GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Great Recordings and Reviews => Topic started by: Que on April 08, 2011, 11:44:50 PM

Title: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on April 08, 2011, 11:44:50 PM
We already have a Christmas music thread, but a thread about this musically significant time of the year was still missing! :)

Please post recommendations of recordings and works that focus on the religious themes of Christianity in this time of the church year: whether Passions, Stabat Maters, etc.

Please remember we have already threads on Bach's two famous Passions:

Bach's St. Matthew Passion (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4877.0.html)

Bach's Johannes-Passion / St. John Passion (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,13767.0.html)

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Drasko on April 09, 2011, 12:05:41 AM
Few favorites:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CBT0CC9RL.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Vr5YuoM-L.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51%2BXiMepx2L.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Lt8U6vpcL.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on April 09, 2011, 01:01:17 PM
...


Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on April 09, 2011, 11:24:06 PM
I would second Drasko's recommendation of Gesualdo's Tenebrae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenebrae), the music for the last three days of Holy Week - really awesome. And the from the French tradition of Leçons de Ténèbres Delalande, but naturally F. Couperin's have to be mentioned as well! :) What I have failed to do yet, is get Charpentier's.. :-\ (Which recording would you reommend, Drakso? :))



Part of the Tenebrae are the Lamentations of Jeremiah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamentations_of_Jeremiah_the_Prophet), there is a beautiful setting by Neapolitan School composer Francesco Durante (looking for a picture I came across a newer recording by Fasolis on Arts - would check that one out as well)

(http://cover7.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/89/1262889.jpg)

Haydn's depiction of the Seven Last Words (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayings_of_Jesus_on_the_cross) - I'm recommending the oratorio version by Harnoncourt:



Oh, and to conclude a Stabat Mater - Domenico Scarlatti's Stabat Mater for Ten Voices is a real hidden treasure:



More to follow - I have a recording of Schütz's Lukas Passion waiting to be listend to! :)

Q



Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Drasko on April 09, 2011, 11:56:57 PM
What I have failed to do yet, is get Charpentier's.. :-\ (Which recording would you reommend, Drasko? :))

Don't have Charpentier's Lecons, don't think I even heard them.

As for Lamentations, Krenek is great:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61WwkDpmoUL.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on April 10, 2011, 12:26:54 AM
I thought of another goodie which I put on symphonyshare recently, because I enjoyed it so much more than others. Scherchen's seven last words

(http://www.highdeftapetransfers.com/img/graphics/default/HaydnSevenLastCat.jpg)

Also Deller's Lecons de couperin, or maybe Cuenod's

 


Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: karlhenning on April 10, 2011, 03:50:05 AM
I would second Drasko's recommendation of Gesualdo's Tenebrae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenebrae), the music for the last three days of Holy Week - really awesome.

Yes, as well as wonderful settings of the Tenebrae Responsories by (to name but two great favorites of mine) Tomas Luis de Victoria and Orlando Gibbons (thinking in particular of Tristis est anima mea.)

And, for those of us who like hanging in the Living Composers Ghetto: Ivan Moody, Passione popolare:


http://www.youtube.com/v/74Pdhe9YT9A

http://www.youtube.com/v/ldIHm4rPFLU
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Antoine Marchand on April 10, 2011, 06:52:16 AM
Following the French path, these recordings are outstanding:


French Sacred Music, Virgin VBD 4820132 (5 CDs 2004). Reissue without liner notes, texts, or translations of Charpenter, Leçons de Ténèbres (3 CDs), Clerambault, Motets pour Saint-Sulpice (1 CD), & Brossard, Leçons de morts (1 CD). Gérard Lesne, countertenor & director, Il Seminario Musicale.


Couperin - Leçons de Ténèbres / Daneman, Petibon, Les Arts Florissants, Christie

I think these two reviews on Amazon deliver a quite exact vision of this wonderful disc:

Quote
An exquisite shining pearl - perfect, simply perfect., April 30, 2004
By Ingrid Heyn "No man is an Iland, intire of it... (Melbourne, Australia)

I possess every recording of these leçons that is currently available. As a soprano with a deep love for the baroque repertoire, I have performed these with fellow singer Katrena Mitchell in our duet ensemble "Sounds Sublime". The pieces themselves are as familiar to me as a byte is to a computer expert...

... and there is simply no recording to compete with this one.

It's exquisite from the very opening. In particular when Sophie Daneman and Patricia Petibon sing together, the work between the two and the ravishing vocal blend is something of which dreams are made. The pronunciation of the Latin is beautifully French, as it would have been performed at the time. The ornamentation and musicianship here is superb, as one would expect from a recording conducted by William Christie.

But the two singers are the highlight here, in this most ravishing of performances.

I have an enormous admiration for Emma Kirkby, but the recording of this work with her and Judith Nelson is stiff, unemotional, and blank in comparison with this recording. (I do not admire Nelson's voice, either, however much I admire Kirkby's.) The vocal beauty on this recording is truly sublime - this CD is one I listen to over and over again, always with a sigh and a smile.

Other versions, including a surprisingly bland rendition by Gens and Sandrine Piau, and two good countertenor versions and one not-so-good (oh dear, Deller...) are available, but nothing approaches the shimmering beauty of this version.

The pieces themselves are of heavenly beauty. I've never performed them without seeing audience members weeping with the beauty of the music.

I recommend this CD strongly.

Quote
By Joanna Daneman (Middletown, DE USA)

The service of Tenebrae (time of darkness--traditionally celebrated at 3 am) is a Holy Week liturgy taken from the Lamentations of Jeremiah. The other reason for the title "Darkness" is that it is accompanied by the solemn ceremony of stripping the altar before the total eclipse of Good Friday. Lighting is gradually reduced throughout the service, initially being fully lit, frequently by candles which are gradually extinguished as the service progresses, thus the name Tenebrae meaning Darkness is virtually performed as well.

Couperin's settings (composed in 1703) uses a few voices and few instrumentals in the French tradition of the service. This recording features sopranos Patricia Petibon and Sophie Daneman. The performance follows the French tradition also in the pronunciation of the Latin. The conductor took great care to reproduce the performance as the French would have heard it, and if you want the genuine experience, this recording surely comes the closest (as far as we can tell, from historical records.)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Brahmsian on April 10, 2011, 07:19:08 AM
I absolutely adore Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Russian Easter Festival Overture'.  Such an energetic, delightful work.

I made a huge mistake, earlier this week, of listening to this piece just before bedtime.  I could not fall asleep for hours because I was so energized and pumped up, and I was toe tapping and air conducting like a maniac.

I especially love the use of the triangle and the percussion in this marvelous work!  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Maciek on April 10, 2011, 11:35:37 AM
First of all, I would like to mention Henning's Passion. Mandatory listening.

Of other recent pieces, there's a Passion by Knittel, which was received very well over here, but for some reason I can't "get into" it.

(http://merlin.pl/Szostakowicz-Knittel-Vol-10_Amadeus-Orkiestra-Kamerlana-Polskiego-Radia,images,21,PRCD095-2.jpg) (http://merlin.pl/Szostakowicz-Knittel-Vol-10_Amadeus-Orkiestra-Kamerlana-Polskiego-Radia/browse/product/4,408092.html)

I guess no one (apart from me) knows Jozef Elsner's Passion. I like it well enough, though not being exactly well-versed in music of that style/period (don't even know Haydn's masses well) I can't really offer an informed opinion. Should be interesting at least by virtue of it being composed by Fryderyk Chopin's teacher.

(http://merlin.pl/Passio-Domini-Nostri-Jesu-Christi-op-65_Warszawska-Orkiestra-Symfoniczna,images_big,1,5907678805164.jpg) (http://merlin.pl/Passio-Domini-Nostri-Jesu-Christi-op-65_Warszawska-Orkiestra-Symfoniczna/browse/product/4,680688.html)

(The one I know must be a different recording...)

It's odd to realize that the Passion I have been most faithful to over the years is Penderecki's... I truly love Bach and listen to his two a lot. And yet, despite the fact that I have "only" one recording of the Penderecki, it has somehow gained precedence. I do not listen to it as often as to Bach's passions - but I listen to Bach's at various moments in the year, while the Penderecki I associate almost strictly with Lent.

BTW, since the Stabat Mater sequence has been mentioned as well - Szymanowski's Stabat Mater, along with his Litany to the Virgin Mary, have got to be among the most beautiful things he ever composed.

And speaking of Penderecki, I have made a habit of listening to the second part of Utrenja (Resurrection) on Easter mornings.

Very odd - I don't listen to Penderecki all that much, generally. But these two pieces of his appear to hold a surprisingly important place in my listening.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Florestan on April 11, 2011, 05:55:59 AM
Off the beaten track

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410THSB21VL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51JKThQ2gBL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51A9FDQ1QVL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51RHa2krZ1L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61tKQPt1BjL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51sokiyV7-L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4009350831421.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/518RMFvETTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

and the relevant parts from

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41YRX48G0AL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/84/0b/d54b810ae7a05a168f821210.L._AA300_.jpg)

(Caldara, Paisiello, Salieri and Myslivecek used the same libretto by Pietro Metastasio)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: The new erato on April 11, 2011, 06:22:15 AM
This:

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Brahmsian on April 11, 2011, 06:26:46 AM
This:



Wasn't this MN Dave's avatar for awhile?  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on April 14, 2011, 09:49:41 PM
A resounding seconding of the Caldara recommendations! :)

Another interesting recording with music of CPE - Kuijken also did a recording of this on Hyperion, but havent heard that.



Q

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: The new erato on April 14, 2011, 10:13:14 PM
A resounding seconding of the Caldara recommendations! :)

I have both those caldaras as well as your CPE recommendation.

It seems to me that Caldara is one of the major baroque "discoveries" of later years and a composer in dire needs of wider representation (I have recently received his Piu del Nome on Glossa and am looking forward to aquainting myself  with that).
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: stingo on April 19, 2011, 08:00:50 AM
Is there anything in English (apart from Messiah)?
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: karlhenning on April 19, 2011, 08:16:18 AM
Well, my setting of the St John Passion is in English . . . .
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on April 05, 2012, 09:10:44 PM
Bump!  8)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 05, 2012, 10:21:33 PM
Here is a great favourite of mine:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AvQfdPLUL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Here is my review from the vocal recital thread.

'This disc combines 17 century pieces with Sicilian folk songs. The progress of the disc revolves around Mary's meditations looking at her child; she sees the pain of the future. The second part of the programme takes in the fulfillment of Mary's visions in the Crucifixion and finally, the resurrection.

The singing is divided between Nuria Rial, Philippe Jaroussky and the male quartet Barbara Furtuna, who provide an earthy tang to set against the pellucid sounds made by the others. There is enormous pleasure here, the orchestra is made up of about 25 musicians playing such as baroque guitars, psalterion, dulcimer, viole de gambe etc. Rich, but never overwhelming.

There is some extemporisation. Possibly the most famous piece here is Merula's 'Hor ch'e tempo di dormire' a hypnotic piece where the accompaniment rests on two notes, back and forth rocking as Mary envisions the child in her arms in his final pain. It is a remarkable piece. In this version, the musicians have provided some quite violent harmonies at the ends of some verses. It works, Rial's light soprano is a beautiful instrument; but although I enjoy this version, I prefer the austerity of the original as voiced by the plangent tones of Sarah Mingardo.

But there is so much to beguile here. It is not a procession of miserable and dolorous music any more than you might extract from Bach's music when covering the painful parts of the journey.

This is an original and marvelous progression of pieces, Rossi, Cazzati, Biber and many others. The colours glow, the melodies are sinuous. A really beautiful disc of mainly little known music.'

Try this to get a flavour of the sounds........

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11POTypBh2I&feature=channel
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11POTypBh2I&feature=channel)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 05, 2012, 10:34:43 PM
The Vivaldi Stabat Mater is a beautiful piece. Two of my favourite versions are each lead by counter tenors. Either will give a lot of pleasure.

Andreas Scholl or David Daniels. The latter is the one I go back to most often. Here is Daniels, in his considered reading of the text and his shaded, subtle singing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiY5svTiFh4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiY5svTiFh4)

For Pergolesi's setting of the same texts I also suggest two versions. These are in great contrast to one another. One is a DG recording made in 1985 with the LSO, Margaret Marshall and Lucia Valentini Terrani. This is of course far from HIP; but the performances are really beautiful and moving. Marshall phrases wonderfully and for certain moments I don't know of another performer to equal her. It is not slushy and romantic, but certainly full in the sound of the accompaniment. In the extract you can hear what I so like about Marshall's singing. An underrated artist.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2SxIMkFCq8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2SxIMkFCq8)

Here is the entire recording. Do try Marshall's entry at 13.12

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-YpfSsDTXc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-YpfSsDTXc)

In contrast there is the hair shirt, pared down sound of Concerto Italiano conducted by Alessandrini on Naive. The singers are Mingardo and Gemma Bertagnolli. This is the real deal Good Friday material.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLKw6kSOqIw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLKw6kSOqIw)

Different as they are, I would not be without either version.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Opus106 on April 05, 2012, 10:53:49 PM
Here is a great favourite of mine:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AvQfdPLUL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Here is my review from the vocal recital thread.

'This disc combines 17 century pieces with Sicilian folk songs. The progress of the disc revolves around Mary's meditations looking at her child; she sees the pain of the future. The second part of the programme takes in the fulfillment of Mary's visions in the Crucifixion and finally, the resurrection.

The singing is divided between Nuria Rial, Philippe Jaroussky and the male quartet Barbara Furtuna, who provide an earthy tang to set against the pellucid sounds made by the others. There is enormous pleasure here, the orchestra is made up of about 25 musicians playing such as baroque guitars, psalterion, dulcimer, viole de gambe etc. Rich, but never overwhelming.

There is some extemporisation. Possibly the most famous piece here is Merula's 'Hor ch'e tempo di dormire' a hypnotic piece where the accompaniment rests on two notes, back and forth rocking as Mary envisions the child in her arms in his final pain. It is a remarkable piece. In this version, the musicians have provided some quite violent harmonies at the ends of some verses. It works, Rial's light soprano is a beautiful instrument; but although I enjoy this version, I prefer the austerity of the original as voiced by the plangent tones of Sarah Mingardo.

But there is so much to beguile here. It is not a procession of miserable and dolorous music any more than you might extract from Bach's music when covering the painful parts of the journey.

This is an original and marvelous progression of pieces, Rossi, Cazzati, Biber and many others. The colours glow, the melodies are sinuous. A really beautiful disc of mainly little known music.'

Try this to get a flavour of the sounds........

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11POTypBh2I&feature=channel
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11POTypBh2I&feature=channel)
You are a very convincing writer, Mike. :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 05, 2012, 10:54:48 PM
Very kind of you, thanks.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 05, 2012, 11:07:45 PM
Someone asked whether there are pieces in English apart from the Messiah. Well, there is Stainer's Crucifixtion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-VD2BUialk&feature=relmfu (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-VD2BUialk&feature=relmfu)

Please note: I point to it, I do not recommend it. The extract above gives a very good flavour of what it is like. Tripple the speed and it is just as turgid and vapid. Pietistic; if I have spelt the word correctly. The work is paralised with respect and I would not sit through it again unless I was paid to; well paid.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: kishnevi on April 06, 2012, 07:32:59 AM
The other seasonally appropriate Handel is of course Israel in Egypt.

And Bach wrote several Eastertide cantatas, besides the Passions and Easter Oratorio.

Leaping from Baroque Germans to modern British, I remember LSO Live released a recording of a St. John Passion by a contemporary British composer--MacMillan, IIRC.  Have not heard it, so I have no idea what it sounds like.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 06, 2012, 07:47:06 AM
You have flummoxed me. How do the plagues in Egypt tie up with Easter?

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Papy Oli on April 06, 2012, 07:56:01 AM
For Pergolesi's setting of the same texts I also suggest two versions. These are in great contrast to one another. One is a DG recording made in 1985 with the LSO, Margaret Marshall and Lucia Valentini Terrani. This is of course far from HIP; but the performances are really beautiful and moving. Marshall phrases wonderfully and for certain moments I don't know of another performer to equal her. It is not slushy and romantic, but certainly full in the sound of the accompaniment. In the extract you can hear what I so like about Marshall's singing. An underrated artist.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2SxIMkFCq8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2SxIMkFCq8)

Here is the entire recording. Do try Marshall's entry at 13.12

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-YpfSsDTXc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-YpfSsDTXc)


Thank you for this one, Mike. I only know this Stabat Mater through Alessandrini's version. This LSO take sounds as a great alternative indeed. Straight in the basket  :D
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 06, 2012, 08:15:00 AM
I hope you enjoy it. I used to have it on LP; the sound was bathroomey. But the CD is much better and the sound is very natural.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 06, 2012, 08:40:56 AM
The following pieces have been mentioned further back in the thread by way of showing the CD cover. However, for anyone who does not know the works, I will try some more detailed encouragement.

Couperin: Lecons de Tenebres

These are deeply contemplative pieces, not at all showey. They consist of three texts for Good Friday and are sung by two voices intertwining with one another. There is a single line accompaniment. That sinuous thread can be warmed up by being shared between several instruments, as in the Erato version, which has the soprano and mezzo acompanied by luth, viola de gambe and clavecin/organ. There is intensity here as well as rumination. In the version mentioned, the order of the lessons has been changed and some other music added including a magnificat.

Each silence in the music was designed to permit a candle to be extinguished until darkness is attained: reflecting the tenebre of the title in both the tone of the music and what it conveyed. Very moving.

I link to a very fine performance by William Christie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAI2Q4aninE&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAI2Q4aninE&feature=related)

Mike

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Marc on April 06, 2012, 09:35:05 AM
You are a very convincing writer, Mike. :)

And he's right, you knøw. It's a beautiful disc indeed!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Marc on April 06, 2012, 09:38:30 AM
You have flummoxed me. How do the plagues in Egypt tie up with Easter?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Opus106 on April 06, 2012, 09:42:48 AM
And he's right, you knøw. It's a beautiful disc indeed!

It has already joined their Monteverdi disc in the wish-list. ;) (Do be wary of Mike's posts, though. One of them even made me listen to and appreciate vocal big-band Bach from the 50s or thereabouts! :o)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Marc on April 06, 2012, 09:49:38 AM
It has already joined their Monteverdi disc in the wish-list. ;) (Do be wary of Mike's posts, though. One of them even made me listen to and appreciate vocal big-band Bach from the 50s or thereabouts! :o)

Relax. :)

In this case, I can even trust my own opinion.

Heard and saw them live ....

(http://i41.tinypic.com/5x0g37.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 06, 2012, 10:06:41 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

Yes, you are right. The connection to Passover is there OK in the 'Last Supper'.

Incidentally, years ago in Sorrento we bought a kitsch miniature reproduction of Michaelangelo's Pieta. It was supposedly made out of black tufa from the nearby Vesuvius. Ah-ha. The artist had decided to improve on the original be placing the statue in the cradling black hand of God.....which sported golden fingernails. The robes of Mary were covered in glitter.

There was a companion piece, Leonardo's Last Supper, brought into three black dimensions. I loved this one especially, as each had a plate of food in front of him. The food was covered in multi coloured glitter and it all looked like pizza. But regretfully there was only so much I was prepared to pay for kitsch.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 06, 2012, 10:08:34 AM
(Do be wary of Mike's posts, though. One of them even made me listen to and appreciate vocal big-band Bach from the 50s or thereabouts! :o)

Yes, I can be a bit subversive.   8)  Always taste before you buy. I would not want anyone to feel dumped with something they did not enjoy.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Marc on April 06, 2012, 10:21:31 AM
Yes, you are right. The connection to Passover is there OK in the 'Last Supper'.

Yes, Jesus was eating matzo with his disciples.

But I actually meant to say that Easter/Pascha/Pesach/Passover is originally a Jewish/Hebrew feast, 'christianized' by the Christian church.
Jesus became the Christian Passover Lamb, slaughtered for man's sake.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: kishnevi on April 06, 2012, 11:57:10 AM
Yes, Jesus was eating matzo with his disciples.

But I actually meant to say that Easter/Pascha/Pesach/Passover is originally a Jewish/Hebrew feast, 'christianized' by the Christian church.
Jesus became the Christian Passover Lamb, slaughtered for man's sake.

Actually, I was just thinking about the fact that tonight is the first night of Passover.   I'm taking a break from preparing for the Seder right now, while a load of dishes gets washed off in the dishwasher.  Then it's back to wiping down,  cutting up food, baking Passover rolls, and general kitcheny stuff.

But Easter is not a holy day with a fixed date precisely because the Church wanted to keep the link with Passover, and since the Jewish calendar is linked to the moon,  Passover's date changes every year compared to the solar calendar.  (Technically we use a solilunar calendar that involves inserting leap months seven times in a nineteen year cycle--or is it nine times in a seventeen year cycle? I don't have the time to actually check on that--to keep the holy days and festivals generally in accord with the actual seasons.  Astronomers call it the Metonic cycle.)  Therefore Easter's date changes.  Passover always falls on the 15th of the Jewish month--on or very close to the full moon, since the 1s of the month is, with some adjustments, officially on the astronomical new moon-- so if you think of Passover as starting on the full moon closest to the vernal equinox, you won't be far off.  It lasts for eight days (so this year it ends next Saturday at nightfall) and Easter generally but not always is the Sunday that falls during that eight day period.  Sometimes it comes just before or just after--I assume that's  because the Church doesn't follow along with every twist of the Jewish calendar's rules. 

And as Marc notes,  Christianity thinks of Jesus as being the ultimate Paschal Lamb:  which is why the Church made sure to keep Easter's date in sync with Passover.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 06, 2012, 12:05:27 PM
A good Pesach to you, Jeffrey!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Ten thumbs on April 06, 2012, 12:33:06 PM
Someone asked whether there are pieces in English apart from the Messiah. Well, there is Stainer's Crucifixtion.

Please note: I point to it, I do not recommend it. The extract above gives a very good flavour of what it is like. Tripple the speed and it is just as turgid and vapid. Pietistic; if I have spelt the word correctly. The work is paralised with respect and I would not sit through it again unless I was paid to; well paid.

Unfortunately this is a popular favourite, as is Mauder's From Olivet to Calvary. In view of the numerous works that have been shown on this thread that is a pity but then the music has to be accessible to amateur church choirs.

My little treat from the piano for Easter Sunday will be March from Fanny Hensel's Das Jahr. Here we have a praeludium that seems to illustrate the crucifixion followed by  the choral 'Christ is risen' leading into what appears to be Fanny's interpretation of Christ's victory. I hope the piano will be capable of producing sufficient volume!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on April 07, 2012, 10:51:28 PM
Another piece in English, especially relevant to Easter Sunday, is by Elgar 'The Apostles'. This is also a work I point out rather than recommend. Although there is a lot of Elgar's music that I love dearly, I have never got to grips with this piece.

Off to Italy now. Handel 'La Resurrezione' The Minkowski is excellent. It reminds me in structure of a Bach Passion. The recit bears the narrative of events and the arias are contemplations on events. I believe that what has held this piece back somewhat is that it does tend to sound incongruously jolly. To an extent it is a bit like the Rossini Stabat Mater, that has some wonderful music in it, but sounds like it was written for a different and less solemn occasion, then recycled with different words.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Ten thumbs on April 08, 2012, 07:10:09 AM
There is the mysterious Easter Sonata that was once recorded as a work of Mendelssohn's. Where is this recording now and why won't the owners of the manuscript allow it to be seen?
Title: Re: Mysterious Easter sonata
Post by: Scion7 on April 08, 2012, 09:01:45 AM
More details?
Title: Re: Mysterious Easter sonata
Post by: Marc on April 08, 2012, 11:20:20 AM
More details?

During one of Mendelssohn's visits to Britain, his companion Karl Klingemann, friend of the Mendelssohn family, wrote in a letter to Fanny Mendelssohn that Felix had played her 'Easter Sonata'.

Was it composed by Fanny?
Was it a gift from Felix to Fanny?

Most scholars believe it was a gift. Some think this piece has gone lost, others think it is the Sonate Eccossaise AKA Fantasia in F sharp minor, op. 28.

I dunno about the manuscript mystery, so, in a way, it remains a mystery even to me. ;)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: DaveF on April 08, 2012, 11:40:25 AM
Has anyone mentioned



?

Far from being all harrowing and gloomy, ithas everything from deep tenderness and joy to, well, harrowing and gloomy.  The moment where the scoring changes from violins to viol consort in the 6th cantata is especially wonderful.

DF
Title: Re: Mysterious Easter sonata
Post by: Ten thumbs on April 09, 2012, 03:37:23 AM
During one of Mendelssohn's visits to Britain, his companion Karl Klingemann, friend of the Mendelssohn family, wrote in a letter to Fanny Mendelssohn that Felix had played her 'Easter Sonata'.

Was it composed by Fanny?
Was it a gift from Felix to Fanny?

Most scholars believe it was a gift. Some think this piece has gone lost, others think it is the Sonate Eccossaise AKA Fantasia in F sharp minor, op. 28.

I dunno about the manuscript mystery, so, in a way, it remains a mystery even to me. ;)

Here is a little of what is known.
A few days after Felix's departure for England, Fanny records that she played her Easter Sonata.
What Klingemann actually states in his letter is 'Felix then played some of the first movement of your Easter Sonata, Fraulein fiancee, of which I had heard only talk until now'.
There is therefore no doubt that she did compose such a sonata.

An Easter Sonata was recorded by Eric Heidsiech in 1972. It is a four movement work in A major of which Larry Todd gives a detailed report in his book. This is attributed to Felix but the description sounds more like Fanny and there is no other record of Felix having composed such a work. Also, I'm surprised that the Mendelssohn fraternity aren't clamouring for the release of the manuscript for publication.

Title: Re: Mysterious Easter sonata
Post by: Marc on April 09, 2012, 08:39:36 AM
Here is a little of what is known.
A few days after Felix's departure for England, Fanny records that she played her Easter Sonata.
What Klingemann actually states in his letter is 'Felix then played some of the first movement of your Easter Sonata, Fraulein fiancee, of which I had heard only talk until now'.
There is therefore no doubt that she did compose such a sonata.

I did not know about Fanny's remark. So: thanks for this information.
I always thought that Klingemann's remark was interpreted in a more linguistic meaning, since it is used in a rather frequent way. If a composition is attributed to a person as a gift, in many occassions it's been referred to as 'his/her/your' piece. Mozart was sometimes referring to his own compositions in this way. Like sentimental married couples refer to the first song they danced and exchanged their first kiss on as 'our song'.
That's why I thought there still is/was doubt about the composer of this mystery sonata.

An Easter Sonata was recorded by Eric Heidsiech in 1972. It is a four movement work in A major of which Larry Todd gives a detailed report in his book. This is attributed to Felix but the description sounds more like Fanny and there is no other record of Felix having composed such a work. Also, I'm surprised that the Mendelssohn fraternity aren't clamouring for the release of the manuscript for publication.

This was another part of the story that I did not know about. Again: thanks for the info!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Ten thumbs on April 10, 2012, 04:47:09 AM
Until the manuscript of the Easter Sonata is released, we can only speculate. My guess is that Fanny gave the manuscript of her sonata to Felix as a leaving gift, intending to write it out from memory in his absence. She never got round to doing so because of the upheaval of her marriage.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 02, 2016, 10:56:02 AM
BUMP!  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 02, 2016, 12:06:49 PM
Well, it's early yet  0:)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: North Star on March 02, 2016, 12:18:35 PM
Well, it's early yet  0:)
I did listen to SMP last week, and am now listening to Concerto Italiano's Gesualdo. . . Of course, I could listen to either one at almost any time of the year.

And besides, I would think that there's a benefit in seeing this thread while there's still time to order some CDs for Easter.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 02, 2016, 12:24:35 PM
Fair enow!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on March 03, 2016, 02:14:11 AM
Yes, hi-time for my annual bath of the St M. First off will be the one to a part version by McCreesh. I first knew the piece from large scale performances and never thought I would reconcile myself to the small scale in this epic work. But I find that despite preferring soloists on other versions; this intimate and dramatic version really satisfies me. No doubt I will spin Rilling and or Richter before Easter.

The only time I have sung it with professional forces was for Abbado, a strangly half way house between old-school and the HIP methods. Small choir, fullish modern orchestra and a viola da gamba. It had remarkable soloists. If it ever surfaced on CD, I would buy it for the soloists. But I suspect it would not be overall satisfying.

The journey begins.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 07, 2016, 07:08:53 PM
Quote
Bach's St Matthew Passion is a monument in music history. Every year it is performed around the globe and especially during Passiontide. In the Netherlands where I live it is a kind of ritual to attend a performance of this work every year. It is hard to imagine that before the St Matthew Passion reached this status another work was just as popular - at least in Germany - as Bach's oratorio is today: Der Tod Jesu by Carl Heinrich Graun. Although he was first and foremost active as a composer of music for the stage it is this work that cemented his reputation. It was first performed on Good Friday in 1755, and was repeated the next year. This became a tradition, which lasted until 1884.



Review by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Mar/Graun_Jesu_OC1809.htm)

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 07, 2016, 07:22:24 PM
Quote
For many years Reinhard Keiser was closely connected to the Oper am Gänsemarkt in Hamburg. He was the first really great German opera composer. His colleague Johann Mattheson called him "the greatest opera composer in the world" and Johann Adolf Scheibe stated that he was "perhaps the most original musical genius that Germany has ever produced". Although there is a kind of revival of his music he still hardly gets the recognition he deserves. That is partly due to the fact that a large part - probably even most - of his oeuvre has been lost. His best-known work today is his Brockes-Passion. It is a specimen of the genre of the Passion oratorio which was to dominate Passion music during the 18th century. In comparison his St Mark Passion is very different: it belongs to the genre of the oratorio Passion to which also Johann Sebastian Bach's Passions belong. It has been documented that the latter performed his colleague's Passion at several occasions. That bears witness to his high esteem of his Keiser's work which probably also influenced his own Passions.



Quote
Whoever is the composer, he has given us a work to savour which should be performed more often.

Rest of the review by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Mirare_MIR254.html) and the review by Brian HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Mar/Keiser_Markuspassion_MIR254.htm).

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: knight66 on March 08, 2016, 01:52:14 AM



Review by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Mar/Graun_Jesu_OC1809.htm)

Q

Que, Thanks, I am listening on Spotify to the only version there and am enjoying it a lot. It is an entirely new piece to me. The review you linked to was very helpful.

Mike
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: OrchestralNut on March 08, 2016, 05:46:50 AM
Yes, hi-time for my annual bath of the St M. First off will be the one to a part version by McCreesh. I first knew the piece from large scale performances and never thought I would reconcile myself to the small scale in this epic work. But I find that despite preferring soloists on other versions; this intimate and dramatic version really satisfies me.

My favourite discovery of 2015 (by far!) was Bach's St. Matthew Passion, via the McCreesh recording.  I have since sampled many larger ensemble recordings and haven't heard anything yet that I like better than the intimate McCreesh.

Bach's StMP, what a gorgeous work!  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on March 11, 2016, 10:13:32 AM
I've decided to celebrate Easter by listening to Gesualdo's responsoria. So far, I've been focussed on Parrott's recording, but it must be a bit old fashioned now. Anyone got any favourites?
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Jo498 on March 11, 2016, 10:23:13 AM
Here is a Bach St. Matthew from the Concertgebouw 1976, if I understand correctly the first time Harnoncourt was invited to conduct that piece there (in 1975 he had already done the St. John) There is also a Missa solemnis from 2012 available there.

http://www.radio4.nl/luister-concerten/concerten/5878/nikolaus-harnoncourt-dirigeert-de-matthauspassion-
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on March 11, 2016, 10:30:18 AM
Here is a Bach St. Matthew from the Concertgebouw 1976, if I understand correctly the first time Harnoncourt was invited to conduct that piece there (in 1975 he had already done the St. John) There is also a Missa solemnis from 2012 available there.

http://www.radio4.nl/luister-concerten/concerten/5878/nikolaus-harnoncourt-dirigeert-de-matthauspassion-

Thank you for posting that link. I look forward to listening to it soon.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: The new erato on March 11, 2016, 10:31:01 AM



Rest of the review by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Mirare_MIR254.html) and the review by Brian HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Mar/Keiser_Markuspassion_MIR254.htm).

Q
I think I haven given this a definite thumbs up in the listening thread once-upon-a-time.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 11, 2016, 11:09:07 AM
I've decided to celebrate Easter by listening to Gesualdo's responsoria. So far, I've been focussed on Parrott's recording, but it must be a bit old fashioned now. Anyone got any favourites?

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: North Star on March 11, 2016, 11:41:53 AM
[Gesualdo Responsoria - De Labyrintho]
I'm taking notes...
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on March 11, 2016, 02:12:13 PM
One thing I'm starting to think is that in a recording, and in real life,  it's good to have the responsoria broken up. I like the comparative plainness of chant interspersed with Gesualdo's music in Parrott's CD, and I'm sure the viol music in Karl's favourite from De Labyrintho is effective too.

In The Hilliard's recording, I find it pretty difficult to listen to (eg) an unbroken chain of Good Friday responsoria, whatever the merits of the performance (one voice per part, great counter-tenor, intimate) are. The music is too intense and expressive.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 21, 2016, 11:10:05 PM
Sharing some items I came across while browsing for Passion music:



Quote
Musical Passion Play, April 28, 2013 by Gio
The staged dramatization of the the arrest and crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth, which draws hundreds of thousands of tourists to the Bavarian village Oberammergau every ten years, is a living fossil of Medieval European traditions that included the liturgical dramas sung in great monasteries as well as the "mystery plays" performed in the streets of English and French market towns. The Catholic Church had long asserted the requirement to include a reading or singing of the Passion narrative in the liturgy of Holy Week, usually as a portion of the services of Good Friday. One of the masterworks of the late Renaissance is the unique setting of the crucifixion narrative from the Gospel of John by the Italo-Fleming Cypriano de Rore. De Rore: Passio Domini Nostri Jesu Christi / Secundum Johannem Eschewing his typical polyphonic madrigalism, Cypriano set the text homophonically as an extension of Gregorian chant. That setting is in effect a "continental divide" between Renaissance and Baroque, paying tribute to the former and foretelling the latter. Later Italian composers generally chose to set the "Tenebrae" texts from Jeremiah, rather than the Gospel narratives, for vespers during Holy Week, but there are two very fine "Passions According to Saint John" - in Latin of course - available as recordings, by Alessandro Scarlatti and by Francesco Feo:Alessandro Scarlatti: Passio Secundum Ioannem / Johannes-Passion / ST. John Passion - Passio secundum Joannem

German Lutheranism in the 17th and 18th Centuries formalized an entire Baroque genre of Passion settings for their Good Friday worship services. The favored narratives were those of John and Matthew, though many composers produced setting of all four Gospel narratives. These German settings employ all the musical forms and effects of contemporary opera and oratorio. The earliest such Passion According to John now available on CD is that of Christoph Demantius, a polyphonic setting more motet-like than oratorio, but the seminal Baroque Passions are those of Heinrich Schütz. All four of Schütz's Passions have been recorded and are frequently performed these days, but the "900-pound gorilla" in the genre is unquestionably JS Bach. There are more recordings listed of Bach's "Johannes Passion" than of all the Passions of all other composers together. The same is true of Bach's "Matthew Passion," a work of such grandeur that it nearly eclipses any other efforts. Both Bach Passions have been superbly recorded quite recently by the Dunedin Consort. John Passion - Matthew Passion (Final Performing Version, c. 1742)Nevertheless, several of the dozens of Johannes Passions produced by German Baroque composers have been revived and recorded, including works by Handel, Telemann, CPE Bach, and the little-known Gottfried Homilius. To my taste, they're all well worth hearing.

Not the least worthy is this setting by Georg Gebel the Younger (1709-1753). Gebel was a Silesian, the scion of a musical family, who spent most of his short career in Rudolfstadt, Saxony. Apparently he was, like Mozart, a child keyboard prodigy with a pushy father. Paternal pushiness was successful; Gebel the Younger gained both fame and position, and composed an enormous oeuvre of music during his short life, nearly all of which has been lost. This Johannes Passion is the most ample of his surviving works, and "we" are very lucky to have it. It's an inventive, incisive concert oratorio, though the scant records suggest that it really was intended for Protestant worship services within the Catholic community of Saxony. To compare it to Bach's monumental Johannes Passion would do it no favors, and yet it's worthy of comparison. Both Bach and Gebel chose to stick to the single Gospel text rather than the fashionable poetic pastiche called the Brockes Passion, and Gebel chose to include every word of the Luther translation of John, a decision that precluded the inclusion of as many non-Gospel chorale hymns and meditational arias as one hears in most other Johannes Passions. Thus Gebel poured most of his inspiration and his expertise in counterpoint into those portions of the whole Passion that were often simplest and starkest in other settings. The chorales in this Passion are in fact the work of Gebel's anonymous assistant.

What will delight a modern listener in the aesthetic cocoon of her/his living room is the fanciful variety and delicacy of Gebel's instrumentation, both of continuo and obbligato. Each aria has its own affect, its rhythmic and harmonic surprises, and its special instrumental effects. The Weimarer Barock-Ensemble, conducted by Ludger Remy, includes the usual strings plus horn, traverso, oboe, bassoon, theorbo, and organ, and each instrument gets its moment of glory, particularly the theorbo played by Andreas Arend. On the whole, this is not a Passion that requires or inspires religious fervor. Rather it's a finely-wrought Baroque opera for the stage of one's musical imagination.

Review by Johan van Veen:
Quote

It doesn't happen that often that a totally unknown work turns out to be a real treasure. But in my view that is exactly what is the case here. The St John Passion by the German composer Georg Gebel the Younger is a splendid work to listen to. It is also a remarkable work from a historical point of view.

http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/CPO_999-894-2.html

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 22, 2016, 11:26:14 AM
.



Quote
Revival of One of the Founders of Modern Music, by Gio on May 18, 2015

Superb performance of the earliest and perhaps the most musically coherent setting of the Brockes Passion, which was also set by Stolzel, Telemann, and Handel among others. You can learn all about Brockes from Wikipedia or from the album notes accompanying this CD. Reinhard Keiser was arguably the most influential composer you've never heard of. His career was chiefly devoted to opera; he was indeed widely regarded as the "greatest composer of operas" of his era, and his role as an impresario entitles him to be venerated (or despised) as one of the founders of the public concert hall. His music must have sounded radically colorful to his contemporaries because of his flamboyant instrumentation. He assigned his distinctive instruments not only the traditional "obbligato" passages of other baroque composers but also surprising and delightful roles in the full orchestra. Therein he was certainly the direct progenitor of Haydn, Mozart and Co. I can almost guarantee that, once you hear this major musical monument, you'll be combing the listings for more of Reinhard Keiser.
Vox Luminis is one of the choicest vocal ensembles to have emerged from Europe in recent years. All of their CDs are gorgeously sung. And here's some good news for American music cognoscenti: Vox Luminis will be featured at the Boston Early Music Festival this June 2015 and at the Berkeley Early Music Festival in June 2016.

Review by Johan van Veen:
Quote

This production is really a winner in every respect. It is a riveting account of the Passion story from the point of view of the Hamburg poet Brockes. 


http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Ramee_RAM1303.html
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Drasko on March 22, 2016, 12:01:06 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81IxVLTvAOL._SL1500_.jpg)

In December 1959 Leonard Bernstein commissioned a new work from Poulenc for the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. He chose to write the 'Sept Répons des Ténèbres' (Seven Tenebrae Responses) for treble soloist, a chorus of boys’ and men’s voices and symphony orchestra. The posthumous first performance took place on 11 April 1963 at Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall) under the direction of Thomas Schippers.

Though only Pretre's EMI recording uses original forces. Both The Sixteen and Reuss opt for mixed chorus and female soprano. Nevertheless Reuss' is an excellent performance.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 22, 2016, 03:38:09 PM
.


Quote
Review by Johan van Veen

A title like 'St John Passion' suggests a composition from the renaissance or by a German composer of the 17th or the 18th century. But here we have a Passion from Italy, and from Naples, of all places, where religious music was under the influence of opera. 

Francisco Feo was born in Naples and also died there. He received his first musical education at the Conservatorio di S. Maria della Pietà dei Turchini. Very quickly he started to make a name for himself as a composer of operas, and also contributed arias and scenes to operas by other composers. Feo was also active as a composer of sacred music, most of which was written between 1723 and 1743. He composed music in all then common genres, like oratorios, masses, vesper psalms, cantatas and lamentations. In 1791 the German theorist Johann Friedrich Reichardt considered him "one of the greatest of all composers of church music in Italy". In modern times Feo has been largely forgotten until recently when a Mass and a Psalm setting were recorded. 

The performance and recording of Feo's Passio secundum Joannem is more or less a coincidence. The director, Lorenzo Ghielmi, was planning to perform the Stabat mater by Pergolesi. During his preparations the name of Francesco Feo turned up several times. He was a close friend of Pergolesi's and warned him against overstretching himself while composing his Stabat mater. Ghielmi searched after music by Feo, and found this Passion oratorio. It is one of three Passions by Feo; of his two St Matthew Passions only the turbae are extant. 

Whereas Pergolesi's Stabat mater was meant to replace an older setting by Alessandro Scarlatti, Lorenzo Ghielmi believes Feo's Passion could be written to replace Scarlatti's St John Passion. And as at that time in Naples a setting of the Stabat mater and a Passion were often performed together, Ghielmi thinks these two works by Pergolesi and Feo could have been performed together as well. This seems plausible in the light of the strong similarity between these two works. One of them is that they are in the same key of f minor. 

Feo's Passion which dates from 1744 is a remarkable work. It is more modern than Scarlatti's Passion, but the scoring is almost the same: five voices (SATTB) and an instrumental ensemble of two violins, viola and bass. Even more remarkable is that Feo, like Scarlatti, only uses the text of the Gospel, without any free poetic additions, like arias and duets. 

The most important part is that of the Evangelist, which is scored for an alto - again like in Scarlatti's Passion. It is a mixture of recitative and arioso, in which the text is effectively translated into music. Especially notable are the fermates which frequently appear in the part of the Evangelist. They are taken here as an opportunity to add a cadenza. In an interview with the German magazine Toccata/Alte Musik Aktuell Ghielmi says that they more or less compensate for the lack of arias. 

There are also many passages in which Feo makes use of harmonic means to express the text. The part of the Evangelist contains some striking examples. The words of Jesus are always accompanied by the strings. They also contribute to the depiction of particular events. Examples are the strong chords in the passages about the betrayal of Judas or the scourging of Jesus. The turbae are just as dramatic, mostly homophonic, and very powerful. 

The Passio secundum Joannem is an impressive composition, and in my view a very important addition to the repertoire for Passiontide. The performance is of the highest order. The part of the Evangelist is given a splendid performance by Doron Schleifer, who has a beautiful and very agile voice, and sings his part with an impeccable technique. Krystian Adam is also impressive in the role of Jesus, and Mirko Guadagnini gives a very good account of the role of Pilate. The smaller roles are also well executed. 

Ghielmi has added some short arias, two by Feo and one by his contemporary Gasparini. I don't see any reasons for that as I think Feo's Passion is good enough as it is. But these arias - which are relatively short - are nice to listen to, and Barbara Schmidt-Gaden sings them very well. The choir and the instrumental ensemble are also first-rate, and the scoring of the basso continuo, with harpsichord, organ, harp, with cello and violone, gives some colour to the foundation of the ensemble. 

This Passion is something special, and so is the booklet of 84 pages. It contains the complete lyrics, with translations in English, German, French and Italian. There are concise liner notes by Lorenzo Ghielmi. I had liked them to be more extended and include the remarks about the performance which I referred to above. Also in the booklet are beautiful pictures from the Sacro Monte sopra Varese. They are from the five 'sorrowful mysteries' from the Mysteries of the Rosario, depicting the Passion of Christ. They do go well with the music by Feo. 

In short, this is an exemplary production which can only be strongly recommended. 
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: HIPster on March 22, 2016, 03:51:54 PM
.



Thanks for posting Que.  Have you heard this recording?

Looks interesting.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 22, 2016, 10:50:36 PM
Thanks for posting Que.  Have you heard this recording?

Looks interesting.

Doesn't it? :) I always hold Johan van Veen's opinion in high esteem.
Sometimes he is a stickler on details that don't bother me that much, but other than that he is strict but fair and has a keen eye for interesting music and good HIP performances.

Haven't heard it yet, but already got it. Will report! :)

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: The new erato on March 22, 2016, 11:18:46 PM
I have had it for some time. Classy stuff, playing it now. Deluxe packaging.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Maestro267 on March 24, 2016, 12:24:53 PM
Surprised no one's yet mentioned Krzysztof Penderecki's dramatic setting of the St. Luke Passion. On the orchestral front, there is Josef Bohuslav Foerster's Symphony No. 4, "Easter Eve".
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: André on March 24, 2016, 12:37:23 PM
Listening to the Passion According to St John by Karl Henning. The dramatic second part never fails to astonish and move, after the contemplative, ruminative first part.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 24, 2016, 06:38:29 PM
Listening to the Passion According to St John by Karl Henning. The dramatic second part never fails to astonish and move, after the contemplative, ruminative first part.

Many thanks.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Cato on March 27, 2016, 04:39:25 AM
Listening to the Passion According to St John by Karl Henning. The dramatic second part never fails to astonish and move, after the contemplative, ruminative first part.

Here is a link to Karl Henning's work:

http://www.mediafire.com/download/wdpk77t7m042s7o/Karl+Henning+-+The+Passion+According+to+St+John%2C+Opus+92.mp3 (http://www.mediafire.com/download/wdpk77t7m042s7o/Karl+Henning+-+The+Passion+According+to+St+John%2C+Opus+92.mp3)


 0:)  Happy Easter!   0:)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: zamyrabyrd on March 27, 2016, 06:32:10 AM
Listening to the Passion According to St John by Karl Henning. The dramatic second part never fails to astonish and move, after the contemplative, ruminative first part.

That was Karl WHO? (just kidding).
Who were the performers?

ZB
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 27, 2016, 08:15:58 AM
That was Karl WHO? (just kidding).
Who were the performers?

ZB

IIRC, that was the première performance by the choir of the Cathedral Church of St Paul here in Boston, directed by Ed Broms.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: zamyrabyrd on March 27, 2016, 08:38:48 AM
IIRC, that was the première performance by the choir of the Cathedral Church of St Paul here in Boston, directed by Ed Broms.

Cool!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 26, 2017, 12:28:05 AM
Bumping this thread with this new release:
(Would this be a reissue of a recording originally issued on the French label K617?)



Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on March 26, 2017, 01:13:39 AM
Bumping this thread with this new release:
(Would this be a reissue of a recording originally issued on the French label K617?)



Q

That looks quite interesting. I have always enjoyed the small amount of Jommelli's music that I have.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: HIPster on March 26, 2017, 06:33:38 AM
Bumping this thread with this new release:
(Would this be a reissue of a recording originally issued on the French label K617?)



Q
That looks quite interesting. I have always enjoyed the small amount of Jommelli's music that I have.

I agree.  Looks very interesting.  ;)

Thanks Que.  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 26, 2017, 06:44:14 AM
Thanks for posting Que.  Have you heard this recording?

Looks interesting.

I did get it last year.
My comments were brief at the time, but definitely worthy of a strong recommendation.
If you like a chamber oratorio in Neapolitan style, high in musical invention, this is the ticket.
Beautiful presentation.

Credits for discovery go to new erato BTW.... :)

Morning listening:


A Passion in Neapolitan style, in Latin following the Bible texts.
Fransesco Feo wrote it in a relatively modern style but in a small setting, ceating a pure and emotive atmosphere.
He has a keen sense of balance and detail in singing and instrumental accompaniment. Very stylish.
If you're  into Italian Baroque, this is a beauty not to be overlooked! :)

Q

FANFARE review: http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Namedrill?name_id=239466&name_role=4&rewr=1#review

Review by Johan van Veen: http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Passacaille_964.html
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 26, 2017, 06:47:09 AM
new erato made me another recommendation BTW....

Should be on this year's shopping list! :)

Fabulous disc:



Those Neapolitans really knew how to write colorful and jubilant passions!  ;)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Spineur on April 03, 2017, 07:32:47 AM
This is going to be my program this year







(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5140IfnrKCL.jpg)

I'll also try to watch Corpus Christi, Arte TV documentary, although it is really vert long.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Cato on April 03, 2017, 08:28:25 AM

Here is a link to Karl Henning's work:

http://www.mediafire.com/download/wdpk77t7m042s7o/Karl+Henning+-+The+Passion+According+to+St+John%2C+Opus+92.mp3 (http://www.mediafire.com/download/wdpk77t7m042s7o/Karl+Henning+-+The+Passion+According+to+St+John%2C+Opus+92.mp3)



Also:

Theodore Dubois' The Seven Last Words of Christ.  This version is for orchestra, rather than organ reduction:

https://www.youtube.com/v/JMa-Ru29j5M&list=PL2PIYcYDLjGecNx88X0VgxocjyFUN1v82



Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: vandermolen on April 03, 2017, 11:33:53 AM
Another vote for Karl Henning's ethereal 'Passion according to St Join' - my favourite work by him I think.

And also:

J B Foerster's Symphony 4 'Easter Eve'.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: André on April 03, 2017, 12:09:15 PM
Another vote for Karl Henning's ethereal 'Passion according to St Join' - my favourite work by him I think.

And also:

J B Foerster's Symphony 4 'Easter Eve'.

Same here (re: Karl Henning's St-John Passion). Pulled it out of the shelf yesterday. My notes tell me I last listened to it March 24, 2016. I long for a professional or good amateur company to take the work in their repertory. I recall mentioning how the emotional second part perfectly complements/ strongly contrasts with the hieratic first part. A classic.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: vandermolen on April 03, 2017, 09:27:15 PM
Same here (re: Karl Henning's St-John Passion). Pulled it out of the shelf yesterday. My notes tell me I last listened to it March 24, 2016. I long for a professional or good amateur company to take the work in their repertory. I recall mentioning how the emotional second part perfectly complements/ strongly contrasts with the hieratic first part. A classic.
You alerted me to Karl's fine score. Thank you.
 :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 04, 2017, 01:52:00 AM
Thanks, all.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 14, 2017, 12:40:42 PM
Jommelli: Miserere [Ubaldi]....


(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/416-zr4M6XL._QL70_.jpg)


A good work with interesting and varied musical content and a fine role for the solo soprano arias [fine duets there also]. The scoring for the accompaniment is sparse but that accentuates the vocal content, and thus the text.
Title: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 14, 2017, 03:16:06 PM
"Papa's" Seven Last Words (don't look surprised)

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Gordo on March 26, 2018, 03:58:07 AM
The wonderful project called "All of Bach" has released a new Johannes-Passion conducted by Jos van Veldhoven, and performed by his Netherlands Bach Society:

http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-245/

Just in time!  :)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on March 26, 2018, 08:23:47 AM
The wonderful project called "All of Bach" has released a new Johannes-Passion conducted by Jos van Veldhoven, and performed by his Netherlands Bach Society:

http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-245/

Just in time!  :)

This may sound totally incredulous coming from a Dutchman, but: the Dutch have a very special relationship with Bach...


Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on March 26, 2018, 12:16:59 PM
This may sound totally incredulous coming from a Dutchman, but: the Dutch have a very special relationship with Bach...


Q

Yes, it's odd that, I remember once meeting someone who freelances in baroque orchestras and she talked about the way that, in Holland, a Bach concert will sell out even in some small town in the middle of nowhere. She'd done a lot of work for Leusink, who she argued had become rich by exploiting this trait of the Dutch (and, she said, by exploiting the musicians who work for him.)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: André on March 26, 2018, 01:11:06 PM
Being away from home right now I cannot listen to anything. But I’ll be back Friday, in time to listen to the Passion according to St-John by Karl Henning  ;D
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: vandermolen on March 26, 2018, 01:35:20 PM
Being away from home right now I cannot listen to anything. But I’ll be back Friday, in time to listen to the Passion according to St-John by Karl Henning  ;D

+1 a fine work.

Also J.B. Foerster's Easter Eve Symphony.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Gordo on March 26, 2018, 04:58:44 PM
Well, probably this will sound irrelevant coming from a Chilean, literally living at the end of the world   ;D, but today I don't have any doubt that the best performers of Bach's music are Dutchmen. As an aside, many people criticize Leusink, but IMO the guy is a practical genius, and all we --fans of Ancient Music- have a great debt with him...  :)   
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Gordo on March 27, 2018, 01:41:53 AM
Is this whom you refer to: Pieter Jan Leusink?

Yes, probably Brilliant Classics hadn't been possible without the huge inicial success of the Bach Edition, and the sacred cantatas performed by Leusink and his people, recorded under conditions previously unthinkable.

P.S.: I don't know from where came that "van".  :D

 
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 27, 2018, 02:55:09 AM
Being away from home right now I cannot listen to anything. But I’ll be back Friday, in time to listen to the Passion according to St-John by Karl Henning  ;D

+1 a fine work.

I appreciate your kindness, gents.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mandryka on March 28, 2018, 04:20:19 AM
(https://www.hbdirect.com/coverm/thumbnails/761195124321.pt01.jpg)

Half a dozen or so of Biber's Mystery Sonatas are inspired by Easter ideas. I'm enjoying listening to  Sirkka Liisa Kaakinen Pilch more than most violinists because she knows avoid the trap of making it sound something played by a gypsy in a restaurant. She also judges tempo well, so that I can grasp the meaning of the music.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Mr. Minnow on March 29, 2018, 04:16:23 PM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/8424562225053.jpg?1401982573)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Christo on March 29, 2018, 11:22:29 PM
This may sound totally incredulous coming from a Dutchman, but: the Dutch have a very special relationship with Bach...

Q
We do, sort of civil religion. Sung the St. Matthew Passion twice this year, among the many performances in Amsterdam and Utrecht only (there must be hundreds? of them).   :-X
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: GioCar on March 30, 2018, 09:03:24 PM
A new release I'm listening to right now

(http://ecstatic.textalk.se/shop/thumbnails/shop/17115/art15/h9361/5019361-origpic-e79584.png_0_0_100_100_1600_1600_0.png)

I'm not that familiar with Victoria's music, and this one is blowing me away. Highly recommended!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Spineur on March 30, 2018, 10:18:22 PM
A new release I'm listening to right now

(http://ecstatic.textalk.se/shop/thumbnails/shop/17115/art15/h9361/5019361-origpic-e79584.png_0_0_100_100_1600_1600_0.png)

I'm not that familiar with Victoria's music, and this one is blowing me away. Highly recommended!
If you feel like more the Ensemble Plus Ultra has a 10 cd box of his music.  They specialize in spanish baroque music. They recorded this cd From spain to eternity, a favorite here on GMG

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/517tPo-r74L._SY400_.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: GioCar on March 31, 2018, 11:25:14 PM
^^^ Thank you Spineur, intriguing for sure. I'll investigate.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 02, 2018, 05:57:52 AM
Cross posts from The Listening Thread..

During this Holy Week I decided to revisit the various different versions of the JS Bach St. John Passion. I just wanted to put them together into this thread for references purposes.


The Gardiner version:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/817F9OsPpUL._SY355_.jpg)


You get exactly what you expect from Gardiner here with a highly refined performance and wonderful choral singing from the Monteverdi Choir.



The Suzuki version:


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51JjrlRcbSL.jpg)


The Suzuki is really very good overall with particularly well sung both solo and choral contributions.



The Cleobury version:


(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51a77xFvnSL._SS500.jpg)


A vibrant performance with good presence. This performance “sang” for me which, in any JS Bach performance, is a vital ingredient.



The Fasolis version:


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51uNePpXQVL._SX466_.jpg)


This is a fine performance and recording being both well performed and sung by all concerned. The pacing is also good and I particularly like something about the tone of the interpretation; it has great presence.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: HIPster on April 02, 2018, 11:00:49 AM
Nicely done, aligreto!  ;)

Thanks for posting those together.

TD ~

A recent acquisition, one which deserves to be placed here:



Beautiful vocal and instrumental performances throughout this two disc set.  Franco Pavan's notes are fascinating reading too.

This is one I will return to often.  8)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Christo on April 07, 2019, 08:43:27 PM
These two:
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61lUQsm5-UL._SY355_.jpg) (https://static.fnac-static.com/multimedia/Images/FR/NR/46/10/7a/7999558/1540-1/tsp20160513180830/St-Luke-Passion-Sacred-Works.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Marc on April 16, 2019, 09:10:51 AM
I did not listen much to music for passiontide and easter, but I did buy (and listen to) Jordi Savall's reconstruction of Bach's Markus-Passion BWV 247, which is probably my fav BWV 247 recording now. A bonus was that I could (more or less) immediately sing along with the Evangelist ;), because Savall used the Evangelist parts of BWV 244 as a base. After all, the text differences between the gospel of St. Mark and St. Matthew are rather small.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on March 29, 2021, 03:26:38 AM
I am starting my Easter week sacred music listening with a single disc vinyl of extracts from Bach's Matthaus-Passion conducted by Richter


(https://www.picclickimg.com/d/l400/pict/154254768153_/BACH-Matthaus-Passion-RICHTER-SEEFRIED-TOPPER-RICHTER-DGG-SPLEM-136-233.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: vandermolen on March 29, 2021, 03:05:58 PM
Foerster: Symphony no.4 'Easter Eve'.
(http://)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Cato on March 29, 2021, 03:19:39 PM
Les Sept Paroles du Christ by Theodore Dubois, one of my favorite works!


https://www.youtube.com/v/7K_nzI8h_qU[/flash


and the second half:


[flash=400,400]https://www.youtube.com/v/8lNi18B0LGI&t=182s
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 01, 2021, 06:11:04 AM
Poulenc: Sept Repons des Tenebres [from the Poulenc big box].


(https://www.warnerclassics.com/sites/default/files/5099997216520.jpg)


I like this work. Upon Poulenc’s insistence a child soprano is obbligato [I am not sure about the children’s choir used in conjunction with an adult one] so he once said that this music “is very simple….but very moving”. It is not over complex music to be sure but neither is it over simplistic and yes, it is moving. I find it to be appealingly direct and lyrical. The musical content has great diversity from the pensive to the taut and dramatic often in close juxtaposition, particularly at the beginning. I also like the scoring. It is sparse but full sounding.

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: OrchestralNut on April 01, 2021, 11:34:57 AM
Fortunately for you, I'm not a woke. I'm an old-fashioned liberal for whom free speech is sacrosanct.

None of us are woke. We all listen to white supremacist music.  :D
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: pjme on April 01, 2021, 12:09:00 PM
Easter (Christians commemorate the crucifixion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ) has inspired so many artists.

As a small child, it was fun to go looking for the hidden chocolate eggs in the garden.
However, I have also vivid memories of endless and endlessly boring church services, excruciatingly bad singing of the (catholic) priests and amateur choirs.
Worse: sitting (on a wooden chair!) through complete Matheus Passionen in freezing churches....
Then suddenly (around 1968) Penderecki's Lucas Passion was performed in Brussels and Amsterdam. It was even broadcast (probably from Poland)  on national TV. It had a huge impact on me, similar to hearing Britten's War Requiem for the first time. The formidable voices of soprano Stefania Woytowicz and bass Bernard Ladysz can be heard on this recording

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71afpeQ00jL._SX450_.jpg)

At the other side of the expressive spectrum, there are Charpentier's superb Leçons de ténèbres du Vendredi saint and the heart wrenching saetas of the Semana santa in Spain
https://youtu.be/Z3eW5F60i04

And a real favorite : Honegger's (all too short) Cantique de Pâques - only surviving fragment of a large scale choral work, Mystère de Pâques (1922).
https://youtu.be/CQkljyO13kw
And, almost forgotten: RVW's Easter from the 5 mystical songs.
Federico Mompou's late choral "Improperios" (orchestrated with the help of Markevitch).
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on April 01, 2021, 12:50:45 PM
Easter (Christians commemorate the crucifixion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ) has inspired so many artists.

As a small child, it was fun to go looking for the hidden chocolate eggs in the garden.
However, I have also vivid memories of endless and endlessly boring church services, excruciatingly bad singing of the (catholic) priests and amateur choirs.
Worse: sitting (on a wooden chair!) through complete Matheus Passionen in freezing churches....
Then suddenly (around 1968) Penderecki's Lucas Passion was performed in Brussels and Amsterdam. It was even broadcast (probably from Poland)  on national TV. It had a huge impact on me, similar to hearing Britten's War Requiem for the first time. The formidable voices of soprano Stefania Woytowicz and bass Bernard Ladysz can be heard on this recording

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71afpeQ00jL._SX450_.jpg)

At the other side of the expressive spectrum, there are Charpentier's superb Leçons de ténèbres du Vendredi saint and the heart wrenching saetas of the Semana santa in Spain
https://youtu.be/Z3eW5F60i04

And a real favorite : Honegger's (all too short) Cantique de Pâques - only surviving fragment of a large scale choral work, Mystère de Pâques (1922).
https://youtu.be/CQkljyO13kw
And, almost forgotten: RVW's Easter from the 5 mystical songs.
Federico Mompou's late choral "Improperios" (orchestrated with the help of Markevitch).
Hello.

I found some recordings of that on youtube....trying to find one of the concert (and/or recording???).  Could you provide a link if it exists?  I'd love to hear it.  If not, I'll pick another.

PD
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: pjme on April 01, 2021, 01:27:43 PM
Ehhh...which work do you mean exactly?
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 01, 2021, 01:37:26 PM
I don't like Easter (too much religious nonsense for my taste - it feels like "mental bee sting."  ??? ).

I rather wait the week is over.

The absolute curse of the internet; the individual contrarian will have his/her say.
Not everything in Life is logical.
In the context of this thread what is the need for such a statement here?
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: (: premont :) on April 01, 2021, 02:28:51 PM
The absolute curse of the internet; the individual contrarian will have his/her say.
Not everything in Life is logical.
In the context of this thread what is the need for such a statement here?

Can't but agree.

TD:
To day I have listened to a new aquisition (Richard Egarr's recording of the SMP by Bach). Unfortunately it is a dud, so to morrow I shall listen to another recording - think it will be either Herreweghe I, Harnoncourt I or Kuijken.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: 71 dB on April 01, 2021, 02:39:09 PM
I deleted my messages. I try again:

J. S. Bach - Johannes Passion - Ricercar Consort - Philippe Pierlot - MIRARE

¡Feliz Jueves y Viernes Santo!
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 01, 2021, 04:14:23 PM
I deleted my messages. 


 Good for you. I admire your retraction in the spirit and context of the thread. That was big of you.



Quote
J. S. Bach - Johannes Passion - Ricercar Consort - Philippe Pierlot - MIRARE

¡Feliz Jueves y Viernes Santo!


I have not heard that particular recording but, based on another recording of JSB by the same forces, I can anticipate the quality.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 01, 2021, 05:07:08 PM
De Lalande Lecons De Ténebres [Desrochers]


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41gbSak98ZL.jpg)


I have posted the respective Lecon from this CD on each of Mercredy, Jeudy and now today, Vendredy, simply to draw attention to it for those who may not be aware of it. It is a presentation of the highest quality and comes with the requisite unhesitating recommendation.

This is a most poised, refined and elegant performance from all concerned, particularly from the soprano Desrochers who ultimately carries the presentation with a sublime vocal performance. The accompaniment is also very fine and sensitive and definitely contributes to the overall sense of occasion. Each Leçon is preceded by a tombeau by a different composer. The playing is wonderful and the recording is excellent; there is great bite in the lower register strings of the viola da gamba and the tone of the continuo in total is wonderfully recorded.

I have long held the opinion that De Lalande’s Leçons de Tenebres are the most beautiful and exquisite that I have heard. Desrochers’ voice certainly enhances the already wonderful music; her singing is quite haunting and is very sensitively accompanied.



Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: DavidW on April 01, 2021, 07:39:26 PM
I'll probably listen to Bach's Easter Oratorio, not sure which recording yet.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Florestan on April 02, 2021, 01:20:19 AM
I deleted my messages.

I deleted mine too.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on April 02, 2021, 03:05:08 AM
Ehhh...which work do you mean exactly?
Oh, sorry lol!  I had meant Penderecki's Passio Secundum Lucam.  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: pjme on April 02, 2021, 03:14:58 AM
Afaik, this is the fist commercial recording & it is still very impressive.

https://www.youtube.com/v/bIaGM8xvf10

Krzysztof Penderecki (1933 - 2020)

Passio et Mors Domini Nostri Iesu Christi secundum Lucam
(1965)

Stefania Woytowicz - soprán / soprano
Andrzej Hiolski - baryton / baritone
Bernard Ładysz - bas / basso
Leszek Herdegen - recitace / recitation
Chlapecký a Smíšený sbor Krakowské filharmonie 
Boys and Mixed Choir of Krakow Philharmonic
sbormistři / choirmasters Janusz Przybyski a Józef Suwara
Orchestr Krakowské filharmonie
Orchestra of Krakow Philharmonic
řídí / conducting Henryk Czyż[/flash]

Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on April 02, 2021, 03:17:45 AM
Afaik, this is the fist commercial recording & it is still very impressive.

https://www.youtube.com/v/bIaGM8xvf10

Krzysztof Penderecki (1933 - 2020)

Passio et Mors Domini Nostri Iesu Christi secundum Lucam
(1965)

Stefania Woytowicz - soprán / soprano
Andrzej Hiolski - baryton / baritone
Bernard Ładysz - bas / basso
Leszek Herdegen - recitace / recitation
Chlapecký a Smíšený sbor Krakowské filharmonie 
Boys and Mixed Choir of Krakow Philharmonic
sbormistři / choirmasters Janusz Przybyski a Józef Suwara
Orchestr Krakowské filharmonie
Orchestra of Krakow Philharmonic
řídí / conducting Henryk Czyż[/flash]
Thank you! Will add that to today's play list.  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 02, 2021, 05:25:14 AM
JS Bach: St. Matthew Passion [Leppard]


(https://img.discogs.com/9iVK0ywok1Gpdls3XGPRKKWgB78=/fit-in/600x600/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-13400338-1571685426-9914.jpeg.jpg)


This performance would not necessarily be a top recommendation. It is of its time and would be typical of Leppard [for those who know his interpretations]. However, I enjoy it [as I do Leppard presentations]. Leppard basically provides the requisite forward momentum and rhythmic integrity for a good JSB interpretation. The solo female vocals can tend towards the operatic at times but not excessively so but the male vocalists are robust and are sympathetic to the music. The choral singing is robust and also quite sensitive to the spirit of the music. I also like the presentation of the woodwinds in this performance.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: aligreto on April 02, 2021, 10:49:14 AM
Poulenc Stabat Mater from the Poulenc big box.


(https://www.warnerclassics.com/sites/default/files/5099997216520.jpg)


This is a wonderful, heartfelt and very powerful work. The musical language is straightforward and it is enhanced by lyricism, drama and tension at various stages. The harmonies are wonderfully appealing and the choral singing is very atmospheric. It is a very fine work.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: Que on April 02, 2021, 11:38:01 PM
Any recommendations on Händel's Brockes-Passion?  :)

The field used to be monopolised by McGegan (Hungaroton), but nowadays there is a wealth of choice:

A new recording by Jonathan Cohen with Sandrine Piau et al. (Alpha)
Richard Egarr (AAM Records)
Lars Ulrik Mortensen (cpo)
Laurence Cummings (Accent)
Hans Peter Neumann (Carus)

Q
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: amw on April 03, 2021, 12:22:38 AM
Currently listening to some versions of the 1725 version of Bach's St. John Passion. I have these two at the moment:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51XrHdUA3EL.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61mC2rSkn9L.jpg)

The Neumann is preferable, at least from a technical instrumental and vocal perspective. The van der Meel sounds more "historically informed" though.

What other recordings of this version should I look for?

edit: Found three more on streaming services, have listened to this one so far. Good, modern instruments, but generally on the slow side, and none of the soloists struck me as really exceptional. Other two are Herreweghe & Wunderkammer which I am saving for tomorrow.

(https://cdns-images.dzcdn.net/images/cover/345b714e547e31d93fa419d7b09d4f73/500x500-000000-80-0-0.jpg)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: DavidW on April 03, 2021, 04:59:09 AM
Any recommendations on Händel's Brockes-Passion?  :)

The field used to be monopolised by McGegan (Hungaroton), but nowadays there is a wealth of choice:

A new recording by Jonathan Cohen with Sandrine Piau et al. (Alpha)
Richard Egarr (AAM Records)
Lars Ulrik Mortensen (cpo)
Laurence Cummings (Accent)
Hans Peter Neumann (Carus)

Q

I've listened to the new recording and it is pretty good.  But I haven't heard the others so I have nothing to compare to.  I usually like Christie in Handel, but he hasn't recorded it.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: amw on April 04, 2021, 01:32:20 AM
Currently listening to some versions of the 1725 version of Bach's St. John Passion. I have these two at the moment:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51XrHdUA3EL.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61mC2rSkn9L.jpg)

The Neumann is preferable, at least from a technical instrumental and vocal perspective. The van der Meel sounds more "historically informed" though.

What other recordings of this version should I look for?

edit: Found three more on streaming services, have listened to this one so far. Good, modern instruments, but generally on the slow side, and none of the soloists struck me as really exceptional. Other two are Herreweghe & Wunderkammer which I am saving for tomorrow.

(https://cdns-images.dzcdn.net/images/cover/345b714e547e31d93fa419d7b09d4f73/500x500-000000-80-0-0.jpg)
(https://cdns-images.dzcdn.net/images/cover/c1d50677a3d29e96d088f74de5af655b/500x500-000000-80-0-0.jpg)
(https://cdns-images.dzcdn.net/images/cover/97e6b4e0daf39f5b35b4e6b0424603d7/500x500-000000-80-0-0.jpg)

Second one is one voice per part, and is also my preference out of this pair, somewhat to my surprise; I've never heard of any of the singers, but they're all excellent (some of them seem to have participated in the Carus Schütz integral which is also excellent, so that's not surprising), and the energy of the recording outpaces the somewhat sedate Herreweghe. Released last year, apparently.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: The new erato on April 04, 2021, 02:58:09 AM
Any recommendations on Händel's Brockes-Passion?  :)

The field used to be monopolised by McGegan (Hungaroton), but nowadays there is a wealth of choice:

A new recording by Jonathan Cohen with Sandrine Piau et al. (Alpha)
Richard Egarr (AAM Records)
Lars Ulrik Mortensen (cpo)
Laurence Cummings (Accent)
Hans Peter Neumann (Carus)

Q
I have the Egarr and found no particular fault with it when I listened to it a year ago, but it is my only encounter with this work.
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: André on April 04, 2021, 05:52:59 AM
I normally observe obvious signposts of the season such as Christmas and Easter with the appropriate musical fare, but not this year. It seems the pandemic has upended my reaction to the passing of time, as if my internal clock was frozen in pre-covid time... ::)
Title: Re: Music for Passiontide & Easter
Post by: DavidW on April 04, 2021, 06:01:28 AM
I normally observe obvious signposts of the season such as Christmas and Easter with the appropriate musical fare, but not this year. It seems the pandemic has upended my reaction to the passing of time, as if my internal clock was frozen in pre-covid time... ::)

Quartet for the End of Time then? 

All kidding aside I understand.  I kind of went the other way.  Holidays I never cared out I now look forward to celebrating as excuses to get my head out of the grey fog.