GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Great Recordings and Reviews => Topic started by: aukhawk on November 20, 2014, 04:25:38 AM

Title: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on November 20, 2014, 04:25:38 AM
Brian has already announced his next blind test:
After amw's Schubert game ends, I intend on doing a "mini" game for Beethoven's Op 59 No 3 (just 8 recordings and 2 rounds).

The afterglow on this one [Bruckner] will be around for a while. I still want to listen to a couple of especially promising recordings that missed the finals.

After that - so probably sometime in January - I propose one of the following short blind tests:
NB one aim will definitely be to keep the early rounds short - targetting no more than 60 minutes listening per round (ie in a group of 6, a 10 minutes sample, or in a group of 4, 15 minutes sample) - OK that may be a bit optimistic (!) but it is a target.
The aim being that the whole thing would take no more than a couple of months.

Please indicate if you have an interest in any of these, with (optionally) a 2nd choice.  Thanks.

* Bartok Music for Strings,Percussion and Celeste
as a MIDI-blind (3 rounds) starting with 3 groups of 5 or thereabouts.

* Bach Cello Suites
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 21 (max 24) starters.
Only selected movements will be used, maybe 'testers choice' in round 2.

* Sibelius 7th Symphony
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 21 (max 24) starters.

* Sibelius 4th Symphony OR 5th OR 6th
as a MINI-blind (ie just 2 rounds) with about 8 (max 12) starters.

* Bach Violin Sonatas/Partitas
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 15 starters.  Selected movements only, as Cello Suites above.

* Bach Orchestral Suite No.1
OR No.3
as a mini-blind (2 rounds) just 10 starters.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Jo498 on November 20, 2014, 04:40:54 AM
++ Bartok
+ Bach cello or violin solo

not particularly interested in the others

Notwithstanding the greatness of the Schubert quintet, for me both the length of the movements and of the whole piece make it less than ideal for extended blind comparison.
I think I am always game for Beethoven string quartets or other chamber music (we can pick the shorter ones...), also Haydn, Mozart, Schumann, Brahms, Bartok, Shostakovich
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: (: premont :) on November 20, 2014, 04:53:53 AM
++ Bach Cello suites
+ Bach Orchestral suites - or perhaps a movement from one of the Brandenburgs would be more interesting
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Wanderer on November 20, 2014, 05:12:19 AM
I'd be particularly interested in the Bartók and Sibelius 5 & 7 suggestions, provided it'd be the whole works we'd be reviewing.

If anyone'd be willing to commit to the undertaking, I think Beethoven's opp.47, 58 & 96, the Brahms op.5 sonata or Bach's B minor Mass would make excellent future blind test projects. And we should really pick up and continue (or re-organize) the Mahler 2 test.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 20, 2014, 05:31:45 AM
In addition to these, I think we should welcome very, VERY short listening tests. In 2015 I'm hoping not just to do Beethoven's Quartet Op. 59/3, but also a few short piano pieces like Ravel's Une barque sur l'ocean or Chopin's Nocturne Op. 48 No. 1.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on November 20, 2014, 06:04:32 AM
I agree - I think your previous mini-blinds have gone really well Brian.  Even though (or especially because) one of the pieces you featured was one I'd never even heard of before!!

PS after say 10 responses I'll shorten my list of proposals to maybe just 3.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: kishnevi on November 20, 2014, 07:56:49 AM
I would be up for any of the Bach possibilities.
Not familiar enough with the Bartok .
Sibelius maybe,  depending on outside factors.
One long term project would be comparing Beethoven symphony cycles, using various movements in the earlier rounds and holding one complete symphony like the Fourth or Seventh for the final round.  There are enough possibilities there we could easily l
Iimit it to cycles recorded in the last 15 years or to classic big name cycles like Bohm or Karajan.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Mandryka on November 20, 2014, 11:41:12 AM
I would be interested in organising one about a piece from Messiaen's Catalogue d'oiseaux. Or Carter's Night Fantasies. Or maybe a Stockhausen Klavierstuck. Or a Cage piano etude. Or a bit of Ludus Tonalis.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 20, 2014, 11:47:10 AM
Even though (or especially because) one of the pieces you featured was one I'd never even heard of before!!
Oooh, remind me, which one was that? Happy you liked it!
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: mc ukrneal on November 20, 2014, 12:39:12 PM
No interest in Bartok or Sibelius (I've done some Sibelius in the past - blind listening I mean - so don't really need to do him again).

Definite interest in Bach Cello Suites or other Bach.

I'd actually like the Carter or Messiaen idea as I really don't know those pieces well and this is where I like the blind listening most. I'd like to give the bigger pieces a rest. Would love to try a concerto, as i think it would be interesting to contrast different approaches and combinations. 
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: EigenUser on November 20, 2014, 01:20:14 PM
Brian has already announced his next blind test:
After that - so probably sometime in January - I propose one of the following short blind tests:
NB one aim will definitely be to keep the early rounds short - targetting no more than 60 minutes listening per round (ie in a group of 6, a 10 minutes sample, or in a group of 4, 15 minutes sample) - OK that may be a bit optimistic (!) but it is a target.
The aim being that the whole thing would take no more than a couple of months.

Please indicate if you have an interest in any of these, with (optionally) a 2nd choice.  Thanks.

* Bartok Music for Strings,Percussion and Celeste
as a MIDI-blind (3 rounds) starting with 3 groups of 5 or thereabouts.

* Bach Cello Suites
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 21 (max 24) starters.
Only selected movements will be used, maybe 'testers choice' in round 2.

* Sibelius 7th Symphony
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 21 (max 24) starters.

* Sibelius 4th Symphony OR 5th OR 6th
as a MINI-blind (ie just 2 rounds) with about 8 (max 12) starters.

* Bach Violin Sonatas/Partitas
as a midi-blind (3 rounds) with about 15 starters.  Selected movements only, as Cello Suites above.

* Bach Orchestral Suite No.1
OR No.3
as a mini-blind (2 rounds) just 10 starters.
Bartok, for sure. I know that piece inside-out and I'd love to participate. The others are of little interest to me. Has there ever been a Bartok comparison?

EDIT: Brian, I might be interested in a comparison for Ravel's Barque... (the original piano, not his orchestration).
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 20, 2014, 01:20:59 PM
Sib 7 and MSPC
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: jfdrex on November 20, 2014, 02:30:10 PM
As a certified Sibelius nutcase, I'd be more than happy to participate in any Sibelius blind test. ;D 8)  Of the symphonies, for the purposes of the test, either 4 or 7 would interest me the most, but No. 6 would probably provide the freshest challenge.

I'm on somewhat less familiar ground with Bach, but would be equally happy with either the cello suites or the violin sonatas & partitas.

If Bartok is the people's choice, include me out. :laugh:
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: amw on November 20, 2014, 08:04:54 PM
++ Bach violin sonatas and partitas
+ Bach cello suites

Not really interested in the others at the moment.

Things I'd like to see comparisons on eventually -
Mozart chamber music, e.g. K515 or 516
Schumann piano music
Brahms
something by Carter or Stockhausen
Tchaikovsky String Serenade
Beethoven Op. 106, 120 or 130
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 20, 2014, 08:27:07 PM
Schumann piano music
The Kreisleriana game is all yours ;)

By the way, I am also very interested in Sibelius symphonies, Bach cello suites, Tchaikovsky string serenade, Bach Orchestral Suite No 3, or Beethoven symphonies/concertos/quartets.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Daverz on November 20, 2014, 08:39:07 PM
Why not some shorter works, tone poems or overtures?
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 20, 2014, 08:46:35 PM
Why not some shorter works, tone poems or overtures?
Yes. 15 minutes or less.
My first choice would be for a Dumbarton Oaks contest. Such a very demanding piece.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Mirror Image on November 20, 2014, 08:52:13 PM
How about we do a blind comparison for Sibelius' The Oceanides? This would definitely be one I'd participate in.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on November 21, 2014, 02:28:12 AM
Even though (or especially because) one of the pieces you featured was one I'd never even heard of before!!
Oooh, remind me, which one was that? Happy you liked it!

That was Gaspard.  I didn't participate (knowing so little about the music) - but it was a great ride - thanks!
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21672.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21672.0.html)


Well that's been 10 responses, thankyou, and I think the choice will come down to one of these:
(with apologies to those who, like me, were rooting for the Bartok)

* Bach Cello Suites
I estimate 21 starters in 3 groups of 7, 3 rounds
1st round would be 3 selected movements mixing fast, slow, major, minor totalling approx 11 minutes.
Final round would be a single complete suite, probably the 5th.


* Sibelius 7th Symphony
Again I estimate 21 starters in 3 groups of 7, 3 rounds
initially auditioning from ~2 minutes in to the 1st huge climax at ~13 minutes, so approx 11 minutes.
Final round would be the whole thing of course, approx 22 minutes.

or if you would prefer something short and sweet -

* Bach Orchestral Suite 1
10 runners and riders, 2 rounds, all done and dusted in a month?
1st round would be 3 selected movements totalling 7 or 8 minutes.  x5 that's just 40 minutes of listening in total.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: mc ukrneal on November 21, 2014, 05:45:07 AM
* Bach Orchestral Suite 1
10 runners and riders, 2 rounds, all done and dusted in a month?
1st round would be 3 selected movements totalling 7 or 8 minutes.  x5 that's just 40 minutes of listening in total.
If this was the choice, I'd prefer less time per contestant and more contestants. I know this adds some difficulty in two ways: 1) remembering more performances (and perhaps the way to do this is to create more groups - many of us do multiple groups anyway, or you can send two groups to everyone from the start, ie 4 per group), and 2) determining a winner with fewer minutes. On #2, I don't find this an issue, since 95% of the time, I have an idea what I think within 30-45 seconds (not always the case, and sometimes opinion changes, but it is remarkable how often my initial impression is my final impression). I'm not sure I've ever had a case where I needed more minutes of playing to know for sure. SO basically it would be the same 40 minutes, just 5 min per entry instead of 8 min. I'll participate in this one regardless of how it is done though.

On Sibelius 7, I would do 2 rounds - winner of each group goes through to final. First round is long though.

Cello suites are a bit of logistical nightmare. I'd really want the whole thing in the last round, so maybe this isn't a good candidate after all. If you could narrow it to three in the last round, you could do the whole thing.  Or maybe you use complete suites in the leadup to the last round? Since I don't have multiple versions of this one, my question would be is one suite enough to determine the style/approach of the whole thing or do some performers do better at some suites than others?
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 21, 2014, 05:55:58 AM
I'd suggest we focus on one cello suite at a time. Two rounds per: first round covers the first half, second round covers the whole suite. I also agree with Neal about dividing Sibelius 7 into only two rounds, not three.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: North Star on November 21, 2014, 05:59:41 AM
I'd suggest we focus on one cello suite at a time. Two rounds per: first round covers the first half, second round covers the whole suite. I also agree with Neal about dividing Sibelius 7 into only two rounds, not three.
+1 to everything.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 21, 2014, 09:08:32 AM
That was Gaspard.  I didn't participate (knowing so little about the music) - but it was a great ride - thanks!
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21672.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21672.0.html)


Well that's been 10 responses, thankyou, and I think the choice will come down to one of these:
(with apologies to those who, like me, were rooting for the Bartok)

* Bach Cello Suites
I estimate 21 starters in 3 groups of 7, 3 rounds
1st round would be 3 selected movements mixing fast, slow, major, minor totalling approx 11 minutes.
Final round would be a single complete suite, probably the 5th.


* Sibelius 7th Symphony
Again I estimate 21 starters in 3 groups of 7, 3 rounds
initially auditioning from ~2 minutes in to the 1st huge climax at ~13 minutes, so approx 11 minutes.
Final round would be the whole thing of course, approx 22 minutes.

or if you would prefer something short and sweet -

* Bach Orchestral Suite 1
10 runners and riders, 2 rounds, all done and dusted in a month?
1st round would be 3 selected movements totalling 7 or 8 minutes.  x5 that's just 40 minutes of listening in total.

Sib 7
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Wanderer on November 21, 2014, 09:52:01 AM
+1 for Sibelius 7.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: kishnevi on November 21, 2014, 10:14:28 AM
I would be interested in organising one about a piece from Messiaen's Catalogue d'oiseaux. Or Carter's Night Fantasies. Or maybe a Stockhausen Klavierstuck. Or a Cage piano etude. Or a bit of Ludus Tonalis.

I would be interested in that.  But are there enough alternatives available to make a truly blind and truly competitive comparison?
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: amw on November 22, 2014, 12:33:57 AM
I see no reason why we can't start the Bach cello suites with a single movement (if we can find one that is sufficiently representative—perhaps the prelude to no. 5? Though I'd prefer the violin S&Ps for that reason as any of the fugues would be enough), then possibly moving on to a few selected movements and ending with a complete suite—or a wider selection of movements.

I agree that if you think of the suites as a 2-hour 'cycle' it would present logistical problems—I don't think that myself, but don't know how one would go about determining the best overall performance of all six suites without actually listening to them complete.

Might change vote to the Bach Orchestral Suite #1 then. (I have no interest in Sibelius at this time)
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on November 22, 2014, 03:35:34 AM
Thanks for all your comments and suggestions.  Well, there's no rush sorting this out, it's not going to happen before the New Year I guess.

Whole Cello Suites in final round - that would be out of the question as far as I'm concerned, and for several reasons (not least, that some of the Suites in my collection are incomplete sets).
In fact I have big reservations about presenting any work in its entirity, at any stage of any such comparison, for reasons of copyright infringement.  But it has been done here, and it obviously would be pretty unavoidable in Sibelius 7 for example.

So for the Cello Suites I'd end with a complete suite - 5th or 6th would be the obvious choices, my preference would be the 5th if only because in most performers' hands it's shorter - but also because I'd want to feature the 6th in the 2nd round, and movements from the 4th and 2nd in the first round.
I'm saying this now so that if you don't like that deal we can opt to do something else, such as the Sibelius, or find someone else to run the Bach.

Sibelius in 2 rounds - well yes I can see the advantages in that.  It would mean a very severe cull from round 1 to the final, really we'd need to start with 4 groups (of 5 probably) and that would depend on getting enough participants signing up - which I'm a bit doubtful would happen.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: EigenUser on November 22, 2014, 02:56:37 PM
...Zzzzzzzzzzz...

We should have a Gruppen blind comparison -- using all two recordings! :laugh:
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 23, 2014, 08:03:58 PM
By the way, I happen to think three-movement works totaling 20-30 minutes are ideal for the blind test format. Only three rounds, and each clip will be 10 minutes tops. This is part of why people stuck through the Ravel Gaspard game, and I think it means these games would be good for many, many great concertos, some 20th-century symphonies (e.g. Sibelius), Rachmaninov's symphonic dances, and the middle/late Beethoven piano sonatas.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Mirror Image on November 23, 2014, 08:13:21 PM
...Zzzzzzzzzzz...

We should have a Gruppen blind comparison -- using all two recordings! :laugh:

I was going to say Ades' "Asyla". ;)
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: amw on November 23, 2014, 08:17:48 PM
A Prokofiev concerto might be interesting actually. My two favourites the Symphony-Concerto and VC2 are both over 30 minutes, but VC1 might be fun.

I would also be ok with Beethoven's Op. 31/2, 57, 101, 109, 110

or maybe Shostakovich's String Quartet No. 7, it's short enough and there aren't heaps of recordings, could be a quick game
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 23, 2014, 08:20:40 PM
A Prokofiev concerto might be interesting actually. My two favourites the Symphony-Concerto and VC2 are both over 30 minutes, but VC1 might be fun.
VC2 is over 30 minutes?! You must have the Celibidache version...oh I bet you mean PC2.  :D I'm going to hijack the post to suggest VC2.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: amw on November 23, 2014, 08:24:00 PM
VC2 is over 30 minutes?! You must have the Celibidache version...oh I bet you mean PC2.  :D I'm going to hijack the post to suggest VC2.
No I meant VC2, momentary brainfart caused me to add 12 + 10 + 6 up to 38 instead of 28. I swear not all arts students are this bad at maths.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 23, 2014, 08:28:10 PM
No I meant VC2, momentary brainfart caused me to add 12 + 10 + 6 up to 38 instead of 28. I swear not all arts students are this bad at maths.
That's okay, I'm at the exact opposite end of the arts-student-math(s)-skills spectrum and it's pretty freaking lonely.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 23, 2014, 10:43:49 PM
That's okay, I'm at the exact opposite end of the arts-student-math(s)-skills spectrum and it's pretty freaking lonely.
One of us is at the wrong end of the "understanding what that means" spectrum.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Mirror Image on November 23, 2014, 11:29:43 PM
I think we should have one of Ravel's "Ma mere l'oye".
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: EigenUser on November 24, 2014, 01:07:55 AM
I think we should have one of Ravel's "Ma mere l'oye".
Yes!
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: North Star on November 24, 2014, 01:12:48 AM
Solo piano, piano duo, orchestral suite or the extended ballet version? 8)
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on November 24, 2014, 05:44:56 AM
Ken, I mean for an arts student I was unusually good at math(s), and didn't know anybody else like that.

Solo piano, piano duo, orchestral suite or the extended ballet version? 8)
The orchestral suite is dead to me. EVERY time I hear it, I think "hey, what happened to the rest of the music?" It's only about 12 minutes shorter, anyway. There is no excuse for it. Gosh, even thinking about it makes me angry.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: North Star on November 24, 2014, 06:02:41 AM
Ken, I mean for an arts student I was unusually good at math(s), and didn't know anybody else like that.
The orchestral suite is dead to me. EVERY time I hear it, I think "hey, what happened to the rest of the music?" It's only about 12 minutes shorter, anyway. There is no excuse for it. Gosh, even thinking about it makes me angry.
I'm not sure I've ever heard it, myself.   8)
I have Dutoit & Martinon in the ballet, and in the original Argerich & Pletnev and Pascal & Denise-Francoise Rogé, and Argerich, Freire, Sadlo & Guggeis in the version with additional percussions. 99% of the time I listen to the piece it's Argerich & Pletnev or the Rogés.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 24, 2014, 08:17:21 AM
Ken, I mean for an arts student I was unusually good at math(s), and didn't know anybody else like that.

Ah. As a math student I was unusually interested in the arts, and didn't know anybody else like that.  ;D When I audited a graduate Shakespeare course for instance, I had read more literature than any of the English majors.

I did have a friend who did a music major with math minor, and another math major who liked classical. So cross-over is better in that direction. (Insert obligatory remarks about mathematicians as ubermenschen here).
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Mirror Image on November 24, 2014, 08:26:14 AM
Solo piano, piano duo, orchestral suite or the extended ballet version? 8)

Complete ballet. :) Why listen to just the suite? It's like listening to Bartok's Miraculous Mandarin in it's suite form.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: North Star on November 24, 2014, 08:49:59 AM
Complete ballet. :) Why listen to just the suite? It's like listening to Bartok's Miraculous Mandarin in it's suite form.
Well yes, if Mandarin had been originally the suite, written for two pianos..
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Cosi bel do on November 25, 2014, 09:13:21 AM
I haven't entirely lost interest in organizing blind comparisons, but there are many of them now (and I remain quite proud to have imported this fabulous exercise here :) ).

But the (ridiculous and organized...) failure of my blind comparison on Mahler's 2nd Symphony is still a great frustration. I am still wondering if it would be interesting to start it again, but for such a work we'd need to be around 15 participants at least, if we want to take it seriously.

Other works I think interesting for such comparisons are :

- Bach: cantata BWV 82
- Beethoven: Overture Egmont (or Coriolan?)
- Beethoven: Kreutzer Sonata
- Brahms: Alt-Rhapsodie
- Brahms: Quintet op. 34
- Chausson: Poème
- Debussy: Préludes (short comparison on 2-3 of them)
- Franck: Symphony
- Haydn: one symphony (49? 50? 59? 88? 94?)
- Haydn: a piano sonata
- Hindemith: a symphonic work (Symphony Mathis de Maler? Metamorphoses? ...)
- Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps
- Mozart: a piano sonata (K.475/457? or just the Fantasy K.475?)
- Prokofiev: piano concerto no. 3 (or 2?)
- Schubert: an Impromptu (op. 90/3?)
- Scriabin: Poem of Ecstasy
- Shostakovich: Symphony 10

If anyone is interested to launch one of these quickly we can co-organize some :)
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Cosi bel do on November 25, 2014, 09:20:00 AM
Also, I think there should be a topic listing all past comparisons and their results (with winners and final ranking). That would be a very useful thing.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: amw on November 25, 2014, 09:52:36 AM
- Brahms: Quintet op. 34
- Debussy: Préludes (short comparison on 2-3 of them)
- Haydn: one symphony (49? 50? 59? 88? 94?)
Interested in all of these. Can't contribute a lot of recordings of any of them though
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on November 29, 2014, 03:05:32 AM
Also, I think there should be a topic listing all past comparisons and their results (with winners and final ranking). That would be a very useful thing.

This is probably only a partial list of Blind Comparisons on this forum
(in approximate order of start date, for completed projects):
(in reverse order of start date, for current and incomplete projects):

Holst Jupiter  (jun 2007)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2387.0.html
Schumann Symphony 4  (feb 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20042.0.html
J.S. Bach, Fuga sopra il Magnificat BWV 733 (feb 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20041.0.html
Bach Toccata (hpschd) (mar 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20245.0.html
Mahler 6 (april 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20334.0.html
Debussy La Mer (may 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20461.0.html
Monteverdi, Lamento della ninfa (june 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20609.0.html
Strauss Zarathustra (June 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20657.0.html
Mahler 1 (aug 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,20853.0.html
Berlioz SF (Oct 2012)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21089.0.html
Chopin etude mini-blind (jan 2013)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21316.0.html
Mendelssohn Violin mini-blind (mar 2013)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21584.0.html
Ravel Gaspard (mar 2013)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21672.0.html
Beethoven Waldstein mini-blind (feb 2014)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22915.0.html
Bruckner 6 (may 2014)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23157.0.html
Schubert String Quintet (july 2014)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23409.0.html
Liszt Funerailles mini-blind (dec 2014)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23818.0.html
Bach Cello Suites midi-blind (jan 2015)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23936.0.html
Bach Violin Sonatas & Partitas (nov 2015)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,25338.0.html
Chopin Ballade No.2 mini-blind(s) (feb 2017)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26686.0.html
Sibelius Symphony No.7 mini-blind (march 2017)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26783.0.html
Shostakovich String Quartet No.8 mini-blind (april 2017)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26927.0.html
Bach Violin Concerto BWV1052r mini-blind (june 2020)
https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,29912.0.html
Mahler 7 Nachtmusik I mini-blind (july 2020)
https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,29984.0.html

Glass Etude No.6 micro-mini-blind (sep 2020, stillborn)
https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,30166.0.html
Mendelssohn Octet mini-blind (sep 2017, inconclusive)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,27404.0.html
Scarlatti K27 on piano mini-blind (july 2017, inconclusive)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,27204.0.html
Bartok SPC (oct 2015, stillborn)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,25260.0.html
Mozart Fantasia K.475 (dec 2014, stillborn)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,23815.0.html
Mahler 2 blind (feb 2014, incomplete)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22742.0.html
Brahms 2 blind (dec 2013, incomplete)
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22639.0.html




Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on November 29, 2014, 12:58:05 PM
Thanks for this.

Most interesting bit: how Sarge managed vote against the Cleveland Symphony, even in the string quintet contest ...
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on December 08, 2014, 07:56:25 PM
An unexpected opportunity has arisen for me to do a blind test "speed round" on Liszt's "Funerailles". I am thinking one round only, and I have 5-6 recordings to consider, for a total of about 60-70 minutes of listening. A mixture of old and new recordings, from a newly reissued live-from-Moscow rarity to a 2013 recording.

Would there be any interest in this?
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: mc ukrneal on December 08, 2014, 08:24:40 PM
An unexpected opportunity has arisen for me to do a blind test "speed round" on Liszt's "Funerailles". I am thinking one round only, and I have 5-6 recordings to consider, for a total of about 60-70 minutes of listening. A mixture of old and new recordings, from a newly reissued live-from-Moscow rarity to a 2013 recording.

Would there be any interest in this?
Sure. It's a piece I barely know, which makes it perfect for this sort of thing. But then you knew I'd agree!! :)
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on December 09, 2014, 12:57:21 PM
An unexpected opportunity has arisen for me to do a blind test "speed round" on Liszt's "Funerailles". I am thinking one round only, and I have 5-6 recordings to consider, for a total of about 60-70 minutes of listening. A mixture of old and new recordings, from a newly reissued live-from-Moscow rarity to a 2013 recording.

Would there be any interest in this?
Sure. Like Neal says, terra incognita.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Jo498 on December 09, 2014, 01:09:23 PM
Go ahead. At least it is rather short. (I do not know it well, but it is probably one out of a handful of Liszt's piano pieces I'd recognize)
Schubert's quintet is definitely too long fo this kind of thing, heck, the first movement alone is too long for extended comparisons.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on December 10, 2014, 06:20:21 AM
But not as long as 2 Mahler symphonies, 1 Bruckner, and 1 Berlioz, that have so far been enjoyably blind-tested.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Jo498 on December 10, 2014, 07:28:49 AM
yeah, you guys are obviously much tougher than I am. :D
And the quintet is longer than the SF and about as long as Mahler's 1
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Ken B on December 10, 2014, 04:13:28 PM
But not as long as 2 Mahler symphonies, 1 Bruckner, and 1 Berlioz, that have so far been enjoyably blind-tested.
Yeah, mostly by those of us who just watched!  :laugh:
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on December 11, 2014, 02:30:38 PM
My fault, I failed to mention I'd be interested in participating in your blind test.  :-[  I hope it's not too late to register?

(Already listened twice to No.3 and No.5.)
No registration is necessary. :) Anybody can listen and post comments!
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: Brian on May 21, 2020, 11:13:51 AM
BUMP

What better way to spend quarantine time than playing a blind listening game? We all have lots of time to listen to music, probably, and without even sport to distract us (except Bundesliga), we could all use a game to play.

I feel like we ought to start off with a Big Piece. Going through my FLAC collection yesterday, and comparing to discs I could rip for the purpose of gameplay, it looks like I could easily pull together 12 recordings each of Dvorak's 9th or Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphonies. I'd lean towards the Tchaikovsky personally. Also feel like a Prokofiev or Shostakovich symphony could be fun. amw notes above (and 6+ years ago) that Haydn symphonies would be good too, which is very true...maybe 103?

If there are others interested in "hosting" games for different works, maybe we could do one a month or something like that.
Title: Re: Possible future blind tests
Post by: aukhawk on May 22, 2020, 08:56:35 AM
On the face of it, it seems like a good suggestion.
However we haven't had a really meaty and successful comparison since amw's Schubert Quintet July-December 2014.
Since then various midi- or mini- blinds have been somewhat or less successful, the Bach Violin S&P for example was painful starting in November 2015 and not finishing untiul January 2017 despite only surveying extracts from the music - but a fairly definite conclusion was reached although the number of listeners was too small really.
A lightning mini-round of Chopin (amw again) went very well in Feb 2017, but subsequent to that my two Sibelius and Shostakovich mini-blinds were barely credible due to the small number of listeners, and my Mendelssohn and Scarlatti mini-blinds fared worse, just inconclusive.

It's difficult to conclude what format would best catch the imagination.
Also, I have found that hosting the anonymised files has become increasingly difficult, with many cloud solutions identifying and tagging the music.  Even a 2-minute 'bleeding chunk' from the middle of a 10-minute movement say, with all tags and images completely removed, gets correctly identified and tagged and the cover pic replaced, on, for example, Google Drive.  This forced me to providing zipped files, which of course is a big obstacle to getting a successful blind going with lots of participants.

I do have partially-prepared projects, awaiting their moment - Tchaikovsky 6, Mahler 7, Bach Orchestral Suite 1, Glass Piano Etude - all in mini-blind format.