Recent Posts

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The Diner / Re: What TV series are you currently watching?
« Last post by milk on Today at 08:05:26 AM »
I'm just not into any series on TV anymore. I'd like to enjoy a "show" again. Meanwhile, this is fascinating. How do I shrink this????? Sorry folks.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by milk on Today at 08:01:34 AM »
What I noticed is that Hough mentions how Chopin's preference for the Pleyel played such an import role in writing this music:

"There is significance too that his indications are generally faster than later norms (the much-loved Op 27 No 2 is a startling example). Chopin’s original tempi and long phrase markings encourage melodies to float in one breath across the bar lines; and his preferred Pleyel piano had a much faster decay of resonance than modern instruments, compelling the pianist to move on to the next note before the sound literally dies."

But of course, he doesn't use a Pleyel...   ::)
Not like this:
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Todd on Today at 07:50:28 AM »
To me it's breathtaking...I should just buy the darn discs.


Yes, you should - right now.  You shan't regret it.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Krzysztof Penderecki (b. 1933)
« Last post by Maestro267 on Today at 07:49:50 AM »
Yes, I think there's a lot to enjoy in all of Penderecki's oeuvre. Also, this belief that his earlier, more avant-garde works are somehow better just because they're wilder and more spontaneous is wrong-headed, IMHO. The composer has stated many times that he needed to move away from this style as he felt he had exhausted it, which I believe he did and the proof of this in the pudding as the saying goes. Penderecki's more tonal works are incredibly focused works that require more than a passing listen to get into and understand. One can very well just not like the music, but no one should make the mistake of completely writing these works off. Works like the Horn Concerto, String Quartet No. 3, "Leaves of an unwritten diary", Symphonies Nos. 6, 7 & 8, A Sea of Dreams Did Breathe on Me, the Sinfoniettas, the Sextet, Violin Sonata No. 2 et. al. all demonstrate a wide range of style. I think once a person actually starts digging into his oeuvre and not just superficially, they will begin to realize there's more variety in his writing then what was initially thought.

This, 100%. He got 40+ years of works out of the tonal idiom compared to 20 years at most out of avant-garde.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: 18th Chopin Competition
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:42:22 AM »
Of course, one of main squeezes Bartók had this to say: "Competitions are for horses, not artists." And I'm pretty much in agreement with him.
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Wölfl, Joseph - String Quartets, Op. 4, 10, & 30 w/ the three groups shown below, all performing on period instruments - Wölfl (also Woelfl) wrote at least 18 string quartets (see HERE) - 9 are performed on these 3 recordings, although there is one duplication, thus 8 in toto.  I own about 10 CDs of this short lived composer, the rest mainly piano sonatas/concertos (except for one disc of Symphonies).  Dave :)

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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Brian on Today at 07:36:34 AM »
(While I'm here and on my soapbox: listen to Tobias Koch's recording of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata)
While you're here, I'd be curious about your reaction to the sample clip on this page of Emma Boynet playing Schubert D. 899 No. 3 in the 1930s. To me it's breathtaking...I should just buy the darn discs.

EDIT: wow, Koch is an interesting guy...takes 3 minutes to play the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata, but takes 32 minutes to play the first movement of Schubert D. 960?
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Composer Discussion / Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Last post by krummholz on Today at 07:27:20 AM »
The replacement finale is not really a light throwback; it is still one of the longest and most complex finales to a Beethoven quartet (493 bars; only the GF at 741 bars is longer). It only appears small by comparison with the GF. The main "problem" with it for listeners is that it doesn't attempt to solve the inherent dissociation of the piece, but rather heightens it; not bothering to integrate the various styles, instead introducing all kinds of new disruptions (e.g. its own section in A-flat which is "resolved", rather than through modulation, simply by being played again in E-flat and then B-flat—not a real resolution at all, in that sense; also all the extended contrapuntal interludes that intrude on the sonata-rondo structure, and whatever the hell is happening in bars 215-223) which continue all the way to the pianissimo fermata on the last sixteenth note of the antepenultimate bar. In this sense it creates an "open" ending similar to those in Op. 131 and, to a lesser extent, 135, one where the music is destabilised to the extent that any ending feels arbitrary.

Interesting take (and in-depth analysis!) on the replacement finale! Admittedly it has been literally decades since I listened to that finale and must revisit it soon... thanks for the thoughtful post.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 07:02:52 AM »
I think that is a wonderful set.

Right,some parts are really very beautifully sung, in my opinion the recordings are a bit too reverberant, anyway I'm glad I have them. My preference  goes to the motets, although the masses are not to be missed.  :)
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Composer Discussion / Re: Krzysztof Penderecki (b. 1933)
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 07:00:26 AM »
Well, you'll have to count me in as one who likes a wide variety of Penderecki's works from early to late. I'm sure John (MI) and some others feels the same way.

Yes, I think there's a lot to enjoy in all of Penderecki's oeuvre. Also, this belief that his earlier, more avant-garde works are somehow better just because they're wilder and more spontaneous is wrong-headed, IMHO. The composer has stated many times that he needed to move away from this style as he felt he had exhausted it, which I believe he did and the proof of this in the pudding as the saying goes. Penderecki's more tonal works are incredibly focused works that require more than a passing listen to get into and understand. One can very well just not like the music, but no one should make the mistake of completely writing these works off. Works like the Horn Concerto, String Quartet No. 3, "Leaves of an unwritten diary", Symphonies Nos. 6, 7 & 8, A Sea of Dreams Did Breathe on Me, the Sinfoniettas, the Sextet, Violin Sonata No. 2 et. al. all demonstrate a wide range of style. I think once a person actually starts digging into his oeuvre and not just superficially, they will begin to realize there's more variety in his writing then what was initially thought.
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