youtube.com/v/197n_eDgcM8

"Polysomnography" for woodwind quintet and piano
Unknown performers

II. Myoclonus 0:02
III. Sleep Spindles 1:48
IV. Delta Waves 4:44
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 28, 2013, 04:36:27 PM
Alistair Zaldua (http://www.alistair-zaldua.de/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/lPFlhQL69Uw

"contrejours" for piano and live electronics, performed by the composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 28, 2013, 05:19:05 PM
Nicolas Tzortzis (http://www.nicolastzortzis.org/)

Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/nicolastzortzis)

https://www.youtube.com/v/5vFlI526STM

"Femme-tête-temps" for string quartet, played by the Arditti Quartet.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Rinaldo on September 28, 2013, 10:06:29 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/gUdF4NGLung

Jean-Paul Dessy (http://www.moderecords.com/profiles/jeanpaul_dessy.html)

Too bad the account was suspended.. I recall attending a performance of an older piece by Dessy and being very impressed by it. Thanks for reminding me to check out if there's a recording - indeed there is!

Jean-Paul Dessy: Oreé-Oraison-Hors-Raison pour 2 violons, alto et violoncelles (https://soundcloud.com/cinechantdumonde/jean-paul-dessy-or-e-oraison)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on September 29, 2013, 05:31:19 PM
Ana Paola Santillán Alcocer (http://anapaolasantillanalcocer.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/3SzX0V6mGCI#t=129


Heiligenschein for Harp and Percussion
Duo Harpverk: Katie Buckley, Harp; Frank Aarnink, Percussion

Her soundcloud page (https://soundcloud.com/paola-santillan-alcocer)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2013, 03:25:04 PM
Daniel Hanzlik (http://Daniel Hanzlik) (music) | Pavel Mrkus (http://mrkus.ixode.org/) (images)

http://www.youtube.com/v/SgZmwmLvkW0

Daniel Hanzlik (Czech) is leading figure in Czeck intermedia art. His work has been represented at The Prague Contemporary Art Festival 2010, Emil Filla Gallery, Prague, Formate der Transformation at Museum auf Abruf, Vienna, FORMÁTY TRANSFORMACE at the The Brno House of Arts, Space for intuition and the City Gallery Prague.

Pavel Mrkus (Czech) is an intermedia artist of wit, range and invention. His work has been presented at Chelsea Art Museum, New York, The Venice Biennale, Kunsthaus Dresden, The Brno House of Art, Kunst Verein in Schlossberg, and elsewhere.

The Echofluxx 12 (http://echofluxx.org) is a festival of new media (sound and film), visual art, and experimental music.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: modUltralaser on October 01, 2013, 03:27:17 PM
Thanks again. I'm going to try and get back on track and contribute more.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2013, 03:40:52 PM
Gráinne Mulvey (http://www.grainnemulvey.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/e1iwjeQIcqg

Joe O'Farrell (flutes) and Gráinne Mulvey (live processing) performing Mulvey's "phonological loop" (2013) for for flute and live electronics.

This recording was made in rehearsal at the New Music Dublin Creative Labs at the National Concert Hall on 3 March 2013.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2013, 03:54:29 PM
Michèle Bokanowski (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mich%C3%A8le_Bokanowski)

http://www.youtube.com/v/EAiJH-YbUfk

(I really like this one.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 01, 2013, 03:57:15 PM
Giovanni Verrando (http://www.giovanniverrando.net/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/j4TRVjcqq7k
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2013, 05:44:48 PM
Rashad Becker (http://www.factmag.com/tag/rashad-becker/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/MKvwModIsBY

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2013, 05:48:35 PM
Valerio Tricoli (http://gapersblock.com/transmission/2013/03/27/valerio_tricoli_and_the_real_art_of_noises_at_lampo/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/JiQt9QI9i3A
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2013, 06:07:23 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/S6m618N7Mzc

Angharad Davies (http://angharaddavies.net/‎), Tisha Mukarji (http://tishamukarji.com/‎) & Dimitra Lazaridou-Chatzigoga (http://www.strokebystroke.net/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 02, 2013, 06:19:19 PM
Michael Pisaro (http://michaelpisaro10years.tumblr.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/7v2OKdWpHtw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on October 03, 2013, 01:01:36 AM
thnx fer the festival!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Octave on October 03, 2013, 01:30:57 AM
Indeed, the inclusions are catholic.  Initially I was surprised at Valerio Tricoli, but of course he counts.

I used to like his band (or was it just a band he worked with?), 3quartersHadBeenEliminated.  Mysterious stoner-drone-concrète.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 03, 2013, 02:04:36 AM
The Tricoli is wildly gorgeous. Thanks for that.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 03, 2013, 03:04:34 AM
The shores of Tricoli?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sergeant Rock on October 03, 2013, 03:28:41 AM
The shores of Tricoli?

I hear the sewers of Tricoli; then what is clearly a bout of severe indigestion (who says music can't clearly depict non-musical themes!), with the piece climaxing in group flatulence. If that is what he was going for, it's very well done.

The Tricoli is wildly gorgeous.

We have a very different definition of gorgeous.

Sarge
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sergeant Rock on October 03, 2013, 03:39:18 AM
Rashad Becker (http://www.factmag.com/tag/rashad-becker/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/MKvwModIsBY

Mr. Becker and I have very different definitions of dance. (For some reason English just isn't working for me in this thread.) But what a fascinating sound world--like an alien barnyard. I hear mutant cows, sheep, goats, geese, ducks...and Harpo Marx!  :D But is it dance? In any case, an amusing píece that didn't have me reaching for the bottle of Tums like the Tricoli did.

Sarge
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on October 03, 2013, 03:42:33 AM
I hear the sewers of Tricoli; then what is clearly a bout of severe indigestion (who says music can't clearly depict non-musical themes!), with the piece climaxing in group flatulence. If that is what he was going for, it's very well done.

We have a very different definition of gorgeous.

Sarge
Must agree with Mr. Sergeant Rock on that one....which isn't always the case !

Sorry, Mr. Sanantonio - am diligently searching through your posts for things I can vaguely appreciate, but doing less well of late.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 04:04:49 AM
Glad to see people are giving the music a try - even if some don't like a clip here and there.  I try to present music from a variety of composers, with no expectation that anyone will like all of them (well, I do, but that's just me  ;)  ).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sergeant Rock on October 03, 2013, 04:08:04 AM
Glad to see people are giving the music a try - even if some don't like a clip here and there.  I try to present music from a variety of composers, with no expectation that anyone will like all of them (well, I do, but that's just me  ;)  ).

Keep posting...I'll keep listening.

Sarge
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 04:31:15 AM
Enno Poppe (http://www.ricordi.de/poppe-enno-portrait.0.html?&L=1)

https://www.youtube.com/v/vKmc0PDxZgM
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 04:33:38 AM
Salvatore Sciarrino - String Quartet no.8 (2008) (http://www.kairos-music.com/home.php?il=660&l=deu#660)

http://www.youtube.com/v/SgfTObtVAQ8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 03, 2013, 05:17:48 AM
Are the concepts of melody, harmony and rhythm now considered so outmoded that modern music has dispensed with them?  That's the impression I get after a few random clicks on this thread.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 03, 2013, 07:12:37 AM
We have a very different definition of gorgeous.
Indeed.

I also do not recall ever calling something you fancied a sewer, either, or flatulent.

Just another way in which we differ.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 03, 2013, 07:18:58 AM
Sorry, Mr. Sanantonio - am diligently searching through your posts for things I can vaguely appreciate, but doing less well of late.
You're looking in the wrong place. Appreciation comes from inside of you not outside. If you're looking for things that you can appreciate, then you will find them only in areas where the new things that you don't know yet are very much like the old things that you already do like.

You could maybe try looking at the things that are there and letting them do whatever it is they are doing. (Hint, it's not farting.)

Are the concepts of melody, harmony and rhythm now considered so outmoded that modern music has dispensed with them?  That's the impression I get after a few random clicks on this thread.
Hahaha, you sound like a nineteenth century critic struggling with Beethoven's Grosse Fuge.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 03, 2013, 07:27:18 AM
Hahaha, you sound like a nineteenth century critic struggling with Beethoven's Grosse Fuge.

More of us need to read Slonimsky's Lexicon of Musical Invective, and heed its lessons.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 03, 2013, 07:32:07 AM
Hahaha, you sound like a nineteenth century critic struggling with Beethoven's Grosse Fuge.

This may strike you as strange, but I have never read 19th century critics of the Grosse Fuge.  Does the piece by Michael Pisaro have melody, harmony or rhythm, or have I missed something?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 08:09:18 AM
This may strike you as strange, but I have never read 19th century critics of the Grosse Fuge.  Does the piece by Michael Pisaro have melody, harmony or rhythm, or have I missed something?

For some time there has been a growing body of work, mainly electronic, but can be acoustic or electro-acoustic, which deals in sound divorced from meter, or conventional harmony.  One could think of works by Morton Feldman which might fit this description, and those go back 30 years or more.  Nevertheless, there is still plenty of music being written which utilizes melody, harmony and rhythm in a more conventional fashion - and if you were to scroll back a page or two, you would find some examples.  Granted, the melody, harmony and rhythm might be complex and/or atonal, but the work is not divorced from those three aspects as you have implied.

I don't post much from tonal works, since those do not occupy my main interest for new music, but there is plenty of that kind of music being written today as well.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 03, 2013, 08:46:33 AM
For some time there has been a growing body of work, mainly electronic, but can be acoustic or electro-acoustic, which deals in sound divorced from meter, or conventional harmony.  One could think of works by Morton Feldman which might fit this description, and those go back 30 years or more.  Nevertheless, there is still plenty of music being written which utilizes melody, harmony and rhythm in a more conventional fashion - and if you were to scroll back a page or two, you would find some examples.  Granted, the melody, harmony and rhythm might be complex and/or atonal, but the work is not divorced from those three aspects as you have implied.

I don't post much from tonal works, since those do not occupy my main interest for new music, but there is plenty of that kind of music being written today as well.

I don't have any particular interest in modern tonal works, and am generally interested in modern works which have a lot of complexity (i.e., Elliot Carter, thorny, non-electronic Boulez, that sort of thing).   But I get the (perhaps incorrect) assumption that having recognizable pitches in music is now considered passe.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 03, 2013, 08:51:49 AM
And I'll repeat (the latest occasion was for Annie's benefit, though she scorned the idea without proving her own case) that music for upitched percussion ensemble does not miraculously become "non-music" for want of definite pitch.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Rinaldo on October 03, 2013, 08:54:35 AM
Enno Poppe (http://www.ricordi.de/poppe-enno-portrait.0.html?&L=1)

https://www.youtube.com/v/vKmc0PDxZgM

Very good.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 08:55:10 AM
I don't have any particular interest in modern tonal works, and am generally interested in modern works which have a lot of complexity (i.e., Elliot Carter, thorny, non-electronic Boulez, that sort of thing).   But I get the (perhaps incorrect) assumption that having recognizable pitches in music is now considered passe.

I'd say it is an incorrect assumption.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on October 03, 2013, 10:51:26 AM
More of us need to read Slonimsky's Lexicon of Musical Invective, and heed its lessons.
On my wishlist already :D (http://rateyourmusic.com/list/heraclite/favorite_quotes_from_lexicon_of_musical_invective/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 03, 2013, 06:08:54 PM
Alberto Posadas (http://brahms.ircam.fr/alberto-posadas)

https://www.youtube.com/v/4vg3EDbncZc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Artem on October 03, 2013, 06:52:10 PM
Michael Pisaro (http://michaelpisaro10years.tumblr.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/7v2OKdWpHtw
I quite like Michael Pisaro's music. I'm not too keen on those pieces where he uses field recordings very prominently. Close constellations and a drum on the ground and asleep, street, pipes, tones may be my favourite though.

He's got a new cd coming out soon, by the way.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 04, 2013, 03:15:41 AM
Does the piece by Michael Pisaro have melody, harmony or rhythm, or have I missed something?
You have missed something.

The piano part is so conventionally melodic/harmonic/rhythmic that that almost kills the piece for me.

Almost.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on October 04, 2013, 06:23:03 AM
And I'll repeat (the latest occasion was for Annie's benefit, though she scorned the idea without proving her own case) that music for upitched percussion ensemble does not miraculously become "non-music" for want of definite pitch.

(http://golfstrong.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/610-head-in-hands-man-frustrated-laptop.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 04, 2013, 06:26:30 AM
Thanks for not proving your case, either. Puts you in . . . curious company, doesn't it?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 04, 2013, 07:04:01 AM
You have missed something.

The piano part is so conventionally melodic/harmonic/rhythmic that that almost kills the piece for me.

Apparently I didn't listen long enough to get to the piano part.
:(
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on October 04, 2013, 07:16:54 AM
An interesting and well-researched thread of course, particularly from the contemporaneously committed sanantonio; I don't have all the enthusiasm for the content as some but it makes access easy...

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 04, 2013, 08:19:49 AM
Brett Dean (http://www.boosey.com/composer/brett+dean) (b. 1961)

https://www.youtube.com/v/197n_eDgcM8

"Polysomnography" for woodwind quintet and piano
Unknown performers

II. Myoclonus 0:02
III. Sleep Spindles 1:48
IV. Delta Waves 4:44
I like this!  I'd love to play it! ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 04, 2013, 08:21:51 AM
Are the concepts of melody, harmony and rhythm now considered so outmoded that modern music has dispensed with them?  That's the impression I get after a few random clicks on this thread.
Melody, harmony, and rhythm are always present in "organized sound."  But I grant, much of the music here has nothing to do with traditional melody, harmony or rhythm. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 06, 2013, 04:02:44 AM
Idin Samimi Mofakham (http://idin-samimi.com/)

Iranian Composer/Musicologist.  His works are mostly composed for chamber ensembles and based on traditional and folk music of his homeland Iran. He is a permanent member of Iranian Society of Composers and tutor of Superior Music schools and colleges in Tehran. He is also a founding member of Composition and Music Theory Department at Music Department of University of Applied Science and Technology in Tehran, Iran.

LISTEN (https://soundcloud.com/idin-samimi-mofakham/hesar): Hesâr for Recorder, Violin and Cello

Xelmya Trio: Alexa Renger, Violine; Sylvia Hinz, Blockflöten; Ehrengard von Gemmingen, Cello
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 06, 2013, 07:16:00 AM
Mayako Kubo (http://www.mayako-kubo.de/en)

http://www.youtube.com/v/J8QO0ViBVzU
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 09, 2013, 03:52:28 PM
Simone Movio (https://soundcloud.com/simonemovio)
(b. 1978)

https://www.youtube.com/v/4Psh-yC9xAI

Zahir V for saxophone quartet, played by the Mac Saxophone Quartet

Stefano Pecci, soprano sax
Luis Lanzarini, alto sax
Alex Sebastianutto, tenor sax
Valentino Funaro, baritone sax

Recording by Stefano Amerio at Artesuono Recording Studio (Cavalicco, UD - 28/04/2013)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brian on October 09, 2013, 04:03:35 PM
A couple of guys I know have started a casual message board (http://robertwmcclure.weebly.com/listening-fridays.html#/listening-fridays/), primarily intended for composers and serious listeners, where every Friday they post a new piece of music and discuss it. Like a book club, but a listening club. The first one's a vocal piece from 2006. Try it out.  :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 09, 2013, 05:50:15 PM
A couple of guys I know have started a casual message board (http://robertwmcclure.weebly.com/listening-fridays.html#/listening-fridays/), primarily intended for composers and serious listeners, where every Friday they post a new piece of music and discuss it. Like a book club, but a listening club. The first one's a vocal piece from 2006. Try it out.  :)

Thanks for posting this.  For me it is unfortunate that the discussion starts on Friday - but I will check in Saturday night and see if it is still going on.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 09, 2013, 05:51:35 PM
Anthony Donofrio (http://www.donofrio-music.com)

https://www.youtube.com/v/7YetdkrQ2Tg

III for saxophone, piano and percussion; played by Jeff Heisler, I-Chen Yeh and Bill Sallak.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Octave on October 10, 2013, 01:51:48 AM
.



It seems that those gadflies at Important Records will be (re)issuing a CD deluxe edition of Eliane Radigue's epic megaclassic drone/tape-music composition ADNOS I-III.  I don't see mention of it on their website, at a glance, but here's an ASIN: B00CXN3XQK
Release ~28 Oct 13.
I got it when Table of the Elements released it, and it was a big favorite for years.

Quote from: Important label blurb
Eliane Radigue's Adnos trilogy was composed between 1973 and 1980 and is among her finest compositions. Adnos is a deeply meditative work of infinite depth and sensitivity; one of the high points of modern minimal electronic composition. Packaged in a heavy duty 3CD jacket much like the recent Eleh releases and containing extensive archival materials.
http://www.importantrecords.com/ (http://www.importantrecords.com/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 02:52:57 AM
Inspired by the 20th century violin concerto thread, I went looking for some 21st century violin concertos.  Here's two good ones to start off with ~

Thomas Ades | Violin Concerto, Op. 24, "Concentric Paths" (2005)

https://www.youtube.com/v/CVG5R6sIobo

And Somei Satoh | Violin Concerto (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/v/EOecmVS8Bg0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on October 10, 2013, 03:52:33 AM
Glad to hear ADNOS is being reissued, so more people can hear it. I really love Radigue's electronic music, not too sure about her more recent chamber music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 10, 2013, 03:55:49 AM
Inspired by the 20th century violin concerto thread [....]

Then it has served at least one good purpose, and I am content.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Cato on October 10, 2013, 04:02:00 AM
Here is a quote from James Conlon, which I read today, in an article about the operas of Benjamin Britten:
Quote
The centenary has given Mr. Conlon an opportunity to advance the case for Britten more intensely than usual. "I'm taking advantage of it to put him more in the forefront than might be possible at another time," he said. "Americans don't need somebody to play more Brahms or Beethoven. They need to know that there is very important music out there that they're not listening to—because our ears and spirits need constant renewal."

(My emphasis above)

See:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304520704579125240632913728.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_6 (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304520704579125240632913728.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_6)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 10, 2013, 04:19:45 AM
Nice!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on October 10, 2013, 04:22:20 AM
Here is a quote from James Conlon, which I read today, in an article about the operas of Benjamin Britten:
(My emphasis above)

See:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304520704579125240632913728.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_6 (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304520704579125240632913728.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_6)
Great quote!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 05:02:03 AM
Another 21st C. violin concerto, this one by Huw Watkins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huw_Watkins), a non-threatening British composer.   ;D

https://www.youtube.com/v/CnpdjRp5OT4

These Proms clips always begin with some talking, but the music starts after around four minutes in.

A very nice work.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Rinaldo on October 10, 2013, 05:10:18 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/CnpdjRp5OT4

A very nice work.

Whoa, very nice indeed!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 06:40:41 AM
Franck C. Yeznikian (http://www.youtube.com/user/fcyeznikian)
(b. 1969) France

https://www.youtube.com/v/OvXHINAXWP0

... blessed with a tuneful voice (2010)

Inspired by the triptych of Cy Twombly "I am Thyrsis of Etna, blessed with a tuneful voice" (1977) this is a piece Free trio for clarinet (in A), piano, and electronic Vibraphon commissioned by the EDU (Dijon) / GRAME ( Lyon).

Agnes Ino (clarinet),
Erika Dyckmans (piano)
Guillaume Gibert (percussion)
Vincent R. Carinola and Franck C. Yeznikian: electronic and diffusion

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 07:02:29 AM
Per Nørgård - 2nd Violin Concerto "Borderlines" (in 3 parts) (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/v/dNlkElCd2dc

https://www.youtube.com/v/j68xl9jR1AA

https://www.youtube.com/v/IbHEDOnSreo
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 09:56:26 AM
Stefano Gervasoni (http://www.stefanogervasoni.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/W0pmFe_fCd0

"Antiterra" for large chamber ensemble.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on October 10, 2013, 10:18:23 AM
A couple of guys I know have started a casual message board (http://robertwmcclure.weebly.com/listening-fridays.html#/listening-fridays/), primarily intended for composers and serious listeners, where every Friday they post a new piece of music and discuss it. Like a book club, but a listening club. The first one's a vocal piece from 2006. Try it out.  :)

Yes, thanks from me as well, Brian - will see if I can squeeze in time to investigate. (And that Beat Furrer piece is fascinating.)

And thanks to Cato for unearthing that great Conlon quote: "Americans don't need somebody to play more Brahms or Beethoven. They need to know that there is very important music out there that they're not listening to—because our ears and spirits need constant renewal."

And continuing thanks to sanantonio for the huge array of things to listen to.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 10, 2013, 10:40:04 AM
Gérard Pesson (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A9rard_Pesson)

https://www.youtube.com/v/c3yf8fbYYmI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 11, 2013, 07:30:46 PM
I heard some 21st century classical music this evening, in live performance.

Foreign Bodies, by Esa-Pekka Salonen.

Interesting, and noisy.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 12, 2013, 12:51:43 AM
I've heard that piece, too.

There are a few very brief bits that an extremely sensitive person might, at a stretch, refer to as noisy.

There are many very long bits that are either extremely delicate or extremely soft and placid.

As for interesting, well that's such a loaded term. Loaded with what? My mother, for instance, used it exclusively to refer to things she didn't like but didn't want to just say she didn't like them.

Coupled with "noisy," I suspect that "interesting" here also means "didn't like it."

Hard to say, though.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on October 12, 2013, 08:55:21 AM
I wonder what all the non-Klang non-Sonntag aus Licht Stockhausen is doing in a 21st C music thread...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 12, 2013, 01:46:17 PM
By this logic, a just recently published on youtube piece from 1920 or 1840 or 1460 belongs on a 21st century thread.

(Nope.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 12, 2013, 01:55:16 PM
I've heard that piece, too.

There are a few very brief bits that an extremely sensitive person might, at a stretch, refer to as noisy.

There are many very long bits that are either extremely delicate or extremely soft and placid.

As for interesting, well that's such a loaded term. Loaded with what? My mother, for instance, used it exclusively to refer to things she didn't like but didn't want to just say she didn't like them.

Coupled with "noisy," I suspect that "interesting" here also means "didn't like it."

Hard to say, though.

Fascinating that you were able to determine that I didn't like the piece.  I was under the impression that I did.  As far as the piece having 'very many long bits  that are either extremely delicate or extremely soft and placid' and 'a few very brief bits that an extremely sensitive person might, at a stretch, refer to as noisy,' I can't imagine it was the same piece.  Most of it was quite vigorous, and made dramatic use of a large percussion section, including timpani, bass drum, tuned and untuned gongs, side drum, xylophone, cymbals, etc.  My wife, who does not have a particular interest in modern classical music, was very impressed with the orchestra.  She commented "it was so messy, I was amazed the musicians could tell when it was their time to play."  Her favorite part of the program was the piece that immediately preceded the Salonen, Wagner's Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 12, 2013, 02:36:38 PM
His Vln Cto is supposed to be really good, I haven't dug in yet. It won the heralded Grawemeyer award for outstanding musical achievment last year. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20551.msg632614.html#msg632614)

A recording of that piece lurks in my amazon shopping cart.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 12, 2013, 07:08:19 PM
Murail: Symphonic Concerto for Piano and Orchestra "Le Désenchantement du monde" (2012)

I can't find a YT clip or even a commercially released recording but you can listen to this work through the Instant Encore site ~ HERE (http://www.instantencore.com/work/work.aspx?work=5070803).

Ensemble: New York Philharmonic
Conductor: David Robertson
Artist: Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Piano)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: amw on October 12, 2013, 07:44:06 PM
Murail: Symphonic Concerto for Piano and Orchestra "Le Désenchantement du monde" (2012)

I can't find a YT clip or even a commercially released recording but you can listen to this work through the Instant Encore site ~ HERE (http://www.instantencore.com/work/work.aspx?work=5070803).

Ensemble: New York Philharmonic
Conductor: David Robertson
Artist: Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Piano)

I was listening to that the other day. I found it here (http://www.mediafire.com/?3ax4hdr1hzxkmix).

Murail's recent music has not been easy to find for whatever reason. Perhaps I'm not looking in the right places.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 13, 2013, 01:29:00 AM
Fascinating that you were able to determine that I didn't like the piece.
I was NOT able to determine that. And I said so, explicitly.

As far as the piece having 'very many long bits  that are either extremely delicate or extremely soft and placid' and 'a few very brief bits that an extremely sensitive person might, at a stretch, refer to as noisy,' I can't imagine it was the same piece.  Most of it was quite vigorous, and made dramatic use of a large percussion section, including timpani, bass drum, tuned and untuned gongs, side drum, xylophone, cymbals, etc.  My wife, who does not have a particular interest in modern classical music, was very impressed with the orchestra.  She commented "it was so messy, I was amazed the musicians could tell when it was their time to play."
Yes, and many people who have heard Berlioz' Requiem, especially in concert, take away a firm impression that it is big and noisy, regardless of the fact that the piece is mostly, by the minute, quite soft and delicate. There is hardly any time when the whole orchestra and chorus is used at the same time.

Yes, the Salonen has a large percussion section. But how often in the piece is it used? How often is all of used at the same time? How often is it loud?

I'd suggest you watch the youtube video with Salonen conducting and time the loud bits and the soft bits, the vigorous bits and the placid bits. I think you'll be surprised at how your impression of volume and vigor in the live performance does not match what actually happens in the piece. (That's probably true for the messiness as well. It's not at all a messy piece, though to someone without a particular interest in modern music I suppose it could easily appear to be messy.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 13, 2013, 06:59:17 PM
Miguel Farías (http://miguelfarias.free.fr/English/News.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/B0qBx9l2t78

"Mambo Lines"
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 14, 2013, 06:30:08 AM
Gabriel Erkoreka (http://www.erkoreka.com/)
(b. 1969)

https://www.youtube.com/v/T76QyDoXkMU&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZkBfgFnWZdr2Kcsgcjba4Q

"Dipolo" for cello and piano, played by David Apellániz and Alberto Rosado
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 14, 2013, 04:26:59 PM
Mehdi Hosseini (http://www.monodies.com/)
(b. 1979)

Mehdi Hosseini (Seyed Mehdi Hosseini Bami) was born in 1979 in Tehran. Hosseini began his musical training in Iran, studying Persian music and the fundaments of composition under the guidance of Farhad Fakhreddini.

http://www.youtube.com/v/0mWnNaXw96U#t=143

Monodies (2011)
for flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano
Dedicated to Luciano Berio

"Sound Ways" New Music Ensemble:
Tatiana Rezetdinov, flute
Ilia Gindin, clarinet
Alexandra Korobkina, violin
Kiril Kurshakov, violoncello
Ksenia Gavrilova, piano
Conductor - Brad Everett Cawyer (USA)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 15, 2013, 10:00:26 AM
LIM, Liza: Tongue of the Invisible (musikFabrik, Ridder)

(http://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/others/WER6859-2.gif)

New Wergo release of Liza Lim's Tongue of the Invisible performed by musikFabrik.  The Wergo label has an ongoing series of release by musikFabrik, and they are all worth hearing.  The blog 5:4 has written a good article about this release, HERE (http://5against4.com/2013/10/15/formalised-spontaneous-liza-lim-tongue-of-the-invisible/).

Some YouTube clips of excerpts follow ~

https://www.youtube.com/v/zSeXZMrWGqU

https://www.youtube.com/v/qncW7j0_lcE

The entire CD is available on NML.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 15, 2013, 05:11:15 PM
Variable Formations (http://www.anothertimbre.com/variableformations.html)

An extract from 'Variable Formations', a 40-minute performance by John Tilbury (piano), Lee Patterson (amplified objects), Phil Durrant (electronics), Jamie Drouin (electronics), Angharad Davies (violin) & Johnny Chang (viola). Recorded live at Cafe Oto in February 2013 and released on Another Timbre in October 2013.

https://www.youtube.com/v/DxB2QwVUUBs
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 15, 2013, 05:29:12 PM
antoine beuger (http://www.timescraper.de/antoine-beuger.html) - lieux de passage

https://www.youtube.com/v/pDPzV7HlaJk

extract from Antoine Beuger's composition 'Lieux de passage' (2008), which is a kind of contemporary concerto for clarinet and small ensemble. The musciians are: Jurg Frey (clarinet) with Angharad Davies (violin), Phil Durrant (electronics), Anton Lukoszevieze (cello), Radu malfatti (trombone), Lee Patterson (amplified objects) and Philip Thomas (piano). This recording was released in November 2012 on the CD 'Confluences', which is part of the 6 CD box set 'Wandelweiser und so weiter' on Another Timbre.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 17, 2013, 05:55:02 AM
Peter Eötvös (b. 1944): Seven (2006) for violin and orchestra

Patricia Kopatchinskaja (b. 1977), violin
François-Xavier Roth, conductor
Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Helsinki Music Centre, 27 March 2013

https://www.youtube.com/v/5wWZlD-AYFE

https://www.youtube.com/v/ppsoYJfkIYg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on October 17, 2013, 06:07:41 AM
Murail: Symphonic Concerto for Piano and Orchestra "Le Désenchantement du monde" (2012)

I can't find a YT clip or even a commercially released recording but you can listen to this work through the Instant Encore site ~ HERE (http://www.instantencore.com/work/work.aspx?work=5070803).

Ensemble: New York Philharmonic
Conductor: David Robertson
Artist: Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Piano)

Thanks for posting this! I heard the world premiere last spring (review here (http://www.seenandheard-international.com/2013/04/24/beethoven-almost-trumps-sparkling-new-murail/)) and was wondering if a recording would show up for a repeat hearing.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 17, 2013, 06:12:42 AM
Thanks for posting this! I heard the world premiere last spring (review here (http://www.seenandheard-international.com/2013/04/24/beethoven-almost-trumps-sparkling-new-murail/)) and was wondering if a recording would show up for a repeat hearing.

--Bruce

Instant Encore is a valuable website and has many interesting concerts available for streaming.  I enjoyed your review of the performance; wish I could have been there.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brewski on October 17, 2013, 06:18:20 AM
Thanks! And for some reason, I keep focusing on SymphonyCast and some other sites, and forgetting about Instant Encore - appreciate that reminder. It's a great site, with many things that you wouldn't think would be there.

--Bruce
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 17, 2013, 06:32:43 AM
Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez (http://carlossg.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/uMp9ugIaECI

Diaries, for piano and ensemble [2012] (16:53)

In four movements:

-Machine with Cat Whiskers
-Dream Bolero
-Machine with Roller Chain
-Machine with Messiaen

Daniel Pesca, piano
Eastman BroadBand Ensemble. Juan Trigos, cond.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 17, 2013, 08:55:11 AM
Variable Formations (http://www.anothertimbre.com/variableformations.html)

An extract from 'Variable Formations', a 40-minute performance by John Tilbury (piano), Lee Patterson (amplified objects), Phil Durrant (electronics), Jamie Drouin (electronics), Angharad Davies (violin) & Johnny Chang (viola). Recorded live at Cafe Oto in February 2013 and released on Another Timbre in October 2013.

https://www.youtube.com/v/DxB2QwVUUBs
Ooooh, this is lovely!  I thought at first that the electronic sounds were recording artifacts, but when I realized they weren't, and began to pay attention to them, they became interesting and beautiful.

Do you know whether this is the beginning, or somewhere near the middle?  I could tell that it wasn't ending when the recording ended...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 18, 2013, 06:02:08 AM
After enjoying a live performance of Salonen's "Foreign Bodies" I end up with this disc and listened to Nyx, a tone poem by the same conposer.



I enjoyed this piece as well.  Salonen has a unique way of putting music together, which seems to emphasize the creation of unique textures of sound that develop out of each other or contrast with each other.

After reporting my enjoyment of Foreign bodies some guy told me off for enjoying the piece for the wrong reason and made condescending comments about my wife.  So I await the explanation for why my enjoyment of this piece is also invalid.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 18, 2013, 06:11:20 AM
My thought is that it does not matter why you enjoyed the music, the important thing is that you did.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 18, 2013, 07:32:41 AM
Sven Lyder Kahrs (http://www.gubemusic.com/artist_755)
(b. 1959, Bergen, Norway)

https://www.youtube.com/v/0eJfRDucvcw&list=PLpJMYtmnUL-GZcc9VCnr9uZb784SL_kor&shuffle=2755

Wir nur ziehen allem vorbei, wie ein luftiger Auftausch (We only pass everything by like a change of air) for ensemble (2009), returns to the themes and temporariness, again taking its title from Rilke's Duino Elegies. THis work, however, has another form or presence wich comes across clearly. The refined, timbral chamber music nuances of Kahr's work are accompanied by expressive outbursts, a sort of collective instrumental cries. This many partly be a result of the instrumentation, but even so, this piece has unusally acute and violent features, rare in kahr's output. The time measured out by the work is treated with less reverence than previously. In some places it is more a question of humorous sabotage of the musical discourse.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 19, 2013, 04:00:05 AM
After reporting my enjoyment of Foreign bodies some guy told me off for enjoying the piece for the wrong reason and made condescending comments about my wife.
Jesus, Scarpia, that's not even close to what I actually said. (Why, it's not even close to what you actually said!)

The allure of strawmen is that they are sooooooooo easy to conquer.

But where's the sport in that?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Parsifal on October 19, 2013, 06:44:37 AM
This thread would also be a good place to round-up the latest new-music releases ..


I fear I'm going to have to get this one.

On another note, listened to Salonen's Nyx again.



I find it increasingly fascinating, particularly the way that transitions in texture seem to create different aural "rooms" which are "occupied" by different flavors of melodic invention.  The ecstatic ending is particularly impressive.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 19, 2013, 08:30:04 AM
(http://asymmetrymusicmagazine.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/tutuguri-cover.jpg)http://asymmetrymusicmagazine.com/reviews/felipe-otondos-tutuguri/
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on October 19, 2013, 01:19:00 PM
Murail: Symphonic Concerto for Piano and Orchestra "Le Désenchantement du monde" (2012)

I can't find a YT clip or even a commercially released recording but you can listen to this work through the Instant Encore site ~ HERE (http://www.instantencore.com/work/work.aspx?work=5070803).

Ensemble: New York Philharmonic
Conductor: David Robertson
Artist: Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Piano)
Thanks, Mr. Sanantonio - that's the first bit of Murail I've felt able to sit through ! Enjoyed several of your VCs too; much appreciated !
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 19, 2013, 02:39:41 PM
My thought is that it does not matter why you enjoyed the music, the important thing is that you did.

 :)
That works for me too.  De gustibus non disputandem est. ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 19, 2013, 04:27:27 PM
Doesn't sound like much of a thought. The experience of music isn't a mindless affair, the experience can be deeper ... inquistive folks, ones who listen deeply will ponder, reflect, think-about what it was that they noticed & liked about the music, and draw conclusions as to what it means & represents to them.

I did not imply what you allege I implied in my statement.  (Oh, and thanks for the gratuitous insult, btw.) 

Of course enjoyment of a piece of music is not a mindless affair - but different people will respond differently to the same piece of music.   I do not consider one response more valid than the next, and don't lump people into groups like you: "inquistive (sic) folks, ones who listen deeply" (people like James ... you know, superior people) and then all those other people (the ones James looks down on). 

 ::)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 19, 2013, 05:41:31 PM
Lefteris Papadimitriou (http://www.lefterispapadimitriou.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/-JUhklDDHko

Piece n.6 from the album Oriental Resonant Networks (2013).

Electronics, piano and percussion.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on October 20, 2013, 12:00:59 AM
...it is more about just being human
Well, that's easy enough. Since we are all already that.

And since we are all already that, without any effort (and without any encouragement (!) from you), you have just very neatly invalidated every single thing you have ever said.

Great job!

(Takes a lot of pressure off of us. Thanks!)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 21, 2013, 07:46:28 AM
Michael Gordon: Light is Calling

Film by Bill Morrison (director, producer, editor)
Music by Michael Gordon (composer, ASCAP)

"A scene from a deteriorating print of James Youngs The Bells (1926) was optically printed and re-edited to Michael Gordons 7 minute composition."


http://www.youtube.com/v/cf9ah8IUVgw

The music is featured on this album, which is fantastic...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515nVkkZO-L._SX200_.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 21, 2013, 08:05:52 AM
Jimmy Lopez (http://www.jimmylopez.com)

https://www.youtube.com/v/I64qaCPyaQo&list=UUXQ00jOcg9i2_BwLc2atDVQ

15 Études for String Octet
Arditti String Quartet
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on October 21, 2013, 08:58:24 AM
Theo Verbey (http://www.theoverbey.com/web/home.aspx) (*1959) -

Fractal Symphony (2004)

http://www.youtube.com/v/BhkF29qTXNs




Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 21, 2013, 02:37:00 PM
Emre Sihan Kaleli (https://soundcloud.com/emresihan/)
(b. 1987)

https://www.youtube.com/v/MUXBVin3j7Y

"Seventeen Thoughts on a Chamber Concerto", played by the Nieuw Ensemble

Conductor: Ed Spanjaard

Flute: Harrie Starreveld
Clarinet: Jelrik Beerkens
Oboe: Ernest Rombout
Mandolin: Hans Wesseling
Guitar: Helenus de Rijke
Harp: Marieke Schoenmakers
Piano: Sepp Grotenhuis
Percussion: Herman Halewijn
Violin: Lisanne Soeterbroek
Viola: Frank Brakkee
Cello: Jeroen den Herder
Double bass: James Oesi
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 21, 2013, 02:55:33 PM
Gabriel Erkoreka (http://www.erkoreka.com/)
(b. 1969)

https://www.youtube.com/v/T76QyDoXkMU

"Dipolo" for cello and piano, played by David Apellániz and Alberto Rosado.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 22, 2013, 05:12:56 AM
Turgut Ercetin (https://soundcloud.com/turgut-ercetin)

https://www.youtube.com/v/RSEfcgEJfmI

The Arditti Quartet performs Ercetin's second string quartet "Contra-Statement" at Espace de Projection, IRCAM.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 22, 2013, 12:05:25 PM
Richard Glover (http://richardglover.wordpress.com/biography/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/5KQygxhjWME

Cello with Clarinet and Piano played by Seth Woods (cello), Jonathan Sage (clarinet) and Philip Thomas (piano), from the CD 'Logical Harmonies', featuring seven compositions by Richard Glover.

Richard Glover (b. 1981) grew up in Lichfield and studied at the University of Hertfordshire for his undergraduate degree in Electronic Music before moving to Huddersfield, where he gained a distinction for his MA in Music Composition. He completed his PhD with Bryn Harrison at Huddersfield, investigating perception and cognition within music of sustained tone textures. He is currently working as a Research Fellow in the music department and teaching in composition and music technology.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 22, 2013, 04:54:02 PM
Andrea Di Paolo (http://www.andreadipaolo.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/HegItEAacQU&list=UU1P-kTkphAxVG7P65yCcgMQ

Das Universum for string quartet
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 23, 2013, 11:12:32 AM
Never any critical thinking? Introspection, questioning things NEVER enters into it? Sounds like a total load of bs.
That's not it, James.  I love to analyze and sort out my various responses--but at its heart, our responses to music are so personal and irreducibly complex that it's a waste of effort to go beyond a certain point in our self-analysis.  This is especially true with the most recent music, much of which is so different from any "traditional" music, including the "Good Music" this forum is supposedly about, that there have been many academic-style polemics and analyses about it already.

In other words, if I like it, I'm likely to analyze why; that's just me.  But the first answer, and the final one, is likely to be, to paraphrase and add to the words of an early Everest explorer: It's there, and I'm here, and it resonates in my central being.  Why--well, we can tear apart and put back together ad nauseam, but it's still a Great Mystery.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on October 23, 2013, 11:23:41 AM
Richard Glover (http://richardglover.wordpress.com/biography/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/5KQygxhjWME

Cello with Clarinet and Piano played by Seth Woods (cello), Jonathan Sage (clarinet) and Philip Thomas (piano), from the CD 'Logical Harmonies', featuring seven compositions by Richard Glover.

Richard Glover (b. 1981) grew up in Lichfield and studied at the University of Hertfordshire for his undergraduate degree in Electronic Music before moving to Huddersfield, where he gained a distinction for his MA in Music Composition. He completed his PhD with Bryn Harrison at Huddersfield, investigating perception and cognition within music of sustained tone textures. He is currently working as a Research Fellow in the music department and teaching in composition and music technology.
Fascinating!  Kind of trance-inducing with its very long tones, changing slowly.  I'm sure it was very challenging to record!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 23, 2013, 02:13:37 PM
Michael Jarrell (http://www.michaeljarrell.com/home.html‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/AVrGyeCOU1A
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 24, 2013, 05:23:56 AM
Peter Eötvös: Snatches of a conversation (2001)

https://www.youtube.com/v/TyvL5MaN52U
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 24, 2013, 09:26:04 AM
Osvaldo Coluccino (http://osvaldocoluccino.blogspot.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/8tPe-5mkYuQ
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 24, 2013, 04:44:04 PM
Hans Zender (http://www.boosey.com/composer/Hans+Zender)

https://www.youtube.com/v/a3tTNaFbhCc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 24, 2013, 05:10:23 PM
Mark Delpriora (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Delpriora)

https://www.youtube.com/v/1J-3-GoDiyI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on October 25, 2013, 05:41:02 AM
Hans Zender (http://www.boosey.com/composer/Hans+Zender)

https://www.youtube.com/v/a3tTNaFbhCc

Can appreciate some/much of this...interesting composer. What do you make of his take on Winterreise ? I like the contrast of centuries; how is it viewed by lovers of purely contemporary music ?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 27, 2013, 07:14:11 AM
Juan Camilo Hernández Sanchez (http://jucahesa.webs.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/fo_0bEhPqFs

"Flux, traces floues" (2010) for 21 instruments and live electronics, Orchestre des lauréats du Conservatoire de Paris.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Artem on October 27, 2013, 10:34:39 AM
I don't know how to post youtubes here, but i wanted to share this short extract from a solo piano piece by Bryn Harrison called Vessels released later this month on Another Timbre label. It's an interesting composition, similar to Morton Feldman's later long piano compositions, but is also kind of different.

(http://www.anothertimbre.com/_wp_generated/wpc049e484_05_06.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7c_3RJOqWY&list=UU3EXY6jOXxa_9E17MP2_nqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7c_3RJOqWY&list=UU3EXY6jOXxa_9E17MP2_nqw)

Here's a link to a website: http://www.anothertimbre.com/vessels.html (http://www.anothertimbre.com/vessels.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 28, 2013, 01:41:56 AM
Saed Haddad (http://www.saedhaddad.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/PKes3qtAsCI&feature=c4-overview&list=UUOg0mUnx6LFHW8a5hP1jCpw

The Sublime (2008) for ensemble
Ensemble Modern / Frank Ollu, conductor
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 28, 2013, 02:11:46 AM
Paul Coleman (http://www.paulcolemanmusic.com)

https://www.youtube.com/v/dwf-xL-5zwU

Gathering (2008) for piano, guitar, harp, and marimba with electronics.
Performed at OSSIA at the Eastman School of Music Kilbourn Hall February 2008.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 28, 2013, 03:59:29 PM
Jesús Rueda (http://www.naxos.com/person/Rueda_Jesus/88829.htm)

https://www.youtube.com/v/o-z23dyRP4E

String Quartet III "Islas"
Arditti Quartet
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 28, 2013, 04:06:22 PM
Misato Mochizuki (http://www.misato-mochizuki.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/gj7BixghbI0

Chimera
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 28, 2013, 04:18:58 PM
Jean Luc Hervé (http://brahms.ircam.fr/composers/composer/1619/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/8-AyuHXQ3g4

Dans l'heure brève
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 29, 2013, 02:50:15 AM
Rodolfo Acosta Restrepo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodolfo_Acosta_(composer))

https://www.youtube.com/v/Gwgl-2Nj8cQ

Todas las Noches, el Cielo Arde sobre Bogotá (2004)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 29, 2013, 04:05:36 AM
Franghiz Alizadeh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franghiz_Alizadeh)

https://www.youtube.com/v/fJjEk8m5SGM

Piano Quintet
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 29, 2013, 06:00:20 PM
Clara Maïda (http://www.claramaida.com/eng/files/biography.htm)

https://www.youtube.com/v/rwEYZLwahQo

~ Doppelklaenger, prepared and amplified piano solo.  Excerpt from the score. (http://www.claramaida.com/docs_comm/pdf/part/doppelklanger.pdf)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 29, 2013, 06:22:02 PM
Michael Hersch (http://www.michaelhersch.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/4UTSKEhaibY

"After Hölderlin's 'Hälfte des Lebens'" for viola and cello

Miranda Cuckson, viola
Julia Bruskin, cello
October 18, 2011
The Transit Circle Contemporary Music Series
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on October 29, 2013, 06:32:01 PM
Jason Eckardt (http://www.ensemble21.com/eckardt)

https://www.youtube.com/v/Kq-v441Ai7s

After Serra (2000)

"Although connections between the American sculptor Richard Serra's monolithic, post-minimalist works and my music may not be immediately apparent, I seek to convey in sound the simultaneous imposition and precariousness that I perceive in his pieces.

"Serra's sculptures overwhelm the observer with their massive dimensions and sharply defined form. At the same time, they appear as if they might, with the slightest disturbance, collapse. As Serra's work disrupts the observer's sense of physical balance, After Serra is similarly conceived to undermine the listener's sense of temporal stability. My composition attempts to thwart expectations of formal and gestural continuity, juxtaposing a volatile and restless surface with steadily unfolding underlying processes. While After Serra may appear to be surging toward a more secure environment as it draws to an end, the conclusion may in fact be more disturbingly fragile than the violent outbursts of the opening." - JE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 01, 2013, 05:26:45 AM
Johannes Maria Staud (http://www.universaledition.com/Johannes-Maria-Staud/composers-and-works/composer/2231)

https://www.youtube.com/v/2FaFqshsg3k

One Movement and Five Miniatures | for harpsichord, live-electronics and ensemble | Neufassung 2009.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 01, 2013, 07:51:33 AM
R. Murray Schafer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._Murray_Schafer)

https://www.youtube.com/v/lSzVS7Bg2PI

String Quartet No. 12 [2012]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 01, 2013, 08:21:45 AM
Søren Nils Eichberg (http://eichberg.net/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/GFkS_abCCJU

Endorphin (2011), Concerto Grosso for String Quartet and Orchestra

Søren Nils Eichberg was born in 1973 in Stuttgart, Germany, grew up in Denmark and today lives and works in Berlin.

Programnote
The Concerto Grosso is a musical form which was very common in the Baroque period, but then widely vanished. With "Endorphin" I aimed to explore what of this traditional form is still of interest for us in a contemporary work and what we can save from this temporarily forgotten tradition.

In contrast to the solo concerto there is not only a single soloist, but a small group of soloists -- in this case a string quartet -- emerging from the orchestra. Partly the orchestra is leading, partly the quartet. Partly they are playing against each other, partly together. Ideas are being created here and are picked up there, revised, echoed, or even thwarted -- and vice versa.
In so doing, it is not only the virtuosity of the soloist which is focussed on, but rather the constantly changing colours between smaller and bigger groups, as well as the split-up (fragmentation) and get together of the smaller group which in itself is interesting.

Regarding the title:
Endorphines are what we colloquially refer to as "happiness hormones". Endorphine is an endogenous opioid that drives our feelings of excitement, pain and love. Thus our body rewards ourselves in certain situations -- or stimulates us -- with chemical compounds, which make us feel happiness. However, these are compounds which are similar to very dangerous drugs, which can often lure people on to destruction. It was this ambiguity between euphoria and constant threat that I found suitable for the mood to which the music developed during the process of composing:
On the surface there is a seemingly untroubled lust for life and for playing, which is always verging on drifting to something hidden, something broken. Even the tempo declaration at the beginning ("hyped", quarter = 120) indicates this ambiguity.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 03, 2013, 06:13:54 PM
Katherine Young (http://www.katherineyoung.info/bio4.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/-tYA9U1NGRM
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 05, 2013, 06:05:06 AM
Guilherme Carvalho (https://myspace.com/carvalhoguilherme)
(1974-)

https://www.youtube.com/v/dRXwMO7Q9xU&list=UUbKdvkzSYQs6w4yMi8M3BDg

"Topologie Faible", for chamber orchestra.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 06, 2013, 05:40:37 AM
Max Eastley (https://myspace.com/maxeastley)

https://www.youtube.com/v/SC6DSFNNLSg

This clip is a film about Eastley's work that was made prior to 2000, but he has more recent works, just not on YouTube.  I find him a fascinating composer/sculptor who creates assemblages that produce sound either from mechanical or natural means.  Some of his works are activated by wind, or water, or by a small engine that moves an arm across the earth, or other objects.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 06, 2013, 07:34:42 AM
Nina C. Young (http://www.ninacyoung.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/vPd0MQXcSTk

Kolokol for two pianos and electronics, played by Yuxi Qin and Wensi Yan.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 06, 2013, 10:54:29 AM
Michał Dobrzyński (http://michaldobrzynski.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/tUM7dMNSGls&list=PLSg92tfsDMmLEBwYAu85rO7nXZlXG953z

"Continuum" (2009) for Two Pianos and Two Percussion Sets. Mariusz Klimsiak, Bartłomiej Wezner -- Piano, Jan Wezner, Mateusz Krawczyk -- Percussion. Image is by Karel Appel.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on November 10, 2013, 11:43:53 AM
There doesn't seem to be a thread for Salonen's compositions (probably not surprising since his output is rather small).

Listened to this disc over the last few days. 



The first piece (from 2005) is a piece for orchestra called Helix, which I did not find very interesting.

The second piece (2007) is the Piano Concerto, which I enjoyed a great deal, particularly the first two movements.  I had to disable my subwoofer, since I find Salonen's use of bass drum excessive, but the work was full of engaging writing for piano and lush textures frrom the orchestra.  The description in the booklet accompanying the CD was a bit odd (apparently the second movement is inspired by a sci-fi vision of a future inhabited by postbiologic birds).

The last piece on the disc is a piece for solo piano which I also enjoyed.

My experience with Salonen seems to be hit-or-miss.  The last release I listend to contained a tone poem which I enjoyed a lot (Nyx) and a violin concerto which I didn't.  Next up will be the disc containing "Body Language," I piece which I heard in concert last month.

Perhaps a moderator, or yourself, could transfer this post to Salonen's composer thread that I started: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,18616.msg519070.html#msg519070
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 11, 2013, 06:16:18 AM
Ferran Fages (http://www.ferranfages.net/‎) -

https://www.youtube.com/v/C5F6D7NuKa4

Radi d'Or

Extract from Ferran Fages's composition 'Radi d'Or' (2011),performed by the Ferran Fages Ensemble: Olga Abalos (flute & alto saxophone), Lali Barriere (sinewaves), Tom Chant (soprano and tenor saxophones), Ferran Fages (acoustic guitar) & Pilar Subira (percussion).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 12, 2013, 05:21:59 AM
Benet Casablancas (http://www.accompositors.com/compositores-curriculum.php?nIdioma=ing&idComp=29)

https://www.youtube.com/v/yz4upglVSqU

Pastoral, Concertino for Sax and Ensemble (2012).  Festival de Música Contemporánea de Alicante, 27/09/12

[Note: This clip takes a little while to get going, the music starts after about 1'30" of the stage business.]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 12, 2013, 06:59:26 AM
Hector Parra (http://brahms.ircam.fr/composers/composer/3571/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/07DdmpTyq5I

"String Trio" (2006)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on November 12, 2013, 10:37:28 AM
Where do you FIND all these gems, sanantonio? ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 12, 2013, 10:45:54 AM
Where do you FIND all these gems, sanantonio? ;D

YouTube is a great resource.  There are some folks who have created fairly large collections of new music, or music from the last 50 years or so.  I also regularly research the students of composers I like and look for their music.

I am happy you find these clips worthwhile.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pjme on November 12, 2013, 02:43:08 PM
From Flanders: the second symphony by Annelies Van Parys "Les ponts" - The bridges.

http://www.youtube.com/v/-h6Jy-dbvLw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pjme on November 12, 2013, 02:45:41 PM
Bram Van Camp: violinconcerto - 2008


http://www.youtube.com/v/BEwJO2jFz1g
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pjme on November 12, 2013, 02:54:45 PM
Frank Nuyts : Chambersymphony "Fetish" - first movement

The Emanon ensemble is now the Flemish Symphonietta: http://www.vlaams-sinfonietta.be/

http://www.youtube.com/v/wcfRIHW3fBk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 12, 2013, 04:16:16 PM
Interesting clips, pjme - the violin concerto was the one I enjoyed the most.  Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pjme on November 13, 2013, 11:26:01 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/V46kiwpz6qg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: pjme on November 13, 2013, 11:33:44 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/WqSJ1e2SvaY

Luc Brewaeys: Shakespeare sonnet nr. 8 for soprano and two crotales
Laure Delcampe, soprano
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 13, 2013, 02:26:16 PM
I trust you can distinguish which pair of hands is mine in the applause in that last video.

Each set of hands has its own distinct sound, you know.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 19, 2013, 05:43:06 AM
Oliver Schneller (http://www.oliverschneller.net/)...

https://www.youtube.com/v/XGYpbuS8ZNA

Stratigraphie (2005-6) für sechs Instrumente und Live-Elektronik Ensemble UnitedBerlin / Titus Engel, conductor.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 19, 2013, 05:47:21 AM
I trust you can distinguish which pair of hands is mine in the applause in that last video.

Each set of hands has its own distinct sound, you know.

I'm still chuckling at the clown who wrote, really what you are trying to tell us is that you are not really a critical thinker.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 19, 2013, 10:15:14 AM
Ha ha ha, me too.

The university course I taught for twenty years was called, in part, "Critical thinking."

But I could have been faking it.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 19, 2013, 10:20:53 AM
It seems that when someone posts an opinion that another member does not identify with, often they are told that  the problem is with their less than impressive intellect.  That is, as opposed to something  like, "oh, that's an interesting alternative to how I approach it."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 19, 2013, 02:46:05 PM
I know I'm being naughty to say this, as Gurn will doubtless tell me--in his gentle but stern way--but I'm going to postulate that "an interesting alternative to how I approach it" is only available to people with reasonably impressive intellects.

THREAD DUTY!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJXnifjdmyU

I like this one even more (if I may :)), but the visuals aren't. That is, there's only the one picture. A visual.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG8yYG2jzWI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 19, 2013, 04:33:33 PM
THREAD DUTY!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJXnifjdmyU

I like this one even more (if I may :)), but the visuals aren't. That is, there's only the one picture. A visual.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG8yYG2jzWI

I haven't heard any Simon Steen-Andersen in a while - which means I should followup with some directed listening.  Enjoyed both of the clips.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 19, 2013, 06:43:37 PM
Ramon Lazkano (http://www.lazkano.info/‎)

http://www.youtube.com/v/1JyL4ZrlX68

Lur-Itzalak (2003)
Lisa Kerob, violon / Thierry Amadi, violoncelle — Ramon Lazkano (San Sebastián, 1968), es un compositor español, afincado en París.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on November 20, 2013, 08:57:45 AM
This was actually posted by sanantonio in the WAYLT thread, but I'm putting it here for my personal convenience, because I won't be able to listen to it this morning (or the rest of the day, or tomorrow),  and want to be able to find it when I do get the chance.

https://www.youtube.com/v/HlJvqa9xU4E

Lutz Glandien (http://www.lutzglandien.com/) - Es Lebe
Recorded May 1989 at the Studio of the Academy of Art, Berlin, GDR.  Tuba -- Michael Voight

Lutz Glandien (born 1954) is a Berlin-based German avant garde composer and musician. He has composed a number of classical and electroacoustic pieces, released four solo albums, and collaborated with English percussionist Chris Cutler to record two acclaimed avant-rock albums, Domestic Stories (1992) and P53 (1996).

Beautifully sonorous, even for those who do not usually enjoy electroacoustic music, this might be a gateway to a new sonic world.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 20, 2013, 09:01:57 AM
Jeffrey,

Disclaimer: That work was written in 1986, or thereabouts - so it does not technically adhere to the thread topic - but, hey, who cares?

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on November 20, 2013, 10:01:16 AM
Oliver Schneller (http://www.oliverschneller.net/)...

https://www.youtube.com/v/XGYpbuS8ZNA

Stratigraphie (2005-6) für sechs Instrumente und Live-Elektronik Ensemble UnitedBerlin / Titus Engel, conductor.
Gorgeous!  For some reason the opening made me think of Lutoslawski's Symphony #3; I think it's the way a fast, loud opening is followed by a long quiet chord.  I like how this one sounds almost tonal and dance-like in sections, then tosses twists at us. 8)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 20, 2013, 10:11:04 AM
Gorgeous!  For some reason the opening made me think of Lutoslawski's Symphony #3; I think it's the way a fast, loud opening is followed by a long quiet chord.  I like how this one sounds almost tonal and dance-like in sections, then tosses twists at us. 8)

Some of the electronic/acoustic music I like best has a lush, like you say, "almost tonal" effect.  The one that Jeffrey cross posted also comes across in that manner.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 20, 2013, 06:22:05 PM
Keeril Makan (http://keerilmakan.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/FqSHinEKACo

After Forgetting
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 22, 2013, 07:38:24 AM
Salvatore Sciarrino ~ Quattro Adagi (2008)

https://www.youtube.com/v/tixdkJ1__JE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 22, 2013, 08:15:17 AM
sounds almost tonal
Ya know, jochanaan, it's interesting. I'm 61. I've been listening to classical music for over fifty of those years. I have partaken in online classical music discussion boards for seven years, more or less.

Before doing so, I never, at any time, ever thought of things as being tonal or not tonal. Things were interesting, to me, or not. Things were intriguing, or not. Some things made me want to hear them again. Some did not.

Many things that I did not like at first became great favorites. A few things that were instantly likable became somewhat meh as time went on.

But never, until online music discussions, did I ever think of tonality per se. Whether something was in a key or not just didn't enter into it.

I still don't think that way--just by the way!!--but it's a concept that's hard to avoid, being ubiquitous* and all.

Anyway, it's interesting. I don't have the impression that you think of things that way, either, but are aware that others do--and are encouraging those others to give this "non-tonal" piece a quick listen.

Good on you for doing so.

*Plus, you see it everywhere! ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Pessoa on November 22, 2013, 08:22:02 AM
Ramon Lazkano (http://www.lazkano.info/‎)

http://www.youtube.com/v/1JyL4ZrlX68

Lur-Itzalak (2003)
Lisa Kerob, violon / Thierry Amadi, violoncelle — Ramon Lazkano (San Sebastián, 1968), es un compositor español, afincado en París.
Sounds a bit like Sciarrino´s flutes.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 22, 2013, 08:22:38 AM
I'm 61.

So am I, at least for the next month.

 8)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 22, 2013, 09:20:45 AM
Well, I don't get to 62 until March. So you have three months to lord it over me, whippersnapper that I am....
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on November 22, 2013, 06:50:52 PM
Ya know, jochanaan, it's interesting. I'm 61. I've been listening to classical music for over fifty of those years. I have partaken in online classical music discussion boards for seven years, more or less.

Before doing so, I never, at any time, ever thought of things as being tonal or not tonal. Things were interesting, to me, or not. Things were intriguing, or not. Some things made me want to hear them again. Some did not.

Many things that I did not like at first became great favorites. A few things that were instantly likable became somewhat meh as time went on.

But never, until online music discussions, did I ever think of tonality per se. Whether something was in a key or not just didn't enter into it.

I still don't think that way--just by the way!!--but it's a concept that's hard to avoid, being ubiquitous* and all.

Anyway, it's interesting. I don't have the impression that you think of things that way, either, but are aware that others do--and are encouraging those others to give this "non-tonal" piece a quick listen.

Good on you for doing so.

*Plus, you see it everywhere! ;)
Having perfect pitch, and being a performing musician, the question of "key" or "no key" is inescapable to me.  But when I get a chance, I do like to play with the concept of tonality, sometimes throwing in a little polytonality or atonality into an improvisation. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 23, 2013, 05:28:11 PM
Polina Nazaykinskaya (http://www.utclutch.org/user/46)

https://www.youtube.com/v/DfB4eY8ve_0

Haim for clarinet, string quartet and two pianos (excerpt)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 24, 2013, 08:17:45 AM
Esaias Järnegard (http://www.esaiasjarnegard.se/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/xIdcrYEDa00

Stones Ash Ash (2011)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 25, 2013, 04:33:36 AM
Cecilia García (http://www.ceci.scd.cl/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/gmR1NHk9qdY

Desarme Final (2007)

More clips here (http://soundcloud.com/cecigarcia1‎).

Garcia's music resides at the boundary of electoacoustical/classical and electronica/ambiant.  Some may object to her use of "beats" here and there, but this is not trance music. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 26, 2013, 10:09:40 AM
I have to confess that I don't listen to each and every clip posted here.

Partly because that's my whole life, listening to new music. So I hardly need any encouragement. :)

But occasionally I'll take a nibble. And I must say, that Järnegard thing was very very tasty indeed.

I'm very tempted, now to go back to the beginning and listen to every single clip on this whole thread.

Could be quite fun, eh?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 26, 2013, 11:06:25 AM
I have to confess that I don't listen to each and every clip posted here.

Partly because that's my whole life, listening to new music. So I hardly need any encouragement. :)

But occasionally I'll take a nibble. And I must say, that Järnegard thing was very very tasty indeed.

I'm very tempted, now to go back to the beginning and listen to every single clip on this whole thread.

Could be quite fun, eh?

Listening is good; but posting some clips you find noteworthy would be even better.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 26, 2013, 11:43:36 AM
A worthwhile website (http://www.ubu.com/) for electroacoustic music.  Free streaming of mp3 audio for all their sound pages, including 70 hours of the history of electroacoustic music (http://www.ubu.com/sound/electronic.html).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 27, 2013, 12:23:34 AM
Esaias Järnegard (http://www.esaiasjarnegard.se/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/xIdcrYEDa00

Stones Ash Ash (2011)

Good grief.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 27, 2013, 04:16:39 AM
Yes dear, we know.

You are the only person in the world. The only one of any consequence, anyway. :D

Why do you even bother?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 27, 2013, 04:37:29 AM
A worthwhile website (http://www.ubu.com/) for electroacoustic music.  Free streaming of mp3 audio for all their sound pages, including 70 hours of the history of electroacoustic music (http://www.ubu.com/sound/electronic.html).
Nice challenge at the end, after apologizing for the obvious gaps in the selection!

Very tempting, I assure you, as some huge names are simply non-existent. Starting with Francis Dhomont. He taught for many years in Montreal, so one entire strand of Canadian electroacoustic music can be attributed to him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45PQX_2j1Y0&list=TLuUMWpWT0KrpyEhBdqbD0h7Wku_qTaUDk

And the women! All the women who are not on that list. Starting with Pauline Oliveros. Indeed, electroacoustic music is practically--for the past thirty or forty years--the special province of women. Or maybe I just prefer women, so know the female electroacoustic composers better.... Or maybe the women are simply writing better stuff. Hmmmm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY6_i26s-U4

This is a recent film by Patrick Bokanowski. Music by Michele Bokanowski.

(sanantonio, you do know that I posted two links awhile back. Post #643. I want to make sure I get credit for those. :))
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 27, 2013, 04:53:59 AM
Nice challenge at the end, after apologizing for the obvious gaps in the selection!

Very tempting, I assure you, as some huge names are simply non-existent. Starting with Francis Dhomont. He taught for many years in Montreal, so one entire strand of Canadian electroacoustic music can be attributed to him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45PQX_2j1Y0&list=TLuUMWpWT0KrpyEhBdqbD0h7Wku_qTaUDk

And the women! All the women who are not on that list. Starting with Pauline Oliveros. Indeed, electroacoustic music is practically--for the past thirty or forty years--the special province of women. Or maybe I just prefer women, so know the female electroacoustic composers better.... Or maybe the women are simply writing better stuff. Hmmmm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY6_i26s-U4

This is a recent film by Patrick Bokanowski. Music by Michele Bokanowski.

(sanantonio, you do know that I posted two links awhile back. Post #643. I want to make sure I get credit for those. :))

I agree the selection is weighted very heavily with the "big names" (I think they could have reduced the amount of Stockhausen, and added some other composers).  But what a playlist like this offers is an easy way for people who are not experienced with this music to find a lot of very representative music in one place.  Dhomont is an important omission, as are the others you mention. 

I've found posts of yours in other threads with lists of composers which I've appreciated.  Post #643 is another helpful post.  Please, don't hold back.  You are probably the person on GMG who knows the most about new music and I, for one, would very much appreciate your contributions.

 ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 27, 2013, 05:48:13 AM
Mauro Lanza (http://brahms.ircam.fr/mauro-lanza)

https://www.youtube.com/v/NCZGOlU5oa0

#9

His soundcloud page (https://soundcloud.com/maurolanza) with more audio clips.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 27, 2013, 06:21:21 AM
Yes dear, we know.

You are the only person in the world. The only one of any consequence, anyway. :D

Why do you even bother?

Okay, actually I'm vaguely interested in electronic music, which indeed is still being written. I do think posterity will understand it as another cul-de-sac and another nail in the coffin, but maybe there's a little left to say with it, I don't know...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 27, 2013, 09:10:13 AM
Posterity is a fancy word for "the grandchildren of grandchildren."

These are not people that I will ever have a chance to meet, as I will have died long before they are born. Long before even their parents are born.

That the suppositious opinions of those people can have any sort of effect on how I listen and what I listen to and what I value today, in my current condition of being alive, takes my breath away.

I cannot know, no one can know, what these as yet unborn people will think about anything we know about. And even if we could, would it really make any difference?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on November 27, 2013, 10:27:08 AM
Electronic music is just as much a dead end as that thing with all those hammers that was so popular in the late 18th century.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 27, 2013, 03:21:25 PM
Posterity is a fancy word for "the grandchildren of grandchildren."

These are not people that I will ever have a chance to meet, as I will have died long before they are born. Long before even their parents are born.

That the suppositious opinions of those people can have any sort of effect on how I listen and what I listen to and what I value today, in my current condition of being alive, takes my breath away.

I cannot know, no one can know, what these as yet unborn people will think about anything we know about. And even if we could, would it really make any difference?

Hello some guy, well I can see you're a man of some sensitivity and judgement, and in touch with real and objective aesthetic experience.

But my point here is that the characters on this thread are making a mistake, although I'm happy to agree to disagree. It's a mistake I made as a headstrong youth when first getting into 20th century music- despite my enthusiasm, older more experienced people at the local music society pointed out that though it is indeed interesting it just doesn't compare in depth and potential of interpretive richness with the great works of the repertory.

And once we take a few steps back from the thicket we're in and take a look a the wood properly we see that of course modernism in music has only really worked when allied to established tonal principles that the human ear and mind understands, such as in Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Messiaen and others.

The rest is rather trivial if curious expressive areas people have found rummaging in the post-Schoenbergian decadence and silliness.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 27, 2013, 05:10:40 PM
Ansgar Beste (http://www.ansgarbeste.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/jn2a7OPrCYc

"Pèlerinage Fantastique" (2010) for prepared string quartet.  2011-03-12, Kairos Quartet in Klosterneuburg / Vienna (Aut), final concert of ZEITklang competition 2011.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 27, 2013, 06:37:55 PM
Sean .. its everywhere though, you'd have to live in a cave not to notice, and in fact it could be easily argued that music that just ONLY uses traditional instruments & practices is cul-de-sac. Electronic music & media is far more widespread and prevalent today in comparison, and its formed its own evolution, history and tradition. By far the most fruitful of all the avant gardes experiments was the development of electronic music.

No, this is the big intellectual trap. It's when we attend to music on music's own terms that we find a tremendous range of expression, not when false harmonic systems are concocted in its place under confused ideas of finding new idioms.

The literary parallel in modernism is with the likes of Joyce and the deeply confused idea of altering the terms of language itself, instead of just saying something new with it, resulting in meaninglessness. And remember all this garbage is pushed by academics way up in towers separated from reality who don't engage with artworks on any personal level.

Or take the dramatic switch to tonality centred on the 1590s- it had been assumed that harmonic variety issued from using a variety of modes, but no, once composers noticed there was something much more communicative about only two then they developed the set of 24 keys all using those same progressions to exploit this amazing new aesthetic realm. And nobody with any sense bothered with the other modes for 300 years and certainly not with the similar possible sets of keys within them.

Here's Shiva dancing freely but circumscribed by a circle of fire, the mind never straying beyond its core reference to truth out into intellectual groundlessness- he stands on the demon of ignorance and foolishness.

(http://www.lotussculpture.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/nataraja-statue-z.jpg)


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 27, 2013, 06:49:12 PM
Lucia Ronchetti (http://www.luciaronchetti.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/1HGurfyE38I

Le Palais du silence (extrait)

Too bad this is just an excerpt; I'd love to hear the entire work.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 28, 2013, 03:20:52 AM
despite my enthusiasm, older more experienced people at the local music society pointed out that though it is indeed interesting it just doesn't compare in depth and potential of interpretive richness with the great works of the repertory.
Well, there's the problem right there. When you were young and impressionable, you allowed the prejudices of some older people to impress you way too much.

You should have kept listening to music.

You should have taken your own advice, which is to attend to music on its own terms. This is precisely what you have NOT done. Quite the contrary. You have accepted a view of what "music" should do, have internalized that view, and then have listened to music with this idea in mind. But not all music does those things. There is other music, with other terms. And you have demonstrated over and over again that music that does not follow a particular set of terms--not its terms but something else's terms--is somehow inferior or less valuable.

My best advice to you is to take your own advice, and attend to every single piece you hear ON ITS OWN TERMS. Not your terms, not some other piece's terms, not on the terms of "the great works of the repertory." ITS terms.

It's good advice, Sean. Take it.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 28, 2013, 05:13:07 AM
some guy

Quote
My best advice to you is to take your own advice, and attend to every single piece you hear ON ITS OWN TERMS. Not your terms, not some other piece's terms, not on the terms of "the great works of the repertory." ITS terms.

Okay, I guess you're right there. Nothing like empirical observation free of preconceptions and baggage. We agree on something...

James, very well, I'm probably not as up to date as you with the electroacoustics. I do recommend however Brian Eno's Thursday afternoon, Apollo and Music for airports...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 28, 2013, 05:17:16 AM
By the way I wonder if Jonty Harrison is still composing, I met him a couple of times years ago at Birmingham University- he's an artist and was coming up with some really interesting use of natural sounds.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 28, 2013, 06:23:31 AM
My best advice to you is to take your own advice, and attend to every single piece you hear ON ITS OWN TERMS. Not your terms, not some other piece's terms, not on the terms of "the great works of the repertory." ITS terms.

Yep.   
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 28, 2013, 06:28:39 AM
Brian Ferneyhough (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Ferneyhough)

https://www.youtube.com/v/s5cMRabf14Q

Renvoi/ Shards (2008) for quarter-tone guitar and quarter-tone vibraphone, played by asamisimasa (ensemble).

Renvoi / Shards: fragments of delay, revision, regeneration.  "Emerging from a babble of miniscule, disconnected figural constructs, the discourse obsessively seeks to unravel its own Gordian knot in order to arrive back at a primal state it never started from."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 28, 2013, 06:41:51 AM
Brian Ferneyhough

https://www.youtube.com/v/xANR6U5CLG8

Liber Scintillarum (2012) for flute, oboe, clarinet, violin, viola, cello.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on November 28, 2013, 07:28:52 AM
I certainly hope Jonty is still composing.

I haven't kept up with him as I should. I've kept up with a couple of his students.

I'll be right back, though.

[...]

I didn't find any recent Jonty on youtube, but I did find an electroacoustic channel that has many of the people that did not make that other list. Put those two lists together, you've got a pretty decent overview of the past 70 years or so.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3db0bMg9GI0&list=PLD099C32FB32E9E1E
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on November 28, 2013, 10:58:48 AM
... not when false harmonic systems are concocted in its place under confused ideas of finding new idioms....Or take the dramatic switch to tonality centred on the 1590s- it had been assumed that harmonic variety issued from using a variety of modes, but no, once composers noticed there was something much more communicative about only two then they developed the set of 24 keys all using those same progressions to exploit this amazing new aesthetic realm. And nobody with any sense bothered with the other modes for 300 years and certainly not with the similar possible sets of keys within them...
Do you not see the internal contradiction here, Sean?  Tonality as it's practiced now is just as artificial as 12-tone serialism.  The only "natural" system possible is one based on the harmonic series; anything else is a variant or a construct.  And any instrument except the human body (voice, hands and feet for rhythm) is as artificial as a synthesizer.  But it is obvious that, with these "artificial" means, musicians have created music that moves souls.  So why not use any and all means to make music?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 28, 2013, 03:20:07 PM
jochanaan, tonality is defined by a reference to acoustic consonance and dissonance, meaning a huge range of harmony and music is possible. Once you move away from the basic understanding however that music needs to respect the experience of frequently coinciding wave peaks as agreeable and euphonious and replace everything with an intellectual scheme then you really are in an Emperor's New Clothes procession making its way down the road. This is the situation today where the arts, if not our civilization, have done everything else and are exhausted.

You can't use any and all means to make music because music has a natural reference- and indeed it's that objectivity which provides for its truth content...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on November 28, 2013, 03:47:12 PM
jochanaan, tonality is defined by a reference to acoustic consonance and dissonance

(...)

You can't use any and all means to make music because music has a natural reference- and indeed it's that objectivity which provides for its truth content...

Except that "reference" isn't fixed nor unchanging. Consonance and dissonance are fluid concepts that have changed over time.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on November 28, 2013, 07:30:11 PM
Except that "reference" isn't fixed nor unchanging. Consonance and dissonance are fluid concepts that have changed over time.
Indeed.  It is said that tonality began to break down almost as soon as it was fully developed; some even point to J.S. Bach as one of the agents of its breakdown.  After all, the dissonances in such music as the famous Toccata and Fugue in d are considerable... :o :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 28, 2013, 08:05:34 PM
No, these concepts haven't changed over time. I know it's an old discussion but the Congolese, the Eskimos, the ancient Egyptians and the alien greys perceive and must perceive the octave with its coinciding wave peaks as euphonious and the minor second as not. These sounds can be shaped in context as concord and discord but cannot be fundamentally altered as there is nothing to alter them to without the rest of aural perception shifting with it- we don't need every dissonance to be immediately resolved because the musical argument is ongoing, but it must be resolved. Sound organized around any other reference point is not music but just noise.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 29, 2013, 06:06:50 AM
Dai Fujikura (http://www.daifujikura.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/LlU3y0bWNHQ

echo within
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 29, 2013, 06:10:06 AM
Qigang Chen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qigang_Chen)

https://www.youtube.com/v/fAufzzVcwMk

"Yi (易)" for clarinet and string quartet.  [Written in 1986, but posted here nonetheless.]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sean on November 29, 2013, 11:13:02 PM
Some 21st century music. Bce that is...

(http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk/images/Harp-NewKingdom.jpg)  (http://www.aniwilliams.com/images/ancient_egypt-harpist.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on November 30, 2013, 04:06:55 PM
Sanzhar Baiterekov (https://soundcloud.com/sanzharbaiterekov)

https://www.youtube.com/v/hYtUD4_y_uM&feature=c4-overview-vl&list=PL5E943EFFEE1BBD38

In(pulse) (2011) for flute, clarinet, violin, viola and cello.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Artem on November 30, 2013, 07:18:08 PM
Didn't think I'd see a composer from Kazakhstan mentioned here.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 01, 2013, 05:30:52 AM
David Hudry (http://www.davidhudry.com/site/Welcome.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/9JpGykaCfoA

"Nachtspiegel" (2008) for chamber orchestra, OLC de Paris. Art by František Kupka.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 01, 2013, 07:54:22 AM
True31 (part 1)

https://www.youtube.com/v/83naKUPcewc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Rinaldo on December 03, 2013, 04:34:59 AM
Carola BauckholtZugvögel ("Migrant birds")

http://www.youtube.com/v/KEAHxLNyVxw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 03, 2013, 07:40:25 AM
Spektral Quartet (http://spektralquartet.com/) ~ Albumblatt (2010) by Hans Thomalla (http://hans-thomalla.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/zXG_OUx1ObA

This work is one of the six included on this new CD by the Spektral Quartet (http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/sounds-heard-spektral-quartet-chambers/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sounds-heard-spektral-quartet-chambers).

(http://f0.bcbits.com/img/a4196462317_2.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 03, 2013, 07:43:59 AM
Carola BauckholtZugvögel ("Migrant birds")

http://www.youtube.com/v/KEAHxLNyVxw

Thanks for posting this interesting work by Carola Bauckholt (http://www.carolabauckholt.de/Carola_Bauckholt/Carola_Bauckholt.html).   Interesting composer, who I've listened to before, but not a huge number of works.  It is always good to hear one that is new to me. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 03, 2013, 10:36:17 AM
One of my favorites, for sure.

And a super nice person. (Reminds me of Karl Henning in that regard. :))

Treibstoff was the first piece of hers I heard. It was in a concert somewhere. Carola was there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0prV3wgI04s
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on December 03, 2013, 05:59:18 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kqzERyqL-4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kqzERyqL-4) Some local (for me) fare.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 05, 2013, 07:00:12 PM
Jonathan Dove, The End (2012)
as found here


co-commissioned by the Britten Sinfonia and Wigmore Hall, with support of the Tenner for a Tenor campaign (as the HM blurb takes pains to make clear); text by Mark Strand.  Instrumentation designed to match that of the Warlock song cycle: string quartet, English horn, flute.  Complements/combines with but also contrasts with the other works on the CD to just the right degree.  Total length of this peformance is 8 minutes 53 seconds

Haven't gone looking for a Youtube clip, although I wouldn't be surprised if there is one posted.  (First listen to the entire CD suggests it's worth getting for both this work and the rest of the program.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 06, 2013, 08:35:24 AM
A Life in Music: Earle Brown’s Contemporary Sound Series

The extraordinary world of contemporary and avant-garde music that Earle Brown published on 18 LPs in the 1960s and 1970s – carefully digitized by the Earle Brown Music Foundation and reissued by WERGO (http://www.wergo.de/shop/de_DE/artists/1/earle-brown/).

VOL. 1
CD 1 Concert Percussion for Orchestra
CD 2 Stockhausen – Kagel
CD 3 Live Electronic Music Improvised

VOL. 2
CD 1 Works for Chamber Orchestra
CD 2 New Music from London
CD 3 Feldman – Brown

VOL. 3
CD 1 The Voice of Cathy Berberian
CD 2 Toshiro Mayuzumi
CD 3 New Music for Piano(s)

VOL. 4
CD 1 New Music for String Quartet
CD 2 New Music for Chamber Orchestra
CD 3 The Hamburger Kammersolisten

VOL. 5
CD 1 Sonic Arts Union: Electric Sound
CD 2 “Concord” Sonata
CD 3 Music for Flute and Piano

VOL. 6
CD 1 Cage – Wolff
CD 2 New Music for Violin and Piano
CD 3 New Music from South America for Chamber Orchestra
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on December 06, 2013, 06:49:52 PM
Six Earl Brown boxes!





Sounds expensive, yet interesting.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 07, 2013, 03:47:05 AM
13 euros a disc.

Just two nights ago, I had a spinach tortellini with pesto sauce, pizza garlic bread, a copa of red wine, an ice cream thing, and a coffee.

26 euros.

Already, the memory of the flavors of that meal has subsided. The actual meal has long ago passed on.

As it were.

But I can take any of those 13 euro Earle Brown discs out at any time and play them any number of times, all for the initial price of 13 euros. I can play them hundreds, thousands of times without paying any more than the initial cost.

Last night, I went back to the same restaurant, by the way. I got a pizza vegatal this time, but I'm guessing that they would not have fancied the idea of giving me a meal of tortellini, bread, wine, ice cream, and coffee for free. :)

You have probably paid as much or more for dozens of meals without even blinking.

Music is cheap.

At twice the price, those Earle Brown sets would be cheap.

At four times the price.

Music and literature. For what you get from the initial outlay, these are two of the cheapest things you can buy. At any price. (And two of the nicest things to have, too, I might add. Throw in a nice reproduction or two, and maybe a nice original by one of your struggling artist friends, and you are pretty much set. Now all you need is some bookcases, a nice stereo, some furniture and some clothing, and a house to put all that stuff in. Oh, and go out to a nice restaurant once and awhile! It's fun!!)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on December 07, 2013, 06:03:56 AM
13 euros a disc.

Just two nights ago, I had a spinach tortellini with pesto sauce, pizza garlic bread, a copa of red wine, an ice cream thing, and a coffee.

26 euros.

Already, the memory of the flavors of that meal has subsided. The actual meal has long ago passed on.

As it were.

But I can take any of those 13 euro Earle Brown discs out at any time and play them any number of times, all for the initial price of 13 euros. I can play them hundreds, thousands of times without paying any more than the initial cost.

Last night, I went back to the same restaurant, by the way. I got a pizza vegatal this time, but I'm guessing that they would not have fancied the idea of giving me a meal of tortellini, bread, wine, ice cream, and coffee for free. :)

You have probably paid as much or more for dozens of meals without even blinking.

Music is cheap.

At twice the price, those Earle Brown sets would be cheap.

At four times the price.

Music and literature. For what you get from the initial outlay, these are two of the cheapest things you can buy. At any price. (And two of the nicest things to have, too, I might add. Throw in a nice reproduction or two, and maybe a nice original by one of your struggling artist friends, and you are pretty much set. Now all you need is some bookcases, a nice stereo, some furniture and some clothing, and a house to put all that stuff in. Oh, and go out to a nice restaurant once and awhile! It's fun!!)

Oh, I WANT it. Now, it's just a matter of funds. Looking forward to finding out what it'll cost in the states.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on December 09, 2013, 04:31:47 AM
Cesar Camarero - Vanishing Point

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JuTzB9uQZ4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on December 09, 2013, 04:45:41 AM
I was going through some of the distinguished bright talents on today's scene the other nite listed on the Kairos site ..
lots of talent out there that I'd like to get more familiar with and keep an eye on ..

FRIEDRICH CERHA (b.1926, Vienna) www.friedrich-cerha.com

GöSTA NEUWIRTH (b.1937, Austria)
HANS ZENDER (b.1936, Wiesbaden)

HUGHES DUFOURT (b.1943, French)
BRIAN FERNEYHOUGH (b.1943, England)
PETER EöTVöS (b.1944, Transylvania) www.eotvospeter.com
MATHIAS SPAHLINGER (b.1944, German)
GEORGES APERGHIS (b.1945, Athens) www.aperghis.com
SALVATORE SCIARRINO (b.1947, Palermo)

GERD KüHR (b.1952, Austria) www.gerd-kuehr.at
PHILIPPE MANOURY (b.1952, French) www.philippemanoury.com
GEORG FRIEDRICH HAAS (b.1953, Austria)
TOSHIO HOSOKAWA (b.1955, Japan)
MICHAEL JARRELL (b.1955, Geneva) www.michaeljarrell.com
MANUEL HIDALGO (b.1956, Spanish)
LUCA FRANCESCONI (b.1956, Italy)
JóSE MANUEL LóPEZ LóPEZ (b.1956, Madrid) www.josemanuel-lopezlopez.com
BERNHARD LANG (b.1957, Austria) members.chello.at/~bernhard.lang
BEAT FURRER (b.1957, Switzerland)
WOLFGANG MITTERER (b.1958, Austrian) www.wolfgangmitterer.at
PETER ABLINGER (b.1959, Austria) www.ablinger.mur.at
JOHANNES KALITZKE (b.1959, Cologne)

HANS-PETER KYBURZ (b.1960, Swiss)
UNSUK CHIN (b.1961, Seoul)
JESúS RUEDA (b.1961, Madrid)
MAURICIO SOTELO (b.1961, Spain) http://mauriciosotelo.com/Mauricio_Sotelo.html
PIERLUIGI BILLONE (b.1960, Italy) www.pierluigibillone.com
CéSAR CAMARERO (b.1962, Madrid) www.cesarcamarero.com
ISABEL MUNDRY (b.1963, Germany)
MARK ANDRE (b.1964, Paris)
FRANCISCO LOPEZ (b.1964, Spain) www.franciscolopez.net
CLEMENS GADENSTäTTER (b.1966, German) www.gadenstaetter.info
ALBERTO POSADAS (b.1967, Spain)
REBECCA SAUNDERS (b.1967, London)
WOLFRAM SCHURIG (b.1967, German)
RAMON LAZKANO (b.1968, Spanish ) www.lazkano.info
JOSé M. SáNCHEZ-VERDú (b.1968, Spain) www.sanchez-verdu.com
OLGA NEUWIRTH (b.1968, Graz) www.olganeuwirth.com
BERNHARD GANDER (b.1969, Lienz)
MISATO MOCHIZUKI (b.1969, Toyko) www.misato-mochizuki.com
ENNO POPPE (b.1969, Germany)

PIERRE JODLOWSKI (b.1971, France) www.pierrejodlowski.fr
MATTHIAS PINTSCHER (b.1971, Marl) www.matthiaspintscher.com
KLAUS LANG (b.1971, Austria) klang.mur.at
ELENA MENDOZA (b.1973, Sevilla) www.elenamendoza.net
JOANNA WOZNY (b.1973, Poland)
JOHANNES MARIA STAUD (b.1974, Innsbruck)
JESúS TORRES (b.1974, Saragossa) www.jesustorres.org
BRUNO MANTOVANI (b.1974, French)
HèCTOR PARRA (b.1976, Barcelona)



Very nice sum up of contemporary composers.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 09, 2013, 09:17:04 AM
Henk, I'm sure you didn't intend it this way, but I took your assessment as a challenge.

So I produced my own list, which is, I think, a far nicer sum up of contemporary composers. And the ratio of men to women, while still not all that good, is better at 2 to 1 than the Kairos list, which is 7 to 1. And if I were really going for a seriously representative list all on my own, I would have included several on that list, which is a very nice list, to be sure, for what it is, which is NOT by any means a nice sum up of contemporary composers. Which was not Kairos' intent, anyway.

Maryanne Amacher
Ana-maria Avram
Natasha Barrett
Carola Bauckholt
Günter Becker
Martin Bédard
Michèle Bokanowski
Michael Boyd
Ludger Brümmer
Anna Clyne
Chaya Czernowin
Francis Dhomont
Tod Dockstader
Kevin Drumm
Iancu Dumitrescu
Gerard Eckert
Rolf Enström
eRikm
Ivan Fedele
Brunhild Ferrari
Luc Ferrari
Beatriz Ferreyra
Bernard Fort
Emmanuelle Gibello
Gilles Gobeil
Heiner Goebbels
Annie Gosfield
Christine Groult
Jonty Harrison
Robin Hayward
Erdem Helvacioğlu
Tim Hodgkinson
Ryoji Ikeda
Philip Jeck
Elsa Justel
K.K. Null
Zbigniew Karkowski
Dmytro Federenko (Kotra)
Matsunaga Kouhei
Ulrich Krieger
Christine Kubisch
Bronius Kutavičius
Ricardo Mandolini
Lionel Marchetti
Walter Marchetti
Christian Marclay
Bérangère Maximin
Francisco Meirino
Ole-Henrik Moe
Katsura Mouri
Grainne Mulvey
Gordon Mumma
Toshimaru Nakamura
Phill Niblock
Jérôme Noetinger
Helmut Oehring
Pauline Oliveros
John Oswald
Zeena Parkins
Bernard Parmegiani
Åke Parmerud
Felipe Otondo
Eddie Prevost
Eliane Radigue
Horatio Radulescu
Guy Reibel
Dirk Reith
Fausto Romitelli
Keith Rowe
Ákos Rózmann
Peter Ruzicka
Sachiko M
Diane Simpson Salazar
Philip Samartzis
Alice Shields
Adam Stansbie
Simon Steen-Andersen
Iris ter Schiphorst
Avet Terterian
Martin Tétreault
Doug Theriault
Yasunao Tone
Barry Truax
Annette Vande Gorne
Jennifer Walshe
Hildegard Westerkamp
Otomo Yoshihide
Z'ev
Lidia Zielinska

(If you want an even 100, then you could do much worse than add the following eight from Kairos' list:

Peter Ablinger
Mark André
Georges Aperghis
Friedrich Cerha
George Friedrich Haas
Bernhard Lang
Francisco Lopéz
Salvatore Sciarrino

And these four to make up the difference:

Julio Estrada
Ellen Fullman
Andrea Neumann
Dan Senn

Now. Now there's a nice sum up of contemporary composers. ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 09, 2013, 09:31:21 AM
Both your lists illustrate something rather depressing about the state of contemporary music:  combining both lists,  I can say I've heard of at most ten of the composers listed--and only one of them have I ever seen mentioned (that I can remember) outside GMG (Eotvos).  (And who is Z'ev?  That's actually a rather common first name, and I know a couple of Z'evs IRL, but as far as I know none of them are involved in music.)

Granted that I live in a place where any form of music that's not pop or allied thereto can not be said to flourishing, where I would go to find the music of these people (YouTube, apparently--but is there any consistent place to sample such music--please bear in mind that I'm rather conservative in my taste, so there's a high chance I won't like the music.  But to decide if I like it or not, of course, I have to hear it first!)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on December 09, 2013, 09:36:14 AM
I certainly don't like all those composers of the Kairos list. I have checked out almost all.

My list would be:
Aperghis
De Raaff (not on any of these lists, great composers imo)
Parra
Camarero
Birtwistle
Ferneyhough
Sciarrino
Stockhausen
Posadas
Pécou
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 09, 2013, 09:51:21 AM
Both your lists illustrate something rather depressing about the state of contemporary music me:  combining both lists,  I can say I've heard of at most ten of the composers listed--and only one of them have I ever seen mentioned (that I can remember) outside GMG (Eotvos). 

Fixed.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 11, 2013, 01:41:33 PM
Shai Cohen (http://www.israelcomposers.org/Members.aspx?lang=English&letter=C&id=268)

https://www.youtube.com/v/nWAb-ajJSIo

Echoes of Eternity (2009), for violin solo and orchestra.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on December 13, 2013, 05:54:01 AM
Fixed.
Why so harsh ? Most of the composers on some guy's list are unknown (no cds, only played localy...). And I could still produce two or three lists of 100 composers who most people here wouldn't know, while most of the composers of these lists would be more interesting than these guys from Kairos. It does say something about "the state of contemporary music".
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 13, 2013, 06:31:24 AM
Why so harsh ? Most of the composers on some guy's list are unknown (no cds, only played localy...). And I could still produce two or three lists of 100 composers who most people here wouldn't know, while most of the composers of these lists would be more interesting than these guys from Kairos. It does say something about "the state of contemporary music".

For me it says that contemporary music is a dynamic and busy world.   There is some very good music being written today, at least in my opinion, and all I can tell you is to get started curing your ignorance.

 ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 13, 2013, 06:44:18 AM
Mr. Bloom, so far as I know, only four people on my original list have not released commercial CDs.

I don't know about your mathematical abilities generally, but four (and I may be wrong about any of them--so far as I know, they don't have CDs out) out of eighty-nine in no way constitutes "most."

But you weren't saying that most of them didn't have CDs out, not quite, but only that most of them were unknown. Hmmm. Most of these people are very well-known, with multiple CDs and international concert schedules.

Besides, why the dig on "locally"? Everywhere in the world is "local" to its inhabitants. And if you're being played all the time in, oh, say Chicago (Anna Clyne) or in Paris (Emmanuelle Gibello), then so what if those are your localities?

As for more interesting that those guys from Kairos (and the handful of gals) is really neither here nor there, though I confess to thinking my list more interesting. I didn't make it to be more interesting, but to be more representative. That is, it contains people working in all fields of new music, not just one or two. "Interesting," like "unknown" begs for the question "to whom?" Leaving that unanswered is to pretend that the composers mentioned, and their music, are in and of themselves unknown and uninteresting.

Anyway, you'd have a much better idea of the state of contemporary music if you got out more.  :)

If you don't, I promise you that I will produce two or three lists of 100 composers each, none of whom you will have heard of. People much more "unknown" than the very prominent 89 I originally produced.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 13, 2013, 07:41:29 AM
Besides, why the dig on "locally"? Everywhere in the world is "local" to its inhabitants.

And, Lord knows, if my music were not performed locally, it would be performed next to not at all.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on December 13, 2013, 07:55:40 AM
For me it says that contemporary music is a dynamic and busy world.   There is some very good music being written today, at least in my opinion, and all I can tell you is to get started curing your ignorance.

 ;)

Listing names is bullshit, it proves nothing of experience or knowledge .. list the notably great compositions from said names, and then we will have something .. & the list will be much, much smaller. Truth.

I agree with both. The lists giving in this thread is just a nice way to explore composers and music.

There's indeed some beautiful music written these days, I only have to mention three of my favorite composers who are all still young and at the beginning of their carreer:

De Raaff
Parra
Pécou

I begin to develop a preference to these composers and contemporary music. I try to listen to Mozart, but I think it's rather boring comparing to music written these days by these composers, which I can really connect to. Mozart is not of our time, the music by these composers is, and it's incredible music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 13, 2013, 09:11:08 AM
I think a list of names is helpful and preferable to listing "great compositions".   

From a list of names, one can Google the composer, find some audio clips and begin to familiarize themselves with the music, some of which might strike another listener as a great piece of music.  Conversely, when someone predetermines what is a "great work" they reduce the exposure of all the composers who did not make their cut.   

I say, list away!

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 13, 2013, 10:49:32 AM
No, James what it mean is that I, and possibly others, enjoy the process of discovery.  It is how I learn about new music: by hearing of a composer and checking them out myself; not relying on someone else to tell me what is good or bad.

Of course there are plenty of places where you can find lists of "great works" and those are easily and eventually all heard - then you are back where you started - with plenty of other new music to discover.

YMMV.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 13, 2013, 01:00:52 PM
James, you perhaps forget that it was you, James, who posted the list that started this little subthread.

'Course, it wasn't really your list. It was Kairos' list. But you posted it. And then, later, you said that listing names was bullshit.

OK. Then you condemn yourself. Which is fine, as I've remarked before. Takes the pressure off the rest of us. :P

"Great work," if it means anything at all (and I think that it doesn't), means after, not before. After you've listened. After you've evaluated. After you've decided.

This naive belief that you can start with "great" is just laziness, intellectual laziness, that takes it as given that getting others to do your work for you is a good thing. You know, saves time.

Say what? Time is for spending, not for saving. You can't save it. (Another naive belief, I fear.) It just keeps on ticking on. Spend it. That's what it's for.

Besides, letting other people decide for you what is valuable and what is not is so obviously a chump's game. I'm surprised you keep thinking of all of us as chumps. And I'm even more surprised that you keep your missionary zeal for making sure us chumps remember that we're chumps. Well, no. Less surprised. Sorry. I got my mores and my lesses confused there. It happens. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 13, 2013, 01:05:37 PM
He cracks me up, though. "Listing names is bullshit, it proves nothing of experience or knowledge" . . . but add to the list the notably great compositions from said names, and voilà! You've proved experience and knowledge.

Wait . . . maybe if I copy and paste some articles . . . .
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on December 13, 2013, 02:08:17 PM
But you weren't saying that most of them didn't have CDs out, not quite, but only that most of them were unknown. Hmmm. Most of these people are very well-known, with multiple CDs and international concert schedules.
Nice to hear that. I will tell all the composers I know who struggle to get a few concerts each year (mostly in front of huge audiences of 25-30 people) that they are very well-known, and on an international scale by that. They'll for sure be pleased to know that.

Besides, why the dig on "locally"? Everywhere in the world is "local" to its inhabitants. And if you're being played all the time in, oh, say Chicago (Anna Clyne) or in Paris (Emmanuelle Gibello), then so what if those are your localities?
I live in Paris. Emmanuelle Gibello isn't played all the time here.

Anyway, you'd have a much better idea of the state of contemporary music if you got out more.  :)
That is the most laughable thing you wrote. You don't know a thing about me. Not a thing.
Seriously, what is wrong with people here ? The amount of arrogant assholes around here never cease to amaze me.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on December 13, 2013, 02:20:33 PM
And, Lord knows, if my music were not performed locally, it would be performed next to not at all.
Contrary to what some guy, in pure rhetorical machiavellianism, is trying to make me say, there wasn't any contempt in my remark.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 13, 2013, 04:55:48 PM
And I'd like to know where I'm supposed to go exploring new music.  I live in a city which barely has a classical radio station (signal doesn't go everywhere, and it's piped in from Minnesota), and has two orchestras and an opera company--the opera company gave a world premiere  (Anna Karenina) a few years ago,  but cut back in face of the recession and general indifference among the audiences.  One orchestra gives concerts only sporadically. and is trying to cultivate Hispanic audiences, so only favorites, and stuff with a Latin beat,  goes on there.  The other orchestra does program new stuff occasionally,  but its aim is to lure hip young people with proven favorites, and concertizes only in one place and one time of the week--South Beach on weekends, which is a complete disincentive to attending.   And they do have a brand new spanking Gehry building to pay for.  Guess how boundary breaking their concertizing actually is?  And the Cleveland Orchestra has started a schedule of four weekends a year here--impressive sometimes but nothing programmed that falls within the thread of this ambit.

Result: if I depend on local resources,  I'll never hear any of those composers unless they become trendy for some reason, like John Rutter.

Internet is very limited. To put it bluntly,  I'm not upgrading my Internet connection solely for the goal of hearing contemporary music.

So where does one go to explore on a regular basis?  If I need to get out more,  tell me where to get out, don't just sneer at me.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 13, 2013, 04:57:29 PM
And I'll throw one name at you.  I've mentioned him before; he's a gentleman I know solely from online, and originally in a non musical context, but he's a bona fide composer and you can find his stuff online if you look.


Jeffrey Quick.


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Johnll on December 13, 2013, 05:19:56 PM
Contrary to what some guy, in pure rhetorical machiavellianism, is trying to make me say, there wasn't any contempt in my remark.
Yes and yes to James's immediately preceding post. We are all free to judge but in my book one real post has more value than 15000-20000 artificial posts than some indulge in. No offense intended to you Karl as we realize you have chosen a hard road and it is not one I personally have the stuff for.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 14, 2013, 06:22:49 AM
I live in Paris. Emmanuelle Gibello isn't played all the time here.
Indeed, she is.

Seriously, what is wrong with people here ? The amount of arrogant assholes around here never cease to amaze me.
Don't try to sweet talk me, Mr. Bloom. :)

ADDED:

Contrary to what some guy, in pure rhetorical machiavellianism, is trying to make me say, there wasn't any contempt in my remark.
Um, would you mind terribly pointing out where I said, or even suggested or implied, that you were being contemptuous? I went back over the last coupla pages and couldn't find anything.

Also, for Jeffrey, you really don't need what you're asking for. One, you are here, on this thread, which has a shitload of clips of 21st century music. Two, nothing. There is nooooooooo second thing. (You don't need to be told where to go, you're already there.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on December 14, 2013, 06:26:45 AM
James, you perhaps forget that it was you, James, who posted the list that started this little subthread.

Touché! ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on December 14, 2013, 08:23:23 AM
Indeed, she is.
Please list the concerts Emmanuelle Gibello has been part of in the last few years.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 14, 2013, 02:50:19 PM
Let's try this. I've taken the first 5 names from some guy's list. Let's see if he can help us further by listing a specific piece of music from each that makes them worthy of his boasting. Of course, this will be from his perspective but it will give us an idea of what the composer is about (i.e. the best light, essence) and offer a glimpse of where Mike is coming from more precisely.
I have a better idea. How about James takes any of the names from his (Kairos') list and do the same.

His list preceded mine, after all. :)

By the time he's done with that, I should be back in Barcelona, where my internet connection will be more powerful (and more reliable) than it is here in Andorra.

Then let's look and see if we can find any boasting on my part. The only claim I made for my list was that it was more representative than the Kairos' list. That is, it contains examples of more of the kinds of things that have been happening in the past 13 years or so. I'll go ahead and make another claim for it, though, more along the lines of the boasting that James seems to want--and that is that I have music from every single one of those people on my list. I have CDs or sound files, many of which I have gotten from the composers themselves, and I have listened to all of them, many times, with great pleasure. I have heard their music in concert in Los Angeles, in Portland, OR, in New York, in Paris, in Chalon-sur-Saone, in Bucarest, in Berlin, in Oslo, in Wroclaw, in Bourges. Among others.

I have eaten and drunk with many of them and consider not a few of them to be friends.

That, my dear James, is what boasting looks like. Not the very modest remark that you have called boasting. So now you know.

Then let's go head to head on how many of those Kairos discs each of us has actually owned and or listened to. I have most of those albums in my collection and have listened to each of them many times. With great pleasure.

Mr. Bloom, I have only attended one of Emmanuelle's concerts in Paris. It was at an Instants-Chavires event this past April. That was in Montreuil, which you may or may not want to consider to be "in" Paris.

I know that she has performed her music in Nantes and Chalon-sur-Saone, where I first met her. But you can find out her track record in Paris as well as I can by simply going to her site. Where I am sure that you will find that my "all the time" was we call in the business "hyperbole."

I'm sorry if you find that unworthy. Point is, she gets her music performed in Paris, where she lives, and outside Paris as well. She is very well thought of by myself (formerly from Portland, OR) and by Beatriz Ferreyra, an unknown who worked at the unknown GRM with the unknown Pierre Schaeffer and who also taught at the completely unknown Dartmouth and who lives somewhere in France, a country no one knows anything about.

And I think that Bernard Parmegiani, who was an international figure with over a dozen LPs and CDs to his credit that no one has ever listened to, rather liked her stuff, too. My French is not good enough for me to be entirely sure, and his English was only slightly better than my French. OK, quite a lot better, really. But quite a lot better than practically zero is not necessarily fluent. Just sayin'.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 14, 2013, 08:39:44 PM
You must have a lot of time on your hands.

I don't; but it is not time consuming to Google a name, find a clip and listen.  I think one difference between you and I is that I am not trying to find "great" works.  I couldn't care less whether a work is considered "great" by you, or a critic, or general consensus.  In fact, I never even think to myself if a work is great or not.  I don't go beyond if it is interesting to me as I listen to it.   I am not in any hurry to get somewhere, so the time spent finding new music is simply an enjoyable enterprise in and of itself.

Jeffrey
And I'd like to know where I'm supposed to go exploring new music. 

Result: if I depend on local resources,  I'll never hear any of those composers unless they become trendy for some reason, like John Rutter.

Internet is very limited. To put it bluntly,  I'm not upgrading my Internet connection solely for the goal of hearing contemporary music.

So where does one go to explore on a regular basis?  If I need to get out more,  tell me where to get out, don't just sneer at me.

I am not sneering at you and I apologize if my "Fixed" post came across like that.  And I don't understand what you mean by upgrading your connection - are you not able to view YouTube?   YouTube, SoundCloud and blogs are the places where I hear new music, because I too live in a city without much going on besides a few new music concerts at the area music schools (you might look into to that in South Florida, the University of Miami has a great music department).

But these days a high speed internet service is fairly affordable. Or you could visit an Internet cafe, and have a cup of coffee while you listen to some new music on those places I mentioned.

 :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 15, 2013, 05:42:20 AM
I don't; but it is not time consuming to Google a name, find a clip and listen.  I think one difference between you and I is that I am not trying to find "great" works.  I couldn't care less whether a work is considered "great" by you, or a critic, or general consensus.  In fact, I never even think to myself if a work is great or not.  I don't go beyond if it is interesting to me as I listen to it.   I am not in any hurry to get somewhere, so the time spent finding new music is simply an enjoyable enterprise in and of itself.
Many many thanks for saying this, sanantonio!!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: OrchestralNut on December 15, 2013, 05:47:07 AM
So what you are saying is that you are never moved or turned on so greatly by what you are hearing to share it with others.

I have to disagree here.  Sanantonio frequently shares what he enjoys.  He is always posting a clip of what he's listened to, and thus sharing.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on December 15, 2013, 01:32:03 PM
I have no problem with someone turning me on to new music.  8)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on December 15, 2013, 02:11:53 PM
Oh so that is what all the YouTube clips 'mean', I didn't know that.

Now if only 'some guy' could passionately advocate the music that moves him greatly than we would be really getting somewhere.

Preferably from that long list of 'most representative' stuff of the last 13 years or so.


James, you know what you're problem is? You're constantly putting everything you listen to up on some kind of pedestal and damning anyone who doesn't share your views. Get over it man. It's a tired racket at this juncture.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on December 15, 2013, 02:24:15 PM
Then let's look and see if we can find any boasting on my part. The only claim I made for my list was that it was more representative than the Kairos' list. That is, it contains examples of more of the kinds of things that have been happening in the past 13 years or so. I'll go ahead and make another claim for it, though, more along the lines of the boasting that James seems to want--and that is that I have music from every single one of those people on my list. I have CDs or sound files, many of which I have gotten from the composers themselves, and I have listened to all of them, many times, with great pleasure. I have heard their music in concert in Los Angeles, in Portland, OR, in New York, in Paris, in Chalon-sur-Saone, in Bucarest, in Berlin, in Oslo, in Wroclaw, in Bourges. Among others.

Not everyone have the money or the opportunity to travel to all these cities. Not everyone personaly know composers or can get recordings from them (even if these days pretty much anybody can write a mail and manage to get in contact with a lot of people).
I find highly contemptful to consider ignorant or lazy people who are simply not wealthy enough to travel to concerts, don't work in these circles, or simply don't have the time to spend hours on the net looking for obscure music.
These people should be the public. Not some "in" people, with little capacities to share music with others.
I know composers too. I've been to other countries to hear concerts. But I never forgot I wasn't the standard listener and that I was lucky. And I would never consider ignorant someone who didn't have the same possibilities and didn't get the chance to hear these concerts, because it's fucking complicated to get a good image of what is actually going on, even when you're inside. I've been amazed at how far from realities the circles of contemporary music are, how bloated with hypocrisy, politics and illusions they are. Obviously, if they got back down to earth, it would shatter their little world, and not many are ready to do that.

If these circles are not capable to recognize that the state of things is not normal, then we should simply let this music and these circles die.

Mr. Bloom, I have only attended one of Emmanuelle's concerts in Paris. It was at an Instants-Chavires event this past April. That was in Montreuil, which you may or may not want to consider to be "in" Paris.
This is wild recognition, for sure. Or a clear example of how blind people working in the contemporary music circles are.

I know that she has performed her music in Nantes and Chalon-sur-Saone, where I first met her. But you can find out her track record in Paris as well as I can by simply going to her site. Where I am sure that you will find that my "all the time" was we call in the business "hyperbole."
There is no track record of concerts on her site.

I'm sorry if you find that unworthy. Point is, she gets her music performed in Paris, where she lives, and outside Paris as well. She is very well thought of by myself (formerly from Portland, OR) and by Beatriz Ferreyra, an unknown who worked at the unknown GRM with the unknown Pierre Schaeffer and who also taught at the completely unknown Dartmouth and who lives somewhere in France, a country no one knows anything about.
Again, where is the critical distance ? Why should we care about the GRM ? Do you know what it is these days ?
A lot of people in these circles have ego problems anyway. And that dicks contest you have on going in these page is another proof of that.

And I think that Bernard Parmegiani, who was an international figure with over a dozen LPs and CDs to his credit that no one has ever listened to, rather liked her stuff, too.

So you're only relying on authoritative arguments now ? This is pretty weak.
This is pretty much a sum up of contemporary music anyway : dicks contests, authoritative arguments, intellectual contempt, politics, money, computers, ego problems, little music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 15, 2013, 09:10:24 PM
I don't; but it is not time consuming to Google a name, find a clip and listen.  I think one difference between you and I is that I am not trying to find "great" works.  I couldn't care less whether a work is considered "great" by you, or a critic, or general consensus.  In fact, I never even think to myself if a work is great or not.  I don't go beyond if it is interesting to me as I listen to it.   I am not in any hurry to get somewhere, so the time spent finding new music is simply an enjoyable enterprise in and of itself.
in full agreement there
Quote
Jeffrey
I am not sneering at you and I apologize if my "Fixed" post came across like that.  And I don't understand what you mean by upgrading your connection - are you not able to view YouTube?   YouTube, SoundCloud and blogs are the places where I hear new music, because I too live in a city without much going on besides a few new music concerts at the area music schools (you might look into to that in South Florida, the University of Miami has a great music department).

But these days a high speed internet service is fairly affordable. Or you could visit an Internet cafe, and have a cup of coffee while you listen to some new music on those places I mentioned.

 :)

Actually, on my present set up,  I can't view Youtube or any large sound file.  Well, I suppose I could, but it would probably requires a couple of days to download each clip or file :) 
When I do listen to (for example) clips posted in this thread,  I do in fact do it at the public library, spending a couple of hours on my day off--if I have the time available, which isn't always a given.  And right now,  I'm not interested in getting broadband.  Dialup is cheaper and serves all my other needs, so if I did switch it would literally be solely for the sake of listening to new music....
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 16, 2013, 09:54:31 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/k8VuZ_dz5W4

Maryanne Amacher (1938-2009): Living sound, for "Sound-joined Rooms" series (1980).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on December 16, 2013, 10:36:08 PM
No, James what it mean is that I, and possibly others, enjoy the process of discovery...
I'm definitely one of those "others." ;D The thrill of finding something really new is one of the reasons I like contemporary classical music so much.  Yes, it's comforting to return to The Old Masters (and Mistresses?) once in a while, but I prefer the sensation of discovery.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 17, 2013, 05:27:04 AM
I'd still like to discover the best of what some guy lists, now if he can only eagerly make some specific recommendations. I personally don't have the time to search through that huge list of unknowns in search of musical gems. Last time I did that with one of his lists .. I wasted about 4 hours and came up empty handed. True story. And another reason why I'm asking this time.

Have you considered the possibility that when you came away empty-handed, someone else would find dozens of musical gems?   At least to them.  What is the point?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 17, 2013, 05:31:12 AM
Ana-maria Avram

Her music is spectral, acousmatic, heterophonic and transformational. She has composed around 90 works as of 2009: music for soloists, chamber music, music for orchestra, electronic music and computer assisted music.

Her soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/ana-maria-avram-composer-2).

An article with a clip (http://thewire.co.uk/video/watch_iancu-dumitrescu-and-ana-maria-avram-live).

Ana-Maria AVRAM: "Nouvelle Axe" for string quartet

http://www.youtube.com/v/nzlwuBDh-qk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 17, 2013, 07:51:52 AM
James: Hey, let's play a nice game of "Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose."

Me: No.

James: Hey, let's play a nice game of "Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose."

...

James: Hey, let's play a nice game of "Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose."

...

James: Hey, let's play a nice game of "Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose."

...

James: Hey, let's play a nice game of "Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose."

...
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 12:19:01 AM
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Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: amw on December 18, 2013, 01:21:43 AM
This is pretty much a sum up of contemporary music anyway : dicks contests, authoritative arguments, intellectual contempt, politics, money, computers, ego problems, little music.

More or less.

I like this thread a lot better when it's just music.

Here's Richard Barrett's codex XII (2013):

           
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 18, 2013, 05:13:56 AM
More or less.

I like this thread a lot better when it's just music.

Here's Richard Barrett's codex XII (2013):

           

Your clip did not appear on my computer.  When I tried to copy and paste the link into my browser I got a 403 forbidden error.  However, here it is   performed by Ensemble Studio6.  Wonderful piece.

https://www.youtube.com/v/04q6N24CAWk

I too prefer music posts, but occasionally a good conversation will erupt. 

EDIT: Interesting, I can now see the clip player, but it does not play anything.  There must be something amiss  with a plugin on my machine, maybe I am missing an update to java or something.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 05:20:20 AM
Actually, to quote "..." and then say "all talk" is a pretty good joke.

Not altogether sure if it was intended or not, of course, but still. Pretty good joke.

I didn't see any link for Richard Barrett's Codex VII, either. No player. Nothin'. Just a blank space.

Music and conversation are both nice. Here's a nice clip of some Martin Bedard. Woefully short, but certainly long enough for James or Mr. Bloom to say something vicious or snotty about that no one will pay any attention to. ;D (Whatever happened to "conversation"?)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUM85q50mXU
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 07:09:35 AM
Well, there you have it.

Heads, James wins. Tails, everyone else loses.

What a fun game this is!!

Maybe I'll post some more music for James to diss. It's fun!! Yay!!!

Everyone can play, and lose!! It's more sure than the lottery.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 18, 2013, 07:26:28 AM
Actually, it is helpful, to some degree, to point to specific pieces of music and some indications of your own reaction.  Once I know how well another listener's tastes compare to mine,  it helps me decide if a particular piece they were impressed by or left unimpressed by would be of interest to me.   Your subjective opinion has a predictive value, in other words.

For instance,  I've learned that I can safely avoid anything James likes, since his preferences seem to contrast rather starkly with mine, and what he is enthusiastic  about leaves me, at best, cold. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 07:46:23 AM
You're lucky.

Most of what James likes, I like too.

Music, that is.

But I like a lot of other things, too. Things that James doesn't even think qualify as music.

I could limit myself to talking about the things James and I like in common. But that would be just to duplicate James. I think that secretly, deep down inside, that's exactly what James wants.

Too bad!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 18, 2013, 07:54:44 AM
Shut up n' give us some actual music 'some fraud'. If you're that passionate about it - it shouldn't be that hard at all. In fact, you should be eager to do so.

It is telling that you complain about someguy not posting music right after a post in which he does offer a piece of music.  You would do yourself a favor to spend more time reading and comprehending his posts and not be so eager to pull the trigger on your next insulting comment.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 18, 2013, 08:47:05 AM
I did look at the little 2 and a half minute YouTube thing .. hardly him eagerly spreading the news regarding a set of strong pieces (in his estimation) from that HUGE 'most representative' list. I don't understand what is so difficult about providing something more in-depth & specific on his end. Again, most folks who are passionate and knowledgable about something like this are normally eager to share.

But when he does share, it's something more than cut and pasted pundritry found via a Google search.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 18, 2013, 09:27:30 AM
Bill Alves (http://www.billalves.com/bio.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/hPFelIa3wkI

Aleph (http://www.billalves.com/aleph.html) (2002)

DESCRIPTION FROM THE COMPOSER: Aleph was inspired largely by the geometric patterns of Islamic art, an art derived from the same proportions and numerical symbolism as the tuning systems of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines. In this music I have adopted similar just intonation systems, as well as intricate and slowly transforming patterns of pitches and timbres. Writers such as Keith Critchlow have connected the arithmetic symbolism of this art to the Arabic language and alphabet, the first letter of which, aleph, is a single vertical stroke. This stroke represents the descent of light, the "creative ray which initiates existence." From this simple division follows the expansion into creation, and the connection of all people to the cosmological rhythms of number and pattern.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 12:00:32 PM
Not sure why I'm doing this. Probably will stop after this post.

...a set of strong pieces (in his estimation)
See, thing is, James, what you want is a set of strong pieces in your estimation, not mine. Well, OK then. Why don't you just do that yourself instead of breaking balls? (Well, trying to, anyway. Mine have too much iron in them.)

...from that HUGE 'most representative' list.
It's not a huge list. No one, especially me, ever claimed it was huge. As for "representative," that's already been explained, clearly, as "includes more of the different kinds of things being done now" than the Kairos list does. Period.

I don't understand what is so difficult about providing something more in-depth & specific on his end. Again, most folks who are passionate and knowledgable about something like this are normally eager to share.[/font]
Didn't you get the memo about you going first? Yeah. Your list, cut-and-paste though it was, was first. So you first. And your words, too, not some huge (!) cut-and-paste from the Stockhausen site. You. What do YOU think of all those people on that Kairos list you provided for us? In detail. Your details.

And, just by the way, I am not at all eager to share anything with you, James. No. Not even a little bit. I am so not eager, that I'm even willing to not share anything with anyone else here, either, even people I like a lot.

But you don't want me to share any of my passions, anyway. Not really. You're just being your sweet little disingenuous self.

All you want are targets.

Nope.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 18, 2013, 12:09:49 PM
Quote
And, just by the way, I am not at all eager to share anything with you, James. No. Not even a little bit. I am so not eager, that I'm even willing to not share anything with anyone else here, either, even people I like a lot.

Unfortunate.  I for one would suggest that you ignore James and share more.

 ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: amw on December 18, 2013, 12:19:09 PM
Your clip did not appear on my computer.  When I tried to copy and paste the link into my browser I got a 403 forbidden error.  However, here it is   performed by Ensemble Studio6.  Wonderful piece.

https://www.youtube.com/v/04q6N24CAWk

I too prefer music posts, but occasionally a good conversation will erupt. 

EDIT: Interesting, I can now see the clip player, but it does not play anything.  There must be something amiss  with a plugin on my machine, maybe I am missing an update to java or something.
Apparently I'm not very good at figuring out how to embed audio from soundcloud. Let me do some tests.

edit: Nope. Seems like the only way to get to soundcloud is to link it. Oh well.

Have some Canadians - https://soundcloud.com/quatuor-bozzini/j-rg-frey-streichquartett-ii
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 03:02:42 PM
I for one would suggest that you ignore James and share more.
You are, of course, correct.

And I realized that in effect I just spent the last several days validating James.

OUCH!!!

Sorry. I apologize and promise to be more enlightened in the future.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 18, 2013, 03:13:18 PM
Here's a track from Emmanuelle Gibello's first album.

https://soundcloud.com/bruitclairrecords/emmanuelle-gibello-pour-faire-peur-aux-enfants-dans-le-noir

Soundcloud is a great resource. As is Bandcamp.

Here's a favorite of mine from Doug Theriault:

http://vicmoddougtheriault.bandcamp.com/

I think, too, amw, that posting links is fine. Sometimes the embedded youtube links take forever to load and thus slow scrolling through a thread to a halt.

Big fan of Canadian composers, just by the way.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 18, 2013, 04:08:58 PM
I agree about soundcloud - I regularly find interesting new composers there.  I've not used bandcamp, but will look there as well.  Also, I did not realize that YT clips caused the page to load slowly for some people.  I enjoy the way YT clips appear embedded but will consider just posting links if it means more people will access the music from this thread.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Cato on December 18, 2013, 04:28:01 PM
I posted the following under Opera News:

For those looking for the greatest opera of 2013.... well, don't look here:

A "weird" and "tedious" opera put together by three composers:

Quote
A successful memoir depends on the synergy of compelling raw material and the artistry of the teller, but Robert Wilson's "The Life and Death of Marina Abramović," a traveling production that opened last week at the Park Avenue Armory, brings out the worst aspects of both. The combination of Ms. Abramović, a performance artist known for long duration pieces (in "The Artist Is Present" at the Museum of Modern Art in 2010, she sat motionless for hours), and Mr. Wilson, a pioneer of cryptic, image-based, slow-motion theater (" Einstein on the Beach" lasts 41/2 hours), is weird and finally tedious. The content is repellent, and the artistry doesn't amaze...

The music is so amplified and mixed that although there are four live players in the pit, the instrumentals all feel electronic. Three musical genres overlap. The compositions of William Basinski, which repeat brief melodic figures in endless loops (like Philip Glass, another Wilson collaborator, but without the rhythmic drive), segue into the ululations of Svetlana Spajić and her four-voice ensemble. Their Serbian folk-inflected, straight-tone numbers, no doubt intended to evoke the heritage of Ms. Abramović, who was born in Belgrade, have more grit. Then there is Antony, a transgender singer and composer, who also wears a long black gown and sings croony, moony songs with few notes and little textual or textural variety.


As reviewed by Heidi Waleson:

See:  http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304858104579262263065673006?cb=logged0.1296555924572511 (http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304858104579262263065673006?cb=logged0.1296555924572511)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 18, 2013, 09:45:17 PM
Bill Alves (http://www.billalves.com/bio.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/hPFelIa3wkI

Aleph (http://www.billalves.com/aleph.html) (2002)

DESCRIPTION FROM THE COMPOSER: Aleph was inspired largely by the geometric patterns of Islamic art, an art derived from the same proportions and numerical symbolism as the tuning systems of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines. In this music I have adopted similar just intonation systems, as well as intricate and slowly transforming patterns of pitches and timbres. Writers such as Keith Critchlow have connected the arithmetic symbolism of this art to the Arabic language and alphabet, the first letter of which, aleph, is a single vertical stroke. This stroke represents the descent of light, the "creative ray which initiates existence." From this simple division follows the expansion into creation, and the connection of all people to the cosmological rhythms of number and pattern.

Interesting that he used the usual transliteration of the equivalent Hebrew letter, and not the usual transliteration of the Arabic letter, which is alif or 'alif. 

Regarding YT links:
A few months back, there was a scare running around, the gravamen of which was that java plug-ins were being used as vehicles for malware, and the best solution was to disable them in whichever browser one uses.  My usual browser (Opera, on Windows XP) has an option which disables plug ins unless one specifically clicks on it to allow the plug in to play.   After selecting that, I found that pages using YouTube (or other similar plug ins) loaded much quicker, so I suggest those that have that option or a similar one on their browser choose it.  Don't know  if it will actually deflect any malware, but the benefit in less wait time will be immediate.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 19, 2013, 05:03:09 AM
Lente marche (https://soundcloud.com/brunocapelle/lente-marche) (soundcloud)

by Bruno Capelle (http://brunocapelle.wordpress.com/)

Minimal electronic work - very recent. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on December 19, 2013, 09:03:56 PM
...https://soundcloud.com/bruitclairrecords/emmanuelle-gibello-pour-faire-peur-aux-enfants-dans-le-noir...
Kind of minimalist electronic.  Not as fond of it as I might be--yet.  If anyone needs a translation better than Bing or Google, the title might be rendered "To Make Children Afraid in the Dark."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 22, 2013, 05:26:14 AM
I just noticed on my Antimatter: Reset CD that that album is dedicated to the memory of Maryanne Amacher and J.G. Ballard.

I was just going to mention it as a good thing to listen to, but then saw the note about Amacher.

Antimatter has done a couple of albums with Zbigniew Karkowski, too. Along with Francisco Lopez (who is on the Kairos list--they put out a five CD set of his works, a couple of them rereleases of otherwise unavailable things), Karkowski is one of the more consistently good new music guys.

I couldn't find any clips, though. There have to be some somewhere.

In fact, there are quite a number of things that have not made it onto the interwebs for one reason or another.

My favorite Christmas music, by the way, which is Francoise Barriere's Musique pour le temps de Noel.

Again, no sound files anywhere for that, either.

Sigh.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 22, 2013, 06:46:11 AM
I just noticed on my Antimatter: Reset CD that that album is dedicated to the memory of Maryanne Amacher and J.G. Ballard.

I was just going to mention it as a good thing to listen to, but then saw the note about Amacher.

Antimatter has done a couple of albums with Zbigniew Karkowski, too. Along with Francisco Lopez (who is on the Kairos list--they put out a five CD set of his works, a couple of them rereleases of otherwise unavailable things), Karkowski is one of the more consistently good new music guys.

I couldn't find any clips, though. There have to be some somewhere.

In fact, there are quite a number of things that have not made it onto the interwebs for one reason or another.

My favorite Christmas music, by the way, which is Francoise Barriere's Musique pour le temps de Noel.

Again, no sound files anywhere for that, either.

Sigh.

When I saw Amacher's name on your list I did not say anything but had known of her passing in 2009. 

Zbigniew Karkowski has a MySpace page, https://myspace.com/zbigniewkarkowski - with about 45 minutes of music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 22, 2013, 08:52:02 AM
sanantonio, when I clicked on the Karkowski link, it sent me to a page with a little over six minutes of music. And no amount of clicking around got me to any more than those three short clips.

 :(
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 22, 2013, 09:42:56 AM
sanantonio, when I clicked on the Karkowski link, it sent me to a page with a little over six minutes of music. And no amount of clicking around got me to any more than those three short clips.

 :(

Oh, you're right.   It was early for me this morning when I posted that.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 22, 2013, 10:44:59 AM
Shit.

This is one of those times when I very much wanted to be wrong!

Well, I still have my 15 albums and soundcloud and bandcamp.

https://soundcloud.com/experimedia/zbigniew-karkowski-nerve

http://danielmenche.bandcamp.com/album/unleash

I used to live about sixteen blocks from Menche.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brian on December 23, 2013, 09:11:04 AM
An organist accidentally puts an interesting new spin on Handel's Messiah. Contrary to the text on the video, I kinda liked it!

http://www.youtube.com/v/_9gBGaB5bwI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Sergeant Rock on December 23, 2013, 09:36:58 AM
An organist accidentally puts an interesting new spin on Handel's Messiah.


"The organist didn't Handel that very well."

 ;D :D ;D


Sarge
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 23, 2013, 10:20:42 AM
Shit.

This is one of those times when I very much wanted to be wrong!

Well, I still have my 15 albums and soundcloud and bandcamp.

https://soundcloud.com/experimedia/zbigniew-karkowski-nerve

http://danielmenche.bandcamp.com/album/unleash

I used to live about sixteen blocks from Menche.

Separately . . . Michael, are you going to the Wuorinen opera next month?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 23, 2013, 11:26:33 AM
Sadly, I am no longer in Madrid. At the moment (or "ahora" as we say :)) I am in Barcelona (where we actually say "ara." It's so confusing).

By the 28th of January, I'll be in Southern California, for my sins.

I'll be back in Spain at the end of March. Too late to see Brokeback, though.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 23, 2013, 11:51:05 AM
Barcelona! That's a city I need to spend more time in . . . .
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 23, 2013, 07:12:57 PM

By the 28th of January, I'll be in Southern California, for my sins.


Pero dicen en California, como acqui en Florida,  ahora.


(It does remain true that two of the most important cities in Latin America are Los Angeles and Miami.)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 24, 2013, 01:55:39 AM
Es verdad. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Brian on December 24, 2013, 05:53:14 AM
Sadly, I am no longer in Madrid. At the moment (or "ahora" as we say :)) I am in Barcelona (where we actually say "ara." It's so confusing).

Might I recommend this tapas bar (http://i.prs.to/t_200/sony88883795632_temp.jpg). If it's the way it was three years ago, they do tapas the old-school way: each item is served on a toothpick, and at the end of the meal they charge you something like 1.40 euros per toothpick. Nobody there spoke English and they all just looked at me like I was a crazy person, but they kept bringing food around and I kept eating it. At one point I was so thrilled with a sandwich that I asked, que tipo de queso, or something, and the waiter said "guwAHHHT". For a while I marveled at this new guwaht cheese that Catalonia had... then realized it was "goat".

Anyway. Amazing place. I left at 2:15 p.m. and the lunch crowd was just arriving. A million times better than the armada of tourist rip-off places closer to the center.

The only really good patatas bravas I had were at Meson David, which is in the heart of the old town and is also where I met the New York Ska Jazz Ensemble, who were tucking in to massive meals before their gig at the Sala Apolo and put me on the list for VIP entry. They do a great show.  :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 30, 2013, 08:21:25 PM
The blog A Closer Listen (http://acloserlisten.com/) has posted this -

Top Ten Modern Compositions of 2013 (http://acloserlisten.com/2013/12/22/acl-2013-top-ten-modern-composition/)

Their description:
This may be called Neoclassical, Modern Classical or Modern Composition, but everyone knows what it is: classical music for a modern generation.  When it comes to honoring remarkable writing and playing, Modern Composition is the genre to which we turn.

Some of these composers fill concert halls.  Others perform in smaller venues, solo or with ensembles.  One creates his own orchestra.  Each is identified with at least one specific instrument.  While some kids grow up wanting to play the guitar, bass, and drums (not that there’s anything wrong with that!), these composers prefer the piano, cello and baton.  One might call this “serious minded music”, except in many cases, it’s downright fun.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 31, 2013, 05:29:34 AM
Their description:
This may be called Neoclassical, Modern Classical or Modern Composition, but everyone knows what it is: classical music for a modern generation.
I wonder who they mean by "everyone"?

This site reminds me of the time I co-taught a class in experimental music a few years ago. The three of us gradually became aware of some vague unrest in the class, but it wasn't until almost the end of term that someone was brave enough to tell us why--seems that a certain number of students had signed up for the class thinking they were going to be able to talk about the music that they called "experimental." We oldies (!) hadn't realized that the word "experimental" had more or less replaced the word "alternative" some time in the early 2000s. We were offering a class in the musics of the fifties and sixties and beyond that were called "experimental." Generally, this refers to music where the results are outside the composer's control.

They had no sense of history going into the class, just an expectation. And they didn't appreciate the history they got as it did not correspond with their expectation.

This site has a similar lack of historical sense. It's as if music started up some time in the 1990s, and all the terms they use have never been used to describe anything else. "Neoclassical," for instance. I think any classical listener would be quite surprised that "neoclassical" seems now to refer to modern instrumental music that is not pop or rock or jazz. I went to the "experimental" section and found roughly what one would find in the same section of Bandcamp, a mish-mash of "alternative" new music, none of it "experimental" in the original use of that word. Same for electronic, which was co-opted back in the 80's to refer to, well, all the things it refers to now: house, techno, dubstep, ambient, trance, and so forth.

Of course words change, but technical vocabulary usually changes more slowly and is more disorienting when it changes rapidly. "Electronic" used to mean Eimert and Varese and Stockhausen. Now it means Moby and Bangface and The Chemical Brothers. And the people who are doing electronic music today (or electroacoustic, to keep things straight--or more confusing) don't even register: Emmanuelle Gibello, Ludger Bruemmer, Michele Bokanowski, Lionel Marchetti.

This site also uses words like "song" and "band," which pretty well identifies where they are coming from. Which is fine, for what it is, but it isn't "neoclassical" or "modern classical," either one. "Modern composition" seems to be their own neologism, though Itunes has a "modern composition" section, populated with such items as the London Symphony Orchestra, Brian Eno, The Knife, and Kraftwerk, to name the first four items.

I don't know if you all know The Knife, but Itunes lists their genres as "Electronic, Music, Classical, Modern Composition, Dance, Rock."

Oh well.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 31, 2013, 06:39:43 AM
I wonder who they mean by "everyone"?

This site reminds me of the time I co-taught a class in experimental music a few years ago. The three of us gradually became aware of some vague unrest in the class, but it wasn't until almost the end of term that someone was brave enough to tell us why--seems that a certain number of students had signed up for the class thinking they were going to be able to talk about the music that they called "experimental." We oldies (!) hadn't realized that the word "experimental" had more or less replaced the word "alternative" some time in the early 2000s. We were offering a class in the musics of the fifties and sixties and beyond that were called "experimental." Generally, this refers to music where the results are outside the composer's control.

They had no sense of history going into the class, just an expectation. And they didn't appreciate the history they got as it did not correspond with their expectation.

This site has a similar lack of historical sense. It's as if music started up some time in the 1990s, and all the terms they use have never been used to describe anything else. "Neoclassical," for instance. I think any classical listener would be quite surprised that "neoclassical" seems now to refer to modern instrumental music that is not pop or rock or jazz. I went to the "experimental" section and found roughly what one would find in the same section of Bandcamp, a mish-mash of "alternative" new music, none of it "experimental" in the original use of that word. Same for electronic, which was co-opted back in the 80's to refer to, well, all the things it refers to now: house, techno, dubstep, ambient, trance, and so forth.

Of course words change, but technical vocabulary usually changes more slowly and is more disorienting when it changes rapidly. "Electronic" used to mean Eimert and Varese and Stockhausen. Now it means Moby and Bangface and The Chemical Brothers. And the people who are doing electronic music today (or electroacoustic, to keep things straight--or more confusing) don't even register: Emmanuelle Gibello, Ludger Bruemmer, Michele Bokanowski, Lionel Marchetti.

This site also uses words like "song" and "band," which pretty well identifies where they are coming from. Which is fine, for what it is, but it isn't "neoclassical" or "modern classical," either one. "Modern composition" seems to be their own neologism, though Itunes has a "modern composition" section, populated with such items as the London Symphony Orchestra, Brian Eno, The Knife, and Kraftwerk, to name the first four items.

I don't know if you all know The Knife, but Itunes lists their genres as "Electronic, Music, Classical, Modern Composition, Dance, Rock."

Oh well.

Yeh, I know what you are saying.  And while I agree with you that labels, in many ways, have lost much of their meaning, genre bending is an important aspect of what is going on these days, and I find that music worth pursuing.  That blog is only one of many places to find creative  new music which, while it is far from the conservatory contemporary classical scene, will still have some folks producing music that I like to hear.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on December 31, 2013, 08:53:52 AM
Just some thoughts & observations, while I'm waiting for some specific pieces from our new music guru ..

Seems to me you worry too much about other people.

Generally, a musician that has no control or plays 'games' which greatly relinquishes control of what they are writing or playing, mostly produces rubbish compared to music that is in the opposite direction of that - as history clearly shows us. Musical materials are simplified too, generally. The results also lack shape, sharpness, clarity, detail etc. And experimentation, exploration, discovery can imply a great deal more than that sort of thing - obviously.  The best musicians to a greater degree are able to hear & control what they write and play.

Well, nothing like stating a few platitudes and generalizations, eh?

I'll wait for some specific observations and critique from you regarding open form, 'games' and 'relinquishing control' in, say, Stockhausen's Momente (to avoid the beaten path of his Klavierstück XI and Spiral and especially the rabbit-hole of his intuitive music pieces).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on December 31, 2013, 08:58:07 AM
genre bending is an important aspect of what is going on these days
Which is quite different from putting any label to any genre.

will still have some folks producing music that I like to hear.
Agreed.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 08:59:11 AM
Well, nothing like stating a few platitudes and generalizations, eh?

Artfully done, amico.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 31, 2013, 11:17:51 AM
What James is talking about reminds of a quote attributed to Pierre Boulez by Morton Feldman:  "Boulez once said in an essay that he is not interested in how a piece sounds, only how it is made."

The method or process that produces the music is a means to an end.  What is important is the music, not how it is produced.  If what we hear is an amazing piece of music, that's all that matters.  Morton Feldman, John Cage, Christian Wolff all wrote amazing pieces of music using methods of indeterminacy.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 11:21:54 AM
There's the odd chance that Feldman is tendentiously paraphrasing Boulez.  OTOH, it is plausible.


It is an extraordinarily inartistic remark, and (let it be said) a laughable lapse on the speaker's part.  Like saying you don't care what a painting looks like, only how it is made.


Truly, if the music sounds great, who cares how it was made?  The method is only a means;  the sound is the end.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on December 31, 2013, 12:11:00 PM
Well, I did use the word 'generally' ..  ::)

I noticed; however, for someone asking for substance, you didn't provide much. You see, there is a lot to be said about using chance in art, there are degrees of uncertainty and there are intermediate shades of artistic expression that can go all the way to the complete removal of intention. But not, it seems, in your world of absolutes, however couched your observations might be in get-out-of-jail-free words like 'generally', 'mostly', and so on.

We already talked about this before, the last time I made a statement along these lines. It was a curiousity for him .. and there is a period of his career where he gradually explored (& documented) these ideas to varying degrees. Generally, the stuff with less and less control holds the pattern of what I said earlier. So what I said earlier in the last post generally applies to his efforts in this area of his output too. In the end, he was a rigorous formal composer ultimately absorbed by shape, sharpness, detail, clarity, unity.. in what he was rehearsing & writing. This includes the uber-complex Momente, a work of synthesis bringing together so many strands of his work that he was building upon for quite some time, with a hierarchy, texts .. "cantata-like in scale", "operatic in scope" .. feat. a modular type of writing where he strived for these things to the extreme - but for each composed moment - and there is a mobility where you can re-order sections which toy with notions of narrative and psychological time. It is a dynamic work that certainly has a dramatic thrust dealing with the subject of love with elements of autobiography in it too.

I already know all of the above. What I was asking for was your personal critique of the use of those methods in Momente, since you appear to have a very firm opinion on what constitutes valid artistic expression. Are they a felicitous use of mobility? Do chance and rearrangement of the sections work well? In your estimation, does it fit with your statements about the meaninglessness and futility of giving away control?

Let me make it easier for you, all re Momente: 1. Where do you find the synthesis you talk about? 2. Can you elaborate on what you mean by "cantata-like" and "operatic in scope"? 3. Can you elaborate on the "[toying] with notions of narrative" and of 4. "psychological time"? 5. Which specific elements are you saying are autobiographical?

Let's try to avoid regurgitating any pre-canned opinion found in the literature. There is only so much of it, and I probably already have most of what you'd reference anyway.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 31, 2013, 12:12:43 PM
Just some thoughts & observations, while I'm waiting for some specific pieces from our new music guru ..

Generally, a musician that has no control or plays 'games' which greatly relinquishes control of what they are writing or playing, mostly produces rubbish compared to music that is in the opposite direction of that - as history clearly shows us. Musical materials are simplified too, generally. The results also lack shape, sharpness, clarity, detail etc. And experimentation, exploration, discovery can imply a great deal more than that sort of thing - obviously.  The best musicians to a greater degree are able to hear & control what they write and play.


I read it again, and nothing changes.  For sure, you couch it in CYA language like "generally"and "mostly", however, you still sound more concerned with how the music was made instead of the music itself. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 31, 2013, 05:52:03 PM
I posted this in the Philosophy of Music thread, but it seems germane to the current discussion

The more likely a piece of music is to receive what might be called a "definitive performance", the less likely it is to be worth hearing more than once.

And in elaboration,   the less control a composer has on the music as heard,  the more important the performer becomes, and the more likely that the piece will be able to yield different but equally artistically interesting results from different performers.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 05:53:44 PM
This is just meaningless blah, blah, blah.

Yes! Petrarch winds the first round of James Cliché Bingo!


Reset the chips.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 05:58:30 PM
Go back and read what I did say carefully.

san anton' does get to roll over this juicy chip for the next round, though!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on December 31, 2013, 06:54:03 PM
Another list (http://5against4.com/2013/12/31/best-albums-of-2013-part-2/) of "best" recordings from 2013, this time by Five Against Four (http://5against4.com/)

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on December 31, 2013, 07:48:29 PM
You always pull the very same Stockhausen card out .. just because it was a curiousity for him during a period of his career won't really change things.

Now this is disappointing. Lumping Momente with the progressively freer works of the end of that decade is outright nonsensical. But I note that none of my questions elicited anything of substance. Oh well... Keep up your copy & pasting; at least that might be considered useful by some and to contain some original thought.

This is just meaningless blah, blah, blah. Taking risks and chances has been inherent to the art form since the beginning, and even of the best of it - intentions are never certain.
.

Read again; not very surprisingly, you misunderstood my use of the word 'chance'. Actually, don't bother.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on December 31, 2013, 09:10:37 PM
Another list (http://5against4.com/2013/12/31/best-albums-of-2013-part-2/) of "best" recordings from 2013, this time by Five Against Four (http://5against4.com/)

I must admit that the inclusion of Igor/Sir Simon in that list seemed a mite incongruous.  And having read his description of the Phillipe Petit CD, and re-read it, and then re-read it again,  I'm blessed if I really know what he means there (other than he thinks it's a really really really good CD).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 03:18:53 AM
I must admit that I ignored the descriptions and use these lists to checkout some new music.  He does post some decent reviews of live performances of new music on a regular basis, so his blog is not without merit, in general.

I haven't heard all of his recommendations, but will listening to as many as I can find on MOG over these next few days.  The Petit CD is one I have begun to listen to and it is something I will keep in my collection.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on January 01, 2014, 03:25:29 AM
Well, by looking at this list, I found out that Zbigniew Karkowski died last month (the 12th) of pancreatic cancer. Only 55.

I blame cigarettes.

I bought the Processor album that he and Xopher Davidson did from Boomkat.

Sigh.

Not a very happy beginning to the new year, for sure.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 06:20:59 AM
Milton Babbitt ~ Partitions

https://www.youtube.com/v/gBa16sM2uaU

John Cage ~ Music of Changes

https://www.youtube.com/v/B_8-B2rNw7s

 :)
Title: Re: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 01, 2014, 07:28:51 AM
Quote
Klang, means "sound", acoustic vibrations, but for Stockhausen, above all "the INNER EAR, for the divine Klang, the mystic sound of the beyond with the voice of the conscience, in German: die Stimme des Gewissens"

Someone's BS-detector needs new batteries, or to be replaced altogether.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 01, 2014, 07:45:00 AM
Quit with the games.

Pffft. The self-appointed Stockhausen guru has zero substance, after all... (but who didn't know that already?)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 08:12:19 AM
Isn't there a thread for Stockhausen already?

James, are you a one trick pony?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 01, 2014, 08:20:42 AM
Awww, some ad hominem.

Ha, love it! (QFT, look in the mirror, etc)


In the end, he was a rigorous formal composer ultimately absorbed by shape, sharpness, detail, clarity, unity.. in what he was rehearsing & writing. This includes the uber-complex Momente.


No one disputed that, nor the "uber-complexity" (really?) of Momente. But the unwashed multitudes are still eagerly waiting for a grounded opinion on some of the aspects and qualities you listed and that I summarized in enumeration to assist in getting the discussion going.

This should probably be moved to the Stockhausen thread, with the benefit of raising the s/n ratio there and make it something more worthy than a mere deposit of reviews and concert schedules, while getting this one back on 21st C music.

Unless, of course, this call for a deeper discussion proves to be (once again) a stoic effort and the debate will end here due to no-show.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 08:28:50 AM
Here's a mixcloud playlist of 5:4's "best of".  The first track is a little indie-pop thing but it also includes some good electronic stuff.

http://www.mixcloud.com/5against4/mix-tape-29-best-albums-of-2013/
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 01, 2014, 08:36:41 AM
Ryan Gallagher, Oboe Quartet

https://www.youtube.com/v/c_ATDm7_l24

Disclosure:  the composer is the son of my first composition instructor.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 01, 2014, 08:39:50 AM
Conclusion to Jack Gallagher's Symphony № 2, « As Sparks Fly Upward »

https://www.youtube.com/v/GypXCoOP84I

Disclosure:  the composer is my first composition instructor.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 01, 2014, 08:59:35 AM
5:4

Isn't 5:4 a member of GMG? I recall seeing his 5:4 avatar, but maybe that was on Facebook... In any case, his blog has been a good read. His Dillon's Nine Rivers coverage from a couple of years ago was quite excellent.

EDIT: He was a member indeed (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,16175.msg572535.html#msg572535).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 01, 2014, 09:26:34 AM
Atoning for the longish tangent on this thread, here's some 21st C music (it is quite substantial, though):

Emmanuel Nunes, Das Märchen, Opera in a prologue and two acts, for 9 singers, 5 actors, choir and orchestra with live electronics (2007).

Prologue + Act I:

http://www.youtube.com/v/_BKAgfsLllo

Act II:

http://www.youtube.com/v/xVMnKS8gHM0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 09:31:42 AM
Isn't 5:4 a member of GMG? I recall seeing his 5:4 avatar, but maybe that was on Facebook... In any case, his blog has been a good read. His Dillon's Nine Rivers coverage from a couple of years ago was quite excellent.

EDIT: He was a member indeed (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,16175.msg572535.html#msg572535).

Yes, I too had remembered him here.   Too bad he decided not to stick around.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 09:42:09 AM
It's frustrating that the few people here who are the most interested in new music spend a lot of time quibbling over methods, composers, etc. 

Maybe in 2014 can we try to spend more time sharing the music and not indulging in these petty disagreements?

 ;)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 01, 2014, 09:47:48 AM
It's frustrating that the few people here who are the most interested in new music spend a lot of time quibbling over methods, composers, etc. 

Maybe in 2014 can we try to spend more time sharing the music and not indulging in these petty disagreements?

 ;)

My bad; sometimes it is irresistible to give out some rope and see where it all will lead ;).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 01, 2014, 05:21:11 PM
Karin Rehnqvist (http://www.karin-rehnqvist.se/English/karinrehnqvist.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/7pi36lhIrls

Tentative (Part II) from Beginning (2003) Chamber Ensemble Sonanza / Conductor: Jan Risberg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 02, 2014, 06:05:18 AM
Eric Wubbels - Viola Quartet

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiK8pPQSZ0s

Eric Wubbels (http://www.wubbelsmusic.com/) (b.1980) is a composer, pianist, and Executive Director of the Wet Ink Ensemble, a New York collective devoted to creating, promoting, and organizing adventurous contemporary music.

Wubbels's music has been performed throughout Europe, Asia and the U.S., by groups such as the Wet Ink Ensemble, Kammerensemble Neue Musik Berlin, ICE, Yarn/Wire, Ensemble Linea, Talea Ensemble, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, and the Mivos Quartet, and featured on festivals including the Zurich Tage für Neue Musik (2013), Metz Festival (2014), and MATA Festival (2012).

He has received commissioning grants from Chamber Music America's Classical Commissioning Program, ISSUE Project Room, the Jerome Foundation, New Music USA, and Yvar Mikhashoff Trust, and has been awarded residencies at the MacDowell Colony and Civitella Ranieri Center (Italy).

As a performer, he has given U.S. and world premieres of works by major figures such as Peter Ablinger, Richard Barrett, Michael Finnissy, Beat Furrer, George Lewis, and Mathias Spahlinger. He has recorded for hat[NOW]art, Spektral, Albany Records, Carrier, and Quiet Design.

He holds a D.M.A. and M.A. in composition from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Amherst College, and has held teaching positions at Amherst College (2009-11) and Oberlin Conservatory (2012-13). His principal teachers include Lewis Spratlan, Tristan Murail, and Fred Lerdahl.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 02, 2014, 07:54:21 AM
Ivan Moody, Istella (2008) for bass flute and percussion (https://soundcloud.com/ivanmoody/moody-istella)

Ivan studied with John Tavener. [ bio on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Moody_(composer)) ]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 02, 2014, 08:01:29 AM
Okay, must add another:

Ivan Moody, Ossetian Requiem for choir and eight cellos (https://soundcloud.com/ivanmoody/ivan-moody-ossetian-requiem)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 02, 2014, 04:53:46 PM
Peter Eötvös (http://eotvospeter.com/biography)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z48W6CW6wY

Windsequenzen (2002) for fl. (picc., altfl.) , ob. (Eng. horn, windimitation), 2cl., bcl., tuba, double bass, bassdrum, accordeon

1. Windless I
2. Three sequences of the montain wind
3. Seven sequences of the whirlwind
4. Sequence of the morning breeze
5. Four sequences of the sea wind - North wind
6. Four sequences of the sea wind - South wind
7. Four sequences of the sea wind - East-west wind
8. Windless II

Klangforum Wien:
Eva Furrer,flauto, flauto contralto, ottavino
Markus Deuter, oboe, corno inglese, windimitation
Donna Wagner Molinari, clarinetto
Bernhard Zachhuber, clarinetto
Ernesto Molinari, clarinetto basso
Gérard Buquet, tuba
Uli Fussenegger, contrabbasso
Krassimir Sterev, accordion
Lukas Schiske, percussioni

Ensemble diretto da Peter Eötvös.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on January 02, 2014, 05:10:14 PM
Isn't 5:4 a member of GMG? I recall seeing his 5:4 avatar, but maybe that was on Facebook... In any case, his blog has been a good read. His Dillon's Nine Rivers coverage from a couple of years ago was quite excellent.

EDIT: He was a member indeed (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,16175.msg572535.html#msg572535).

...and he's back! I see 5:4 re-registered yesterday.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 03, 2014, 10:10:42 AM
Alberto Posadas (http://www.kairos-music.com/composer/bios/PosadasBio.html)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qmk77F8jvhQ

~ Glossopoeia (2009) .... For 3 dancers, 4 musicians, electronics and video.

Alberto Posadas was born in Valladolid in 1967. It was there that he began his musical training, which he continued and concluded in Madrid.

In 1988 he became acquainted with Francisco Guerrero, with whom he studied composition and whom he regarded as his most important mentor. The meeting represented an important turning point in his career. It was while studying under Guerrero that he discovered new techniques with which to shape musical forms, such as mathematical combinatorics and fractals. Nonetheless, his constant, self-determined quest to integrate aesthetics into this process led him to develop his own models of composition, such as the translation of architectural spaces to music, the application of topology and perspective-related painting techniques and the exploration of the acoustic features of instruments at the “microscopic” level.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 06, 2014, 09:34:00 AM
The site Composers Circle (http://composerscircle.com/) has started something new for 2014: each month they will post a themed playlist of some of the works featured previously on their daily composer posting.  January's playlist is NEW MUSIC FOR STRING QUARTET.

http://composerscircle.com/january-mixtape-new-music-for-string-quartet/
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 07, 2014, 11:22:16 AM
Daniel Osorio (http://www.danielosoriogonzalez.tk/)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMSqJ32NKCI

Zikkus-F for flute and electronics (2008)

Karolin Schmitt, flute
Daniel Osorio, electronics
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 08, 2014, 12:30:08 PM
Written in 1997, which is close enough -

German composer Isabel Mundry (http://www.kairos-music.com/composer/bios/MundryBio.html)'s (1963) "Gesichter"  for two sopranos (Salome Kammer and Claudia Barainsky in this recording for Col Legno), two percussionists, and live electronics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwKWVY47dhY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on January 10, 2014, 07:41:04 AM
Well, I would argue that nothing happened musically in either 2000 or 2001 that changed the direction of music like Schoenberg's wind quintet or Stravinsky's early ballets did. Or like Berlioz' first symphony did. Or like Monteverdi's monophony did.

I would argue that we are in the era that started in 1939 with Cage's Imaginary Landscape #1.

And that the first twentieth century era went from 1906 to 1939.

(We all have our little hobbies.)

But Francisco Meirino put out some delightful stuff last year, of which this is one example:

https://soundcloud.com/auditoryfield/anextendedextract-francisco

And last year is unequivocally within the target area. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on January 10, 2014, 12:51:05 PM
Well, I would argue that nothing happened musically in either 2000 or 2001 that changed the direction of music like Schoenberg's wind quintet or Stravinsky's early ballets did. Or like Berlioz' first symphony did. Or like Monteverdi's monophony did.

I would argue that we are in the era that started in 1939 with Cage's Imaginary Landscape #1.

And that the first twentieth century era went from 1906 to 1939.

(We all have our little hobbies.)

But Francisco Meirino put out some delightful stuff last year, of which this is one example:

https://soundcloud.com/auditoryfield/anextendedextract-francisco

And last year is unequivocally within the target area. :)

I'm not sure Cage's work back then was an inflexion point, around which we can see a change in the musical landscape,  so much as a pioneering work that showed the way for later developments: it's not in the category of the Schoenberg and Stravinsky works you refer to.

Up to 1939 I'd call the decline of the late Romantic and the development of non tonal music(perhaps what you refer to as the "first twentieth century era", but I pick 1939 as a pivotal date because of a non-musical event, WWII;  then from the end of WWII to about 1980 the development of musical types we associate with Boulez, Stockhausen, Nono, etc, as well as a separate stream more closely tied to tonal/Romantic, of which Britten and Barber are handy examples; and then what might be called the modern or contemporary era, as newer composers began to draw from both,  began to choose what they consider useful or good elements and combine them eclectically.  I wouldn't pick a particular musical event, or even a specific year beyond using 1980 as a vague reference point (IOW, if you can think of a better one,  go ahead and use it): tje difference being more a change of generations, with newer composers coming into prominence.  I do agree that the last fifteen years are not so dramatically different from the preceding period to warrant a different category on any grounds other than chronological convenience.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on January 10, 2014, 01:00:37 PM

But Francisco Meirino put out some delightful stuff last year, of which this is one example:

https://soundcloud.com/auditoryfield/anextendedextract-francisco

And last year is unequivocally within the target area. :)

Is this classical music?? Sounds noise to me.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 10, 2014, 01:00:43 PM
History is much more seamless than musicologists prefer and so century datelines are natural demarcations.

I don't have a problem with this thread being mostly post 2000 works. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on January 10, 2014, 01:15:57 PM
History is much more seamless than musicologists prefer and so century datelines are natural demarcations.

I don't have a problem with this thread being mostly post 2000 works.

My own mental title for this thread is "Music being produced NOW"
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 10, 2014, 01:18:25 PM
My own mental title for this thread is "Music being produced NOW"

 :)

There is also a thread for music 1950-1999.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on January 10, 2014, 03:26:09 PM
Yeah, I don't really have a problem with it, either. It was more agreeing that 1997 is "close enough."

But I'm glad I posted, because Jeffrey brings up a distinction that I have not spent as much time thinking about as I would like. And so I'm going to do that.

I think he's right. Ives' Unanswered Question is where I would date the beginning of the twentieth century (round one), but that piece had no real, immediate affect. Not like those Schoenberg and Stravinsky things. It did embody certain principles that I find to be valuable in distinguishing the twentieth century from the nineteenth is all. Says more about me, probably than about the music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on January 10, 2014, 05:17:43 PM
Karlheinz Stockhausen - Strahlen (2002)

Karlheinz Stockhausen: Strahlen/Rays (2002)
für einen Schlagzeuger und 10-kanalige Tonaufnahme.
László Hudacsek, vibraphone; Kathinka Pasveer, sound projection.
Stockhausen Complete Edition CD 75. Kürten: Stockhausen-Verlag, 2011
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strahlen


Just curious. Do you feel that this sort of thing says anything fresh ? Isn't this all really derived from stuff that was already pioneered long ago (well,  several decades ago, to be precise) by several composers, only one of whom was Stockhausen?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 10, 2014, 06:47:35 PM
Such naive questions but ..

Yes, it is fresh, and could have only been authored or composed by him. He had one of the most unique & original minds & voices in all of art or classical music. The music is derived from only his own dynamic work & personal vocabulary. A lifetime. Expressed here thru percussion & electronics (areas he helped put on the map in such a way that few others have historically & compositionally). But he tended to do that being the visionary and great musician that he was; he opened new doors with his work, that many others have passed through.


Spoke the greatest fan of Stockhausen on the planet. No biases here folks. Just James running his mouth again about how much of a 'visionary' Stockhausen was, but totally ignoring the hard evidence, which is his music only appeals to a small percentage of classical listeners and these listeners don't even make up enough people to actually support the so-called 'music' Stockhausen churned out over a lifetime.

Give up on Stockhausen, we have Dvorak now. 8)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 10, 2014, 07:28:37 PM
His music has a much broader appeal than just your stereotypical 'classical listener' (or performer) of course. And being of 'our time' that is how it ought to be. High level composition & performance is much broader in the 20/21 centuries than a select handful of old concert halls, or traditional models and instruments. He was an obvious testament to that, able to support himself quite well, and the commissions never ceased, nor did the interest. A busy, fruitful, musical life .. composing, teaching, rehearsing, conducting, touring, recording, writing, publishing, garnering awards & honors, films/books etc., etc. ..  and to this day, concerts do well and occur frequently, recordings & scores are sold via his own record label and publishing, and students and interpreters are always studying his music. In fact, there is a whole foundation built supporting & preserving his music. Its very much alive out there.

Another copy/paste job again I see?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 10, 2014, 07:34:56 PM
Why is it I can go see Dvorak's 9th, for example, performed by any major orchestra, even provincial orchestras for that matter, but I would have to wait until a 'Rest Is Noise' festival to hear any of Stockhausen's muzak? There may be performances of his music taking place but in order to see them you would have fly all the way across the world just to attend a concert. In other words, no, James, you're wrong and delusional. Stockhausen is only listened to by a small minority of classical listeners and I'm certainly not excluding you within this minority.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 10, 2014, 08:07:44 PM

Where do you live?[/font]

The wonderful land of Oz.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 10, 2014, 08:35:24 PM
You always 'in a mood' like this?

Nah, but you're fun to mess with.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on January 11, 2014, 06:24:11 AM
His music has a much broader appeal than just your stereotypical 'classical listener' (or performer) of course. And being of 'our time' that is how it ought to be. High level composition & performance is much broader in the 20/21 centuries than a select handful of old concert halls, or traditional models and instruments. He was an obvious testament to that, able to support himself quite well, and the commissions never ceased, nor did the interest. A busy, fruitful, musical life .. composing, teaching, rehearsing, conducting, touring, recording, writing, publishing, garnering awards & honors, films/books etc., etc. ..  and to this day, concerts do well and occur frequently, recordings & scores are sold via his own record label and publishing, and students and interpreters are always studying his music. In fact, there is a whole foundation built supporting & preserving his music. Its very much alive out there.
Pretty fair description of Cage, there, except for the "via his own record label" part. Cage always generated enough interest in other people to get his things recorded and published. Otherwise, pretty fair description of him.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 11, 2014, 04:09:08 PM
Florent Caron-Darras (https://soundcloud.com/florentcarondarras)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snWInbLv2Lk

- Cordes Enlacées ... for two violas, two cellos, accordion and percussion

Noémie Bialobroda - viola I
Thien Bao Pham Vu - viola II
Marie Ythier - cello I
Askar Ishangaliyev - cello II
Fanny Vicens - accordion
Noam Bierstone - percussion

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on January 11, 2014, 08:18:08 PM
Why is it I can go see Dvorak's 9th, for example, performed by any major orchestra, even provincial orchestras for that matter, but I would have to wait until a 'Rest Is Noise' festival to hear any of Stockhausen's muzak? There may be performances of his music taking place but in order to see them you would have fly all the way across the world just to attend a concert.
With such an attitude, sir, what are you doing on this topic?  :) But audiences, at least in this country, have been conditioned to like stuff that's been played thousands of times already. Heaven/Corporations forbid they like anything really new! That would invalidate the marketers' algorithms! :laugh:

Yet fortunately, there are folks who like advanced music enough to produce, rehearse and listen to it. Some of us are right here on GMG.  ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 12, 2014, 07:23:10 AM
Eric Wubbels (http://www.wubbelsmusic.com/) -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zD1f5b9B6aA

Katachi Part 2 ... played by the Wet Ink Ensemble

Erin Lesser - flutes
Alex Mincek - saxophone, bass clarinet
Kate Soper - voice, objects
Ian Antonio - percussion
Josh Modney - violin
Eric Wubbels - piano
Sam Pluta - electronics
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mirror Image on January 12, 2014, 12:17:19 PM
With such an attitude, sir, what are you doing on this topic?  :) But audiences, at least in this country, have been conditioned to like stuff that's been played thousands of times already. Heaven/Corporations forbid they like anything really new! That would invalidate the marketers' algorithms! :laugh:

Yet fortunately, there are folks who like advanced music enough to produce, rehearse and listen to it. Some of us are right here on GMG.  ;D

I'm all for new music. I just get tired of James going on and on about Stockhausen. He isn't the only composer that ever lived as James would have us all to believe.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Rinaldo on January 12, 2014, 06:07:55 PM
Wrapping up my Caroline Shaw binge with an Entr'acte (http://carolineshaw.com/o/hear/entracte/) for string quartet (2011).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 13, 2014, 06:08:30 AM
Luca Belcastro - ... cristal verde del mundo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaaTsYalV0o
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 13, 2014, 07:31:28 AM
Mathias Spahlinger ~ Extension

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVJoIr262-8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 13, 2014, 12:45:08 PM
Sven Lyder Kahrs ~ Wir nur ziehen allem vorbei, wie ein luftiger Auftausc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eJfRDucvcw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 14, 2014, 07:39:04 AM
Give up on Stockhausen, we have Dvorak now. 8)

I like that!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: North Star on January 14, 2014, 08:02:40 AM
Give up on Stockhausen, we have Dvorak now. 8)
Classic!

Good job quoting it, too, Karl - I must have been busy when I read John's post the first time..
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2014, 08:24:38 AM
David Hudry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JpGykaCfoA

~ Nachtspiegel (2008) for chamber orchestra,
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2014, 11:08:25 AM
Georg Friedrich Haas: ...Und... (2008)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeYKzBr6yQY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 14, 2014, 01:27:28 PM
Wolfgang Rihm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7amMKHLCXM

- Epilog (2012-13) for string quartet.


Arditti Quartet
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2014, 03:58:22 AM
Alain Bancquart ~ Violente Vie (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvBAJ3D1Y2A

Concerto for Violoncello and 24 flutes

Pierre Strauch, violoncello solo, l'Orchestre de Flûtes Français (of Pierre-Yves Artaud) conducted by Joël Soichez in April 2013

Violente Vie is also a book of poems by Marie-Claire Bancquart edited by Le Castor Astral in 2012
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2014, 05:36:48 AM
Pascal Dusapin - À quia - Piano Concerto (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfDQUlYASe4

À quia (concerto pour piano et orchestre) 2002
(Ian Pace/Orchestra de Paris/Christoph Eschenbach Live recording September 2002, Beethovenhalle, Bonn)
7 études pour piano 1997-2001 (Ian Pace January 2003, Studio Varga, Sion)
naïveclassique MO 782164

(http://www.musicalpointers.co.uk/images/dusapin_aquia.jpg)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 15, 2014, 11:19:39 AM
Luca Francesconi ~ Rest (2004) for cello and orchestra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TD2Jljtu5Xc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 21, 2014, 06:39:37 PM
Robert Normandeau - Palindrome (2005 - 2007)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_iNPop_8BY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 22, 2014, 01:28:37 PM
Julian Anderson ~ Eden

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1Iv224AGF0

An Echo from Heaven: Orchestral Works of Julian Anderson on LPO (http://www.icareifyoulisten.com/2014/01/an-echo-from-heaven-orchestral-works-julian-anderson-lpo/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ICareIfYouListen+%28I+CARE+IF+YOU+LISTEN%29)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2014, 06:06:28 AM
Salvatore Sciarrino - Libro Notturno delle Voci (2009)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ee45U2Q64o

Mario Caroli, flute

Donaueschinger Musiktage 2009, Vol. 1
NEOS records, 2011
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 23, 2014, 09:32:13 AM
Tristan Murail - Légendes Urbaines (2006)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNnjWc_f0XE

Note from the composer:
Légendes urbaines arose from a specific commission by the Ensemble intercontemporain for a "theme" concert integrated into a thematic season. The themes were: the city, travel, and more precisely for this concert, New York - New York is obviously not a travel destination for me, but rather a frequent "commute" from my semi-rural residence. Literary or visual themes in music have caused much ink to flow and left more than one baffled. Can music express or tell? Is it possible to bring the symphonic poem back to life, to continue writing operas? If so, is this legitimate, or is doing so not definitively obsolete? Since I believe in an experimental approach, I decided to rise to the occasion and make an attempt at the proposed subject, though not without keeping a certain ironical distance from the exercise. It was also a chance to research several models, not depriving myself of more or less transparent references to several of my predecessors to the new continent. The formal structure is that of Pictures at an Exhibition, with suites of musical illustrations intertwined with promenades - musical references that can be fun to guess - the visual allusions, starting points or destinations of the musical reverie, will not be the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty and other postcards formatted for tourists, but rather the images and sensations provoked by frequenting a city both familiar and completely foreign.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 24, 2014, 11:47:03 AM
Pretty good article (http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/finding-the-right-balance/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=finding-the-right-balance) by Frank Oteri on New Music Box.  Here is an excerpt of a much longer article ~

The most exciting music being created today is not the product of a single compositional aesthetic or the work of just one segment of the population. (Pick your prejudice and throw it away.) It cannot be contained geographically or be hermetically sealed up in impenetrable genre boxes. What writers like Vanhoenacker get so wrong when they look at statistics is how arbitrarily creative work is carved up to fit into niches that are no longer relevant. (It’s important to point out that in the percentages he shared as proof that classical music and jazz are at the bottom of “the business of American music,” no genre has a majority. That’s a far more significant piece of information which speaks to what music in the 21st century is all about thus far.)

During the question and answer period following a fascinating panel discussion at the CMA conference moderated by Joel Harrison, which also included Missy Mazzoli, Clarice Assad, and Billy Childs, Kevin James said something that I believe is emblematic for our time:


Quote
Composers now prefer to be beyond genre. There is no sound that I would not consider. Composers today want that flexibility.

That last quote really speaks to me.  I would love to think we are finally entering a post-genre era.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 27, 2014, 05:31:41 AM
Hilda Paredes ~ Señales, Hommage to Jonathan Harvey (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTLQDPwY9Qs
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 27, 2014, 07:44:50 AM
Hannes Lingens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkY6vZWmxg8

Much of what Lingens has done has involved improvisation of electronic music,often with collaborators.  But he recently completed four pieces for quintet utilizing graphic notation. 

Review here (http://avantmusicnews.com/2014/01/27/amn-reviews-hannes-lingens-four-pieces-for-quintet/).

Berlin composer Hannes Lingens’ Four Pieces for Quintet contains realizations of four of Lingens’ graphic scores as performed by Koen Nutters and Derek Shirley on double basses, Johnny Chang on viola, Michael Thieke on clarinet, and Lingens on accordion. The scores, which happily are included with the release, are elegantly simple designs consisting of rectangles and squares of four different colors plus white, arranged in five rows. For this performance each color was associated with a tone, to be held for a length of time presumably varying with the length of the square or rectangle in which the color occurs. The duration of each of the four realizations was set at five minutes.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 27, 2014, 09:37:08 AM
RYUICHI SAKAMOTO + TAYLOR DEUPREE
DISAPPEARANCE

(http://www.12k.com/images/12k/releases/cache/12k1076-220x220.jpg)

Description and clip here (http://www.12k.com/index.php/site/releases/disappearance/).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 28, 2014, 05:25:25 AM
Marco Stroppa ~ Aye theres the rub

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UhXwQFmhdw

for solo cello
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 28, 2014, 08:15:28 AM
Hugues Dufourt ... L'origine du monde (2004)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mujQmKqIcJ8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 28, 2014, 12:03:37 PM
Edith Canat de Chizy ~ Les Rayons du jour (2005)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VS4081tr2M

She studied first under Ivo Malec and then, in 1983, came the decisive meeting with Maurice Ohana.  At the same time she worked on electroacoustics both at the Paris Conservatoire Supérieur and with the Groupe de Recherches Musicales.

Edith Canat de Chizy’s training as a violonist means she is very familiar with string writing. She has an obvious sense of timbre and sound matter which is particularly in evidence in her orchestral works. Her independent language and freedom of style have enabled her to create a singular sound world where her imagination holds sway.

Her viola concerto Les Rayons du jour, commissioned by the Orchestre de Paris, premiered in February 2005 by Ana Bela Chaves under the direction of Christoph Eschenbach.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 30, 2014, 05:25:28 AM
Max E. Keller ~ Dialoguefelder (2000) for string bass and percussion

https://www.youtube.com/v/vVjhVOXh2vQ

Max Eugen Keller (born March 19, 1947, Aarau) is a Swiss composer, jazz pianist and improvising musician. He was one of the first free-jazz musicians in Switzerland. Since 2007 he is chairman of the Swiss Society for New Music.

He has composed about 100 works, including electronic music. He produce a chamber opera (commission of the Komische Oper Berlin) and several songs. His compositions have been performed in Europe, Australia, South Africa, North and South America, Russia, Korea, China, Mongolia and Azerbaijan (including the World Music Days in Zurich (1991) and Mexico (1993)). Performers were the Orchester Musikkollegium Winterthur, the Tonhalle Orchester Zürich, the Ensemble Sortisatio and the Hanns Eisler New Music Group.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on January 31, 2014, 10:32:01 AM
Richard Wernick ~ The Name of the Game for Guitar and Eleven Players (2001)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Cb_2ppi_2k


David Starobin (guitar), International Contemporary Ensemble, Cliff Colnot
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 02, 2014, 07:37:14 AM
Mauricio Pauly (http://www.mauriciopauly.com/)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWrhhsAe7N8

"vs. el monopolio de la memoria"

From the composer's website:
(b. Costa Rica / UK resident since 2007) I am a chamber electroacoustic music composer and electric bass player. Recent commitments include performances at Ultima Festival for Contemporary Music in Oslo, MATA Festival in New York and Aldeburgh as well as commissions for Darmstadt 2010 (Staubach Honoraria) and 2012. Upcoming performances in Paris, Geneve, Bordeaux, Melbourne, Berlin, New York, London, TelAviv and at Warsaw Autumn.

In 2011, I was awarded the Costa Rican Composers Association Composition Prize. I’m artistic co-director of Distractfold Ensemble and play electric bass with the Manchester-based trio, A Greater Horror. I am also a founding member of the Altavoz Composers. I teach at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester and at the Architectural Association Interprofessional Studio in London.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 03, 2014, 12:41:24 AM
Alberto Posadas ~ Oscuro abismo de llanto y de ternura

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDn1U1pKO2w

From Wikipedia:
Alberto Posadas was born in 1967 in Valladolid where he underwent his first musical education which he then continued in Madrid at the Madrid Royal Conservatory.

In 1988 he met Francisco Guerrero Marín with whom he studied composition and whom he considered his real master. This meeting represented an important turning point in his career. Together with Guerrero he discovered new techniques for musical form creation such as mathematical combinatorics and the fractals. Nonetheless, his determination and constant search for the integration of aesthetics in these procedures led him to employ another “model” of composing such as the translation of architectural spaces into music, the application of topology and painting techniques related to perspective or the exploration of the acoustic features of instruments at a micro level.

He explored the possibilities of electro-acoustic music developing, in a self-taught way, through various projects starting with Liturgia de silencio (1995) and continuing with more recent pieces like Snefru or Versa est in luctum (2002). His interest in investigating the application of movement to the electronic transformation of sound determined him in 2006 to become involved in a multi-disciplinary project promoted by IRCAM Paris whose premiere is scheduled for 2009.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 03, 2014, 06:25:14 AM
Billone ~ Mani. Giacometti

https://www.youtube.com/v/3Nf3PlsQvRA

Mani.Giacometti (2000)
for Violin, Viola and Violoncello

Commissioned by the Südwestrundfunk and Ensemble Recherche with support from the Ministry for Culture, Baden-Württemberg.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 03, 2014, 08:35:30 AM
Philipp Maintz (http://www.philippmaintz.de/)

https://www.youtube.com/v/SoWi7kinF04

Tourbillon (2008) ~ music for violin, viola und klavier
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 03, 2014, 09:33:25 AM
Sebastian Currier ~ Time Machines (2007)
concerto for violin and orchestra

https://www.youtube.com/v/DnEsELZUk54

From the description on Boosey & Hawkes website:
World Premiere
6/2/2011
Avery Fisher Hall, New York, NY
Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin / New York Philharmonic / Alan Gilbert

Composer's Notes     
Time Machines is a seven movement concerto for violin and orchestra, written for and dedicated to Anne-Sophie Mutter. Each of the seven movements explores some aspect of the relationship between the perception of music and time. 

In the first movement, fragmented time, the solo violin holds together diverse short, abrupt, and incongruous fragments drawn from later movements. In this way the movement is also about future time, as it allows for brief glimpses of material heard in the rest of the piece. In delay time, the second movement, with the exception of three held chords, the entire fabric of orchestral textures is nothing but a reverberation, a resonance, of the violin's lyrical line: not a note sounds that wasn't first formulated in the violin before it's "delayed" representation is reflected in the orchestra. The violin seems to propel everything forward at a frenzied, fast pace in the third movement, compressed time, which ends as abruptly as it begins.  In the fourth movement, overlapping time, passages of contrasting character, and rhythmic and metric structure, constantly cross paths, so that as one passage gradually fades into nothingness another is heard gradually coming into the foreground. Entropy, the principle that ordered systems move towards greater disorder, and which defines the forward moving aspect of time, is the basis for the musical rhetoric in the fifth movement, entropic time. This movement begins with a sharply chiseled motive presented in an orchestral unison.  From this point on, this ordered presentation gives way to more chaotic elements, as the theme itself is gradually dissembled. In backwards time, the sixth movement, the flow of time is momentarily reversed. Both the musical rhetoric and aspects of instrumental acoustics run "backwards" while brief flashes of previous movements mysteriously float by. In this way, it forms a relation to the first movement: where at the beginning there a glimpses of future time, here there are now glimpses of time past. In harmonic time, the final movement, the violin presents a long cantabile line amidst a varied harmonic landscape. 

It's only a little bit of an exaggeration to say that music is made of nothing but  time - well, and air too. Clearly the form of a piece is how it unfolds in time. On a smaller scale, melodic or rhythmic gestures are made of a series of events moving forward in time. Even pitch is a product of time: a pitch is created form a periodic oscillation, the less the time of each oscillation, the higher the pitch. This extends to timbre as well, since the tone color of an instrument is dependent on its overtones and overtones are simply vibration patterns that create pitches above the fundamental tone at a variety of time proportions. And the rest is air. A musician bows a string, blows air in a cylinder, strikes a metal object, and a series sound waves take that information to our ears, the intensity of those waves affecting the relative amplitude. It has always fascinating to me that an art form that is so penetrating, that seems to be able to inhabit a place inside one, is made of such ephemeral stuff.


— Sebastian Currier
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 04, 2014, 09:46:45 AM
Denis Smalley ~ Base Metals (2000)

https://www.youtube.com/v/glYOSUGajYc

The title refers to the metal sounds that provided the central material for the piece, and it also evokes the creative process of transmuting these raw sources to a higher musical and expressive plane.

Notes from the composer:
All the metal sources derive from sound sculptures created by the artist Derek Shiel from metal objects collected over a period of time. From the wide range of objects I selected those with the internal resonant properties that could provide me with variegated spectral families. Some possessed intervallic and tonal properties, others were inharmonic or noisier, and some sounded more synthetic than truly metallic. Although there are a number of orchestrated impacts and resonances in the piece, I was less interested in the clash of metal than in more sustained morphologies. Thus there is a focus on varied pushes, surges, swirls and sweeps of spectral energy, balanced with calmer drifts, undulations and dips, all of which move in and out of more clearly pulsed moments. These motions are also spatial so there are approaches, emergences, dispersals and distant disappearances, sometimes leaving behind the residues of spectral trails. The metal-based families, which are hardly ever absent, are brought into relations with a few other sound-types, and those who know my other pieces might spot the occasional refugee-sound from the past, recontextualized.

Base Metals was composed in 2000 in the composer's studio and premiered on October 15, 2000 during the 7th International Acousmatic Festival L'Espace du son (Brussels, Belgium). The piece was commissioned by Sveriges Radio Malmö — Swedish radio in Malmö — (Sweden).

Thanks to Derek Shiel for making his sound sculptures available, and to Bosse Bergqvist for initiating the commission.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 04, 2014, 07:32:52 PM
Wolff ~ Exercise 28 (2000)

https://www.youtube.com/v/cs_wLeMHIgY

for theremin, violin, French horn and double-bass
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 07, 2014, 09:08:46 AM
Thierry Machuel (http://www.thierrymachuel.com/)

(Pardon the Google translation) - French composer and pianist born in Paris, 1962, Thierry Machuel has devoted most of his work in the choral art on contemporary texts in many languages ​​of authors.  He has long been interested in the texts of testimony, writings or resistant communities with unique life experiences, such as those collected from inmates between 2008 and 2011 (box Clairvaux But the walls ... Grand Prize Academy Charles Cros 2010).  He was resident at the Villa Medici and the Casa Velazquez is rated price SACEM / Francis and Mica Salabert vocal music in 2008, a grant from the Fondation Beaumarchais in 2009 and commissioned by the Ministry of Culture in 2010 for the creation of his next opera, as well as the Grand Prize Lycéen Composers 2011.  His choral works are sung in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

He has also written a number of film scores, including in 2010, Film Socialisme by Jean-Luc Godard.

A work for string trio ~

Leçons de Ténèbres, op.59

https://www.youtube.com/v/-YNMJhaIyh4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on February 09, 2014, 03:30:02 AM
Liza Lim's Songs found in a dream (2005) for Oboe, Clarinet/Bass Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Trumpet, Two Percussion, Violincello, and Double Bass:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPK5up5WuIE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 10, 2014, 10:48:04 AM
Michel van der Aa ~ Above for ensemble and soundtrack.

https://www.youtube.com/v/MrZlSfP_0kE

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 10, 2014, 01:19:16 PM
Stefano Gervasoni ~ Epicadenza (2004) for solo percussion, cymbalom, flute, clarinet, horn, viola, cello and double-bass.

https://www.youtube.com/v/_lWJtQijUCw

https://www.youtube.com/v/qgBHghx171A
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 11, 2014, 06:02:15 AM
Taylor Deupree ~ Interview

http://curatorsintl.org/posts/listen-up-mengyin-lin-speaks-with-artist-taylor-deupree

Taylor Deupree is a sound artist, graphic designer and photographer. He has founded the record label, 12k, in 1997 and since then, it has gained an international following by providing a platform for electronic musicians, composers and sound artists to experiment with conceptual music. Deupree approaches his sound work in the fashion of a minimalist, emphasizing a hybrid of natural sounds and technological meditation, with no hint of digital idolatry. His work, Thursdays, is included in the original version of the ICI exhibition With Hidden Noise and he will debut a new collaborative piece with Stephen Vitiello for a newly updated version of the show.

12k Music Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/12k)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 11, 2014, 11:41:10 AM
Pascal Dusapin - Aufgang (2013)

https://www.youtube.com/v/uU6F0rSbbsg

Renaud Capuçon, violin
l'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande/Osmo Vänskä (Jan. 2014).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 12, 2014, 05:10:32 AM
Alexander BERNE : Soprano Saxophone Choir (The) / The Saduk / The Abandoned Orchestra (http://www.innova.mu/albums/alexander-berne-and-abandoned-orchestra/composed-and-performed-alexander-berne)

(http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/albums/755cover.jpg)

In this current innova 3-CD set I have explored my increasing fascination with the craft of multi-track studio recording techniques to more fully convey (compositionally) on multiple instruments what I previously attempted (improvisationally) solo. The studio has allowed me to more clearly delineate those individual voices and develop a more cohesive yet still fractal polyphony. I hope the essence of the art (musical and spiritual) is not dispersed by studio technology (I am not sure about this...it well might be).

The genesis of the first CD “The Soprano Saxophone Choir” came years ago as an exercise to improve my tone. I found that by creating (in studio) an accompaniment of various layered tones and phrases, in different registers and with different timbres, I could awaken hidden qualities in my sound. Vibrations are powerful, and we sometimes forget that there are actual physical changes taking place in the instrument which have corresponding aesthetic effects on the practitioner and hopefully the listener as well. There seems to be a special, even mystical quality when an instrument or voice is multiplied by itself…a choir. This first CD is an exploration of that choir phenomenon: many soprano saxophones living together, magnifying the ‘overtonal’, textural, harmonic, vibratory, ‘soundistic’ experience.

CD two, “The Saduk” - What do nearly all instrumental virtuoso do? Running headlong into limitations, they make significant changes to their instruments or in some cases make a new one entirely. I love the saxophone deeply, but it has some inherent constraints. It is a ‘heavy’ instrument, laden down with many large keys; you need a lot of breath to vibrate its elongated conical metal tube. Often longing for a more tender palette of expression than the saxophone would allow, – I developed flute envy. My solution was to create the saduk, the simple open-holed flute/reed hybrid featured on these tracks. Inspired in equal measure by an inner sound – one that I have ‘felt’ as much as ‘heard’ throughout my life – and the primal, tender wind instruments found in most world traditions, this recording marries a prenatally familiar wind expression with voice, percussion, saxophone and other acoustic sounds.

For the third CD, “The Abandoned Orchestra”, I did not throw in everything but the kitchen sink; I did, however, use enough plumbing materials – making new wind instruments – to fix that sink quite a few times over. Along with the saxophone and saduk I created the sadukini (a conically functioning saduk, similar to ‘world oboes’ like the nadaswaram, shenai, or zurna), the tridoulaphone (another flute/reed hybrid heard here in soprano, alto, and tenor registers), and a reeded slide trumpet.

“The Abandoned Orchestra” continues with my solitary, unassisted practice of composing, performing and recording. I have been contemplating the two senses of abandonment: to be abandoned is to be either forsaken or unrestrained – but isolation and desertion may lead to autonomy and liberty. In this self-layered orchestra, I have explored my own diverse pre- and post-ethnic sound world...
- Alexander Berne, 2010
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 19, 2014, 12:57:22 PM
Mark Andre - durch (2006) for ensemble

https://www.youtube.com/v/blcBtuVE27Q

https://www.youtube.com/v/Qx1luZXUmrE

Mark Andre (born Marc André 10 May 1964 in Paris[1]) is a French composer living in Germany.  Andre studied composition from 1987 to 1993 with Claude Ballif and Gérard Grisey at the Paris Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique. In Paris, he also graduated from the École Normale Supérieure about the music of Ars subtilior (Le compossible musical de l'Ars subtilior).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 02:31:35 PM
Continuing the 21st century survey .. which includes some of the most polarizing composers of art music
in the last 50 years or so, in their later periods of creativity .. 3 Americans ..

Philip Glass .. (partial list below)
In the Penal Colony (2000; voice & string quartet)
Galileo Galilei (2001; opera)
Symphonies 6-11 (2002-2011)
Concerto for 2 Timpanists & orchestra (2000)
Piano Concerto Nos. 1 & 2 (2000, 2004)
Harpsichord Concerto (2002)
The Hours (2002; commercial film score)
Orion (2004; Philip Glass Ensemble)
Waiting for the Barbarians (2005; opera)
The Passion of Ramakrishna (2006; orchestra, soloists, chorus)
Songs & Poems for solo cello (2005-2007)
Book of Longing (2007; song cycle with Leonard Cohen)
Appomattox (2007; opera)
Violin Concerto No. 2 "The American Four Seasons" (2009-2010)
The Perfect American (2011; opera about the death of Walt Disney, premiere 2013)


Steve Reich
Dance Patterns (2002)
Cello Counterpoint (2003)
You Are (Variations) (2004)
Variations for Vibes, Pianos, Strings (2005)
Daniel Variations (2006)
Double Sextet (2007) Pulitzer Prize for Music
2x5 for 2 drum sets, 2 pianos, 4 electric guitars, 2 bass guitars (2008)
Mallet Quartet for 2 marimbas, 2 vibraphones or 4 marimbas (or solo percussion & tape) (2009)
WTC 9/11 for string quartet & tape (2010)


John Adams
(2001) Nancy's Fancy
(2001) Guide to Strange Places
(2001) American Berserk
(2002) On the Transmigration of Souls (Pulitzer Prize for Music)
(2003) My Father Knew Charles Ives
(2003) The Dharma at Big Sur
(2005) Doctor Atomic
(2007) Doctor Atomic Symphony
(2007) Son of Chamber Symphony
(2007) Fellow Traveler
(2008) String Quartet
(2009) City Noir
(2010) Absolute Jest




YES YES YESSSSSSSSSS YES YES YESSSSSSS
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on February 19, 2014, 02:53:59 PM
I find Mark Andre's music to be quite remarkably attractive.

He's one of my favorite composers who uses mainly (or solely) acoustic instruments.

As is Simon Steen-Andersen, who adds extreme amplification to the mix. Not extreme loudness, extreme amplification--along the lines of how Cage used amplication to make otherwise barely audible sounds (like the plucked spines of cacti) easy to hear.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG8yYG2jzWI
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 20, 2014, 12:16:51 PM
Anna Thorvaldsdottir ~ Hrím (2010) for ensemble

https://www.youtube.com/v/IYBz0qwAer8

CAPUT ensemble

Anna Thorvaldsdottir (1977) is an Icelandic composer who frequently works with large sonic structures that tend to reveal the presence of a vast variety of sustained sound materials, reflecting her sense of imaginative listening to landscapes and nature. Her music tends to portray a flowing world of sounds with an enigmatic lyrical atmosphere.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 21, 2014, 06:01:23 AM
kikuchi yukinori

Margaret : There’s so much light in the room. (https://soundcloud.com/kikuchi-yukinori/margaret-theres-so-much-light)

Well done electronic music from Japanese composer, who also has had a record label specializing in promoting electronic music since 1993 ~ TestToneMusic (http://www.testtonemusic.net/TTM/TestToneMusic.html).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on February 22, 2014, 12:27:28 PM
Taylor Deupree

I enjoy Deupree's music quite a bit; his label is worth exploring if you enjoy that kind of sonority.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 23, 2014, 06:53:39 AM
The New York Times has a article about Georg Frederick Haas (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/23/arts/music/georg-friedrich-haass-works-are-rooted-in-microtonality.html?smid=tw-nytimesmusic&seid=auto&_r=1) that is a good read.  Here's an excerpt ~

Mr. Haas’s works are rooted in microtonality — a system that divides the conventional scale of Western classical music into many more than its usual 12 semitone pitches. (His opera “Thomas” incorporates some 1,600 different pitches.) In Europe, composers like Ligeti and Penderecki used microtones; American composers including Charles Ives, Harry Partch and La Monte Young have also breached the standard division of the octave.

In Mr. Haas’s scores, these microtones result in opulent and otherworldly harmonies that at times seem impossible to have been produced by acoustic instruments. On the two occasions I heard the excellent Argento Chamber Ensemble perform his “In Vain,” a masterpiece of glistening sonorities that unfurls in hypnotic waves of sound, I had the sense of hearing something unique.


His String Quartet No. 5

https://www.youtube.com/v/Ii_jBv2X514
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 24, 2014, 05:13:21 AM
Pierre Jodlowski ~ Drones

http://www.youtube.com/v/JTWvCeKeCs4

Pierre JODLOWSKI is a composer, performer and multimedia artist. His music, often marked by a high density, is at the crossroads of acoustic and electric sound and is characterized by dramatic and political anchor. His work as a composer led him to perform in France and abroad in most places dedicated to contemporary music aswell as others artistic fields, dance, theater, visual arts, electronic music...

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 25, 2014, 08:27:57 AM
Francesca Verunelli ~ Unfolding (2012), for string quartet and electronics

https://www.youtube.com/v/UxUYJ695zEY

Francesca Verunelli studied composition with Rosario Mirigliano and piano with Stefano Fiuzzi at the Conservatorio Luigi Cherubini in Florence where she earned both diplomas cum laude. She concluded her studies at the Accademia Santa Cecilia, with Azio Corghi.

Current projects include an orchestra piece, The narrow corner, commissioned by Radio France’s Philharmonic Orchestra, to be recorded for broadcast in 2014. The 2014-2015 season will see the first performances of two other commissioned works, Cinemaolio, a state commission for the ensemble Court-Circuit and The Dark Day for the Accentus Chamber Choir, to be performed at Cité de la Musique in May 2014.

Since January 2014 she is a composer in residence at GMEM of Marseille. This collaboration includes several projects, the first of which is  the premiere of a new piece for double bass and electronics in July 2014 at Aix-en-Provence Festival.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on February 28, 2014, 04:37:50 AM
"the whole world was mist once" by david e. farrell. performed october 28, 2013 by the sam houston state university percussion group.

john lane, director

The whole world was mist once long ago and some day
it will all go back to mist,
Our skulls and lungs are more water than bone and
tissue
And all poets love dust and mist because all the last
answers
Go running back to dust and mist.


from "Last Answers," by Carl Sandburg

"the whole world was mist once" uses the bowed vibraphone as a central instrument. it is featured in a range of shifting harmonic, timbral, and textural environments. while the tones of the vibraphone cannot help but fade away, the other instruments in the ensemble often enter in their wake, giving them new life and pushing the music in different sonic directions. i cannot avoid connecting Sandburg's words with the resonant, yet ever-fading, music.


https://soundcloud.com/davidefarrell/the-whole-world-was-mist-once
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on February 28, 2014, 11:14:46 AM
Anna Thorvaldsdottir ~ Hrím (2010) for ensemble

https://www.youtube.com/v/IYBz0qwAer8

CAPUT ensemble

Anna Thorvaldsdottir (1977) is an Icelandic composer who frequently works with large sonic structures that tend to reveal the presence of a vast variety of sustained sound materials, reflecting her sense of imaginative listening to landscapes and nature. Her music tends to portray a flowing world of sounds with an enigmatic lyrical atmosphere.
Very evocative!  8) Hrim, if you're interested, may mean "thunder" or may refer to the primordial giant Ymir. I tend to think the latter reference is what Thorwald's daughter intended. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 09, 2014, 04:06:17 PM
Born in 1975, Francisco Meirino (http://www.franciscomeirino.com/home.html) is active since 1994 (as phroq until 2009) in sound and live performance, he explores the tension between programmable material and the potential for its failure by working mainly with the computer, magnetic fields detectors, reel-to-reel tape recorders, piezo transducers and various acoustic devices.

Beyond Repair - Extract 2 (https://soundcloud.com/franciscomeirino/beyond-repair-extract-2)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on March 09, 2014, 04:31:33 PM
Richard Barrett and Per Inge Bjorlo - Dark Matter
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjGl5NdyG18&list=WLACC4B73F08165787
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 09, 2014, 05:43:14 PM
Richard Barrett and Per Inge Bjorlo - Dark Matter
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjGl5NdyG18&list=WLACC4B73F08165787

Nice.  Thanks for posting this one.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on March 09, 2014, 05:46:19 PM
Nice.  Thanks for posting this one.

You're most welcome, and thank you for all of your wonderful postings in this thread. We're battling windmills. :P
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 09, 2014, 05:59:29 PM
Basque composer Ramon Lazkano (http://www.lazkano.info/)'s Hilarriak (2003) for orchestra.

http://www.youtube.com/v/XMqeTkFdagA

Ramon Lazkano (Donostia-San Sebastián, 1968) studied composition in San Sebastian, Paris and Montreal with Francisco Escudero, Alain Bancquart, Gérard Grisey and Gilles Tremblay; he was awarded a First Prize of Compositionat the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique of Paris in 1990 and received a DEA degree (PhD Evaluation Degree) in 20th Century Music and Musicology from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales. His piano concerto Hitzaurre Bi earned him, at the age of 26, the Prince Pierre de Monaco Foundation Prize and shortly afterwards, in 1997, a jury chaired by Luciano Berio gave him the Leonard Bernstein Jerusalem Composition Prize for his Auhen Kantuak. In 2007 Ramon Lazkano was awarded the Georges Bizet Prize by the French Academy of Fine Arts; he was also a prizewinner of the Institute of Music and Drama Arts and the Colegio de España.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 10, 2014, 04:37:28 AM
I'm interested in other composers who might carry a similar sound style to Pascal Dusapin, perhaps some frequent flyers of this thread have some suggestions?  I'm obsessed with Dusapin's music, which I find very lyrical, and his orchestral music to be colorfully textured. His sound is very unique, to me at least, so there might not be any other composer that close in sound.
Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 10, 2014, 07:36:03 AM
[This is post is not made in response to Greg's query ... ]

Mark André (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Andre)   

Mark Andre (born Marc André 10 May 1964 in Paris) is a French composer living in Germany.  Andre studied composition from 1987 to 1993 with Claude Ballif and Gérard Grisey at the Paris Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique. In Paris, he also graduated from the École Normale Supérieure about the music of Ars subtilior (Le compossible musical de l'Ars subtilior). In 1995 he received a scholarship from the French Foreign Ministry, which enabled him to continue his studies of composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts Stuttgart with Helmut Lachenmann. In the Experimental Studio for Acoustic Art he studied electronic music with André Richard. In 1996, he was able to continue his studies in Stuttgart by a grant from the Akademie Schloss Solitude. Numerous other scholarships and residencies followed. Since then, Andre has been heard at the Donaueschingen Music Festival in 2007 qith his composition ... on ... III that his large Orchester triptych ... Auf ... , and was awarded the prize of the SWR Symphony Orchestra Baden-Baden and Freiburg, since this public attention has been drawn to his work even more. But even before Andre earner numerous major awards, so at the Darmstadt Summer Courses (Kranichsteiner Music Prize 1996).   

...auf... III

https://www.youtube.com/v/TiprS7_BtFw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 10, 2014, 09:55:11 AM
Natasha Barrett   

Website (http://www.natashabarrett.org/)

Natasha Barrett (b. 1972, England) is a British composer and performer of electroacoustic art music. Her compositional aesthetics are derived from acousmatic issues, but in addition to acousmatic composition she composes for instruments and live electronics, sound installations, multi-media works and computer music improvisation. She currently lives in Norway. 

Natasha Barrett began working seriously with electroacoustic composition during a master's degree in analysis and electroacoustic composition, studying with Jonty Harrison at the University of Birmingham (UK). This study also gave her the opportunity to work with BEAST (Birmingham ElectroAcoustic Sound Theatre) which has greatly influenced her current work, and lead on to a doctoral degree in composition supervised by Denis Smalley, awarded in 1998 at City University (London, UK).  Both degrees were funded by the Humanities section of the British Academy.  In the same year, a grant from Norges forskningsråd (The Research Council of Norway) enabled her to work as a resident composer at NoTAM (Norsk nettverk for Teknologi, Akustikk og Musikk / Norwegian network for Technology, Acoustics and Music) in Oslo (Norway). 

Hardly any of her work on YouTube, but this link (http://users.notam02.no/~natashab/headphone_streams/concert_works_headphones.html) will take you to a page from her website with some audio clips of some recent works.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 10, 2014, 11:57:43 AM
Ludger Brümmer ~ Speed (2006)

https://www.youtube.com/v/_ob6nf8-JWo

Diploma in psychology and sociology in 1983. Between 1983-1989 composition studies with Nicolaus A Huber (instrumental) and Dirk Reith (electroacoustic) at the Folkwang Hochschule Essen.  Commission and collaboration with choreographer Susanne Linke for the choreography “Ruhrort,” followed by several international performances in America, Europe and Asia (Paris, Théâtre de Ville, Tel Aviv, Charleroi, Madrid, and some others).  Ballet music for the “Nederlands Dans Theater” with his orchestra piece “Riti Contour.”  Work with solo dancers for choreographies for example “Le temps s’ouvre” with electroacoustic music.  Collaboration with Christian Moeller for Multimedia Expositions in Tokyos Spiral Hall.  International Performances f.e. at the INA, Paris or at ICMC’s in San Jose, Tokyo, Banff, Thessaloniki.  Collaboration with the institute “InterArtes” with video artist Silke Braemer for the Video “Lizard Point”.

Interview (http://asymmetrymusicmagazine.com/interviews/ludger-brummer/) with our own "someguy".
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on March 10, 2014, 02:01:56 PM
Ludger is one of my favorite people.

I need to go see him again, soon.

And I want to get some recordings of recent works, too. I've gotten the perhaps erroneous (I hope erroneous) impression that since his elevation to directorship of the music department at ZKM (tsett, kah, emm), his production has tapered off.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 11, 2014, 04:52:22 AM
A more productive than usual (for this musical idiot !) trawl through recent posts, with Currier, Dusapin, Thorvaldsdottir & Lazkano all being modern music I can learn from.
Thank you so much !
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 11, 2014, 05:18:47 AM
Simon Steen-Andersen ~ In Spite Of, And Maybe Even Therefore (2007)

https://www.youtube.com/v/jnonO8ekh_s

The piece mainly consists of two musics that are both being build and destroyed at the same time.

The first process is a quasi unison music played fortissimo by the unamplified instruments in the back; closed piano, double bassoon, double bass/cello and percussion. The very beginning of this sequence is repeated over and over in a small loop, slowly getting longer and longer, revealing more and more of the sequence. At the same time this music is interrupted by breaks or inserts of the other music (played by the amplified flute, clarinet and horn). In the beginning it is only seldom interrupted and only for very short durations. Slowly the interruptions come more and more often and they get longer and longer. Just before the sequence is finally revealed in its whole, the intervals between the interruptions get shorter than the length of the sequence, and thus we never get to hear the complete sequence uninterrupted. Soon the interruptions take over and the sequence gets more and more fragmented and ends up being only short echoes of the beginning.

The second process is one of Beethoven’s Piano Bagatels opus 126 played ultra pianissimo by the amplified flute, clarinet and horn sitting at tables in the front. To begin with they only play one chord at the time every now and then, but slowly the chords come closer. In the beginning one only realizes, that it is tonal music, and that the chords are getting closer and closer. At one point we realize that the chords will eventually get so close, that they will form a tonal music or chord progression. But each time a chord is played, a piece of one of the instruments is being dismantled, eventually making the chords harder and harder to play in tune. Exactly at the point where the chords finally come together, the instruments are completely taken apart, leaving only bits and pieces on the tables in front of the musicians. The musicians try very hard to play the Beethoven on the bits, but the original music almost disappears in the sound of picking up and putting down the pieces, and the noisy and out of tune alternative ways of playing the notes. After a while the tones disappear leaving only the sounds of the “choreography” needed to perform these notes. Out of this “musical ruin” the music attempts to build up new relations and new ways of creating continuity, but this attempted continuity is slowly being destroyed by freezes getting longer and longer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 11, 2014, 06:41:54 AM
David Vélez ~ Desayuno (2007)

https://www.youtube.com/v/P4k4Vnufrpk

David VélezDavid Vélez (b. 1973 in Bogotá, Colombia) is a sound artist / composer.  He moved to NYC on 2002 and returned to Colombia on 2010.  Holds a MA in Fine Arts from the Universidad Nacional de Boogotá.  He started to publish his work on 2005 with his project Lezrod.  With the album 'Retorno a la nada' which was nominated for the Qwartz awards.  Since 2006

David has participated in a series of exhibitions and art festivals such as 'Arte Ocupa' -collective- (Santa María, Brazil 2013), 'Deriva y Catástrofe' (Rojo Galería, Bogotá 2013), 'Transversal sonora' -collective- (2012 Universidad Nacional Bogotá) ‘Frequencias’ (2012 Plazarte Gallery, Medellín), ‘Cacería de Brujas’ (2011, Bogotá), ’Densidades’ (2011 Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá), Intermedios (2011 Universidad Nacional, Bogotá), Internacional Ruidística (2010 Valenzuela Klenner Gallery, Bogotá), Fine Diving (2008, NYC), Red Room (2008, Baltimore, Maryland), Rake Festival (2007, NYC) and Photophono (NYC, 2006).  David Vélez works as content manager, curator and publisher for Impulsive Habitat a label he cofounded on 2009 that focuses on the publication of phonographic and musique concrete works.  On 2011 David Vélez funded the journal The Field Reporter which is focused on the critic and review of phonographic and musique concrete based works.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 11, 2014, 09:34:11 AM
Georg Frederick Haas ~ String Quartet No.7 with electronics (2011)

https://www.youtube.com/v/TDiCfbTwMDE

"Georg Friedrich Haas (b. 1953) is an Austrian composer of spectral music.  Georg Friedrich Haas grew up in Tschagguns (Vorarlberg) and studied composition with Gösta Neuwirth (de), Iván Erőd, and piano with Doris Wolf at the Musikhochschule in Graz, the capital of the Austrian federal state of Styria.  Since 1978, he has been teaching at the Hochschule as an instructor, and since 1989 as an associate professor in counterpoint, contemporary composition techniques, analysis, and introduction to microtonal music.  Haas is a founding member of the Graz composers' collective Die andere Seite.  He composes in a cottage in Fischbach, Styria.

Haas' style recalls that of György Ligeti in its use of micropolyphony, microintervals and the exploitation of the overtone series; he is often characterized as a leading exponent of spectral music. His aesthetics is guided by the idea that music is able ""to articulate a human being's emotions and states of the soul in such a way that other human beings can embrace these emotions and states of the soul as their own"" (""Emotionen und seelische Zustände von Menschen so zu formulieren, daß sie auch von anderen Menschen als die ihren angenommen werden können"").  Thus Haas has disavowed the intellectualism of some strands of the modernist musical avantgarde (such as serialism and deconstructivism). The emotional atmosphere of many of his works is sombre.  Haas' operas have been criticized for giving away themes like suffering, illness and death to aesthetic voyeurism: ""the piece [Haas' opera Thomas (2013)] comes dangerously close to a kind of palliative care ward tourism.""  Im a similar vein, his orchestral works have been compared to film music: ""[Dark dreams for symphony orchestra] lets us think of a soundtrack ready-made for a suspense movie"" (""lässt aber auch an einen probaten Soundtrack zum Suspense-Streifen denken"")."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 12, 2014, 12:05:44 PM
Zeena Parkins (http://www.zeenaparkins.com/) is a harpist, an improviser and a composer.

Visible/Invisible for string quartet (2006)
movement 3 'The Necklace'
performed by the Eclipse Quartet
at Location One Roulette in New York, December 2005
https://www.youtube.com/v/edTT0-8WEFA

I like all the works in this album.
Rzewski, Tenney & Parkins: Music for String Quartet & Percussion
Eclipse Quartet, William Winant



Whimwhams, for marimba and string quartet (1993) by Frederic Rzewski ... enjoyable, I like his "The People United Will Never Be Defeated"
Cognate Canons, for string quartet and percussion (1993) by James Tenney ... hypnotic, repetitive
s:c:a:t:t:e:r:i:n:g, for marimba, tom toms, snare, Lou Harrison bell instrument, chimes, various metal percussion and spinning samples (2011-2012) by Zeena Parkins ... there are many different styles and sounds "scattered" in this work


Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 12, 2014, 12:09:21 PM
Zeena Parkins (http://www.zeenaparkins.com/) is a harpist, an improviser and a composer.

Visible/Invisible for string quartet (2006)
movement 3 'The Necklace'
performed by the Eclipse Quartet
at Location One Roulette in New York, December 2005
https://www.youtube.com/v/edTT0-8WEFA

I like all the works in this album.
Rzewski, Tenney & Parkins: Music for String Quartet & Percussion
Eclipse Quartet, William Winant



Whimwhams, for marimba and string quartet (1993) by Frederic Rzewski ... enjoyable, I like his "The People United Will Never Be Defeated"
Cognate Canons, for string quartet and percussion (1993) by James Tenney ... hypnotic, repetitive
s:c:a:t:t:e:r:i:n:g, for marimba, tom toms, snare, Lou Harrison bell instrument, chimes, various metal percussion and spinning samples (2011-2012) by Zeena Parkins ... there are many different styles and sounds "scattered" in this work

Interesting, I was just listening to her yesterday.  Great stuff.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 13, 2014, 10:38:39 AM
Diana (Simpson) Salazar ~ Papyrus

Soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/diana_salazar/papyrus)

Diana Salazar is a Scottish-born and London-based composer and sound artist. Her compositional output ranges from acousmatic work to music for instruments with live electronics, laptop improvisation and cross-disciplinary collaborations. Her works have been performed throughout the UK and internationally, across Europe and North, Central and South America, with broadcasts on Swedish National Radio, Radio France, and BBC Radio 3. Selected works have been released on the Studio PANaroma, Discparc, SCRIME, Drift Station and Elektramusic labels. From 2009 to 2013 she was a Lecturer, then Senior Lecturer in Music and Music Technology at Kingston University, London. In September 2013 she joined the Department of Creative Practice and Enterprise at City University London as a Lecturer in Music.

Her website (http://dianasalazar.co.uk/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on March 13, 2014, 05:10:58 PM
DJ Sniff: Solo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BORd08p_1C0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 13, 2014, 05:22:59 PM
I went through this once, and hearing some of the tracks again. (I bought it at Google store for cheap.) Not all of them were composed in 21th century. (Should this belong to 1950-2000 thread?)

The NYFA Collection: 25 Years of New York New Music



From Editorial Review on Amazon:
Quote
In 1983, the New York State Council on the Arts established fellowships in 16 arts disciplines, including ones for Music Composition and Sound administered by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). To celebrate 25 years of fellows (there have been more than 200 to date), this five-CD collection features 52 of them, mostly performing new compositions heard here for the first time.

There are so many different types of music here: electronics, percussion, installation, jazz, orchestral, songs, string quartets, etc. from avant-garde to accessible.

All the notes are available here:
Disc 1 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_A.pdf)
Disk 2 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_B.pdf)
Disk 3 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_C.pdf)
Disk 4 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_D.pdf)
Disk 5 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_E.pdf)

Music from Bridge Music by Joseph Bertolozzi (mentioned in this post  Re: Contemporary composers who've made an impression on you (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21270.msg684802.html#msg684802) by sanantonio) is included in Disc 1. This was nice because I wanted to hear it but didn't have courage to buy the whole disc  ;D. It is like rather not-so-abnormal percussion music than expected, but the sound is wild. According to the note, it is now "a permanent installation where listeners can go onto the Mid Hudson Bridge itself and hear the music."

This is just one of them, and the other music are so different that I kept listening to tracks, thinking what is next?

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 13, 2014, 05:24:16 PM
I went through this once, and hearing some of the tracks again. (I bought it at Google store for cheap.) Not all of them were composed in 21th century. (Should this belong to 1950-2000 thread?)

The NYFA Collection: 25 Years of New York New Music



From Editorial Review on Amazon:
There are so many different types of music here: electronics, percussion, installation, jazz, orchestral, songs, string quartets, etc. from avant-garde to accessible.

All the notes are available here:
Disc 1 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_A.pdf)
Disk 2 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_B.pdf)
Disk 3 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_C.pdf)
Disk 4 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_D.pdf)
Disk 5 (http://www.innova.mu/sites/www.innova.mu/files/album/files/307414_8p_Roll_E.pdf)

Music from Bridge Music by Joseph Bertolozzi (mentioned in this post  Re: Contemporary composers who've made an impression on you (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21270.msg684802.html#msg684802) by sanantonio) is included in Disc 1. This was nice because I wanted to hear it but didn't have courage to buy the whole disc  ;D. It is like rather not-so-abnormal percussion music than expected, but the sound is wild. According to the note, it is now "a permanent installation where listeners can go onto the Mid Hudson Bridge itself and hear the music."

This is just one of them, and the other music are so different that I kept listening to tracks, thinking what is next?

This is a good set. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 13, 2014, 07:14:25 PM
Yes, and also I got this another collection of American music on your recommendation. Thank you. I felt this has more serious and contemplating atmosphere overall. This is very good and I enjoyed it.

AMERICAN MASTERS FOR THE 21ST
SOCIETY FOR NEW MUSIC



This 5-CD collection is excellent.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on March 13, 2014, 08:31:23 PM
sanantonio, are you choosing people according to whether I'm friends with them or not?

You have certainly been posting music by a lot of friends of mine recently. Weird.

Anyway, Diana. What a brilliant and talented musician. Love her stuff.

How about some Emmanuelle Gibello, too? Did you do some of her stuff, already? (

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocl1N29Shm8
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 14, 2014, 05:07:00 AM
sanantonio, are you choosing people according to whether I'm friends with them or not?

You have certainly been posting music by a lot of friends of mine recently. Weird.



Some of it is coincidence (arising from YouTube's "if you like this then you might like this" kind of linking), but also because the lists of composers you have suggested on GMG were entered into my (now rather) large Excel sheet of composers I have discovered and/or heard about from someone (some guy in this instance :) ).   I pick a name at random to listen to and possibly post about and just happened to pick some of your names.

Thanks for the suggestions; almost without exception I have found experiencing their music to be very much worthwhile.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 14, 2014, 05:21:24 AM
Love this ~

Michael Finnissy - North American Spirituals

https://www.youtube.com/v/JvBEB5ycE70

"North American Spirituals" from volume 1 of "History of photography in sound", played by Marilyn Nonken
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on March 14, 2014, 07:14:00 AM
This morning's listening before errandizing for the day:



Vigorously dissonant, as opposed to generally atonal.  Works date between 2000 and 2009. Fandango can be categorized as one of those pieces with a noteable ostinato:  the tonal original keeps fighting off bursts of atonality and dissonance, but makes itself heard all through the piece.  The liner notes are by the composer and give an extended description of the music itself, but are too long to copy for here.  So I will quote the Amazon blurb which is a condensation of the blurb on the back cover of the CD.

Quote
Over the last decade the music of the Puerto Rican composer Roberto Sierra has become internationally admired, and this has led to prestigious commissions and performances around the world. Fandangos was heard at the BBC Proms in London and employs a harpsichord work attributed to Antonio Soler as a departure for a richly inventive orchestral fantasy. The dramatic Sinfonía No. 4 was described by ArtsNowNashville as 'a textbook example of how this composer breathes new life into old forms. The piece is basically a classic Germanic symphony imbued with Spanish sensibilities and reinvigorated with new harmonies and rhythms.' Robert Schumann is subtly evoked in Carnaval, five character pieces that explore mythical creatures, both menacing and serene.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 14, 2014, 11:38:52 AM
Alistair MacDonald ~ Scintilla (2014)

Soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/alistair_macdonald/scintilla)

"Dr. Alistair MacDonald is a composer & performer based in Glasgow. Much of his work is collaborative; working with performers, artists and choreographers from different media and backgrounds, he makes work for performance, broadcast and installation internationally.
 
Current projects include Strange Rainbow, a live electroacoustic duo with Scottish harp player Catriona McKay (performances include Celtic Connections, sound festival in Aberdeen and the Norwegian Film Festival) and collaboration, with Carrie Fertig, on Glimmer for glass percussion, electronics and live flame-working, recently selected for the Coburg Prize for Contemporary Glass.
 
Recent works include The Imagining of Things with Brass Art (video and audio installation) for Huddersfield Art Gallery and the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, Mitaki (string quintet and live electronics) for the Scottish Ensemble, and a number of acousmatic works.
 
Interactive, performative installation  Sensuous Geographies, in collaboration with Sarah Rubidge (shown in the UK and USA) was was awarded a Creative Scotland Award in 2002;  Silver Wings and Golden Scales (2007), an installation in collaboration with Jennifer Angus, was commissioned for the Chazen Museum of Art in Wisconsin;  SeaUnsea (2006), an interactive dance and video work with programmer Chiron Mottram, choreographer Carol Brown and architect Mette Ramsgard Thomsen was premiered at Dance Umbrella 2006 at the Siobhan Davies Studios. Other commissions include music for The Scottish Ensemble, The Paragon Ensemble, BBC Radio Scotland, Reeling and Writhing, the Australian ensemble Elision, choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh and Theatre Cryptic.
 
He teaches composition and directs the Electroacoustic Studios at the RCS where he was made a Fellow of the Royal Conservatoire in 2012."
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 14, 2014, 05:44:29 PM
Roger Luke DuBois (http://lukedubois.com/) - Vertical Music (2012)

(http://music.columbia.edu/~luke/projects/assets/vertical.jpg)

Vertical Music (Video on Vimeo) (http://vimeo.com/41507465)

Quote
A chamber piece written for 12 players, lasting 4 1/2 minutes. Each musician was filmed individually in several takes using a high-speed (300fps) camera and a high definition analog-to-digital audio recording setup. When played back at 30fps, total time is ~45 minutes.

The music is ethereal. The video of 12 musicians filmed and edited by DuBois is also very beautiful.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on March 14, 2014, 10:27:48 PM
An extremely interesting piece composed by Dobrinka Tabakova (born 1980):

Suite in Suite in Old Style for viola, strings and harpsichord (composed in 2004)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VXRCNdNc5c
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 15, 2014, 04:43:04 PM
Roger Luke DuBois (http://lukedubois.com/) - Vertical Music (2012)

(http://music.columbia.edu/~luke/projects/assets/vertical.jpg)

Vertical Music (Video on Vimeo) (http://vimeo.com/41507465)

The music is ethereal. The video of 12 musicians filmed and edited by DuBois is also very beautiful.

Interesting idea.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 15, 2014, 06:59:35 PM
erdem helvacioglu - timeless waves

Soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/experimedia/erdem-helvacioglu-timeless)

Excerpts from the album. Now available at Experimedia.net. This is #9 in Sub Rosa's limited edition Framework series -- an extension of their Concrete Electronics Noise series.

Erdem Helvacıoğlu was born in Bursa, Turkey in 1975. He is one of the most renowned "contemporary electronic music" composers of his generation in Turkey. His music has been broadcast on national radios such as BBC, ABC, WDR and Radio France, among others. He has received commissions from the 2006 World Soccer Championship, T-B A21 The Morning Line, Borusan Center For Culture & Arts, Arter "Space For Art," The Association For The Art Of The Harp, Novelum Contemporary Music Festival, International Istanbul Biennial (IKSV) and the world-famous new music ensemble Bang On A Can-All Stars. His sound installations have been included at museums and galleries such as the 10th International Istanbul Biennial, Los Angeles Track 16, Indonesia Soemardja, Köln Museum Für Angewandte Kunst and London's Menier Gallery. His film music has been heard at Cannes, Sarajevo, Locarno, Seoul, São Paulo, and Sydney film festivals and he received the "Best Original Soundtrack" award in the 2006 Mostramundo Film Festival. He has received prizes for his electroacoustic compositions from the Luigi Russolo, MUSICA NOVA and Insulae Electronicae Electroacoustic Music Competitions.

Timeless Waves, originally composed for a 47 channel/53 speaker diffusion system running on The Morning Line, is a sonic work based on six basic human emotions. The CD is a stereo version of this multichannel work. The piece was inspired by W. Gerrod Parrott's book Emotions In Social Psychology and has been commissioned by Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (T-B A21) for The Morning Line -- an interdisciplinary art project by Matthew Ritchie, Aranda/Lasch and Arup AGU -- and premiered in May 2010, when the project was exhibited at Eminonu Square in Istanbul. Sonically, Timeless Waves is based on the timbres of Togaman GuitarViol, Gibson Les Paul electric guitar, sine waves, various analog pedals and hardware fx processors. The music combines elements from genres such as electroacoustic, drone, noise and contemporary music blended with minimal melodies.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on March 15, 2014, 10:15:02 PM
Kasia Glowicka:

"In 2010 Glowicka and Flores collaborated again with the 15 minute performance piece RETINa inspired by the pioneering science of Étienne-Jules Marey that impacted cinema and the early documentary filmmaker Dziga Vertov."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnXNiacV4tg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 16, 2014, 04:01:10 AM
Kasia Glowicka:

"In 2010 Glowicka and Flores collaborated again with the 15 minute performance piece RETINa inspired by the pioneering science of Étienne-Jules Marey that impacted cinema and the early documentary filmmaker Dziga Vertov."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnXNiacV4tg

Very nice.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 16, 2014, 02:30:49 PM
Robert Ashley recently died, and this is belated acknowledgement, one of his best works, IMO ~

Robert Ashley ‎~ In Sara, Mencken, Christ And Beethoven There Were Men And Women

https://www.youtube.com/v/bcfXWv4vPg0#t=27

Some memories (http://blog.frieze.com/robert-ashley-1930-2014/) of those who worked most closely with him.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Octave on March 16, 2014, 03:09:47 PM
I am sorry to see Robert Ashley go.  I still return to his AUTOMATIC WRITING as a reliably unsettling experience when I am in a dark-room headspace.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 17, 2014, 02:54:05 AM
BJNilsen - Londinium

https://www.youtube.com/v/0hAqVP8H9ms

BJNilsen (http://www.bjnilsen.com/) writes this about the work:

"In 2012 I received a scholarship from the Leverhulme Trust for a one-year Artist in Residency at the UCL Urban Laboratory in London, to introduce sound as an art practice to urban scholars and students. As part of my research I decided to derive the city. I spent full days and sometimes nights sweeping the streets and its interiors for sound - walking and listening with no route or intention. A city without sound does not exist. Every location, passageway, alley, road, park, and pub contains its own world of isolated sound events and patterns - the sound of a shopping bag caught by the wind on the asphalt of a busy street when a bus passes by. What seems to be merely a bus is also a cacophony of sounds, a sound world in itself: hydraulics, breaks, interior noise, honking, public announcements, humans, rolling bottles, cell phones, mp3 players. The rattle of an air-conditioning unit in an old pub toilet gradually develops its broken down sound over many years, creating a raga for it own demise. Nobody seems to hear it. Is it there? The choice of sound varies; it's a personal selection, some sounds made it into this composition, many hours of recording didn't. Sound composition can alter space and time and transform a specific location and experience into an imaginary world."

BJ Nilsen (b,1975 Sweden) Is a sound and recording artist. His work is based on the sound of nature and its effect on humans. He primarily uses field recordings and electronic composition as a working method. He has worked for film, television, theatre, dance and as sound designer. His newest album presented here is “Eye Of The Microphone” [Touch # TO:95, 2013] - a somewhat surreal audio rendition of the sounds of The City of London. Currently also working on The Acoustic City, a book publication with CD, co-edited with Matthew Gandy, [2014, JOVIS Verlag, Berlin]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 17, 2014, 07:02:45 AM
Adam Stansbie (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/composer-profile-adam-stansbie/) ~ Escapade

Escapade was composed using tiny fragments of sound. At the start of the piece, the individual fragments are not perceived. Instead, they are so densely packed that they (perceptually) fuse into much larger structures; one hears the source recordings, which are largely, but not entirely, orchestral. As the piece progresses, the individual fragments become increasingly prominent; they no longer fuse into larger structures and are subsequently perceived as discrete units or entities. In this respect, Escapade was inspired by pointillist painting – a technique in which small, distinct points of colour are used to form a larger image.

Escapade received First Prize in the Third International Competition of Electroacoustic Composition and Visual Music, Destellos Foundation, Argentina, 2010 and was a finalist Finalist in the VIII International Competition for Composers “Città di Udine”, Italy 2010.

Soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/usss/escapade-adam-stansbie-usss)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 18, 2014, 07:40:23 PM
Susan Philipsz - Study of Strings (http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2013/soundings/artists/11/works/) (2012)

(http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2013/soundings/common/content/11/media/sp_02.jpg)
           
Quote
Study for Strings is a contemporary interpretation of an eponymous 1943 orchestral work by Pavel Haas (Czech, 1899–1944), who composed the score while imprisoned in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in what is now the Czech Republic. The Nazis filmed a performance of the completed work at the camp as part of the 1944 propaganda film Teresiendstadt. Almost immediately after filming was completed, Haas and many members of the prisoners' orchestra were killed. The conductor, Karel Ančerl (Czech, 1908–1973), survived the Holocaust, and after the war he reconstructed the composition.

For her 2012 reworking, Philipsz has isolated only the viola and cello parts. Recorded onto multiple channels, the piece is a note-by-note deconstruction of the original composition, replete with fraught silence. These charged absences call attention to the fact that other instruments—and the musicians who played them—are absent.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 19, 2014, 12:55:09 PM
william basinski nocturnes

https://www.youtube.com/v/9VjVvBbVTP4

Material created in 1979-1980 but only recently revised and released.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 20, 2014, 06:01:19 AM
José Miguel Fernández - État Intermédiaire (2010) for ensemble and electronics

https://www.youtube.com/v/FAyNx1rHjIQ
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 20, 2014, 05:55:50 PM
Robert Ashley recently died, and this is belated acknowledgement, one of his best works, IMO ~

Robert Ashley ‎~ In Sara, Mencken, Christ And Beethoven There Were Men And Women

https://www.youtube.com/v/bcfXWv4vPg0#t=27

Some memories (http://blog.frieze.com/robert-ashley-1930-2014/) of those who worked most closely with him.
I heard Ashley for the first time and got drawn in. Thank you. Did he influence Paul Lansky?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on March 21, 2014, 08:18:42 AM
I observe that many of these composers are also performers and can improvise. Am I right in thinking that only since Y2K has electronica advanced enough to allow live, real-time improvisation?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on March 21, 2014, 10:01:43 AM
No.

That started as soon as someone figured out that the tape recorder was not just a tool for making compositions with but an instrument as well.

And since then, more and more devices for reproducing music have been played as instruments, turntables, cassette players, CD players, even PA equipment.

And laptops? Whew. The most versatile instrument yet.

Let everything that can make a sound praise the Lord kinda thing, eh?

I think that what advances in technology have meant is that things that were difficult in the 50s are now easy. But there was live electronic improv in the fifties. Maybe even earlier. I ran across some reference to a show that Hindemith and Krenek (I think it was Krenek) put on in 1930, a live show using variable speed turntables to make music with. I've lost that reference. Last time I tried to Google it, what came up was my first post where I had mentioned that. Not useful!! I want the reference!!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 21, 2014, 11:26:29 AM
a live show using variable speed turntables to make music with. I've lost that reference.

Is it John Cage's Imaginary Landscape No. 1 (1939), using variable speed turntables with frequency records? But it was notated, not improvised. I don't know if anyone around that time used it to improvise, but it could have been possible, I guess.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: jochanaan on March 21, 2014, 02:18:03 PM
Sweet! That Hindemith/Krenek event was completely off my radar! But it goes to show something I tell my non-classical musical friends, that if you think you've discovered some radical musical effect, acoustic or electronic, it was probably already found sixty or70 years ago by someone like Messiaen or Varèse or Cowell or Nancarrow... :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: not edward on March 21, 2014, 05:44:20 PM
I think that what advances in technology have meant is that things that were difficult in the 50s are now easy. But there was live electronic improv in the fifties. Maybe even earlier. I ran across some reference to a show that Hindemith and Krenek (I think it was Krenek) put on in 1930, a live show using variable speed turntables to make music with. I've lost that reference. Last time I tried to Google it, what came up was my first post where I had mentioned that. Not useful!! I want the reference!!
It was Hindemith and Toch, which is in some way more pleasing since Toch is not conventionally regarded as being of a particularly experimental bent (it's always good when reality subverts expectations in this sort of matter, IMO).

Tinyurl link below for your delectation: http://tinyurl.com/nr4mggg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on March 22, 2014, 01:35:14 PM
Thank you Edward.

Toch it is!!

Much better than Krenek, for the reason you mentioned.

And kudos for finding the reference for me. I feel stupid now but also very happy. :D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 23, 2014, 04:38:01 AM
Liza Lim ~ The Navigator

Excerpt from a longer interview (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/21/composer-profile-liza-lim/):

The Navigator

Inspired by ancient Greek myth, the Mahabharata and the story of Tristan and Isolde (as told in the Breton folk tale and by Wagner), it also explores desire, war, creation and annihilation. Its structure is built on the in utero development of the five senses, its sexuality or obscure symbolism.

This is an opera about extremity of passion, about Eros and Thanatos, Desire and Death, the gamble of lovers and of war and choices made between annihilation or creation. The prelude to this ‘alchemical dream opera’ is played by a Ganassi recorder, an instrument long associated with lamentation, the erotic, and pastoral and supernatural realms. A counterpoint is provided by the sound of cicadas: a high pitch of desire and the rustle of the quivering feathers of an entrapped Angel of History. The Angel’s gaze takes in landscapes of tidal blood, unwinding rivers, glaciers, a comet, the ocean, the desert, and finally – in a vision of rebirth during which a cicada is placed on the eye of a foetus – the submarine amniotic world of the womb.

The opera is not about narrative form nor psychological development – instead it describes a series of states of being. Musically, I work with this geometry as a kind of template – a ‘pattern language’ in which elements are moving past each other, are momentarily held in tensile balance which also creates some kind turbulence and then the elements continue on their trajectory. Wagner’s famous opening Tristan motif is an example of this ‘pattern’ and I reference it at various points in the opera (though it’s quite hidden).

This is an excerpt from my opera The Navigator (2008): Angel of History aria (libretto by Patricia Sykes, performed by Deborah Kayser, ELISION Ensemble conducted by Manuel Nawri, theatre direction Barrie Kosky, Brisbane Festival of the Arts).

https://www.youtube.com/v/DvnAwCcDl6U
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 24, 2014, 06:27:13 AM
Johann Johannsson: The Miners’ Hymns
Music From the Film by Bill Morrison

“The Miners’ Hymns” is a collaboration between American filmmaker Bill Morrison and Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson who, with images and music, have created a wordless documentary to depict the ill-fated mining community in North East England. Created from BFI, BBC and other archival footage, “The Miners Hymns” celebrates social, cultural, and political aspects of the extinct industry, and the strong regional tradition of colliery brass bands.


Track No.1: They Being Dead Yet Speaketh
(not footage from the film)
http://www.youtube.com/v/b6CgxWFTOaw

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 24, 2014, 06:46:29 AM
Erdem Helvacıoğlu (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/23/composer-profile-erdem-helvacioglu/)

One of his recent project is the album titled “Timeless Waves“. This work was originally composed for a 47 channel/53 speaker diffusion system running on The Morning Line – an interdisciplinary art project by Matthew Ritchie, Aranda/Lasch and Arup AGU and was commissioned by Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (T-B A21). Sonically, “Timeless Waves” is based on the timbres of Togaman GuitarViol, Gibson Les Paul electric guitar, sine waves, various analog pedals and hardware fx processors. The music combines elements from genres such as electroacoustic, drone, noise and contemporary music blended with minimal melodies.

Soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/experimedia/erdem-helvacioglu-timeless)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 24, 2014, 09:47:02 AM
Kevin Drumm is an experimental musician based in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Emerging from the city’s improvised music scene, in the 1990s he became one the world’s pre-eminent prepared guitar players. Drumm’s work expanded to include electroacoustic compositions and live electronic music made with laptop computers and analog modular synthesizers. He has collaborated with many artists working in similar fields, including Japanese guitarist Taku Sugimoto, multi-instrumentalist and producer Jim O’Rourke, and many European improvisers such as Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson and German trumpeter Axel Dörner. He has also worked with the artist group Simparch, composing a piece for their installation Spec, shown at Documenta XI in Kassel, Germany and at the Renaissance Society in Chicago. Drumm has also worked with saxophonist Ken Vandermark’s Territory Band, which brings together American and Eurpoean players who work in both jazz and free improvisation. Drumm’s work draws upon musique concrete, electronic sound, improvisation, heavy metal, and noise music, and has proved difficult to categorize. His solo and collaborative work ranges from challenging improvisations, ambient textures, and blistering walls of sound. Musical influences include Iron Maiden, Ralf Wehowsky, and The New Blockaders.

http://www.youtube.com/v/sX4mysdG-TY
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 24, 2014, 03:25:11 PM
Johannes Maria Staud

https://www.youtube.com/v/2FaFqshsg3k

Staud studied with, amongst others, Brian Ferneyhough and Michael Jarrell. He gained a publishing contract with Universal Edition in 2000, and since then has won numerous prizes, including a special music prize of the Austrian Republic (2001), the composition award of the Salzburg Easter Festival (2002)and the Paul Hindemith prize of the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival (2009). His Apeiron. Music for Large Orchestra was premiered by the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra under Sir Simon Rattle in 2005, and his Segue. Music for Violoncello and Orchestra was performed by Heinrich Schiff and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Daniel Barenboim at the opening concert of the 2006 Salzburg Festival.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on March 25, 2014, 08:06:17 PM
Shulamit Ran (http://shulamitran.wordpress.com/) - Under the Sun's Gaze (2003-2004)
(Concerto da Camera III), 2 fl, 2 cl, soprano sax, perc, piano, violin and cello
The Northern Illinois University New Music Ensemble, Dr. Gregory Beyer
performed on November 29th, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/yKnHI1owzpE

http://www.youtube.com/v/ea6YQmlgDSg

Bluesy theme, sometimes sounds like Stravinsky.

Shaulamit Ran is an Israeli-American composer. Her Symphony (1990) won her the Pulitzer Prize.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 28, 2014, 11:19:14 AM
Natasha Barrett ~ A Collectors Chest

Live electronics composition with POING-FEED performing (classical guitar, percussion, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, double bass, accordion and spatialised electroacoustic sound). Live recording from the premier at Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival 2013.

interview & audio (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/composer-profile-natasha-barrett/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on March 31, 2014, 05:51:22 PM
Clara Maïda ~ Mutatis Mutandis (2008) ... for 12 amplified strings ....

https://www.youtube.com/v/Fpda3n2oPjE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 02, 2014, 06:53:35 AM
World premiere performance of Vivian Fung's Dreamscapes (2009), performed on November 20, 2009 at Le Poisson Rouge in New York City. Featuring Jenny Lin on piano and Metropolis Ensemble led by conductor Andrew Cyr.

https://www.youtube.com/v/ftcq6dqec08
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 03, 2014, 07:48:49 AM
Iancu Dumitrescu is considered one of the leaders of the spectral music trend at a worldwide level. In 1976 he founded the HYPERION Ensemble, proposing a new aesthetic in today’s music, hyper-spectral, based on the radiant power of sound, within its microcosmic complexity - which is questioned, analyzed, re-composed ​​from a spectral perspective. Ana-Maria Avram is a composer, pianist, conductor, born in 1961 in Bucharest, Romania. She studied composition at the National University of Music- Bucharest and musical aesthetics at Sorbonne, Paris. She has been a member of the Hyperion Ensemble since 1988. Her music is affiliated with the spectral music trend and incorporates the outward semblance of abstraction of archetypal sound, achieving its full development in the synthesis of electroacoustic and instrumental sources.

Vimeo link (http://vimeo.com/56992015)

https://www.youtube.com/v/c-7aJAwBoY8

https://www.youtube.com/v/jlrUThDDGE4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 03, 2014, 05:37:27 PM
Ramon Lazkano : Lur-Itzalak (2003)

https://www.youtube.com/v/1JyL4ZrlX68
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 03, 2014, 08:57:22 PM
Andrea Di Paolo (http://www.andreadipaolo.com/‎)

https://www.youtube.com/v/HegItEAacQU&list=UU1P-kTkphAxVG7P65yCcgMQ

Das Universum for string quartet
Andrea Di Paolo's first symphony will be premiered (http://andreadipaolo.blogspot.com/2014/02/symphony-no1-andrea-di-paolo-world.html) on April 6th, 2014 in Lviv, Ukraine. I wonder what the circumstance of the performance would be like. I like the string quartet a lot.

Quote
On 6th April 2014 in the Great Hall of the Lviv Philharmonic in Lviv (Ukraine), will be the world premiere of SYMPHONY No.1 "CORONA AUSTRALIS" for Orchestra, written by Andrea Di Paolo (2013-2014).

The SYMPHONY No.1 "CORONA AUSTRALIS" is divided into 4 movements:
1. Mysterium
2. Australis 
3. Life pulses
4. In Limbo

Orchestra: LVIV PHILHARMONIC (UKR)
Conductor: ILYA STUPEL (SWE)

more info on http://www.philharmonia.lviv.ua/en
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 07, 2014, 02:36:45 PM
one I really like

Carola BauckholtZugvögel

https://www.youtube.com/v/KEAHxLNyVxw
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: EigenUser on April 07, 2014, 02:56:15 PM
one I really like

Carola BauckholtZugvögel

https://www.youtube.com/v/KEAHxLNyVxw
If Ligeti had scored Hitchcock's "The Birds", I think that the result would have been nearly identical.

But seriously, that's really neat. I had no idea what "zugvogel" meant, but somehow I knew that it had something to do with geese. I googled it and, sure enough, it means "migratory birds". Not something I'd listen to on a regular basis, but it is remarkable just how geese-like it sounds.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 07, 2014, 04:55:39 PM
another nice one

Turgut Erçetin - String Quartet No.2 "Contra-statement"

https://www.youtube.com/v/Kj6BsbqqKk4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 07, 2014, 05:15:21 PM
one I really like

Carola BauckholtZugvögel

another nice one

Turgut Erçetin - String Quartet No.2 "Contra-statement"

! Both are incredible. Thank you. Bauckholt is just amazing. Love Erçetin's fragile beauty, it's like a delicate glass sculpture.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 07, 2014, 06:11:43 PM
For the night: Sophie Lacaze

 Voices of Australia, for solo flute and recorded voices (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BA5rKI1NXHk&list=WLACC4B73F08165787
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 08, 2014, 01:13:09 AM
For the night: Sophie Lacaze

 Voices of Australia, for solo flute and recorded voices (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BA5rKI1NXHk&list=WLACC4B73F08165787

nice one.  I've heard  a few of her other works and she is a very interesting composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 08, 2014, 09:47:21 PM
For the early morning: Doina Rotaru

Symphony No. 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL58njl9Ldg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 09, 2014, 04:55:05 AM
For the early morning: Doina Rotaru

Symphony No. 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL58njl9Ldg

very nice; thanks
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 09, 2014, 06:02:53 PM
Wolfgang von Schweinitz (http://www.plainsound.org/WSwork.html) (*1953)
Plainsound Glissando Modulation
Raga in just intonation for violin and double bass, op. 49 (2006–2007) Region 3
Andrew McIntosh, violin
Scott Worthington, double bass
performed February 16, 2012
Conrad Prebys Concert Hall - UC San Diego
https://www.youtube.com/v/EH0vpPgf3XM

This is one of my favorite contemporary music albums recently.

Plainsound Glissando Modulation
Raga in just intonation for violin and double bass, op. 49 (2006–2007)
Helge Slaatto, violin
Frank Reinecke, double bass



It sometimes sounds like medieval music, sometimes not resembling anything. There are many interesting & beautiful moments.

Quote
Wolfgang von Schweinitz studied in 1968-76 with Esther Ballou at the American University in Washington, D.C., with Ernst Gernot Klussmann and György Ligeti at the music academy in Hamburg, and with John Chowning at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in California.

Quote
Just intonation reveals softer, more moving consonances, but also more intense dissonances than the ones admitted by earlier and non-tonal interpretations of tempered tuning. What we are dealing with here is the very first functional system of microtonality to have been thoroughly thought out. Within this scheme, consonance and dissonance no longer appear as opposites: as one complements the other, they form but a single continual harmonic plane. The historically unstable border between these two poles was always dependent on aesthetic criteria or ones arising from questions of tuning, but in the present case it is the acoustic principle of the consonance that has seemingly gained ground. Wolfgang von Schweinitz proposes a tentative new definition: sounds may be considered consonant if they can be tuned exactly by ear.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 11, 2014, 11:18:51 AM
Rozalie Hirs (http://www.rozalie.com/main.htm) (born 1965) is a Dutch composer of contemporary classical music and a poet.

article 7 [seven ways to climb a mountain] (2012) for bass clarinet and electronic sounds
https://soundcloud.com/fie-schouten/article-7-rozalie-hirs (https://soundcloud.com/fie-schouten/article-7-rozalie-hirs)

Venus [morning star] (2010) for percussion sextet and electronic sounds
https://www.youtube.com/v/OxDdCeWEUqg
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 11, 2014, 11:48:45 AM
Rozalie Hirs (http://www.rozalie.com/main.htm) (born 1965) is a Dutch composer of contemporary classical music and a poet.

article 7 [seven ways to climb a mountain] (2012) for bass clarinet and electronic sounds
https://soundcloud.com/fie-schouten/article-7-rozalie-hirs (https://soundcloud.com/fie-schouten/article-7-rozalie-hirs)

Venus [morning star] (2010) for percussion sextet and electronic sounds
https://www.youtube.com/v/OxDdCeWEUqg

Thanks for the information on her.  I like what I've heard very much.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 11, 2014, 07:40:19 PM
For the night:

Amy X Neuburg

Inbred Kisses for 32 voices and 4 electric guitars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBg58JbPBTU
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 12, 2014, 01:03:41 AM
For the morning: Agata Zubel

Parlando for Soprano and Computer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkPx2boekM8

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 12, 2014, 06:10:25 PM
philip jeck : shining

https://www.youtube.com/v/LM9qzw0FsEs#t=73
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 13, 2014, 06:26:51 PM
Colours ... for piano, xylophone and electronics.

Music by Thomas Bjørnseth. Composed 2009.

https://www.youtube.com/v/nTRHjFMiaa4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 13, 2014, 09:56:40 PM
Colours ... for piano, xylophone and electronics.

Music by Thomas Bjørnseth. Composed 2009.

https://www.youtube.com/v/nTRHjFMiaa4
Thank you for the post. Sensitive, beautiful music. The youtube page has a link to the album web site, where the whole album can be downloaded for free, under the Creative Commons License. It is so nice! :) I just downloaded it and am now listening to the other tracks.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 17, 2014, 11:53:56 AM
For the afternoon:

Terje Isungset

Vena Leikros for Ice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqq8SLgoGk






Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 17, 2014, 12:02:21 PM
For the afternoon:

Terje Isungset

Vena Leikros for Ice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqq8SLgoGk

very nice - this is the kind of music I am listening to a lot these days.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 17, 2014, 12:03:12 PM
very nice - this is the kind of music I am listening to a lot these days.

Glad that you enjoyed it, I came across this because I'm on a Scandinavian kick. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 17, 2014, 10:38:46 PM
For the early morning: Sampo Haapamaki

Connection for String Quartet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mArc7ESYB0

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 18, 2014, 11:40:58 AM
For the afternoon: Arne Nordheim

Fonos for Trombone and Orchestra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1LRsbbd5es
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 19, 2014, 07:34:14 PM
Clarence Barlow (born December 27, 1945)

Approximating Pi (2007)
"a sonification of Archimedes’s method, in a special new version for saxophone (Joel Hunt) and 8 channels of electronic sound"
https://www.youtube.com/v/xd2-OkRZZws

(http://www.sonoscop.net/bsl/img/approximatingpi.png)
I need time to understand this ...

Xylophonie I
https://www.youtube.com/v/WzQ0ya0PtmM

His other compositions such as ...until... Version 7 for guitar (1980), ...until... Version 8 for piccolo (1981) are also good, can be found at youtube.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 19, 2014, 08:31:28 PM
For the night: Francisco Coll Garcia

In Extremis for Chorus and Orchestra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yXyYTkq7Es
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on April 20, 2014, 02:09:46 AM
If Ligeti had scored Hitchcock's "The Birds", I think that the result would have been nearly identical.

But seriously, that's really neat. I had no idea what "zugvogel" meant, but somehow I knew that it had something to do with geese. I googled it and, sure enough, it means "migratory birds". Not something I'd listen to on a regular basis, but it is remarkable just how geese-like it sounds.
While I've heard and loved plenty of contemporary music, I can't take these kind of pieces anymore. Once you got that it was about woodwinds doing birds sounds, what is there left ? 13 minutes of nothing. The piece is just a sound-related idea. And we got plenty of pieces that are just that, an overly complex and overlong development of a sound-related idea.
It seems that for these composers music nowadays is just a big fart contest, everyone trying to make the most interesting fart with an instrument, or sound as they call it. It's just one big imposture.

PS : sorry if I sound harsh, but I've heard this piece after some Simon Steen-Andersen works, which are just some of the most stupid music I've ever heard.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 20, 2014, 03:04:27 AM
While I've heard and loved plenty of contemporary music, I can't take these kind of pieces anymore. Once you got that it was about woodwinds doing birds sounds, what is there left ? 13 minutes of nothing. The piece is just a sound-related idea. And we got plenty of pieces that are just that, an overly complex and overlong development of a sound-related idea.
It seems that for these composers music nowadays is just a big fart contest, everyone trying to make the most interesting fart with an instrument, or sound as they call it. It's just one big imposture.

PS : sorry if I sound harsh, but I've heard this piece after some Simon Steen-Andersen works, which are just some of the most stupid music I've ever heard.

lol
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on April 20, 2014, 03:53:31 AM
Yeah, that made me grin, too.

After all, "sound-related idea" is pretty much a description of any piece of music, from any era.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 20, 2014, 05:33:14 AM
stefano gervasoni : dir indir (2010)

https://www.youtube.com/v/noqt288R81E
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on April 20, 2014, 06:32:53 AM
Wow, sanantonio. That was wildly gorgeous.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mr Bloom on April 20, 2014, 07:13:32 AM
After all, "sound-related idea" is pretty much a description of any piece of music, from any era.
Not at all. This is a western/20th century way of thinking.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 20, 2014, 11:08:49 AM
PS : sorry if I sound harsh, but I've heard this piece after some Simon Steen-Andersen works, which are just some of the most stupid music I've ever heard.
I didn't know this composer, searched his music at youtube, and found some clips very good. Thank you. What is wrong with his music? (If you meant Inszenierte Nacht, I may have some sympathy. ;D)

rerendered for pianist and two assistents (optional participating conductor, optional live video) (2003, rev. '04)
https://www.youtube.com/v/gTivjuoiVec

In Spite Of, And Maybe Even Therefore - for amplified fl., horn, cl. + unamplified double bassoon, pno., perc. and db (2007)
https://www.youtube.com/v/jnonO8ekh_s

(I also searched his name here, found that most of the results were some guy's posts. :))
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 20, 2014, 11:47:04 AM
I recently profiled Simon Steen-Andersen on my blog and found him to be a very interesting and talented composer.

Bio, short interview with Simon Steen-Andersen and video of Chambered Music, a recent work (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/27/composer-profile-simon-steen-andersen/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 20, 2014, 06:06:46 PM
I recently profiled Simon Steen-Andersen on my blog and found him to be a very interesting and talented composer.

Bio, short interview with Simon Steen-Andersen and video of Chambered Music, a recent work (http://musicakaleidoscope.wordpress.com/2014/03/27/composer-profile-simon-steen-andersen/)
Thank you for the information. The interview is interesting. I was a little disappointed that he only mentioned “negative influence”.

I found that I have one recording of his work, Double Up (2010) for sampler and small orchestra, included in 4-CD set of Donaueschinger Musiktage 2010. (I was mainly interested in SQs in the first 2 discs and the microtonal work of Wyschnegradsky and Haas. :)) It seems that repeating loud and quiet parts is one of his characteristic styles.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 20, 2014, 09:57:20 PM
For the morning: Hajrullah Syla

Dream for Flute, Violin, Piano, Percussion, and Double Bass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bglFpuADFb4
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 21, 2014, 05:28:56 PM
For the night: Jasna Velickovic

Magnetik for Handmade Magnets, Cimbalom, Amplified Metal Plate, Laptop and Pedal Boxes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOHyc6Gt4Fc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 21, 2014, 09:36:43 PM
Wandelweiser Group (http://www.wandelweiser.de/home.html) is not mentioned much in this forum. (Their music can be listened to at the web radio (http://www.wandelweiser.de/radio.html).) I only heard just few of the composers, but I liked Eva​-​Maria Houben (http://www.evamariahouben.de/)'s recent album Piano Music.

The whole album can be listened to and purchased here (http://recordings.irritablehedgehog.com/album/eva-maria-houben-piano-music).

(http://f0.bcbits.com/img/a3215656213_10.jpg)
abgemalt (2009)
go and stop (2002)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 22, 2014, 06:29:37 PM
Wandelweiser Group (http://www.wandelweiser.de/home.html) is not mentioned much in this forum. (Their music can be listened to at the web radio (http://www.wandelweiser.de/radio.html).) I only heard just few of the composers, but I liked Eva​-​Maria Houben (http://www.evamariahouben.de/)'s recent album Piano Music.

The whole album can be listened to and purchased here (http://recordings.irritablehedgehog.com/album/eva-maria-houben-piano-music).

(http://f0.bcbits.com/img/a3215656213_10.jpg)
abgemalt (2009)
go and stop (2002)

Extremely lovely. Thanks for sharing.

For the night: Vuk Kulenovic


Bukolike II for Harpsichord

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqUAS0V2dEA

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 23, 2014, 11:09:29 PM
For the morning: Sahba Aminikia

Zar for Orchestra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gfi3JHJtYIc
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 24, 2014, 11:12:20 AM
For the afternoon: Aziza Mustafa Zadeh
Bana Bana Gel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4Q-hYJYu1s
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 24, 2014, 07:40:07 PM
For the night: Georgina Derbez
Phantasiestucke

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7n9kxMKwZhQ
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 25, 2014, 01:57:13 AM
Daniel Harrison : Chrysanthemum road for saxophone quartet

soundcloud clip (https://soundcloud.com/daniel-harrison-14/chrysanthemum-road)

The Promethean quartet: Soprano saxophone: Alex Magg; Alto saxophone: Brandon Jinwoo Choi; Tenor saxophone: Om Srivastava; Baritone saxophone: Ryan Van Scoyk
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Philo on April 25, 2014, 09:26:07 AM
For the afternoon: Mira Calix
The Wolf, The Sheep, & The Door

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0DY-8iz1I0
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 26, 2014, 09:13:06 AM
Tao Yu (born 1981) - White Water (2011) for pipa (琵琶), recorder (竖笛), cello, percussion

https://www.youtube.com/v/u8T5Wax3-bQ

Quote
Ms. Tao was born in Beijing, and now lives in Paris. She is the artistic co-director of CREA (France), and is on the board of directors of IAWM (US). She has worked on composition and electro-acoustic music at the China Conservatory of Music and Le Conservatoire Supérieur de Musique de Genève. She received the ‘Diplôme de Composition et de Musique Electro-acoustique’ from Le Conservatoire Supérieur de Musique de Genève. She has been selected to participate in Composition and Musical Information studies at the institute IRCAM. [...]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on April 26, 2014, 10:35:47 AM
Wandelweiser Group (http://www.wandelweiser.de/home.html) is not mentioned much in this forum. (Their music can be listened to at the web radio (http://www.wandelweiser.de/radio.html).) I only heard just few of the composers, but I liked Eva​-​Maria Houben (http://www.evamariahouben.de/)'s recent album Piano Music.

The whole album can be listened to and purchased here (http://recordings.irritablehedgehog.com/album/eva-maria-houben-piano-music).

(http://f0.bcbits.com/img/a3215656213_10.jpg)
abgemalt (2009)
go and stop (2002)

Great album!

I'm interested in the Wandelweiser folks, they seem to be continuing in the stream of Cage and Feldman. If I'm wrong, someone explain it to me. I don't have the patience to dig into the material I find on line about them.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 26, 2014, 11:51:27 AM
I'm interested in the Wandelweiser folks, they seem to be continuing in the stream of Cage and Feldman. If I'm wrong, someone explain it to me. I don't have the patience to dig into the material I find on line about them.
I also want to check their music further. A comment in the Houben disc mentioned Feldman, but I feel it is much closer to Cage's late period (number pieces.) For me, Feldman's music is more repetitive and continuous, while late Cage and Wandelwiser are more sparse & austere.

I think this Michael Pisaro's article (http://www.wandelweiser.de/_texte/erstw-engl.html) summarizes the concept well.
Quote from: Michael Pisaro
[...] 4’33” was seen not as a joke or a Zen koan or a philosophical statement: it was heard as music. It was also viewed as unfinished work in the best sense: it created new possibilities for the combination (and understanding) of sound and silence. Put simply, silence was a material and a disturbance of material at the same time.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 26, 2014, 08:55:44 PM
Eric Gaudibert (http://www.musinfo.ch/index.php?content=maske_personen&pers_id=14) (1936 - 2012) - Si lointaine, sa voix (2010) for female choir, recorder and organ
Première partie: "D'un visage endormi"

https://www.youtube.com/v/YwoDH_59sYo

Quote
Eric Gaudibert was born in Vevey. He studied piano under the tutelage of Denise Bidal and theory of harmony under Hans Haug at the 'Conservatoire de Lausanne' and later at the ' Ecole Normale de Musique à Paris' with piano under Alfred Cortot, and composition under Nadia Boulanger and Henri Dutilleux. He resided in Paris until 1972.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on April 27, 2014, 03:47:11 AM
I also want to check their music further. A comment in the Houben disc mentioned Feldman, but I feel it is much closer to Cage's late period (number pieces.) For me, Feldman's music is more repetitive and continuous, while late Cage and Wandelwiser are more sparse & austere.

I think this Michael Pisaro's article (http://www.wandelweiser.de/_texte/erstw-engl.html) summarizes the concept well.

I think Wandelwiser is closer to Cage too.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on April 27, 2014, 06:08:25 PM
Thomas Ankersmit - Figueroa Terrace

https://www.youtube.com/v/XxdMFzae-mE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 29, 2014, 04:43:28 PM
Thomas Ankersmit - Figueroa Terrace

https://www.youtube.com/v/XxdMFzae-mE
This is nice ambient music (I don't know if that is the composer's intention), thank you. It reminded me of Ryoji Ikeda's +/- (1996). I heard his recent works on youtube, and prefer his old works which were more minimalistic.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on April 30, 2014, 03:36:31 PM
This is nice ambient music (I don't know if that is the composer's intention), thank you. It reminded me of Ryoji Ikeda's +/- (1996). I heard his recent works on youtube, and prefer his old works which were more minimalistic.

Thanks for this, I didn't know Thomas Ankersmit. I wouldn't call it ambient music, though, as I find it engaging throughout. Yes, it is reminiscent of Ikeda, whose works I enjoy greatly, both old and new. They're on the same label, so the similar aesthetic isn't totally surprising.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on April 30, 2014, 05:31:24 PM
Thanks for this, I didn't know Thomas Ankersmit. I wouldn't call it ambient music, though, as I find it engaging throughout. Yes, it is reminiscent of Ikeda, whose works I enjoy greatly, both old and new. They're on the same label, so the similar aesthetic isn't totally surprising.
I should have written that I used it as ambient music and it was nice. ;D I regard ambient music highly.
It was my impression after watching just few youtube clips of Ikeda's recent works that they have a little too much beats. I want to check them more.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: petrarch on May 01, 2014, 02:12:00 PM
I regard ambient music highly.

Me too, mind you. :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 03, 2014, 03:47:06 PM
Antonis Anissegos (http://www.enstase.com/) - oblating spheres [ending] (2013) for 3 string quintets & electronics (dedicated to Walter Russell)

https://soundcloud.com/antonis-anissegos/oblating-spheres-end (https://soundcloud.com/antonis-anissegos/oblating-spheres-end)

His soundcloud page (https://soundcloud.com/antonis-anissegos)

I was searching for information about a new album of John Cage's Sonatas and Interludes played by Antonis Anissegos, and found that he is also a composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 05, 2014, 08:37:48 PM
Daniel Brandes (http://danielbrandes.tumblr.com/) (born 1985) - intimations of melody (2012) for 2-5 melody instruments

https://www.youtube.com/v/kgTTPzXBCmc

Another Wandelweiser composer I like. His string quartet The rooms are furnished in a most peculiar manner is included in A chacun sa miniature (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006DLIDKO) by the Quatuor Bozzini, a nice collection of miniature string quartets.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 11, 2014, 05:35:46 PM
Christian Wolff: 8 Duos
Robyn Schulkowsky with Christian Wolff, Frederic Rzewski, Kim Kashkashian, Joey Baron, Reinhold Friedrich, Rohan de Saram



This album contains some recent works of Christian Wolff.

            For a Medley (2012) for percussion duo (excerpt)
            Duo 7 (2007) for percussion and melodica (excerpt)

Also, Edition Wandelweiser Records released an album of Microexercises (2006).

From "Beat Keller & Reza Khota play 11 Microexercises by Christian Wolff" (http://www.timescraper.de/_e-w-records/_ewr-catalogue/ewr1306.html)

https://www.youtube.com/v/kfFBDCp0Tms
Title: Re: 21st century classical music: "Early" Karl Henning
Post by: Cato on May 14, 2014, 01:49:42 PM
Opus 34 of a composer named Karl Henning:

https://www.youtube.com/watch/v/TdocQFG9WyE
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on May 14, 2014, 03:01:21 PM
Andrea Di Paolo

https://www.youtube.com/v/y-JgRGOOA6M

"Arcaica"
Title: Re: 21st century classical music: "Early" Karl Henning
Post by: Cato on May 15, 2014, 02:44:07 AM
Opus 34 of a composer named Karl Henning:

https://www.youtube.com/watch/v/TdocQFG9WyE

For newer GMG members, visit this page and follow the links to other works by Karl!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music: "Early" Karl Henning
Post by: torut on May 17, 2014, 08:02:54 AM
Opus 34 of a composer named Karl Henning:
A nice organ work. The link does not work with Chrome on Mac OS X. I think you need to write
Code: [Select]
[flash=400,400]https://www.youtube.com/v/TdocQFG9WyE[/flash] instead of
Code: [Select]
[flash=400,400]https://www.youtube.com/watch/v/TdocQFG9WyE[/flash]

Hsiao-Lan Wang (http://www.hsiaolanwang.com/) - Before Sunrise (2012) for vibraphone and marimba

https://www.youtube.com/v/hqBfJib6W_k
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 17, 2014, 08:44:25 PM
Magnus Granberg - Ist gefallen in den Schnee (2010)

https://www.youtube.com/v/JrBJdIvRwz8

Magnus Granberg & Skogen: Magnus Granberg - piano, Angharad Davies - violin, Leo Svensson Sander - cello, Erik Carlsson - percussion, John Eriksson - vibraphone & crotales, Petter Wästberg - electronics, Henrik Olsson - bowls and glasses, Anna Lindal - violin, Toshimaru Nakamura - no input mixing board

Interview with Magnus Granberg (http://www.anothertimbre.com/page129.html)
Quote
The way the piece relates to Schubert is that the rhythmic material as well some other temporal proportions are derived from two different songs from Schubert's well known (well, that's an obvious understatement!) song cycle Die Winterreise; the title of the piece, Ist gefallen in den Schnee, is a text fragment derived from one of these songs.
The tonal material, on the other hand, is derived from a jazz song, which one I have actually forgotten. The rhythmic as well as the tonal material is then transformed by means of different methods, in some cases rather mildly, in other cases rather heavily.
So, why did I choose to do like this when writing the piece? For a couple of different reasons, I think. For me it's a very concrete way of relating to and at the same time transcending musics that have, in one way or the other, been of a certain importance to me. Coming more or less from a working class background as I do, choosing Schubert is a way to approach a music that I haven't really have had access to (but which I somehow have come to like), without giving in to it fully. Jazz, on the other hand, is more or less what I grew up listening to, so partially basing the piece on a jazz song is a simple way to relate to that heritage without reproducing the actual music. It's obviously also a (perhaps both naïve and pretentious) way of trying try to reconcile musics with different social connotations, and a way to reconcile oneself with history and the contemporary world.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on May 18, 2014, 01:33:36 AM
Magnus Granberg - Ist gefallen in den Schnee (2010)

https://www.youtube.com/v/JrBJdIvRwz8

Magnus Granberg & Skogen: Magnus Granberg - piano, Angharad Davies - violin, Leo Svensson Sander - cello, Erik Carlsson - percussion, John Eriksson - vibraphone & crotales, Petter Wästberg - electronics, Henrik Olsson - bowls and glasses, Anna Lindal - violin, Toshimaru Nakamura - no input mixing board

Interview with Magnus Granberg (http://www.anothertimbre.com/page129.html)

Nice.  The label Another Timbre is good. 
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 18, 2014, 05:57:20 AM
Nice.  The label Another Timbre is good.
Yes, there are many interesting recordings in their catalogue. This one posted by Artem some time ago is also very nice.

I don't know how to post youtubes here, but i wanted to share this short extract from a solo piano piece by Bryn Harrison called Vessels released later this month on Another Timbre label. It's an interesting composition, similar to Morton Feldman's later long piano compositions, but is also kind of different.

(http://www.anothertimbre.com/_wp_generated/wpc049e484_05_06.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7c_3RJOqWY&list=UU3EXY6jOXxa_9E17MP2_nqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7c_3RJOqWY&list=UU3EXY6jOXxa_9E17MP2_nqw)

Here's a link to a website: http://www.anothertimbre.com/vessels.html (http://www.anothertimbre.com/vessels.html)

This is really beautiful, and at the same time, it causes a strange feeling. The music reminded me of Feldman's piano pieces.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 19, 2014, 10:39:35 AM
Jürg Frey - Paysage pour Gustave Roud (2007/2008)

https://www.youtube.com/v/LpJG3sw5HSA

I ordered several Another Timbre CDs (Harrison, Skogen, Wandelweiser set, etc.) :)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Artem on May 20, 2014, 04:54:44 PM
I ordered several Another Timbre CDs (Harrison, Skogen, Wandelweiser set, etc.) :)
I hope you have among your ordered disks CD of Terry Jennings minimalistic piano pieces coupled with John Cage's Electronic Music for Piano, 1964.  That's one of my favorite releases from Another Timbre label (http://www.anothertimbre.com/lostdaylight.html (http://www.anothertimbre.com/lostdaylight.html))
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 20, 2014, 05:34:59 PM
I hope you have among your ordered disks CD of Terry Jennings minimalistic piano pieces coupled with John Cage's Electronic Music for Piano, 1964.  That's one of my favorite releases from Another Timbre label (http://www.anothertimbre.com/lostdaylight.html (http://www.anothertimbre.com/lostdaylight.html))
Added to cart! ;D The excerpt is beautiful. Thank you. I may pick some more CDs before making another order.

I had ordered these.
Skogen: Ist gefallen in den Schnee
Anders Dahl & Skogen: Rows
Skogen: Despairs Had Governed Me Too Long
Bryn Harrison: Vessels
Wandelweiser und so weiter [6 CD Box]
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 21, 2014, 10:40:26 AM
Matthew Burtner (http://matthewburtner.com/) - Spectral Shift of a Distance Form (2014) for tenor saxophone, distance cellos and computer

https://www.youtube.com/v/6ewqozmWLvM

His compositions web page (http://matthewburtner.com/compositions/) is nice. You can hear audio samples, see score excerpts, and purchase the scores. SXUEAK for squeaky toys and computer (2006) (http://matthewburtner.com/sxueak/) is fun.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 24, 2014, 08:15:49 AM
Kristian Ireland (http://www.kristianireland.com/) (b. 1975, Melbourne, Australia)

limit of correction (2009) for cello solo
Séverine Ballon (cello)
https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-limit-of-correction (https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-limit-of-correction)

clearing (II) (2008) for string quartet
Arditti Quartet
https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-clearing-ii (https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-clearing-ii)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 25, 2014, 07:55:31 PM
Oleg Paiberdin (http://paiberdin.org/index.html) - POSTSCRIPTUM for cello, strings and percussions, or cello and strings, or 12 cellos and double bass, or string quartet (2011)

https://www.youtube.com/v/B7XxGrOPKNE

The music starts around 2:30. One of the wildest sounds I've heard from a string quartet. Some threads of the cellist's bowstring were snap. ;D
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: snyprrr on May 26, 2014, 05:37:50 AM
Kristian Ireland (http://www.kristianireland.com/) (b. 1975, Melbourne, Australia)

limit of correction (2009) for cello solo
Séverine Ballon (cello)
https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-limit-of-correction (https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-limit-of-correction)

clearing (II) (2008) for string quartet
Arditti Quartet
https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-clearing-ii (https://soundcloud.com/kristian-ireland/k-ireland-clearing-ii)

That was the "worst" Arditti piece I've ever heard. I used to think Alain Gaussin's SQ was a grate-fest, but this guy needed to EDIT!! Not even one moment of difference to make it a Masterpiece- one measure of a noodle- or something- really?- the Arditti thought this was worthwhile? aaaahhhhhh :( yea, I'm sure I'll come around ::)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 26, 2014, 09:29:09 AM
That was the "worst" Arditti piece I've ever heard. I used to think Alain Gaussin's SQ was a grate-fest, but this guy needed to EDIT!! Not even one moment of difference to make it a Masterpiece- one measure of a noodle- or something- really?- the Arditti thought this was worthwhile? aaaahhhhhh :( yea, I'm sure I'll come around ::)
I prefer the cello piece, but I also put the link to the SQ mainly because it is played by Arditti Quartet. ;D The SQ is too dense and heavy, and the sound of strings is not very good (I usually like Arditti's sound), but it has something I have not heard before, which interested me.
I remember reading Arditti's comments on new compositions in general somewhere (it could be this forum), something like that he is not necessarily positive to all the new string quartets they recorded, but it might be a mistake in my memory. Has he ever said anything negative to particular contemporary compositions?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: The new erato on May 28, 2014, 01:32:51 AM
According to gramophone, modern classics aren't written in Germany, Italy or France:

http://gramophone.co.uk/feature/top-10-modern-classics?utm_content=&utm_campaign=Gramophone%20newsletter%2027.05.14&utm_source=Gramophone&utm_medium=adestra_email&utm_term=http%3A%2F%2Fgramophone.co.uk%2Ffeature%2Ftop-10-modern-classics (http://gramophone.co.uk/feature/top-10-modern-classics?utm_content=&utm_campaign=Gramophone%20newsletter%2027.05.14&utm_source=Gramophone&utm_medium=adestra_email&utm_term=http%3A%2F%2Fgramophone.co.uk%2Ffeature%2Ftop-10-modern-classics)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on May 28, 2014, 07:50:58 PM
Howard Skempton
Catch (2001)
Tendrils (2004)



I received Another Timbre discs, listened to Bryn Harrison's Vessels in full. It is fantastic. I felt like hearing music created by light raindrops falling on the ground.
Harrison wrote that Howard Skempton's Tendrils gave inspiration to the materials for Vessels. As suggested by the title Tendrils, the voice parts flow being intertwined each other. A nice, calming piece.
The album contains Jo Kondo's more abstract works: Hypsotony (1989), Fern (1990), and Mr Bloomfield, His Spacing (1973).
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Todd on May 29, 2014, 09:56:21 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/3hX6iRZLEog

https://www.youtube.com/v/MuIERMvyI24
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: San Antone on May 29, 2014, 10:16:04 AM
For the morning: Rene Wohlhauser
Luup for Soprano, Bass Flute, Bass Clarinet, and Violincello

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqqyesElmYM

Love it.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Todd on June 02, 2014, 12:26:50 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/YjpYPS868KA



Don't know if Unsuk Chin's Double Concerto was posted already, so I'll just post it.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 04, 2014, 11:01:53 AM
Gregory Lee Newsome (http://gregoryleenewsome.ca/) - Ourobouros (2013)

Cheryl Duvall - piano
https://www.youtube.com/v/6DmFC6ULPrY

https://soundcloud.com/gregory-lee-newsome (https://soundcloud.com/gregory-lee-newsome)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 04, 2014, 05:02:55 PM
Anna Höstman - Linen (2014)
quartet for 2 violins, cello and piano
commissioned and performed by the Thin Edge Collective

https://www.youtube.com/v/QgDVffvCn3A

http://www.annahostman.net/ (http://www.annahostman.net/)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 05, 2014, 07:35:32 PM
Michael Oesterle (http://www.michaeloesterle.com/) - Carrousel (2012) for Glockenspiel, Vibraphone, Marimba, Piano

https://www.youtube.com/v/XpM7Tg87ECc

Quote
I think of this instrumentation as a way of "preparing" the piano part - not with bolts and rubber bits, but with three mallet instruments with different colours, ranges and sounds, surrounding the piano. My intention is that each keyboard create iterations of the piano's momentum with reflective sparks that bounce from one instrument to the other to create something like the blur of double vision.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Todd on June 06, 2014, 06:59:55 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/pVAsc3zWICQ
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 06, 2014, 09:49:10 PM
Anna Pidgorna (b. 1985)
http://www.annapidgorna.com/ (http://www.annapidgorna.com/)

Sketches for Toss a flower on the water (violin, cello, piano, 2013)
https://soundcloud.com/annapidgorna/sets/soundstreams-workshop-gryphon (https://soundcloud.com/annapidgorna/sets/soundstreams-workshop-gryphon)

Evelyn’s watcher (bass clarinet, electronics and video, 2010)
http://vimeo.com/annapidgorna/evelyns-watcher (http://vimeo.com/annapidgorna/evelyns-watcher)

The more I listen to, the more I like her music.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 07, 2014, 08:17:08 PM
Marc Sabat

Euler Lattice Spirals Scenery (2011) for string quartet in just intonation
           

John Jenkins (2001/11)
music for 2-manual harpsichord and six instruments in 5-limit Just Intonation based on Johann Sebastian Bach’s Ricercar a 6 from Musikalisches Opfer, BWV 1079
https://www.youtube.com/v/iZV2LTn3VIU

http://www.marcsabat.com/index.html (http://www.marcsabat.com/index.html)

I have been listening to the music clips on the web site during the whole afternoon.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Todd on June 10, 2014, 10:47:50 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/BzA-yCxAf08


Who doesn't like accordion music?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 10, 2014, 10:51:45 AM
First movement of Nancy Rexford's Violin Sonata. (https://soundcloud.com/9th-ear/nancy-rexford-violin-sonata)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: mn dave on June 10, 2014, 10:52:57 AM
I'm waiting for "22nd century classical music".

Not really.    :blank:
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: kishnevi on June 10, 2014, 06:44:19 PM
Posted this yesterday in the WAYLT while listening.  Seemed logical to post it here now that I've heard the whole thing.
The first half of the CD, the piano music (one of the piano works supplies the CD title), impressed me more than the  final part, the song cycle (A Padmore Cycle), which seemed to utilize parlando/Sprechstimme style of writing for the voice much of the time.  Stefanovich is the pianist for the solo piano pieces,  the composer tickles the ivories in the song cycle.


In sum, recommended for the piano works,  but not the song cycle.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on June 11, 2014, 10:30:50 AM
*



Dutch Composer. Great chords sequences, unpredictable music. Looking forward to more by this composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 12, 2014, 07:09:00 PM
Franck Bedrossian - The edges are no longer parallel (2013)

https://www.youtube.com/v/6WJjeZUvulc

Quote
This piece and its disposal's main feature is that the piano is prepared in two ways: first with objects situated in the sounding box of the piano, but also through the electronic disposal (doubled electronic and acoustic sounds, speed effects, time lag between acoustic and electronic sounds, real time sound alteration, etc). The aim is finally to create a meta-piano, or piano extended.

https://soundcloud.com/franck-bedrossian (https://soundcloud.com/franck-bedrossian)

A piece for prepared piano & electronics.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 18, 2014, 05:43:15 PM
Michael Harrison (http://www.michaelharrison.com/Default.aspx) - Revelation for Piano (2007)

https://www.youtube.com/v/2ieHZ5qmJZI

Quote
Revelation: Music In Pure Intonation utilizes innovative tuning relationships to further develop "just" intonation - an ancient tuning system where the distances between notes are based upon whole number ratios.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on June 19, 2014, 04:16:18 AM
Michael Harrison (http://www.michaelharrison.com/Default.aspx) - Revelation for Piano (2007)

https://www.youtube.com/v/2ieHZ5qmJZI

I've heard that performed a few times. He is/was a Pandit Pran Nath student like La Monte Young and Terry Riley.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 19, 2014, 07:47:55 AM
I've heard that performed a few times. He is/was a Pandit Pran Nath student like La Monte Young and Terry Riley.
I see. His From Ancient Worlds sounded like another The Harp of New Albion. I found his name in a book about ambient music, listed together with Young, Riley and others.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on June 19, 2014, 03:45:47 PM
I see. His From Ancient Worlds sounded like another The Harp of New Albion. I found his name in a book about ambient music, listed together with Young, Riley and others.

Michael was the primary tuner for the Well Tuned Piano in the '80s.

He (told me) was experimenting with tuning a piano to sing raga and PPN told him about another student - La Monte and his Well Tuned Piano.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 19, 2014, 08:26:07 PM
Michael was the primary tuner for the Well Tuned Piano in the '80s.

He (told me) was experimenting with tuning a piano to sing raga and PPN told him about another student - La Monte and his Well Tuned Piano.
That's interesting. I just read Harrison's article about pure intonation (http://www.michaelharrison.com/pure_piano.aspx) that describes how he closely worked with La Monte Young and developed From Ancient Worlds and Revelation. The site seems under construction (the pages about his tunings and the harmonic piano are not available yet) but it is a good read.

I also enjoyed his string quartet. This is a nice program.

On-Demand Audio: JACK Quartet's 'Modern Medieval'
Recorded Live at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Medieval Sculpture Hall on December 16, 2012
http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/258515-on-demand-audio-jack-quartets-modern-medieval/ (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/258515-on-demand-audio-jack-quartets-modern-medieval/)

Rorate Caeli (Gregorian chant used during Advent, arr. by Kevin McFarland)
Michael Harrison: Chant (world premiere) (2011)
Guillaume Dufay: Moribus et genere (arr. by John Pickford Richards)
Sasha Zamler-Carhart: The St. Francis String Quartets (world premiere) (2012)
Rodericus: Angelorum Psalat (arr. by Christopher Otto)
Caleb Burhans: Contritus (2009)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on June 20, 2014, 03:41:52 AM
That's interesting. I just read Harrison's article about pure intonation (http://www.michaelharrison.com/pure_piano.aspx) that describes how he closely worked with La Monte Young and developed From Ancient Worlds and Revelation. The site seems under construction (the pages about his tunings and the harmonic piano are not available yet) but it is a good read.

I also enjoyed his string quartet. This is a nice program.

On-Demand Audio: JACK Quartet's 'Modern Medieval'
Recorded Live at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Medieval Sculpture Hall on December 16, 2012
http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/258515-on-demand-audio-jack-quartets-modern-medieval/ (http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/258515-on-demand-audio-jack-quartets-modern-medieval/)

Rorate Caeli (Gregorian chant used during Advent, arr. by Kevin McFarland)
Michael Harrison: Chant (world premiere) (2011)
Guillaume Dufay: Moribus et genere (arr. by John Pickford Richards)
Sasha Zamler-Carhart: The St. Francis String Quartets (world premiere) (2012)
Rodericus: Angelorum Psalat (arr. by Christopher Otto)
Caleb Burhans: Contritus (2009)

I'll have to check that out, I missed that one.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 24, 2014, 08:58:33 PM
Andrew Nathaniel McIntosh - Imperfect Distance (2010-2012) for two microtonal pianos

https://www.youtube.com/v/7B9JY8y5OKU

Full length audio
http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/audio/imperfect_distance.html (http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/audio/imperfect_distance.html)

Official web site: http://www.septimalcomma.com/ (http://www.septimalcomma.com/)
audio clips & scores: http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/welcome.html (http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/welcome.html)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on June 25, 2014, 03:31:43 AM
Andrew Nathaniel McIntosh - Imperfect Distance (2010-2012) for two microtonal pianos

https://www.youtube.com/v/7B9JY8y5OKU

Full length audio
http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/audio/imperfect_distance.html (http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/audio/imperfect_distance.html)

Official web site: http://www.septimalcomma.com/ (http://www.septimalcomma.com/)
audio clips & scores: http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/welcome.html (http://www.andrewnathanielmcintosh.com/welcome.html)

that's insane man!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 26, 2014, 06:11:08 AM
that's insane man!
Do you know him? ;D
He played violin on Schweinitz's Plainsound Glissando Modulation (not on CD). That is very good.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 26, 2014, 07:40:02 PM
Davide Zannoni (http://davidezannoni.com/) (b. 1958) - Glimmers of Acceptance (2005) for String Trio

https://www.youtube.com/v/V-gBQezMXSM
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: 7/4 on June 27, 2014, 03:27:17 AM
Do you know him? ;D
He played violin on Schweinitz's Plainsound Glissando Modulation (not on CD). That is very good.

No. Andrew Nathaniel McIntosh is new to me, although I'd heard about this piece a few years ago and didn't check it out. It reminds me of Ben Johnston's microtonal piano pieces.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on June 27, 2014, 10:59:10 AM
No. Andrew Nathaniel McIntosh is new to me, although I'd heard about this piece a few years ago and didn't check it out. It reminds me of Ben Johnston's microtonal piano pieces.
I found his music at this web site called plainsound. (I have no idea what plainsound is. A publisher?) The site just provides links to the pages of composers who seem to compose some or most of the works in just intonation. Ben Johnston's page is also included.

http://www.plainsound.org/ (http://www.plainsound.org/)

Composers:
Marc Sabat
Wolfgang von Schweinitz
James Tenney
Tashi Wada
Douglas Wadle
Chiyoko Szlavnics
Thomas Meadowcroft
Ben Johnston
Peter Sabat
Andrew Nathaniel McIntosh
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on July 08, 2014, 06:33:31 PM
Sheli Nan (http://www.shelinan.com/) - String Quartet for the 21st Century (2009)

https://www.youtube.com/v/oqtn-J7lZzE https://www.youtube.com/v/PD4HcwIL56Y
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on July 12, 2014, 06:53:16 PM
Yoshi Wada - Lament for John Cage

https://www.youtube.com/v/Pf4pk0A9qnY

Performed by Susan Stenger and Robert Poss (electric guitar), Tashi Wada (reed organ), Joe Whelan (timpani), and the City of Newcastle Pipeband with Yoshi Wada (bagpipes), at AV Festival 12: As Slow As Possible (UK), 2012.

Yoshi Wada joined Fluxus in 1968, and studied with Pandit Pran Nath.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: EigenUser on July 21, 2014, 06:27:38 AM
Still, easily, the best music thread on this site. Thanks for all y'all's contributions.
You should post in the listening thread! There isn't enough modern/contemporary stuff there.

I guess the problem with posting there is that things get "lost" quickly as more and more people post.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: amw on July 21, 2014, 01:41:40 PM
It seems like a lot of GMG has become(/always was?) a glorified twitter feed. "Now listening to @DmitriShostakovichOfficial #Symphony9 by @lenniebernstein. #belowthegreenlemon #poundsthetable"

Like/retweet if you agree and don't forget to follow me at @amw455!
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on July 21, 2014, 01:42:50 PM
That's the exact reason I don't really post my contemporary stuff in there. This thread is far more focused and, I think, grants the readers of the thread a lot more leeway and allowance to comment as they take them in. Although, this thread doesn't inspire much commentary either. A lot of these threads just turn into listening dumps, and I'll admit that I do my fair share of that as well, am striving not to though.

It's a social activity.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Henk on July 21, 2014, 01:45:14 PM
It seems like a lot of GMG has become(/always was?) a glorified twitter feed. "Now listening to @DmitriShostakovichOfficial #Symphony9 by @lenniebernstein. #belowthegreenlemon #poundsthetable"

Like/retweet if you agree and don't forget to follow me at @amw455!

:)

I disagree. GMG has it's own character, culture, more advanced.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: amw on July 21, 2014, 01:49:33 PM
Well hopefully you and I will change our behavior to resist this trend. I know I'm going to start adding more meat to my posts. Trying to at least.
Yes! Let's try to get #MoreMeat trending this week!

I do think there's a place for the short status updates, but they shouldn't be everywhere. At least in Composer Discussion/Great Recordings posts should be more substantial than "+1" (to mix metaphors a little) unless that's specifically what someone is looking for (e.g. the "What's the best recording of _____?" posts I've occasionally vomited up onto those boards)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on July 25, 2014, 09:17:30 PM
I appreciate each post in this thread even if it contains only the composer's name and music (an audio clip is very helpful.) I found many composers whom I became to like the music of. But of course, posts with information about composers/works, thoughts, comments, discussions would be very nice, although I myself cannot do musical analysis. It seems that the bar has been raised, but I hope I still can post. ;D


Daniel Corral (http://spinalfrog.com/) (born 1981) is an American composer, born in Alaska, studied with James Tenney, Anne LeBaron, and Morton Subotnick. His works are generally accessible but also experimental in various styles.

WITH STRUCTURE (2009)
https://www.youtube.com/v/NTqN34w8Dn0
a string quartet made entirely out of natural string harmonics.

A fun piece for player pianos. (free download)
ANXIETY OF INFLUENCE vol. 1: Study for 61 Player Pianos
http://spinalfrog.bandcamp.com/track/study-for-61-player-pianos (http://spinalfrog.bandcamp.com/track/study-for-61-player-pianos)
An homage to Conlon Nancarrow, of course
Ever wonder what every Nancarrow study playing in one room would sound like?
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: Mandryka on July 25, 2014, 09:55:48 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/xANR6U5CLG8

Ferneyhough Liber scintliiarum. Full of catchy tunes but they're never allowed to linger, they're always being cut off. And there's an interesting pulse about the music -- you seem to find yourself quite frequently in a sparse landscape like late Nono -- but it doesn't last for long. I think this is a bit of a masterpiece from my favourite living Brit composer.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: cjvinthechair on July 27, 2014, 06:37:38 AM
Still, easily, the best music thread on this site. Thanks for all y'all's contributions.

For the evening: Jaime Reis
Lysozyme Synthesis for Piano

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lR_IPDjR3Bs

And thank you too ! Discovering a number of 'new' names here that would never have found without everyone's posts; great !
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on August 02, 2014, 09:44:43 PM
Molly Herron (http://mollyherron.com/) - Open Systems (2011) for string quartet

https://www.youtube.com/v/_K-tn80cY3w

soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/mherron (https://soundcloud.com/mherron)

"Molly Herron is a Brooklyn based composer, performer, and educator. [...] Molly received her bachelor’s degree from Sarah Lawrence College where she studied composition with Chester Biscardi and Steven Burke. She received a Master of Music degree from the Steinhardt School at NYU where she studied privately with Joan La Barbara and Michael Gordon."

The string quartet is a beautiful piece. The title is a term of physics, and the music depicts the behavior of atoms and electrons in open environment. "Most of the notes in this piece are derived from the open strings and their partials."

I also enjoyed the other works a lot: Nelson (string trio; moving), Breakers (orchestral; powerful), Sputter (violin flute duo, minimalistic), Clamber Up (violin duet; like minimal), etc.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on August 14, 2014, 07:07:17 PM
Joan La Barbara - Persistence of Memory (2012) for chamber ensemble (violin, cello, harp, glass, trombone, piano, voice, sampler and two laptop computers) and sonic atmosphere
performed by Ne(x)tworks, film by Aleksandar Kostic

https://www.youtube.com/v/gM3QJW9Dy6A

With occasionally inserted loud sounds like thunderstorm, the music shows a variety of aspects: minimalistic ostinato, unconventional sounds of instruments (as Lachenmann), an ensemble sounding like a collective improvisation, shamanistic chant, manipulated voice, drones, a mellow segment, musique concrète (?), ... An excellent work. It's unfortunate that very few of her recent compositions (http://www.joanlabarbara.com/comp.html (http://www.joanlabarbara.com/comp.html)) have been recorded.

This live performance is a part of MaerzMusik Festival 2012 in Berlin, Germany celebrating the 100th anniversary of John Cage's birth.

[EDIT] The film by Kostic is available on DVD and Amazon Instant Video.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 01, 2014, 06:53:33 PM
Ken Thomson (http://ktonline.net/)

Perpetual for bass clarinet and string quartet (2010) II: Bad idea
https://www.youtube.com/v/aZj3wlEj2q8

Thaw for string quartet (2011) 4th movement
https://soundcloud.com/ken-thomson/thaw-4-from-ken-thomson-w-jack (https://soundcloud.com/ken-thomson/thaw-4-from-ken-thomson-w-jack)



This is a very powerful and beautiful album. Ken Thomson is a composer, the clarinetist of Bang on a Can All-Stars, saxophonist, and the leader of a Jazz band Slow/Fast.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 06, 2014, 09:23:36 AM
Nate Wooley - The Almond (2011)
https://www.youtube.com/v/UUfkjUK_uHk

A 5-min excerpt from the album of the 70-min solo trumpet tape loop piece. If you like La Monte Young's drones or Palestine, you may enjoy it. The timbre like human chorus that can be heard at times is very beautiful. An interesting, complex music.

Piero Scaruffi (http://www.scaruffi.com/avant/wooley.html (http://www.scaruffi.com/avant/wooley.html))
The Almond (april 2010 - Pogues, 2011) contains a 70-minute "solo" of overdubbed pure-pitched trumpet. Wooley carefully avoided extended techniques but each note was a scientific accumulation of clones (different mutes, tunings, with different microphones and in different rooms), ultimately sounding like ambient music for a droning synthesizer inspired by LaMonte Young.

Interview with Nate Wooley (http://www.tokafi.com/15questions/interview-nate-wooley/ (http://www.tokafi.com/15questions/interview-nate-wooley/))
"For The Almond, I had been interested in ambient music and tape loops especially, and so I wanted to create, what was for me, an extremely rigorous tape loop piece. There are 10 65 minute loops in the full length version of the piece, each of which consists of 3-8 smaller loops which in turn consist of 3-8 notes, which are made up of anywhere from 2-5 recorded versions of that pitch."

A 25-min excerpt of the study for trumpet for Compost and Height can be downloaded here.
http://compostandheight.com/Nate%20Wooley%20-%20the%20almond%20(excerpt).zip (http://compostandheight.com/Nate%20Wooley%20-%20the%20almond%20(excerpt).zip)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 07, 2014, 03:58:17 PM
David A. Jaffe (http://www.jaffe.com/)

8:66 for Trimpin (2012) for Radiodrum-controlled Trimpin installation and singer
Andrew Schloss: Radiodrum, Catherine Fern Lewis: Voice
https://soundcloud.com/uvicmisticsound/t1-andy-et-al?in=uvicmisticsound/sets/trimpin-canonx-4-33-100 (https://soundcloud.com/uvicmisticsound/t1-andy-et-al?in=uvicmisticsound/sets/trimpin-canonx-4-33-100)
http://davidjaffesite.squarespace.com/music/8-66-for-trimpin.html (http://davidjaffesite.squarespace.com/music/8-66-for-trimpin.html)
"8' 66" is a quasi-improvised performance of a unique installation created by Seattle sound artist Trimpin in honor of John Cage's and Conlon Nancarrow's 100th birthday. The work was a collaboration between singer/composer Catherine Lewis, percussionist/composer Andrew Schloss, and composer David A. Jaffe."

Cluck Old Hen Variations (2004) for Solo Violin
https://www.youtube.com/v/sdt9E459Y4Y
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 11, 2014, 07:56:57 PM
Trimpin (born 1951) is an incredible sound artist. After giving up a career as a brass player because of a skin allergy to a mouthpiece, he has been creating amazing MIDI-controlled instruments. The instruments are all acoustic, and computers & electronics are used only to control them. In that sense, he inherits the spirit of Nancarrow rather than Partch. He met Nancarrow in 1987, converted the piano rolls of Nancarrow's Studies to MIDI format, and played it on the instrument ("Conloninpurple") he invented.

https://www.youtube.com/v/ahQKsW0LHEA
The documentary DVD is sold out, disappointingly.

(CanonX+4:33=100) (2012) is Trimpin's interactive sound installation.
https://soundcloud.com/uvicmisticsound/sets/trimpin-canonx-4-33-100 (https://soundcloud.com/uvicmisticsound/sets/trimpin-canonx-4-33-100)
This soundcloud playlist contains the compositions that use the installation.
David Jaffe - 8:66 for Trimpin
Steven A. Bjornson - Music for Prepared Polyrhythmophone
Christopher Reiche - Walk
Darren Miller - Slick Willie
Stefan Maier - Untitled
George Tzanetakis - Red + Blue = Purple
David Parfit - Prepared DiminsionS
Duncan MacConnell / Shawn Trail - Tactus
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: chadfeldheimer on September 13, 2014, 08:23:26 AM
Fausto Romitelli with a quite unique mixture of spectralism and dirty psychedelic rock. It's a shame he died much too early at the age of 41. I would have been very interested in his further musical development.

Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on September 14, 2014, 12:54:53 AM
Ken Thomson (http://ktonline.net/)

Perpetual for bass clarinet and string quartet (2010) II: Bad idea
https://www.youtube.com/v/aZj3wlEj2q8
I think it's a good idea, myself. I just don't think this particular piece does anything to justify the combination. That is, it's just a lot of up and down, nothing particularly bass clarinetty or string quartetty about it. Could be any combination of any instruments (any that can play those notes, those patterns) and be the same.

Really exploring the sounds of strings and of the bass clarinet (not just any clarinet). That would be sweet!

(I realize that probably what torut meant by "bad idea" was something very like what I just said. So I hope I haven't just wasted everyone's valuable time.)

I've been very much taken by the music of Emmanuelle Gibello of late, as I've mentioned before.

http://vimeo.com/58487445

And I still like to promote Simon Steen-Andersen whenever I can.

http://vimeo.com/17403233
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 14, 2014, 08:40:24 AM
It is the title of the movement, not my opinion. :D

Ken Thomson - Perpetual
I: underlying
II: Bad idea
III: Don Pullen says it's OK

I don't know what these titles mean but I suppose Pullen would have said it's OK. :) The third movement is calming and comforting (I cannot find an audio clip), with the bass clarinet and the string quartet blended nicely. The piece as a whole is a good composition for the instrumentation, in my opinion.
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: some guy on September 14, 2014, 09:45:26 AM
Well, it's much funnier that way!

(Why is there egg on my face. Damn it, I'm a vegan!)
Title: Re: 21st century classical music
Post by: torut on September 15, 2014, 06:27:43 PM
Fausto Romitelli with a quite unique mixture of spectralism and dirty psychedelic rock. It's a shame he died much too early at the age of 41. I would have been very interested in his further musical development.